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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv


(Excerpt) Read more at freerepublic.com ...


TOPICS: Agriculture; Astronomy; Books/Literature; Education; History; Hobbies; Miscellaneous; Reference; Science; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: alphaorder; archaeology; economic; emiliospedicato; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; paleontology; science; spedicato
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Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #335 20101218
· Saturday, December 18, 2010 · 53 topics · 2644361 to 1436202 · 760 members ·

 
Saturday
Dec 18
2010
v 7
n 23

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 335th issue, a huge 53-topic issue. Many if not most of the topics were gleaned from the FRchives, including 17 regarding Alexander Hamilton, part of the Framers series.

A big thank you to all who contributed topics, be it this week or nine years ago. I got an early start on it, and have taken more time than usual, so it looks unusually nice imho.

Too bad we all got our hopes up last week, but as we all know now, nothing happened. It may have had to do with this. After all, poor, misunderstood Adolf Hitler used to say "the war is lost!" and swoon at any even obliquely bad news.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: The history books write the winners. -or perhaps- The writers win the history books.

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,201 posted on 12/18/2010 6:24:02 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1200 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #336
Saturday, December 25, 2010

Star of the East

 Revealing the Star of Bethlehem

· 12/21/2010 1:32:02 PM PST ·
· Posted by ZULU ·
· 22 replies ·
· Michael R. Molnar ·
· 1997-2010 ·
· Michael R. Molnar ·

Could the purchase of an ancient coin have led to an important clue about the Star of Bethlehem? The above illustration is a Roman coin from Antioch, Syria which shows the zodiacal sign, Aries the Ram. In trying to understand the meaning behind this coin, I found that Aries was the sign of the Jews. Realizing that this is where ancient stargazers would have watched for the Star of Bethlehem, I embarked on searching for the celestial event that signified the birth of the Messiah in Judea.

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Beneath the Dead Sea, Scientists Are Drilling for Natural History

· 12/18/2010 3:55:56 PM PST ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 11 replies ·
· NYT ·
· 17 Dec 2010 ·

Five miles out, nearly to the center of the Dead Sea, an international team of scientists has been drilling beneath the seabed to extract a record of climate change and earthquake history stretching back half a million years. The preliminary evidence and clues found halfway through the 40-day project are more than the team could have hoped for. The scientists did not expect to pull up a wood fragment that was roughly 400,000 years old. Nor did they expect to come across a layer of gravel from a mere 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. That finding...

Prehistory & Origins

 DNA says new human relative roamed widely in Asia

· 12/22/2010 2:22:43 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 13 replies ·
· AP ·
· December 22, 2010 ·
· Malcolm Ritter ·

Scientists have recovered the DNA code of a human relative recently discovered in Siberia, and it delivered a surprise: This relative roamed far from the cave that holds its only known remains. By comparing the DNA to that of modern populations, scientists found evidence that these "Denisovans" from more than 30,000 years ago ranged all across Asia. They apparently interbred with the ancestors of people now living in Melanesia, a group of islands northeast of Australia. There's no sign that Denisovans mingled with the ancestors of people now living in Eurasia, which made the connection between Siberia...


 Ancient humans, dubbed 'Denisovans', interbred with us

· 12/22/2010 6:26:50 PM PST ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 56 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 12/22/10 ·
· Pallab Ghosh ·

Scientists say an entirely separate type of human identified from bones in Siberia co-existed and interbred with our own species.The ancient humans have been dubbed "Denisovans" after the caves in Siberia where their remains were found. There is also evidence that this population was widespread in Eurasia. A study in Nature journal shows that Denisovans co-existed with Neanderthals and interbred with our species - perhaps around 50,000 years ago. An international group of researchers sequenced a complete genome from one of the ancient hominins (human-like creatures), based on nuclear DNA extracted from a finger bone.


 Genome of extinct Siberian cave-dweller linked to modern-day humans

· 12/23/2010 10:27:59 AM PST ·
· Posted by LucyT ·
· 25 replies ·
· EurekaAlert ·
· 22-Dec-2010 ·
· Bobbie Mixon, NSF ·

Sequencing of ancient DNA reveals new hominin population that is neither Neanderthal nor modern human Researchers have discovered evidence of a distinct group of "archaic" humans existing outside of Africa more than 30,000 years ago at a time when Neanderthals are thought to have dominated Europe and Asia. But genetic testing shows that members of this new group were not Neanderthals, and they interbred with the ancestors of some modern humans who are alive today. Until last year, the mainstream view in genetics was that modern humans inherited essentially their entire DNA makeup from Neanderthal-related individuals when they migrated from...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Bones Give Peek Into the Lives of Neanderthals

· 12/21/2010 5:32:19 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 19 replies ·
· NY Times ·
· December 20, 2010 ·
· Carl Zimmer ·

Deep in a cave in the forests of northern Spain are the remains of a gruesome massacre. The first clues came to light in 1994, when explorers came across a pair of what they thought were human jawbones in the cave, called El Sidrón. At first, the bones were believed to date to the Spanish Civil War. Back then, Republican fighters used the cave as a hide-out. The police discovered more bone fragments in El Sidrón, which they sent to forensic scientists, who determined that the bones did not belong to soldiers, or even to modern humans. They were the...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Population expansion in the N African Late Pleistocene
  signalled by mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U6


· 12/24/2010 7:06:25 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 33 replies ·
· 7thSpace Interactive ·
· December 21, 2010 ·
· Luisa Pereira et al ·

The archaeology of North Africa remains enigmatic, with questions of population continuity versus discontinuity taking centre-stage. Debates have focused on population transitions between the bearers of the Middle Palaeolithic Aterian industry and the later Upper Palaeolithic populations of the Maghreb, as well as between the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Results: Improved resolution of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup U6 phylogeny, by the screening of 39 new complete sequences, has enabled us to infer a signal of moderate population expansion using Bayesian coalescent methods. To ascertain the time for this expansion, we applied both a mutation rate accounting for purifying selection...

Epigraphy & Language

 "Red Festival' In Udmurtia (Redheads)

· 12/19/2010 11:29:11 AM PST ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 54 replies ·
· Finugor ·
· 11-19-2010 ·
· Nadezhda Volokitina ·

The Udmurts are the most red-haired Finno-Ugric people, the most red-haired nation in Russia, and as far as the rest of the world is concerned, they are inferior only to the Irish in this respect. The so-called "Red Festival', which gathers a lot of people, takes place annually in the capital of Udmurtia, Izhevsk. There organized such contests and competitions as "Mother, Father and I are a Red Family' (the most red-haired family contest), "Mischievous Gingers' (the most red-haired child contest), as well as "red' pet contests for cats, dogs,...

Carbon Credits

 Nondestructive Radiocarbon Dating -- College Station, Texas

· 12/24/2010 6:51:46 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Archaeology, v64 n1 ·
· January/February 2011 ·
· Nikhil Swaminathan ·

Over the past 20 years, chemist Marvin Rowe of Texas A&M University has developed a nondestructive method for carbon dioxide extraction. In his process, an object is placed in a vacuum chamber and a supercritical fluid -- a hybrid gas/liquid -- is applied as a solvent (as in dry cleaning). Next, Rowe passes plasma -- an "electrically excited ionized gas" -- over the artifact, which selectively strips carbon from the sample. "It's essentially like slowly burning the sample, so we can just oxidize a little off the surface and collect that carbon dioxide," explains Rowe. This year he further refined...

The Trojan War

 The War that Killed Achilles by Caroline Alexander [reviews]

· 12/23/2010 8:35:56 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 33 replies ·
· Guardian, NY Times ·
· 10/13/09 --12/18/10 ·
· Tom Holland ·
· Vera Rule ·
· Steve Coates ·
· Dwight Garner ·

...In the earliest days of their history, so the Greeks recorded, a city in Asia by the name of Troy had been besieged by their ancestors for 10 long years, captured, and burnt to the ground. Why? Responsibility for the conflict was pinned on Paris, a Trojan prince whose abduction of Helen, the fabulously beautiful daughter of the king of the gods, had set in train a truly calamitous sequence of events. Not only Troy had ended up obliterated, but so, too, had the age of heroes. War had consumed the world. No wonder, then, that the Greeks should have...

Alexander the Great

 Bactrian gold - A treasure hunt - The case of Afghanistan 's missing cache

· 12/18/2003 4:27:49 PM PST ·
· Posted by swarthyguy ·
· 17 replies · 626+ views ·
· Economist ·
· Dec 15 ·

The mound lies just beyond the oasis town of Sheberghan in northern Afghanistan, on the plain that slips south to the Hindu Kush and north to the banks of the Amu Darya, or Oxus. This was once Bactria, where the Hellenic world briefly touched and intertwined with the worlds of the Indus and the Siberian steppe. Greeks prospered here for a century or so after the death of Alexander the Great, in 323BC, and then were driven off. The mound is anonymous now, barely noticeable from the road. It stands three metres (ten feet) high, 100 metres in diameter, lopped...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Will Tuesday Be the Darkest Day in 456 Years?

· 12/19/2010 4:52:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by TaraP ·
· 28 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· Dec 19th, 2010 ·

Break out the flashlights. When a full lunar eclipse takes place on the shortest day of the year, the planet may just get awfully dark. The upcoming Dec. 21 full moon -- besides distinguishing itself from the others in 2010 by undergoing a total eclipse -- will also take place on the same date as the solstice (the winter solstice if you live north of the equator, and the summer solstice if you live to the south). Winter solstice is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and marks the official beginning of winter. The sun is...

Darwinners & Losers

 Truth is a monkey on pols' backs --
  Richard Cohen: "Half Of America Rejects Theory Of Evolution."


