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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Reaction Thread - SPOILERS!!!!
me | 7/21/2007 | me

Posted on 07/21/2007 5:18:11 PM PDT by JenB

So you finally know what happens to Harry. All our questions are answered. Or not. What are your reactions? Whose death hurt the most? Do you want more, and about whom?

SPOILERS are ok on this thread! You have been warned!

Wow. It's over.


TOPICS: Heated Discussion
KEYWORDS: harrypotter
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: Tax-chick; Steelerfan
My 2c re Aurors/Magical LE...I think the Aurors are supposed to be the elite fighting force within the magical community and Ministry, devoted solely to catching dark wizards. There are a lot of other employees within MLE who aren't Aurors--Arthur Weasley, for instance.

The Department, to me, sounds like a cross between a regular municipal LE department, the Department of Justice, and the legislature. They are allowed to write laws, after all, as well as enforce them.

1,451 posted on 07/27/2007 5:31:45 AM PDT by grellis (Femininists for Fred!)
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To: Corin Stormhands

Yes, I think the definite implication there is that Quirrel’s back being toward Harry, Voldemort is looking straight at him...


1,452 posted on 07/27/2007 5:32:56 AM PDT by JenB
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To: grellis
They are allowed to write laws, after all, as well as enforce them.

That stinks. Maybe that's one of the things Harry is supposed to have "reformed" in his adult career!

1,453 posted on 07/27/2007 5:44:28 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Go ahead and water the lawn - my give-a-damn's busted.")
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To: Jet Jaguar

TEST your knowledge of HP Books at

http://www.parade.com/features/harry-potter-quiz/01/question.html

If your an avid fan and have read all
7 books, you should get a score of 41-50.
Good Luck!


1,454 posted on 07/27/2007 5:52:10 AM PDT by Grendel9
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To: Corin Stormhands
I thought that maybe the scar didn't hurt because of Snape, but because of the proximity to Quirrell and Voldy. But that Harry would think it was Snape.

Yes, that's the way I understood it as well. Snape was talking to Quirrell, and when Snape shifted his attention to Harry I can imagine Voldy/Quirrell shifting his attention as well to see what Snape was looking at, and causing Harry's scar to hurt. Harry though would have only seen Snape looking at him, associating the pain with him and causing him to mistrust Snape from the beginning.

1,455 posted on 07/27/2007 6:15:22 AM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: Corin Stormhands; TightyRighty
Did we ever see him change before the last book?

Not that I recall!

1,456 posted on 07/27/2007 6:16:30 AM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: wolfinator
On page 747 we read, “...and Phineas Nigellus called, in his high reedy voice, ‘And let it be noted that Slytherin House played its part! Let our contribution not be forgotten!’” But I’ll be doggone if I know what he’s talking about!

Slughorn was fighting in his pajamas, for one thing -- he came puffing up the stairs on Charlie Weasley's heels. He probably had a few Slytherins who decided to stay with him.

1,457 posted on 07/27/2007 6:22:54 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb

I took it to mean Snape’s role - he was a Slytherin.


1,458 posted on 07/27/2007 6:26:09 AM PDT by Hoodlum91 (I support global warming.)
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To: Hoodlum91

Slughorn was head of Slytherin house ... twice, in fact.


1,459 posted on 07/27/2007 6:29:49 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: Grendel9

I didn’t keep exact count — I thought the stupid quiz would do that. I think I got 46.


1,460 posted on 07/27/2007 6:41:05 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb

Yes, but Snape was a Slytherin while attending Hogwarts and was head for most of Harry’s time there. I took the “role of Slytherin house” to mean mostly Snape’s role in Dumbledore’s plan to get rid of Voldemort. Just my opinion.


1,461 posted on 07/27/2007 6:41:28 AM PDT by Hoodlum91 (I support global warming.)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear

Kudos. Good summation of the Horcruxes’ destruction.