· 04/12/2005 11:29:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by presidio9 ·
· 131 replies · 4,487+ views ·
· NY Daily News ·
· April 12, 2005 ·
· Richard Cohen ·

Behold the giant Galapagos tortoise! It weighs 700 pounds, lives God-only-knows how long and a couple of weeks ago when I was on the Galapagos Islands, could not be beholden at all. The tortoise we wanted to see, Lonesome George, so called because he is apparently the last of his subspecies, was in hiding. In a sense, that's appropriate because almost half of America cannot see any of the Galapagos for what they are: the home office of evolution. This is where Charles Darwin got his bright idea. It is odd to amble around the Galapagos and see the handiwork...

Underwater Archaeology

 Robert Ballard on exploring the oceans (Drill, baby, drill!!)

· 12/18/2010 7:52:44 AM PST ·
· Posted by pillut48 ·
· 6 replies ·
· TED ·
· Feb. 2008 ·
· Dr. Robert Ballard ·

Ocean explorer Robert Ballard takes us on a mindbending trip to hidden worlds underwater, where he and other researchers are finding unexpected life, resources, even new mountains. He makes a case for serious exploration and mapping. Google Ocean, anyone?

Britain

 Woodhenge: Is this one of the greatest discoveries of archaeology
  ...or a simple farmer's fence?


· 12/20/2010 9:18:55 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 8 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· December 12, 2010 ·
· Alun Rees & Jonathan Petre ·

The discovery of a wooden version of Stonehenge -- a few hundred yards from the famous monument -- was hailed as one of the most important archaeological finds for decades. But now experts are at loggerheads after claims that what was thought to be a Neolithic temple was a rather more humble affair -- in fact the remains of a wooden fence. One leading expert on Stonehenge criticised the announcement of the "remarkable' find in July as "hasty' and warned it could become a "PR embarrassment'. But sceptics have now suggested that the evidence is far from conclusive, especially...

Farty Shades of Green

 Seeing daybreak at 'Ireland's Stonehenge'

· 12/21/2010 6:05:08 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 9 replies ·
· BBC ·
· December 21, 2010 ·
· Trish Flanagan ·

On the morning of 21 December, a select group of people made their way through a dark, narrow passage and gathered in a small cross-shaped chamber at Newgrange in Co Meath, Irish Republic, to celebrate the winter solstice.Newgrange, located 40km north of Dublin and perched high above a bend of the River Boyne, is a prehistoric passage tomb, covered on the outside by a large grassy mound. At over 5,000 years old it is the older cousin of Stonehenge and it predates the pyramids by about 500 years. It is difficult to estimate how long it would have taken to...

Ancient Autopsies

 Chinese archaeologists unearth 2,400-year-old 'soup'

· 12/23/2010 7:33:18 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 21 replies ·
· BBC ·
· December 2010 ·
· unattributed ·

Experts say the 'bone soup' in the vessel turned green due to the oxidation of the bronze Chinese archaeologists have unearthed what they believe is a 2,400-year-old pot of soup, state media report. The liquid and bones were in a sealed bronze cooking vessel dug up near the ancient capital of Xian - home to the country's famed terracotta warriors. Tests are being carried out to identify the ingredients. An odourless liquid, believed to be wine, was also found. The pots were discovered in a tomb being excavated to make way for an extension to the local airport. "It's...

Paleontology

 PBS Program Alert- Nova:Arctic Dinosaurs Dec 21 8 pm

· 12/20/2010 10:46:41 PM PST ·
· Posted by CanadianPete ·
· 35 replies ·
· PBS Nova ·

Most people imagine dinosaurs lurking in warm locales with swamps and jungles, dining on vegetation and each other. But "Arctic Dinosaurs" reveals that many species also thrived in the harsh environments of the north and south polar regions. NOVA follows two high-stakes expeditions and the paleontologists who push the limits of science to unearth 70 million-year-old fossils buried in the vast Alaskan tundra.

Climate

 A Dalton Minimum Repeat is Shaping Up

· 12/20/2010 3:05:33 PM PST ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 65 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· December 20, 2010 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

The sun went spotless yesterday, the first time in quite awhile. It seems like a good time to present this analysis from my friend David Archibald. For those not familiar with the Dalton Minimum, here's some background info from Wiki:The Dalton Minimum was a period of low solar activity, named after the English meteorologist John Dalton, lasting from about 1790 to 1830.[1] Like the Maunder Minimum and Spˆrer Minimum, the Dalton Minimum coincided with a period of lower-than-average global temperatures. The Oberlach Station in Germany, for example, experienced a 2.0°C decline over...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 How Earth's orbital shift shaped the Sahara

· 12/21/2010 10:03:52 AM PST ·
· Posted by LucyT ·
· 35 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· December 21, 2010 ·
· Anuradha K. Herath ·

The Sahara, the world's largest desert, was once fertile grassland. This fact has been common knowledge in the scientific community for some time, but scientists are still grappling with historic data to determine whether that transition took place abruptly or gradually. At the European Geosciences Union General Assembly held in Vienna, Austria earlier this year, researchers presented new evidence showing that the eastern region of the Sahara desert, particularly the area near Lake Yoa in Chad, dried up slowly and progressively since the mid-Holocene period.

Archaeoastronomy & Megaliths

 Along The 'Hammonasset Line'
  (Stone Formations He Believes Native Americans Built Long Ago)


· 12/21/2010 4:38:40 AM PST ·
· Posted by raybbr ·
· 13 replies ·
· Courant.com ·
· December 20, 2010 ·
· PETER MARTEKA ·

Madison Resident Finding Stone Formations He Believes Native Americans Built Long Ago To Mark Winter Solstice Sunrise -- As the summer solstice approaches each June, a chunk of white rock in a manmade chamber on the edge of a reservoir here is illuminated by sunlight in the shape of a dagger. In another part of town, a 7-acre parcel is filled with stone walls that align during the solstices with rocks in the shape of snakes, white quartz boulders, prayer seats and assorted cairns. These stone displays are among the thousands discovered by Madison resident and retired engineer Tom Paul...

PreColumbian, Clovis, and PreClovis

 Archeological site on Ingonish Island dates back thousands of years

· 12/20/2010 5:34:39 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Cape Breton Post ·
· December 16th, 2010 ·
· Rannie Gillis ·

Ronald Nash found two separate quarries on the island. The larger one was located on the relatively flat northwest side, facing the village of Ingonish, and provided 40 boxes of artifacts. The smaller site was under cliffs on the very steep northeast side, facing the ocean, and provided a smaller amount of material... All of the evidence found indicates that both sites were quarries, and not the location of early villages. We know this because Nash found no animal bones, empty shells, or pottery fragments at either site, meaning that food was not cooked or eaten on location. Although these...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Ancient Caucasian Remains in America: The Ainu in North America

· 12/22/2010 2:50:38 PM PST ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 118 replies ·
· Nephilman ·
· 12-21-2010 ·

Archeological anomalies that suggest Amerindians were not the first Americans · Kennewick Man · Spirit Cave Mummy · Wizards Beach Man · Gordon Creek Woman · Penon Woman · The "Mummy People" of Alaska A handful of skeletal remains have come to light in recent years which suggests that the Modern Amerindians, descended primarily from Mongolian stock were not truly the first Americans. The Ainu race of Japan appears the be the last remaining vestiges of a race that once roamed the Pacific Areas of Asia and the Americas, theiry skeletal remains may possibly be related...


 Man-Eating Giants Discovered in Nevada Cave [8 feet tall!]

· 12/22/2010 1:49:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by Fractal Trader ·
· 135 replies ·
· Salem News ·
· 20 December 2010 ·
· Terrence Aym ·

The Paiutes, a Native-American tribe indigenous to parts of Nevada, Utah and Arizona, told early white settlers about their ancestors' battles with a ferocious race of white, red-haired giants. According to the Paiutes, the giants were already living in the area. Roaming, man-eating giants The Paiutes named the giants Si-Te-Cah that literally means "tule-eaters." The tule is a fibrous water plant the giants wove into rafts to escape the Paiutes continuous attacks. They used the rafts to navigate across what remained of Lake Lahontan. Giants roamed the Earth According to the Paiutes, the red-haired giants stood as...

The Civil War

 Restoration efforts on Civil War steam engine progressing

· 12/20/2010 2:45:54 PM PST ·
· Posted by thecodont ·
· 34 replies ·
· LA Times ·
· December 18, 2010, 9:13 p.m. ·
· Mark St. John Erickson ·
· Newport News Daily Press ·

When archaeologists and Navy divers recovered the warship Monitor's steam engine from the Atlantic in 2001, the pioneering Civil War propulsion unit was enshrouded in a thick layer of marine concretion. Sand, mud and corrosion combined with minerals in the deep waters off Cape Hatteras, N.C., to cloak every feature of Swedish American inventor John Ericsson's ingenious machine, and they continued to envelop the 30-ton artifact after nine years of desalination treatment. This month, however, conservators at the Mariners' Museum here and its USS Monitor Center drained the 35,000-gallon solution in which the massive...


 Lincoln the Tyrant: The Libertarians' Favorite Bogeyman

· 12/07/2010 11:31:03 AM PST ·
· Posted by presidio9 ·
· 289 replies ·
· Big Government ·
· Dec 5th 2010 ·
· Brad Schaeffer ·

On a recent pilgrimage to Gettysburg I ventured into the Evergreen cemetery, the scene of chaotic and bloody fighting throughout the engagement. Like Abraham Lincoln on a cold November day in 1863, I pondered the meaning of it all. With the post-Tea Party wave of libertarianism sweeping the nation, Lincoln's reputation has received a serious pillorying. He has even been labeled a tyrant, who used the issue of slavery as a mendacious faux excuse to pummel the South into submitting to the will of the growing federal power in Washington D.C. In fact, some insist, the labeling of slavery as...

The Revolution

 America's First Christmas - How we reversed our fortunes in the Revolutionary War

· 12/23/2010 10:21:39 PM PST ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 18 replies ·
· National Review Online ·
· December 23, 2010 ·
· Rich Lowry ·

Gen. George Washington's army retreated from New York in ignominy in November 1776. As it moved through New Jersey, Lt. James Monroe, the future president, stood by the road and counted the troops: 3,000 left from an original force of 30,000. In December 1776, the future of America hung on the fate of a bedraggled army barely a step ahead of annihilation. The Americans confronted about two-thirds of the strength of the British army, and half of its navy, not to mention thousands of German mercenaries. Ron Chernow recounts...

World War Eleven

 'Don't shoot, we're Republicans'

· 12/21/2010 3:23:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by artichokegrower ·
· 7 replies ·
· Navy Memories Shop ·

From November 1943, until her demise in June 1945, the American destroyer 'William Porter' was often hailed - whenever she entered port or joined other Naval ships - with the greetings: 'Don't shoot, we're Republicans!' For a half a century, the US Navy kept a lid on the details of the incident that prompted this salutation. A Miami news reporter made the first public disclosure in 1958 after he stumbled upon the truth while covering a reunion of the destroyer's crew. The Pentagon reluctantly and tersely confirmed his story, but only a smattering of newspapers took notice. In 1943, the...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Was Patton killed?

· 12/19/2010 12:17:44 PM PST ·
· Posted by ConservativeStatement ·
· 152 replies ·
· NY Post ·
· December 18, 2010 ·
· Robert K. Wilcox ·

Sixty-five years ago this month, Gen. George S. Patton Jr., hero of World War II and an outspoken critic of the Soviets, was en route to a Sunday hunting trip, a day before permanently leaving Europe, when he was critically injured in a vehicle accident on a deserted two lane highway near Mannheim, Germany. A large US army truck that Patton's driver later said was waiting for them, suddenly -- and without signaling -- abruptly turned into his limousine's path, causing a head-on crash. Even though Patton had an aide with him and the driver of the truck had one...


 The Mysterious Death of George Patton

· 04/27/2006 6:26:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by spanalot ·
· 524 replies · 15,548+ views ·
· Fox News ·
· 4/27/06 ·
· Oliver North ·

Was General Patton's death the result of a traffic accident or was he the victim of an assassination plot? (By Stalin)

Longer Perspectives

 Kevin Connolly's guide to American culture

· 12/19/2010 3:44:51 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 17 replies ·
· BBC ·
· December 18, 2010 ·
· Kevin Connolly ·

After three years of eating steaks the size of elephants' ears, Kevin bids farewell The BBC's America correspondent Kevin Connolly is packing his bags for a new post in the Middle East. During his three years in the US he has visited 46 out of 50 states and covered the country's election of its first black president.Sometime around the spring of 1835, a young Frenchman called Alexis de Tocqueville travelled to the United States on a mission guaranteed to make Americans bristle with irritation. He was going to understand them, and explain them. De Tocqueville was smart, Gallic and aristocratic...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Sunderland experts study 18th Century Arctic voyages

· 12/24/2010 6:18:03 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 10 replies ·
· BBC ·
· December 23, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

Ships' logs from vessels which travelled in the Arctic Circle in the 18th Century are to be studied to see if they shed light on climate change.A team from Sunderland University will study records kept by explorers, whalers and merchants during trips which took place up to 260 years ago. They want to see if the logs provide clues about the ice levels in the area at that time. They will be analysing log books written between 1750 and 1850. "The Arctic environmentally is a hugely important area, but we need to know how it's behaved in the past...

end of digest #336 20101225


1,202 posted on 12/24/2010 11:52:41 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1200 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; zakbrow; ZULU; zeugma; Zechariah_8_13; yellowhammer; yellow rubber ducky; yellervette; ..

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #336 20101225
· Saturday, December 25, 2010 · 32 topics · 2647073 to 2644953 · 762 members ·

 
Saturday
Dec 25
2010
v 7
n 24

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 336th issue. A big thank you to the many who contributed topics and the more who shared in the threads. A public welcome to new members.

Merry Christmas!

Note: I plan to check all the list members to see if you're active (not banned) and/or if you've not posted in a long time. In either case you'll be moved to the Digest list.
  • from June 26, 2009: Why didn't Michele accompany Pres. Obama to Arab countries?...I was at a Blockbusters on Saturday renting videos... there was a video called "Obama"... the two men next to me... were Arabs and I asked Them why they thought Michele Obama headed home following her Visit in France instead of traveling on to Saudi Arabia and Turkey with her husband. They told me she couldn't go to Saudi Arabia , Turkey or Iraq ... I Said "Laura Bush went to Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Dubai " They Said that Obama is a Muslim, and by Muslim law he would not be Allowed to bring his [non-Moslem] wife into countries that accept Sharia Law. Just thought it was interesting that two Arabs at Blockbusters accept the idea that we're being 'led' by a Muslim who follows the Islamic creed. They also said that's the reason he bowed to the King of Saudi Arabia . It was a signal to the Muslim world...
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: Note: I don't know what happened, but my ping message never went in. I did do the danged thing. Oh well, in my heart, I know it was done in plenty of time. Should have appeared about 3:30 am local time here on Christmas morning.

The days are getting longer again, at least for those of us in the northern hemisphere.

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,203 posted on 12/26/2010 6:56:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1202 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Please consider me active. Whether I comment or not, I like the topics.


1,204 posted on 12/26/2010 7:08:57 PM PST by Judith Anne (Holy Mary, Mother of God, please pray for us sinners now, and at the hour of our death.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1203 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Hmm, this must be a great thread, 1200 posts going back years! Got some links to check out :)

Meanwhile, here’s one you may not have seen. An old book, and a grand one, available complete online.

http://books.google.com/books?id=sXFLCeHlrsoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Cassiterides:+An+Inquiry&hl=en&ei=zgAYTabmBYH58AbrzfzUDQ

It’s “The Cassiterides: An Inquiry Into the Commercial Operations of the Phoenicians in Western Europe, With Particular Reference to the British Tin Trade,” by George Smith, published in 1863.

The entire book can be downloaded free — download link is at the upper right. Book is about 150 pages.

Enjoy! and Happy New Year to all, with special thanks to the pingmaster of GGG, my favorite list.


1,205 posted on 12/26/2010 7:23:26 PM PST by 668 - Neighbor of the Beast (Happy New Year!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 668 - Neighbor of the Beast

Thanks!

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001736537

http://members.tripod.com/cornwall_phoenicians/The%20phoenicians.htm

http://members.tripod.com/cornwall_phoenicians/The%20mermaid.htm


1,206 posted on 12/26/2010 8:53:39 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: Judith Anne

Thanks! Will do!


1,207 posted on 12/26/2010 8:55:36 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Please keep me on your list. if that is what you are asking in your GGG ping/ I really enjoy your posts. even though I don’t reply often. I reaed them all.


1,208 posted on 12/27/2010 5:15:36 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: SunkenCiv

Please keep me on your ping list. Thanks!


1,209 posted on 12/27/2010 9:26:12 AM PST by manna
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To: manna

Will do!


1,210 posted on 12/27/2010 5:34:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Thanks, will do!


1,211 posted on 12/27/2010 5:41:00 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I’ve been around since the beginning of this list, please keep me on it. Thanks


1,212 posted on 12/28/2010 9:15:47 AM PST by Founding Father (The Pedophile moHAMmudd (PBUH---Pigblood be upon him))
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To: Founding Father

Thanks Founding Father, will do.


1,213 posted on 12/28/2010 7:43:34 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2649110/posts
The Battle of Towton :Nasty, brutish and not that short


1,214 posted on 12/29/2010 5:06:01 PM PST by worst-case scenario (Striving to reach the light)
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To: worst-case scenario

Thanks wcs.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2649110/posts?page=7#7


1,215 posted on 12/29/2010 5:39:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Please consider me active, also. I really don’t comment, but do read and enjoy all the topics. Thanks!


1,216 posted on 12/31/2010 6:51:53 PM PST by Lynne
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To: Lynne

Will do, thanks Lynne.


1,217 posted on 12/31/2010 10:29:03 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #337
Saturday, January 1, 2011

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Armageddon Fortress May Hold Keys to History

· 12/26/2010 9:43:25 PM PST ·
· Posted by Alex Murphy ·
· 23 replies · 2+ views ·
· AOL News ·
· Dec 26, 2010 ·
· Matthew Kalman ·

MEGIDDO, Israel -- The Book of Revelation says the biblical fortress of Armageddon will be the site of an apocalyptic battle between good and evil at the end of time. Scientists believe it could also be the place where time begins -- at least for archaeology. In a groundbreaking new project, scholars are using the rich archaeological remains that soar more than 50 feet above the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel to synchronize the clocks of the ancient world and create the first definitive calendar of human history. The word "Armageddon" comes from the Hebrew Har Megiddo, which means mountain...

Prehistory & Origins

 Did first humans come out of Middle East and not Africa?...

· 12/27/2010 4:13:51 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 44 replies · 4+ views ·
· Daily Mail ·
· December 27, 2010 ·
· Matthew Kalman ·

Scientists could be forced to re-write the history of the evolution of modern man after the discovery of 400,000-year-old human remains. Until now, researchers believed that homo sapiens, the direct descendants of modern man, evolved in Africa about 200,000 years ago and gradually migrated north, through the Middle East, to Europe and Asia. Recently, discoveries of early human remains in China and Spain have cast doubt on the 'Out of Africa' theory, but no-one was certain. The new discovery of pre-historic human remains by Israeli university explorers in a cave near Ben-Gurion airport could force scientists to re-think earlier theories.