Yes, that crying baby is definitely a key image.
I’ve reread the King’s Cross chapter twice
more just to focus on the specifics of the scene.
Rowling is surely describing Harry as waking at the
gates of Heaven. He accepts the place as another
Room of Requirement. He and that flayed baby
are alone there until he is about to touch it...
VOILA! Dumbledore appears. How indeed? IMO
Rowling is recalling Milton’s oft used quote:
“The mind is its own place, and in itself,
can make heaven of Hell, and a hell of Heaven.”
Even more, p. 709 alludes to a Christian image
with the blood being used to rebuild the body
and the mother’s blessing being carried in that
blood. And how fitting that for the whimpering baby
(Voldemort) ‘there is no help possible.’
Harry repeatedly turns to view it until the
moment HE becomes the mentor of the self-doubting Dumbledore (was I any better than V.? I too tried
to master Death) by reminding him that Dumbledore
chose HALLOWS not HORCRUXES.
So much for the critics who claim the HP series
is dangerou for kids to read: the real message is
there...Good conquers Evil; piety supercedes
self-inflicted ignorance and sacrilege.
But I still don’t buy the claim that JKR wrote
this book FIRST and the others later. I’ll give
her the EPILOGUE as the early write, of course, but
that’s the extent of it. That said, she did a
wonderful job in the series.


1,462 posted on 07/27/2007 6:50:24 AM PDT by Grendel9
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To: Grendel9
But I still don’t buy the claim that JKR wrote this book FIRST and the others later

I've never seen that claim -- I've only seen the one where she had written and saved the last chapter (most likely the epilogue, but maybe the final duel as well).

1,463 posted on 07/27/2007 7:17:39 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: Accygirl

Repeat yourself until you die, doesn’t matter, you’re still wrong. It’s not a matter of what view the author subscribes to, what matters is the content of the story, and modern tragedy has a meaningless death of the main character at the end, period, non-negotiable. While it’s true that many books aren’t named after the protagonist in modern tragedies if the book is named after a character that character WILL be the protagonist and WILL die and it WILL be a modern tragedy and you WILL stick your fingers in your ears and yell “LALALALALALALA” because you’re just unwilling to accept that you’re wrong.

Necessary to defeat Voldy != defeating Voldy. Actually it makes perfectly good dramatic sense that Harry died before the snake. JKR had quite deliberately dropped hints, and even had Dumbledore say that it was a distinct possibility up until Voldy tried to kill Harry, that Neville was the child in the prophecy. Which we now can see was all put in to create doubt that the final confrontation between Harry and Voldy would see Harry triumphant, and of course doubt in the final outcome is put into the audiences mind to create dramatic tension, which then amped to a higher level when Harry died chapters before the end of the book, then Neville kills Nagini and it really ratchets up the possibility that everybody’s interpretation of the prophecy was wrong. Anything that ramps up dramatic tension makes dramatic sense.

OK now you’re just being a jerk for the sake of being a jerk. First you said she was pandering to the demands of the editor and publisher, then you admit that maybe that actually was the ending she wanted the whole time so she’s an even bigger panderer?! Now we know, you’re a failed writer, probably because you’re so addicted to form your stories are thoroughly predictable, and you’re just mad at her success. Sour grapes make bad whine, get over it, get over yourself, we’re done.


1,464 posted on 07/27/2007 8:07:07 AM PDT by discostu (indecision may or may not be my biggest problem)
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To: IDontLikeToPayTaxes

I’d bet they probably could, but it would be different than the normal anti-apparation charm. And of course the Malfoys being elitist pureblood jerks would probably never bother to sully themselves with magic geared to deal with house elves. Ego and the blind spots it creates is a recurring minor theme of the stories.


1,465 posted on 07/27/2007 8:28:59 AM PDT by discostu (indecision may or may not be my biggest problem)
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To: Grendel9
But I still don’t buy the claim that JKR wrote this book FIRST and the others later. I’ll give her the EPILOGUE as the early write, of course, but that’s the extent of it. That said, she did a wonderful job in the series.

I read Sorcerer's Stone yesterday, after I had read Deathly Hallows and Half Blood Prince last week.

The last 2 books in the series compared to the first book is like comparing Filet Mignon to hamburger steak. Not that the first book is necessarily bad, but it's certainly a children's book with a very simple story and writing style. The first book has 309 pages, the last book has 759.

I don't think JK Rowling ever expected the series to become such a cultural phenomenon. I think she originally intended to write a series of simple children's books in the model of the first book. The first book is like the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew with magic. I think that was her original intent. As the series got more popular, she made the story vastly more complex, giving us an epic series instead of a string of magical kiddie mysteries.