 Researchers: Ancient human remains found in Israel

· 12/28/2010 9:05:38 AM PST ·
· Posted by Immerito ·
· 24 replies · 5+ views ·
· Yahoo! News ·
· December 27, 2010 ·
· Daniel Estrin ·

JERUSALEM -- Israeli archaeologists said Monday they may have found the earliest evidence yet for the existence of modern man, and if so, it could upset theories of the origin of humans. A Tel Aviv University team excavating a cave in central Israel said teeth found in the cave are about 400,000 years old and resemble those of other remains of modern man, known scientifically as Homo sapiens, found in Israel. The earliest Homo sapiens remains found until now are half as old.

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 You are what your father ate

· 12/26/2010 1:40:23 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 49 replies · 4+ views ·
· UMass Medical School ·
· December 23, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

UMMS research suggests paternal diet affects lipid metabolizing genes in offspring -- Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Texas at Austin have uncovered evidence that environmental influences experienced by a father can be passed down to the next generation, "reprogramming" how genes function in offspring. A new study published this week in Cell shows that environmental cues -- in this case, diet -- influence genes in mammals from one generation to the next, evidence that until now has been sparse. These insights, coupled with previous human epidemiological studies, suggest that paternal environmental effects may play a more...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 US study finds Neanderthals ate their veggies

· 12/27/2010 2:01:06 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 27 replies · 5+ views ·
· AFP ·
· December 27, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

WASHINGTON (AFP) -- A US study on Monday found that Neanderthals, prehistoric cousins of humans, ate grains and vegetables as well as meat, cooking them over fire in the same way homo sapiens did. The new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) challenges a prevailing theory that Neanderthals' over reliance on meat contributed to their extinction around 30,000 years ago. Researchers found grains from numerous plants, including a type of wild grass, as well as traces of roots and tubers, trapped in plaque buildup on fossilized Neanderthal teeth unearthed in northern Europe and Iraq.

Darwinners & Losers

 Scientists say new human relative roamed widely in Asia

· 12/25/2010 1:48:33 AM PST ·
· Posted by Islander7 ·
· 21 replies · 2+ views ·
· Star Advertiser ·
· Dec 22, 2010 ·
· Malcolm Ritter ·

NEW YORK -- Scientists have recovered the DNA code of a human relative recently discovered in Siberia, and it delivered a surprise: This relative roamed far from the cave that holds its only known remains. By comparing the DNA to that of modern populations, scientists found evidence that these "Denisovans" from more than 30,000 years ago ranged all across Asia. They apparently interbred with the ancestors of people now living in Melanesia, a group of islands northeast of Australia.


 Fish Swam the Sahara, Bolstering Out of Africa Theory

· 12/29/2010 11:42:33 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 30 replies · 4+ views ·
· Live Science ·
· December 29, 2010 ·
· Charles Q. Choi ·

Fish may have once swum across the Sahara, a finding that could shed light on how humanity made its way out of Africa, researchers said. The cradle of humanity lies south of the Sahara, which begs the question as to how our species made its way past it. The Sahara is the largest hot desert in the world, and would seem a major barrier for any humans striving to migrate off the continent. Scientists have often focused on the Nile Valley as the corridor by which humans left Africa. However, considerable research efforts have failed to uncover evidence for its...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 What Triggers Mass Extinctions? Study Shows How Invasive Species Stop New Life

· 12/30/2010 8:02:00 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 37 replies · 51+ views ·
· National Science Foundation ·
· December 29, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

An influx of invasive species can stop the dominant natural process of new species formation and trigger mass extinction events, according to research results published today in the journal PLoS ONE. The study of the collapse of Earth's marine life 378 to 375 million years ago suggests that the planet's current ecosystems, which are struggling with biodiversity loss, could meet a similar fate. Although Earth has experienced five major mass extinction events, the environmental crash during the Late Devonian was unlike any other in the planet's history. The actual number of extinctions wasn't higher than the natural rate of species...

Climate

 Assessing the accuracy of ice-core CO2 records

· 12/26/2010 8:48:45 AM PST ·
· Posted by steveab ·
· 40 replies · 2+ views ·
· Greenie Watch ·
· 12-25-2010 ·
· David Middleton ·

Assessing the accuracy of ice-core CO2 records In the excerpt below, David Middleton points out large problems with ice-core data and suggests that fossil Plant Stomata give a much more accurate account of past CO2 levels -- an account that gives no support for Warmism at all and which in fact supports the obvious physics of the matter: Warming causes higher CO2 levels rather than vice versa

Africa

 Lost Cities of the Sahara

· 12/26/2010 9:06:39 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 53 replies ·
· University of Leicester ·
· July 26, 2000 ·
· Barbara Whiteman ·

...the Garamantes - a mysterious desert people of Greco-Roman date (broadly 500 BC AD 500)... Inhabiting a region that had already been for several thousand years a hyper-arid desert environment, with negligible rainfall, elevated summer temperatures and blistering expanses of barren sand and rock... have long been an enigma. They were depicted by Roman sources as ungovernable nomadic barbarians, who raided the settled agricultural zone and cities of the Mediterranean littoral. Following up earlier work by Daniels, the current project allows a different picture of the Garamantes to be drawn. Archaeological evidence shows them to have been a complex and...

Elam, Persia, Parthia, Iran

 Natural factors added to threats to Shush Castle

· 12/27/2010 11:57:45 PM PST ·
· Posted by BlackVeil ·
· 9 replies · 1+ views ·
· Tehran Times ·
· 28 Dec 2010 ·
· Culture Desk ·

TEHRAN -- Natural environmental factors have been added to the perils threatening the Shush Castle, a historical monument that is a storehouse of many ancient Iranian inscriptions and artifacts. Heavy rainfalls and strong winds have dealt devastating blows to the castle, the Persian service of the Mehr News Agency reported on Monday. The Shush Castle is located on a hill in Shush near the ancient sites of Susa in Khuzestan Province in southwestern Iran. The construction of the Shush Castle was started in 1897 by the French civil engineer, geologist, and archaeologist Jacques Jean-Marie de Morgan (1857-1924), who had come...

Australia & the Pacific

 Ancient rock art's colours come from microbes (Australia)

· 12/28/2010 1:35:28 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 8 replies · 5+ views ·
· BBC ·
· December 27, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

A particular type of ancient rock art in Western Australia maintains its vivid colours because it is alive, researchers have found.While some rock art fades in hundreds of years, the "Bradshaw art" remains colourful after at least 40,000 years. Jack Pettigrew of the University of Queensland in Australia has shown that the paintings have been colonised by colourful bacteria and fungi. These "biofilms" may explain previous difficulties in dating such rock art. Professor Pettigrew and his colleagues studied 80 of these Bradshaw rock artworks - named for the 19th-Century naturalist who first identified them - in 16 locations within Western...

Archaeoastronomy & Megaliths

 Stonehenge Built With Balls?
  New experiment suggests monumental stones could have rolled on rails


· 12/30/2010 3:10:25 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies · 18+ views ·
· National Geographic News ·
· Friday, December 10, 2010 ·
· Kate Ravilious ·

It's one of Stonehenge's greatest mysteries: How did Stone Age Britons move 45-ton slabs across dozens of miles to create the 4,500-year-old stone circle? ...A previous theory suggested that the builders used wooden rollers -- carved tree trunks laid side by side on a constructed hard surface. Another imagined huge wooden sleds atop greased wooden rails. But critics say the rollers' hard pathway would have left telltale gouges in the landscape, which have never been found. And the sled system, while plausible, would have required huge amounts of manpower -- hundreds of men at a time to move one of...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Archaeologists to probe Sherwood Forest's 'Thing' [ Thynghowe ]

· 12/29/2010 6:27:55 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies · 14+ views ·
· BBC ·
· Wednesday, December 29, 2010 ·
· unattributed ·

A team of experts hope to shed new light on one of Nottinghamshire's most mysterious ancient monuments. A 'Thing', or open-air meeting place where Vikings gathered to discuss the law, was discovered in the Birklands, Sherwood Forest, five years ago... It started after husband and wife team Lynda Mallett and Stuart Reddish, along with their friend John Wood, came into possession of a 200 year old document. It described a walk around part of Sherwood Forest which marked an ancient boundary. They searched for the boundary on the landscape and found a place called Hanger Hill on which stood three...

Britain

 The Battle of Towton :Nasty, brutish and not that short

· 12/29/2010 5:00:36 PM PST ·
· Posted by worst-case scenario ·
· 18 replies · 9+ views ·
· The Economist ·
· Dec 16 2010 ·

Medieval warfare was just as terrifying as you might imagine. THE soldier now known as Towton 25 had survived battle before. A healed skull fracture points to previous engagements. He was old enough -- somewhere between 36 and 45 when he died -- to have gained plenty of experience of fighting. But on March 29th 1461, his luck ran out. Towton 25 suffered eight wounds to his head that day. The precise order can be worked out from the direction of fractures on his skull: when bone breaks, the cracks veer towards existing areas of weakness. The first five blows were delivered by a...

Ancient Autopsies

 Rare Discovery of Intact Tomb: German Archeologists Uncover Celtic Treasure

· 12/29/2010 7:07:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies · 28+ views ·
· Spiegel ·
· Wednesday, December 29, 2010 ·
· cro -- with wire reports ·

Archeologists in Germany have discovered a 2,600-year-old Celtic tomb containing ornate jewellery of gold and amber. They say the grave is unusually well preserved and should provide important insights into early Celtic culture... The subterranean chamber measuring four by five meters was uncovered near the prehistoric Heuneburg hill fort near the town of Herbertingen in south-western Germany. Its contents including the oak floor of the room are unusually well preserved. The find is a "milestone for the reconstruction of the social history of the Celts," archeologist Dirk Krausse, the director of the dig, said on Tuesday. The intact oak should...