1,466 posted on 07/27/2007 8:39:46 AM PDT by IDontLikeToPayTaxes
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear; Corin Stormhands

I don’t recall either. I know there were a ton of references to him being bat-like. The vampire essay Lupin asked the kids to write in Azkaban leads me to believe he must have been unregistered and Lupin must have known. Instead of jumping on the Animagus(?) clue - everyone thought Snape was a vampire.


1,467 posted on 07/27/2007 9:05:26 AM PDT by TightyRighty
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To: TightyRighty; Bear_in_RoseBear; JenB
The vampire essay Lupin asked the kids to write in Azkaban leads me to believe he must have been unregistered and Lupin must have known.

??? Am I missing something?

Snape had them write an essay about werewolves, which is how Hermione figured out Lupin. It may be my faulty memory, but I don't recall an essay about vampires.

1,468 posted on 07/27/2007 9:22:16 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands (I drink coffee for your protection.)
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To: Corin Stormhands

Lupin “retaliated” with a vampire essay.


1,469 posted on 07/27/2007 9:25:18 AM PDT by TightyRighty
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To: Corin Stormhands; TightyRighty

I know some people thought Snape was a vampire but I never believed it... of course I don’t think he was an animagus either, I think Rowling meant he was flying without a broom, but in human form, like Voldemort was. Not that he had turned into a bat.


1,470 posted on 07/27/2007 9:26:10 AM PDT by JenB
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To: TightyRighty

Ah, okay. Well, that fits with the whole bat thing.

I’m re-reading the series. Finished Sorceror’s Stone last night.


1,471 posted on 07/27/2007 9:26:44 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands (I drink coffee for your protection.)
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To: wolfinator; TheRealDBear
On page 747 we read, “...and Phineas Nigellus called, in his high reedy voice, ‘And let it be noted that Slytherin House played its part! Let our contribution not be forgotten!’”

I too was surprised to see that apparently, not one Slytherin remained... except that I think Slughorn helped in the defense of Hogwarts, didn't he? He's the only one that comes to mind... isn't there a sentence about him leading a group of the defenders? And I guess one could argue that Malfoy contributed, although unintentionally. And Crabbe or Goyle conjured the fiendfyre that destroyed the diadem. So I guess, except for Slughorn, the Slytherins helped only by accident.

Or perhaps Narcissa counts? After all, she did lie to save Harry and though it isn't mentioned, you've got to think she was in Slytherin.

1,472 posted on 07/27/2007 11:08:31 AM PDT by GraceCoolidge
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To: Accygirl
I expect most fourteen/ fifteen year olds to be able to understand Shakespeare.

Now that is expecting a lot from a 14-year-old. Granted, I don't think that the teachers understand it all very well either. I think that the only play of his that I enjoyed in class was "King Lear" and that was in college with a professor who was a little more passionate about the subject.

On the other hand, I bought my niece a Shakespeare collection for Christmas several years back at the suggestion of her mother. She enjoyed it a lot.

1,473 posted on 07/27/2007 12:25:35 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: wolfinator
But I’ll be doggone if I know what he’s talking about!

Yeah, it was kind of limited to Slughorn, Snape and Phineas himself. You'd have thought that someone in Slytherin would stay. Expecially after the Sorting Hat talked of uniting the houses years ago.

1,474 posted on 07/27/2007 12:29:58 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: IDontLikeToPayTaxes
The first book is like the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew with magic. I think that was her original intent. As the series got more popular, she made the story vastly more complex, giving us an epic series instead of a string of magical kiddie mysteries.

One comparison would be "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings". The Hobbit is much more of a fairy tale. The Lord of the Rings was an epic.

1,475 posted on 07/27/2007 12:38:31 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: All
On another web site, I posted my little geeky entry that Otters are members of the Weasel family. (Yes, I looked it up just to be sure.) I then added a comment that I hadn't figured out what Ron's terrier patronus might mean.

The first response was: "I hope it doesn't mean that Hermione's a bitch!"

TS
well, I thought it was funny.

1,476 posted on 07/27/2007 12:41:27 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: GraceCoolidge
On page 747 we read, “...and Phineas Nigellus called, in his high reedy voice, ‘And let it be noted that Slytherin House played its part! Let our contribution not be forgotten!’”