Longer Perspectives

 Mead, drink of Vikings, comes out of the Dark Ages

· 12/29/2010 10:09:41 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 51 replies ·
· hosted.ap.org ·
· Dec 29 ·
· Allen G. Breed ·

Pittsboro, N.C. (AP) -- Mead, that drink of viking saga and medieval verse, is making a comeback. But this ain't your ancestors' honey wine. "It's not just for the Renaissance fair anymore," says Becky Starr, co-owner of Starrlight Mead, which recently opened in an old woven label mill in this little North Carolina town. In fact, this most ancient of alcoholic libations hasn't been this hot since Beowulf slew Grendel's dam and Geoffrey Chaucer fell in with the Canterbury pilgrims at the Tabard./font>

PreColumbian, Clovis, and PreClovis

 Ancient Maya Temples Were Giant Loudspeakers?

· 12/30/2010 7:01:44 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 40 replies · 437+ views ·
· National Geographic News ·
· December 16, 2010 ·
· Ker Than ·

Centuries before the first speakers and subwoofers, ancient Americans -- intentionally or not -- may have been turning buildings into giant sound amplifiers and distorters to enthrall or disorient audiences, archaeologists say. Temples at the ancient Maya city of Palenque (map) in central Mexico, for example, might have formed a kind of "unplugged" public-address system, projecting sound across great distances, according to a team led by archaeologist Francisca Zalaquett of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Zalaquett's team recently discovered that Palenque's Northern Group of public squares and temples -- built around roughly A.D. 600 -- is especially good at...


 America's Forgotten City

· 12/30/2010 2:07:10 AM PST ·
· Posted by BlueMoose ·
· 16 replies · 31+ views ·
· National Geographic ·
· Jan 2011 ·
· National Geographic ·

If they ever build a Wal-Mart at Machu Picchu, I will think of Collinsville Road.

The Greeks

 The Original Birth of Freedom - What we owe the audacious Athenians

· 12/27/2010 9:03:08 PM PST ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 9 replies · 1+ views ·
· City Journal ·
· Autumn 2010 ·
· André Glucksmann ·

Over the centuries, there have appeared two great conceptions of freedom. The first vision, which one can call "epic freedom," is freedom as Hegel or Marx understood it, the freedom of messianists and of revolutionaries. The meaning of freedom, on this view, is the progressive emancipation of man: step by step, battle by battle, mankind is supposed to break with its alienations and become the creator and absolute master of its fate. Epic freedom is the assumption of a cosmic mastery, more and more aware of itself. Crises become mere historical stages on the way to the final achievement of...

Early America

 Jamestown unearths 400-year-old pipes for patrons (tobacco pipes)

· 12/31/2010 7:44:44 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 14 replies ·
· Associated Press ·
· December 31, 2010 ·
· Michael Felberbaum ·

Richmond, Va. -- Archeologists at Jamestown have unearthed a trove of tobacco pipes personalized for a who's who of early 17th century colonial and British elites, underscoring the importance of tobacco to North America's first permanent English settlement. "It really brings the people back into the picture," said Bly Straube, senior archaeological curator for the Jamestown Rediscovery Project. "We have a lot of artifacts that we can associate with types of people like gentleman or women or children, but to find things like the pipe that bears the name Sir Walter Raleigh, I mean, my goodness. ... It just...

The Revolution

 Tea totaler returns Memphis to revolutionary roots (Tea Party)

· 12/29/2010 3:38:00 PM PST ·
· Posted by GailA ·
· 11 replies · 3+ views ·
· The Commercial Appeal ·
· 12/29/10 ·
· Richard Morgan ·

He was the last president to be a Revolutionary War veteran. Orphaned at 14 by that war, Andrew Jackson went on to be a country lawyer in the pre-Tennessee Southwest Territory. He soon became the state's first U.S. senator, before resigning. He was also a judge on the Tennessee Supreme Court and commander of Tennessee's militia. Then, in 1819, with two other men, he founded Memphis. In 1999, Mark Skoda -- now 56 -- moved to Memphis, which set the stage for a new kind of revolution. Nationwide in 2010, feral Jacksonian populism reigned. This was the year of the...

The Great War

 Photographs of the World's First Aircraft Carrier Resurface

· 12/27/2010 8:04:19 PM PST ·
· Posted by nuconvert ·
· 25 replies · 3+ views ·
· The Atlantic ·

On November 14, 1910, Eugene Ely became the first pilot to successfully launch a plane from a stationary ship. The Curtiss pusher airplane, one of the first models in the world to be built in any significant quantity, flew for two miles before Ely landed on a beach. Using the same aircraft, Ely landed on the USS Pennsylvania on January 18, 1911, while the ship was anchored at the San Francisco waterfront. He had to use a braking system made of ropes and sandbags, but he was able to quickly turn around and take off once again, proving that ideas...

World War Eleven

 A 1944 Christmas miracle for Gen. Patton

· 12/26/2010 6:31:05 AM PST ·
· Posted by Saije ·
· 46 replies · 2+ views ·
· LA Times ·
· 12/26/2010 ·
· Alison Bell ·

In early December 1944, Gen. George S. Patton Jr., commander of the United States' 3rd Army, stood with his troops at Germany's doorstep. He'd pushed his men across France toward Germany with furious speed during summer and early fall, but in the last months, as he drove through France's Lorraine region toward the Saar River, progress stalled. Fuel and supplies were running short, and perhaps even more deviling, the weather wouldn't cooperate. Driving rains had mired his troops and grounded the fighter planes and bombers needed for air support. On Dec. 8, Patton turned to a higher power to clear...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 NM gov. declines to pardon outlaw Billy the Kid

· 12/31/2010 8:38:03 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 45 replies ·
· hosted.ap.org ·
· Dec 31 ·

Santa Fe, N.M. (AP) -- Billy the Kid, the Old West outlaw who killed at least three lawmen and tried to cut a deal from jail with territorial authorities, won't be pardoned, Gov. Bill Richardson said Friday. The prospect of a pardon for the notorious frontier figure nearly 130 years after his death drew international attention to New Mexico, centering on whether Billy the Kid had been promised a pardon from New Mexico's territorial governor in return for testimony in killings he had witnessed.

Epigraphy & Language

 English language has doubled in size in the last century

· 12/30/2010 3:39:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies · 32+ views ·
· Telegraph ·
· December 16, 2010 ·
· Richard Alleyne ·

Researchers at Harvard University and Google found that the language was expanding by 8,500 words a year in the new millennium and now stands at 1,022,000 words. The rate of increase over the years is shown by the fact the language has grown by more than 70 per cent since 1950, according to the study. The previous half century it only grew by a tenth. But nearly half of the new words are not included in any dictionary and are dubbed lexical "dark matter". They are either slang or invented jargon. The findings came from the computer analyse of 5,195,769...

Pages

 What Are You Reading Now? - My Quarterly Survey

· 12/31/2010 7:25:35 AM PST ·
· Posted by MplsSteve ·
· 189 replies ·
· 12/31/10 ·
· MplsSteve ·

Hello everyone! it's time for my quarterly "What Are You reading Now?" survey. As you know, I consider Freepers to be among the more well-read of those of us out in cyberspace. As a result, I like to find out what you're reading. It can be anything...a technical journal, a NY TImes bestseller, a trashy pulp novel, in short, it can be anything. Please do not defile this thread by posting "I'm reading this thread". It became very unfunny a long long time ago. I'll start. I went to the library and picked up a copy of "Sam Walton, Made...

end of digest #337 20110101


1,218 posted on 01/01/2011 9:05:32 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1202 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #337 20110101
· Saturday, January 1, 2011 · 27 topics · 2648935 to 2647430 · 762 members ·

 
Saturday
Jan 01
2011
v 7
n 25

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Happy New Year!

Welcome to the 337th issue. Maybe it's just me, but it seems like this year's GGG-pingworthy news has had great hang time.

Unending thanks to all those who contribute topics, you've been great throughout 2010!

Thanks also to those who posted replies regarding my (eventual) member-by-member list check.

I saw a question on some thread around here, to the effect, what's new about her: Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: Theodore Roosevelt, 1907:
"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag.. We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."
And again, Happy New Year!

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,219 posted on 01/01/2011 9:07:15 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1218 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Fletcher Richman uses the fake cover story that he is “researching” the Bruton Vault and Francis Bacon in order to trick people out of their money through financial misrepresentation. He’s done this for the last 25 years. Fletcher Richman caused MASSIVE financial ruin - and agonizing psychological torture - to my family for the last 2 years through his lies, deceptions, and financial fraud. It is still hard to believe that he could have caused just horrific destruction to my family - along with the assistance of his co-conspirators, Warren Angel and Ellie Henderson. Read the details of what he did to me and countless others over the last 25 years at http://sacredvaults.org


1,220 posted on 01/03/2011 5:50:51 AM PST by tonygreene
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 681 | View Replies]

To: tonygreene

Thanks tonygreene!


1,221 posted on 01/03/2011 5:06:48 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1220 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #338
Saturday, January 8, 2011

Panspermia

 Origin of life on Earth:
  the 'natural' asymmetry of biological molecules may have come from space


· 01/07/2011 6:02:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· AlphaGalileo ·
· Friday, January 7, 2011 ·
· CNRS ·

Certain molecules do exist in two forms which are symmetrical mirror images of each other: they are known as chiral molecules. On Earth, the chiral molecules of life, especially amino acids and sugars, exist in only one form, either left-handed or right-handed. Why is it that life has initially chosen one form over the other? A consortium bringing together several French teams led by Louis d'Hendecourt, CNRS senior researcher at the Institut d'astrophysique spatiale (Université Paris-Sud 11 / CNRS), has for the first time obtained an excess of left-handed molecules (and then an excess of right-handedones) under conditions that reproduce...

Paleontology

 Fossilized Bird Brains May Yield Secret of First Flights

· 01/01/2011 5:28:01 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 16 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· January 1, 2011 ·
· Charles Q. Choi ·

By reconstructing the brains of extinct birds, researchers could shed light on when birds evolved into creatures of flight. Overwhelming evidence suggests birds evolved from dinosaurs some 150 million years ago, but one of the missing pieces to the evolutionary puzzle is how such birds took to the air. Scientists in Scotland are focusing on changes in the size of a part of the rear of the brain. This part of the cerebellum, known as the flocculus, is responsible for integrating visual and balance signals during flight, allowing birds to judge the position of other objects in midflight. [3-D Image...


 Ancient 8-Foot Sea Scorpions Probably Were Pussycats

· 01/03/2011 10:07:49 AM PST ·
· Posted by Silentgypsy ·
· 29 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 12/30/2010 ·
· Charles Q. Choi ·

Ancient sea scorpions included the largest and arguably most frightening bug-like creatures known to have lived on Earth, but despite their fearsome claws, these giants might actually have been creampuffs, scientists think.


 Help needed identifying fossils (Vanity)

· 01/01/2011 6:51:30 AM PST ·
· Posted by Hotmetal ·
· 55 replies ·

I found all of these on my first outting in one creek. I was told the large teeth are from a mastodon but they don't look like the ones I've seen on the web. The vertabra I was told, are maybe from a mosasaur.

Africa

 Rodents Were Diverse and Abundant
  in Prehistoric Africa When Our Human Ancestors Evolved


· 01/01/2011 5:35:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· December 29, 2010 ·
· Margaret Allen et al ·

Rodents get a bad rap as vermin and pests because they seem to thrive everywhere. They have been one of the most common mammals in Africa for the past 50 million years. From deserts to rainforests, rodents flourished in prehistoric Africa, making them a stable and plentiful source of food, says paleontologist Alisa J. Winkler, an expert on rodent and rabbit fossils... Rodents can corroborate evidence from geology and plant and animal fossils about the ancient environments of our human ancestors and other prehistoric mammals, says Winkler, a research professor at Southern Methodist University... Rodents -- rats, mice, squirrels, porcupines,...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 UF study of lice DNA shows humans first wore clothes 170,000 years ago

· 01/06/2011 1:54:04 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 52 replies ·
· University of Florida ·
· January 6, 2011 ·
· Danielle Torrent ·

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- A new University of Florida study following the evolution of lice shows modern humans started wearing clothes about 170,000 years ago, a technology which enabled them to successfully migrate out of Africa. Principal investigator David Reed, associate curator of mammals at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus, studies lice in modern humans to better understand human evolution and migration patterns. His latest five-year study used DNA sequencing to calculate when clothing lice first began to diverge genetically from human head lice. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the study is available online and...


 Male Susceptibility to Parasites May Help Explain Shorter Lifespans

· 09/25/2002 1:17:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by PatrickHenry ·
· 90 replies · 567+ views ·
· Scientific American ·
· September 20, 2002 ·
· Sarah Graham ·

In Westernized societies, women tend to outlive men. The established explanation for this inequality is that males undertake more risky behavior than females do and, as a result, perish prematurely. But new research published today in the journal Science suggests that parasites could be at least partially responsible. Sarah L. Moore and Kenneth Wilson of the University of Stirling analyzed parasitic infections in 355 nonhuman mammal species and found that males were more likely than females to succumb to parasites. What causes this small but significant increase remains unclear. With their generally larger size, males may just make more attractive...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Bacteria's Viral DNA Offers a Sneak Peek into Primitive Immune Systems

· 12/31/2010 9:47:25 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 11 replies ·
· Daily Tech ·
· December 31, 2010 ·
· Tiffany Kaiser ·

Viral DNA trapped in a bacteria cell's chromosome for millions of years has shown how bacteria becomes resistant to antibioticsA Texas A&M University researcher has discovered how nature's most primitive immune systems worked by studying bacteria's methods of resisting antibiotics over millions of years. Thomas Wood, study leader and professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, along with a team of researchers, have researched bacteria's method of using DNA from invading viruses to build a resistance to antibiotics, which revealed the secrets behind how nature's earliest immune systems worked and how it affects humans...

Navigation

 Cretan tools point to 130,000-year-old sea travel

· 01/03/2011 1:35:19 PM PST ·
· Posted by Fractal Trader ·
· 18 replies ·
· AP via Google ·
· 3 January 2011 ·

Archaeologists on the island of Crete have discovered what may be evidence of one of the world's first sea voyages by human ancestors, the Greek Culture Ministry said Monday A ministry statement said experts from Greece and the U.S. have found rough axes and other tools thought to be between 130,000 and 700,000 years old close to shelters on the island's south coast. Crete has been separated from the mainland for about five million years, so whoever made the tools must have traveled there by sea (a distance of at least 40 miles). That would upset the current view that...

Homo Erectus

 Ancient African exodus mostly involved men, geneticists find

· 12/22/2008 5:14:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by CE2949BB ·
· 25 replies · 733+ views ·
· Science Codex ·
· December 21, 2008 ·

BOSTON, Mass. (Dec. 21, 2008) -- Modern humans left Africa over 60,000 years ago in a migration that many believe was responsible for nearly all of the human population that exist outside Africa today.


 Discovery Supports Theory Of A Single Species Of Human Ancestor

· 03/21/2002 12:22:11 PM PST ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 24 replies · 555+ views ·
· Science Daily ·
· 3-21-2002 ·

Discovery Supports Theory Of A Single Species Of Human Ancestor New Haven, Conn. - The discovery of a million-year-old skull in Ethiopia indicates that a single species of human ancestor, Homo erectus, ranged from Europe to Africa to Asia in the Pleistocene era, according to the cover article in the March 21 issue of the journal Nature. The finding by the research team, which included Elidabeth Vrba, a Yale professor of paleontology in the Department of Geology and Geophysics, contradicts recent suggestions that there was a fundamental, early split in the homolineage between Eurasiatic and African populations. "This find puts...

Prehistory & Origins

 Debate Is Fueled on When Humans Became Human

· 02/26/2002 10:50:54 AM PST ·
· Posted by dead ·
· 147 replies · 1,109+ views ·
· New York Times ·
· February 26, 2002 ·
· John Noble Wilford ·

On the biggest steps in early human evolution scientists are in agreement. The first human ancestors appeared between five million and seven million years ago, probably when some apelike creatures in Africa began to walk habitually on two legs. They were flaking crude stone tools by 2.5 million years ago. Then some of them spread from Africa into Asia and Europe after two million years ago. With somewhat less certainty, most scientists think that people who look like us -- anatomically modern Homo sapiens -- evolved by at least 130,000 years ago from ancestors who had remained in Africa. ...

Infertile Crescent

 Tower of Babel's Ruins Waiting for Archaeologists (Dispensational Caucus)

· 01/04/2011 2:51:24 PM PST ·
· Posted by GiovannaNicoletta ·
· 43 replies ·
· Israel National News ·
· January 3, 2011 ·
· Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu ·

snip Following years of devastation under the dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and the ensuing American invasion of Iraq, World Monuments Fund conservationist Jeff Allen told The New York Times this week that archeologists are beginning to work on ancient Babylonian sites and possibly restore some of them. snip

Epigraphy & Language

 Q&A: Dead Languages Reveal a Lost World [ interview with Gonzalo Rubio ]

· 01/01/2011 7:11:58 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Thursday, December 28, 2010 ·
· Clara Moskowitz ·

Gonzalo Rubio spends his days reading dead languages that haven't been spoken for thousands of years. An assyriologist at Pennsylvania State University, Rubio studies the world's very first written languages, Sumerian and Akkadian, which were used in ancient Mesopotamia (an area covering modern-day Iraq). Sumerian appeared first, almost 5,000 years ago around the year 3,100 B.C. This writing was scratched into soft clay tablets with a pointed reed that had been cut into a wedge shape. Archaeologists call this first writing "cuneiform," from the Latin "cuneus," meaning wedge. Sumerian and Akkadian were the languages of the ancient Mesopotamian civilization, which...

India

 A prehistoric map painted on a cave in India

· 01/01/2011 5:59:57 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 59 replies ·
· Stone Pages ·
· Friday, December 31, 2010 ·
· Archaeo News ·

A team of researchers from the Archaeological Survey of India has unearthed maps depicted on the roof of a cave in Karnataka (India) that date back to 1500-2000 BCE. What was once thought to be a megalithic burial site with just paintings of animals and humans, could be the proof of the cartographic skills of prehistoric Indians... While paintings of animals such as cows, hunting scenes and human figurines are common across prehistoric settlements, only the Chikramapura village caves, also called Kadebagilu rock shelters, feature maps... According to Keshava, the prehistoric man obtained a bird's eye view of an area...

Anatolia

 Urartian king's burial chamber opened for first time [ Argishti ]

· 01/08/2011 7:43:24 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 3 replies ·
· Today's Zaman ·
· Monday, January 3, 2011 ·
· Anatolia News Agency ·

Burial chambers of Urartian King Argishti and his family in the western wing of the ancient castle in the eastern province of Van was opened for the first time. The Anatolia news agency took photographs and video of the burial chambers which were closed to visitors. Centered around the Lake Van in the eastern Turkey, the Urartian Kingdom ruled from the mid 9th century BC till its defeat by Media in the early 6th century BC. The most splendid monuments of the Urartian Kingdom take place in Van since the city was the capital of the kingdom. Built on a...