I too was surprised to see that apparently, not one Slytherin remained... except that I think Slughorn helped in the defense of Hogwarts, didn't he? He's the only one that comes to mind... isn't there a sentence about him leading a group of the defenders? And I guess one could argue that Malfoy contributed, although unintentionally. And Crabbe or Goyle conjured the fiendfyre that destroyed the diadem. So I guess, except for Slughorn, the Slytherins helped only by accident.

Don't forget the guy that basically put himself through hell his entire life to work against Dumbledore: Snape

1,477 posted on 07/27/2007 1:06:25 PM PDT by IDontLikeToPayTaxes
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To: IDontLikeToPayTaxes

Oops, make that Voldemort, not Dumbledore


1,478 posted on 07/27/2007 1:07:16 PM PDT by IDontLikeToPayTaxes
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To: Tanniker Smith
The first response was: "I hope it doesn't mean that Hermione's a bitch!"

Ron's the one with the terrier patronus ... which evokes the rather unfortunate mental image of little dogs, and what they do to people's legs.

1,479 posted on 07/27/2007 1:11:23 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb
Right. My point being that Hermione has an otter patronus, and otters are weasels, so there's the connection. I don't see that there's a connection between Ron's terrier and Hermione.

Likewise, James turned into a stag and Lily's patronus was a doe (as was Snape's).

1,480 posted on 07/27/2007 1:14:55 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: Tanniker Smith
I don't see that there's a connection between Ron's terrier and Hermione.

Well no ... but then, I was more focused on making the yucky joke.

Likewise, James turned into a stag and Lily's patronus was a doe (as was Snape's).

Ah, I see. So you're suggesting a lot of Snape's nastiness was a result of his repressed homosexual attraction to James.... and that he'd have been much nicer and well-grooomed (not to mention a snappier dresser) if he'd simply been open about his feelings.... ;-)

1,481 posted on 07/27/2007 2:08:18 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: r9etb

You see, know you’re finding the hidden themes. (No wonder those Christian groups find it all unfitting!)


1,482 posted on 07/27/2007 2:14:02 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: IDontLikeToPayTaxes
They say in the book that house elf magic is different than human magic. That's why the house elfs can apparate in and out of Hogwarts. I don't think the Malfoys can block house elf magic from their house.

If wizards couldn't block elfs from aparating into/out of certain places, then anyone who had a house elf could go anywhere he pleased.

I think it works much better to say that wizards can, in general, block house elves but will often choose to make exceptions.

1,483 posted on 07/27/2007 3:25:15 PM PDT by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: Tanniker Smith

Oh, one of my favorite Shakespeare plays was the Taming of the Shrew. It was great comedy. His other plays I came to enjoy more as an adult but that was because I lived in Montgomery, AL which has one of the most renowned Shakespeare Theatres. Some of the best Shakespearan actors go there to study. I got to see Hamlet, Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet and Othello. It really made me appreciate his writings even more. :)


1,484 posted on 07/27/2007 4:39:57 PM PDT by EmilyGeiger
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To: Tanniker Smith
well, I thought it was funny.

I LOL'ed. ;-)

1,485 posted on 07/27/2007 4:45:54 PM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: Grendel9
Thank you! And yours was a very good summation of the moral themes and allegories in the book.
1,486 posted on 07/27/2007 4:56:20 PM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: IDontLikeToPayTaxes
What I find interesting is that the books grew in sophistication as her original readership grew in age. I don't know if she intended it that way, or if it was just a coincidence as she grew in writing ability, but it meant that the original readership could be challenged by each book as it came out.

Unfortunately I think that may make it difficult for new readers to get into the series. Young readers will find the later books too challenging, while older readers will find the early books too simplistic.

1,487 posted on 07/27/2007 5:02:54 PM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear

“Unfortunately I think that may make it difficult for new readers to get into the series. Young readers will find the later books too challenging, while older readers will find the early books too simplistic.”

FWIW, I read the books for the first time within the past month and I am an older (50+) reader. I had seen the first four movies so maybe it helped but I had no trouble getting into the characters, nor did I feel turned off by the earlier books. I knew it was a series and answers would come later. I bought the books for my own summer reading break and I figured it would be nice to have them on hand for my someday grandchildren (my kids are only 20 and 21). I think they will come in handy eventually.