The Greeks

 A Toast to History:
  500 Years of Wine Drinking Cups Mark Social Shifts in Ancient Greece


· 01/03/2011 4:25:22 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 8 replies ·
· University of Cincinnati ·
· January 3, 2011 ·
· M.B. Reilly ·

University of Cincinnati research examines a timeline of wine drinking cups over a 500-year period in ancient Athens. Changes in cup form and design point to political, social and economic shifts. How commonly used items -- like wine drinking cups -- change through time can tell us a lot about those times, according to University of Cincinnati research to be presented Jan. 7 by Kathleen Lynch, UC associate professor of classics, at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America. Lynch will present the research at the event's Gold Medal Session, when archaeology's most distinguished honor will be bestowed...

Dacia

 The Sarmizegetusa bracelets

· 01/01/2011 7:23:59 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Antiquity ·
· v84 n326 pp 1028-1042 ·
· Bogdan Constantinescu et al ·

We present the authentication and analysis of these beautiful Dacian bracelets of the first century BC, originally pillaged by treasure hunters and recovered thanks to an international crime chase. They were originally fashioned from gold panned from the rivers or dug from the mines of Transylvania and hammered into the form of coiled snakes. The lack of context is the greatest loss, but a votive purpose is likely given their proximity to the great sacred centre at Sarmizegetusa Regia. links to the PDF version of the article, if available.

Roman Empire

 Nokalakevi-Archaeopolis: ten years of Anglo-Georgian collaboration

· 01/01/2011 7:37:16 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Antiquity ·
· v084 n326 December 2010 ·
· Paul Everill et al ·

Nestled by the picturesque river Tekhuri, on the northern edge of the Colchian plain in Samegrelo, western Georgia, lie the impressive ruins of Nokalakevi (Figures 1 & 2). Occupying some 20ha, the site was known to early Byzantine historians as Archaeopolis, and to the neighbouring Georgian (Kartlian) chroniclers as Tsikhegoji, or the fortress of Kuji -- a semi-mythical Colchian ruler or 'Eristavi'. The fortress is located 15km from the modern town of Senaki on the Martvili road, and would have commanded an important crossing point of the river Tekhuri, at the junction with a valuable strategic route that still winds...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Professor discovers hidden literary references in the Mona Lisa

· 01/06/2011 12:40:58 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 22 replies ·
· Queen's University ·
· January 6, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Queen's University Classics professor emeritus Ross Kilpatrick believes the Leonardo da Vinci masterpiece, the Mona Lisa, incorporates images inspired by the Roman poet Horace and Florentine poet Petrarch. The technique of taking a passage from literature and incorporating it into a work of art is known as "invention' and was used by many Renaissance artists. "The composition of the Mona Lisa is striking. Why does Leonardo have an attractive woman sitting on a balcony, while in the background there is an entirely different world that is vast and barren?" says Dr. Kilpatrick. "What is the artist trying to say?"

Pyramid Power

 Great Secret In Pyramid Construction Finally Revealed

· 01/01/2011 11:28:29 PM PST ·
· Posted by ChinaGotTheGoodsOnClinton ·
· 70 replies ·
· Egypt's Ten Greatest Discoveries ·
· self ·

Great Secret In Pyramid Construction Finally Revealed The Egyptians had a secret that allowed construction of the pyramids. Labor Unions! I am not kidding. I about fell off my stationary bike today watching Egypt's Ten Greatest Discoveries. The great genius Zahi Hawass came to this conclusion because: There is evidence that some of them had their broken bones cared for (thus they had union healthcare) They ate a very good diet consisting of fresh fish and grains. Some of their organizers were buried in granite tombs composed of discard of the pharaoh's tombs they were working on so these were...

Egypt

 21st century Welsh technology to save 27th century Egyptian Pyramid

· 01/01/2011 5:13:58 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· Saturday, January 1, 2011 ·
· unattributed ·

A Welsh engineering firm called Cintec has been enlisted by the Supreme Council of Antiquities to help save the iconic Step Pyramid of Djoser at Saqqara. The pyramid was built around 2640 BCE for the burial of Pharaoh Djoser by the fabled architect Inhoptep, but in 1992 after a major earthquake caused serious faults in the famous 4600 year old structure. The tomb started life as an unusual square mastaba -- normally they are flat-roofed, rectangular structures with outward sloping sides -- but over the lifetime of Djoser it develop into a six-stepped pyramid with a rectangular ground-plan. Below ground,...

The Comedy Never Stops

 Israeli Plagues Kill many Egyptians as cycle of violence continues

· 04/01/2004 3:01:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by yonif ·
· 18 replies · 400+ views ·
· Received in an urgent email ·
· 4/1/2004 ·
· unknown ·

The cycle of violence between the Jews and the Egyptians continues with no end in sight in Egypt. After eight previous plagues that have destroyed the Egyptian infrastructure and disrupted the lives of ordinary Egyptian citizens, the Jews launched a new offensive this week in the form of the plague of darkness. Western journalists were particularly enraged by this plague. "It is simply impossible to report when you can't see an inch in front of you," complained a frustrated Andrea Koppel of CNN. "I have heard from my reliable Egyptian contacts that in the midst of the blanket of blackness,...

Religion of Pieces

 Egyptian Lawyer to Sue Jews for Biblical 'Plunder'

· 09/11/2003 10:21:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by jern ·
· 20 replies · 244+ views ·
· Reuters ·
· Sept. 11, 2003 ·
· Opheera McDoom ·

Lawyer to Sue Jews for Biblical 'Plunder' 2 hours, 57 minutes ago Add Oddly Enough - Reuters to My Yahoo! By Opheera McDoom CAIRO (Reuters) - An Egyptian lawyer said Wednesday he was planning to sue the world's Jews for "plundering" gold during the Exodus from Pharaonic Egypt thousands of years ago, based on information in the Bible. Nabil Hilmi, dean of the law faculty at Egypt's al-Zaqaziq University, said the legal basis for the case was under study by a group of lawyers in Egypt and Europe. "This is serious, and should not be misread as being political against...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Ancient Jewish manuscripts reveal a forgotten history

· 01/01/2011 5:56:24 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· Saturday, January 1, 2011 ·
· unattributed ·

The study by Cambridge University researchers suggests that, contrary to long-accepted views, Jews continued to use a Greek version of the Bible in synagogues for centuries longer than previously thought. In some places, the practice continued almost until living memory. The Cairo Genizah was not an archive designed to preserve documents. It was a "receptacle," a final resting place or cache of "trashed" documents written in Hebrew or transliterated into Hebrew text, Arabic and other languages during the Middle Ages. The Ben-Ezra Synagogue in Cairo systematically disposed of deceased persons' documents in a special vaulted room in the attic of...

Star of the East

 In Search of Herod's Tomb

· 01/02/2011 5:26:06 PM PST ·
· Posted by STD ·
· 38 replies ·
· Biblical Archeological Review ·
· 10/25/10 ·
· By Ehud Netzer ·

On October 25, 2010, archaeologist and friend Ehud Netzer fell while working at Herodium, injuring his neck and back. He died from his injuries two days later. Obituary. -- Ed. During the 38 years since I began working at Herodium, Herod's luxurious desert retreat, this architectural masterpiece has yielded many treasures, but none more exciting than the 2007 discovery of Herod's elusive tomb. Some still question this identification, but more recent discoveries confirm my initial conclusion. Today, I have no doubt of it.


 OU Professor Says Ancient Text Reveals
  Startling Information About Magi, Star of Bethlehem


· 12/26/2010 4:50:11 PM PST ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 124 replies · 7+ views ·
· News Oklahoma ·
· 12/25/10 ·
· Carla Hinton ·

University of Oklahoma professor and Harvard grad Brent Landau's new book "Revelation of the Magi: The Lost Tale of the Wise Men's Journey to Bethlehem" reveals startling details about the Magi and star of Bethlehem. -- Many Christians can recite the basics of the Christmas story, complete with the account of the three wise men from the East following a bright star to Bethlehem. It's essentially saying that the people who recognized the significance of Jesus were not just Jews but people from a totally different culture and a totally different religious system. One of the points I made in...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 The 'Mad' Egyptian Scholar Who Proved Aristotle Wrong

· 01/07/2011 5:39:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Thursday, January 6, 2011 ·
· Institute of Physics et al ·

January's Physics World features a fanciful re-imagining of the 10-year period in the life of the medieval Muslim polymath, written by Los Angeles-based science writer Jennifer Ouellette... In 11th-century Egypt, Aristotle's ancient thought that visible objects and our own eyes emit rays of light to enable our vision still held... As Ouellette writes, "This is a work of fiction -- a fanciful re-imagining of a 10-year period in the life of Ibn al-Haytham, considered by many historians to be the father of modern optics. Living at the height of the golden age of Arabic science, al-Haytham developed an early version...

PreColumbian, Clovis, and PreClovis

 Prince Madoc and the Discovery of America

· 01/06/2011 9:51:05 PM PST ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 62 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 11 Oct 2010 ·
· Phil Carradice ·

Who discovered America? It's a simple question and one that usually brings the standard response - Christopher Columbus. But here in Wales we have our own theory. And that theory says that America was actually discovered 300 years before Columbus sailed "the ocean blue" in 1492 - and more importantly, that it was discovered by a Welshman. Mandan Indians used Bull Boats for transport and fishing that are identical to the Welsh coracle. The man in question was Prince Madoc, the son of Owain Gwynedd, one of the greatest and most important rulers in the country, and while the legend...

The Revolution

 Glasses Are Hoisted Once Again at Fraunces Tavern

· 01/07/2011 7:06:52 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 22 replies ·
· NY Times Blog ·
· January 6, 2011 ·
· Diane Cardwell ·

It may be almost a year later than originally expected, but Fraunces Tavern, where Gen. George Washington bade farewell to his officers at the end of the Revolutionary War and where patrons have been eating and drinking on and off since 1762, has finally taken a big leap forward in its reincarnation. The bar, operated by an Irish outfit called the Porterhouse Group, opened last night for the first time since closing in February, attracting a mellow crowd of industry insiders, people who worked on the project and longtime patrons drawn to the place's sense of history...