1,488 posted on 07/27/2007 5:47:59 PM PDT by caseinpoint (Don't get thickly involved in thin things.)
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To: caseinpoint
I first started reading the series myself last year (I was 42 at the time.) I like the charm of the early books. I've read a lot of people who say the first book was poorly written, but I don't agree; I feel it was written for children and is therefore written in a simplistic style. Unfortunately a lot of people apparently give up after trying the first and/or second books, and don't realize that the writing grows more sophisticated with each book.

I read the last one through in a single 12 hour session... it takes a good book to keep my attention focused like that, for that long. ;-)

1,489 posted on 07/27/2007 6:22:15 PM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: Tanniker Smith
"I hope it doesn't mean that Hermione's a bitch!"

TCHA! A big cyberslap to whomever would suggest such a thing!

Actually, I think what you discovered, about the otters, is quite clever. It has me wondering about several fo the other Patronuses that were mentioned, those of secondary characters. It also makes me wonder this: Did Ginny ever cast a Patronus?

I bet it would be something hairy, hahahahahhahahahhahahha

1,490 posted on 07/27/2007 6:47:49 PM PDT by grellis (Femininists for Fred!)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear

A lot of people disagree with me, but the first thing I thought of when I read the first book was Roald Dahl. That’s how I got hooked in within the first few pages. Reminded me of the way Roald Dahl started James and the Giant Peach, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.


1,491 posted on 07/27/2007 6:51:47 PM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: grellis
It the movie, it's a horse. And Daniel Radcliffe has done "Equis". Where he appeared naked, and some slighty-too-old-for-Daniel-type ladies have commented that he's ...
Okay, that's strechting the metaphor past breaking.

Luna is a scwewy wabbit. Well, it's a hare. A mad hare? And as noted either above or on the other thread that I've read, other civilizations have seen a hare on the moon instead of a man.

Aberforth was a goat. I don't recall if we saw what Albus's was.

TS

1,492 posted on 07/27/2007 7:25:43 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: grellis
by grellis (Femininists for Fred!)

Grellis, grellis, PLEASE! Give it up. I feel your loss.
Look at the bright side. You still have George.

;-)

1,493 posted on 07/27/2007 7:27:23 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Muggle when I married her.)
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To: Tanniker Smith
Albus' was a phoenix. Wikipedia to the rescue! List of known Patronuses
1,494 posted on 07/27/2007 7:34:45 PM PDT by Bear_in_RoseBear (Loot it while it lasts)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear
D'oh!! Yeah, that makes sense.
No connection between phoenix and goat.
1,495 posted on 07/27/2007 7:36:12 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a Liberal when I married her.)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear

You just a youngun! ;o) I bought the book online and took delivery Monday afternoon. I finished it Wednesday morning cause I got lots of obligations not in my control and I don’t know if I could have spared twelve conscious hours to go through it nonstop. Perhaps if I took a vacation I could do it but right now my life is way too hectic and scheduled. I read it in the stolen hours. It was a nice break and I plan to slowly go through Books 5-7 again in the next few months. And I probably won’t see movie 5 until it comes out on DVD.


1,496 posted on 07/27/2007 7:58:39 PM PDT by caseinpoint (Don't get thickly involved in thin things.)
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To: Tanniker Smith
and some slighty-too-old-for-Daniel-type ladies have commented

Hey, I resemble that!

But seriously now. The only thing I said was that it looked like the sausage was coming out of the casing. If you know what I mean.....

And that's ALL I'm going to say.

All the intellectuals on this thread are shaking their heads.

This post is so getting pulled.

1,497 posted on 07/27/2007 9:49:18 PM PDT by TightyRighty
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To: r9etb
Ah, I see. So you're suggesting a lot of Snape's nastiness was a result of his repressed homosexual attraction to James.... and that he'd have been much nicer and well-grooomed (not to mention a snappier dresser) if he'd simply been open about his feelings.... ;-)

I find the thought of Snape roaming the halls of Hogwarts whistling show tunes quite disturbing.

1,498 posted on 07/28/2007 3:27:12 AM PDT by Redcloak (The 2nd Amendment isn't about sporting goods.)
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To: HungarianGypsy

I hadn’t thought about that, but it’s true. He is another good writer. I love his books and they make great read alouds for children. His books keep their attention.


1,499 posted on 07/28/2007 4:07:55 AM PDT by EmilyGeiger
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To: Tanniker Smith

Wasn’t Albus’ a phoenix?


1,500 posted on 07/28/2007 4:08:52 AM PDT by EmilyGeiger
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