Early America

 Divers: 1811 wreck of Perry ship discovered off RI

· 01/07/2011 10:33:21 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 11 replies ·
· hosted ·
· Jan 7 ·
· Michelle R. Smith ·

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- A team of divers say they've discovered the remains of the USS Revenge, a ship commanded by U.S. Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry and wrecked off Rhode Island in 1811. Perry is known for defeating the British in the 1813 Battle of Lake Erie off the shores of Ohio, Michigan and Ontario in the War of 1812 and for the line "I have met the enemy and they are ours." His battle flag bore the phrase "Don't give up the ship," and to this day is a symbol of the Navy.

The Civil War

 Faces of the Civil War

· 01/08/2011 6:13:36 AM PST ·
· Posted by real saxophonist ·
· 3 replies ·
· History.com ·

Faces of the Civil War Previous Next 1 of 28 . Faces of the Civil War: The Library of Congress recently acquired a rare collection of nearly 700 Civil War-era ambrotype and tintype photographs, donated by the Liljenquist family. The collection includes photographs of Union and Confederate soldiers, as well as the women and children they left behind. (Photo Credit: Library of Congress)

The Great War

 Breakthrough as DNA identifies WW1 soldier

· 09/15/2007 8:33:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DancesWithCats ·
· 28 replies · 757+ views ·
· London Daily Telegraph ·
· Sept 16, 2007 ·
· DancesWithCats ·

By Jasper Copping Last Updated: 1:29am BST 16/09/2007 He was a young man, like so many others, who fell on the battlefield at Passchendaele. Aged just 29, Private Jack Hunter died in the arms of his younger brother, Jim, who buried him there, on the front line, in a shallow grave. Jack Hunter, who died at Passchendaele, with his brother Jim Jack Hunter, who died in the first world war, with his brother Jim Once the guns had fallen silent, Jim returned to look for his brother's body, but the ground had been chewed up by artillery and he could...

World War Eleven

 Farewell to the Soldier Who Found Hitler's Will

· 01/02/2011 7:31:40 AM PST ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 23 replies ·
· Arutz Sheva ·
· 1-2-11 ·
· Chana Ya'ar ·

The Jewish U.S. soldier who was instrumental in finding Adolf Hitler's last will and testament during World War II has died at the age of 86. Arnold Hans Weiss -- born Hans Arnold Wangersheim -- a banker and attorney who lived in Chevy Chase, Maryland, died of pneumonia. His wife predeceased him in 2005; he is survived by two sons and three grandchildren. Weiss played a pivotal role in the final days of the war as a member of a counter-intelligence unit. Together with a British intelligence officer and historian, and a second U.S. intelligence agent, Weiss helped track down...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 US Congress 1939 records foreign Arab immigration into 'vacant land' of Palestine

· 01/06/2011 6:46:29 PM PST ·
· Posted by PRePublic ·
· 15 replies ·
· US Congress [Free Israel Now, blog] ·

The following is a remarkable speech given in 1939 by John William McCormack (1891 - 1980) of Massachusetts, Representative to the House, on a 'Jewish Homeland' in Palestine. Protesting harshly the British (White Papers) restriction on Jewish immigration while Arab immigration is allowed to flow. Citing the great approval by 5 presidents and an array of high officials all praising the great achievement done by the Jews in Palestine, uplifting and up-building the land. He notices the Arab immigration of at least 150,000 (equal to that of the Jews') from neighboring countries as well as an overall rise in Arab...

Pages

 The Case of the First Mystery Novelist

· 01/07/2011 2:18:26 PM PST ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 4 replies ·
· New York Times ·
· 1/7/2010 ·

Every detective tale needs a red herring, and I had mine: What if I pursued the author of "Velvet Lawn" instead? I found that just one other work, an earlier and unpublished one, shared the same title. It was written by . . . Benjamin Disraeli. The novelist and prime minister was an intriguing suspect: authors are loath to leave good titles unused, and Saunders, Otley published some of Disraeli's books. His political career also gave him good reason for a pseudonym. Yet the mystery's style didn't match his, and it's unmentioned in his copious correspondence. I had a motive,...

Longer Perspectives

 Don Rogers: Media more slave than master

· 01/01/2011 5:48:28 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Summit Daily News ·
· Saturday, January 1, 2011 ·
· Don Rogers ·

In "Annual Editions: Archaeology (2010)," of all places, I stumbled across this: "Today the mass media is the major source of epistemology in the modern world, and it underscores cultural values and also creates cultural myths by which all humans are made to live. The media is as much a response to our demands as we are to its manipulations. ... But the media mind is characterized by fuzzy thinking and skepticism." Love it! Even misusing the word "epistemology" where I'm reasonably sure they meant to simply say "knowledge" (rather than "study of knowledge," which doesn't really make sense in...

end of digest #338 20110108


1,222 posted on 01/08/2011 8:46:38 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1218 | View Replies]

To: 1010RD; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #338 20110108
· Saturday, January 8, 2011 · 37 topics · 2653432 to 2650158 · 763 members ·

 
Saturday
Jan 08
2011
v 7
n 26

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Happy New Year!

Welcome to the 338th issue. Due to some down time during the week, it's been a little short on topics. I think. Actually, I haven't counted them yet. I know there are some oldies from the FRchives that got added in bunches. I'm about to post one more new one, but the server is taking a couple of minutes to send the edit screen. It figures, because I'm rushin' as usual.

[some time later] Okay, 37 topics. They edited together very nicely, a sort of coherent flow. Nice change from my usual.

My thanks to all those who contribute topics, and to those who posted the many thoughtful replies.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: Neville Chamberlain:
"Well, to listen to Mr. Churchill, you'd think that Hitler wanted to kill every Jew in Europe."

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,223 posted on 01/08/2011 8:48:46 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1222 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

“...coherent flow. Nice change from my usual.” Your minimum is infinitely superior to some folks’ max! Walk in beauty, my Brother.


1,224 posted on 01/08/2011 7:55:18 PM PST by Silentgypsy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1223 | View Replies]

To: Silentgypsy

Thanks SG!


1,225 posted on 01/09/2011 3:27:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1224 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #339
Saturday, January 15, 2011

Climate

 Russian team prepares to penetrate Lake Vostok

· 01/09/2011 8:43:41 AM PST ·
· Posted by BenLurkin ·
· 32 replies ·
· wired ·
· 07 January 11 ·
· Duncan Geere ·

Lake Vostok, which has been sealed off from the world for 14 million years, is about to be penetrated by a Russian drill bit. The lake, which lies four kilometres below the icy surface of Antarctica, is unique in that it's been completely isolated from the other 150 subglacial lakes on the continent for such a long time. It's also oligotropic, meaning that it's supersaturated with oxygen -- levels of the element are 50 times higher than those found in most typical freshwater lakes. Since 1990, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute in St Petersberg in Russia has been drilling...

Roman Empire

 Climate Changes Linked to Fall of Roman Empire

· 01/14/2011 5:02:29 AM PST ·
· Posted by Oldeconomybuyer ·
· 41 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· January 14, 2011 ·
· By Emily Sohn ·

A prolonged period of wet weather spurred the spread of the Bubonic plague in medieval times, according to a new study. And a 300-year spell of unpredictable weather coincided with the decline of the Roman Empire. Climate change wasn't necessarily the cause of these and other major historical events, researchers say. But the study offers the most detailed picture yet of how climate and society have been intertwined for millennia. Again and again, the data suggest, climate has impacted culture in dramatic ways. Unusually extreme and frequent shifts in weather patterns between 250 and 550, for example, coincided with a...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Dying young did not cause Neanderthals' demise

· 01/10/2011 3:37:03 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 24 replies ·
· AFP ·
· January 10, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

WASHINGTON (AFP) -- Dying young was not likely the reason Neanderthals went extinct, said a study out Monday that suggests early modern humans had about the same life expectancy as their hairier, ancient cousins. Scientists have puzzled over why the Neanderthals disappeared just as modern humans were making huge gains and moving into new parts of Africa and Europe, and some have speculated that a difference in longevity may have been to blame. If anything, higher fertility rates and lower infant mortality gave modern humans an advantage over the Neanderthals, who died off about 30,000 years ago, said the study...


 The Neanderthal Nose Enigma: Why So Big?

· 01/14/2011 4:16:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 50 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· January 14, 2011 ·
· Charles Q. Choi ·

A mystery of Neanderthals for more than a century is one that's literally as plain as the noses on their faces - why did they have such big schnozes? One common answer suggests their faces somehow helped our extinct relatives deal with the extreme cold they faced. Now, however, scientists find that Neanderthal faces were not built for the cold - meaning that no one still knows why Neanderthals had such noses. The enigma that such a large nose poses is that it seems like an excellent way to lose heat - a paradox, given that Neanderthals lived when glaciers...

Australia & the Pacific

 Secrets of the stones (Amazing Discovery in Australia!)

· 03/18/2003 6:22:49 AM PST ·
· Posted by vannrox ·
· 35 replies · 785+ views ·
· SMH(ABC's Catalyst program) ·
· March 13 2003 ·
· Graham Phillips ·

Secrets of the stones March 13 2003 For nearly 8000 years, the Gunditjmara people of western Victoria farmed eels. They modified more than 100 square kilometres of the landscape, constructing artificial ponds across the grassy wetlands and digging channels to interconnect them. They exported their produce and became an important part of the local economy. And then white settlers arrived and all they left of the Gunditjmara's thriving industry were several hundred piles of stones that had formed the foundations to the people's huts. Since the 1970s, archaeologists have suspected that the stone remains in the Lake Condah region were...

Prehistory & Origins

 Ancient farmers swiftly spread westward

· 01/15/2011 7:18:08 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· Science News ·
· January 29th, 2011 ·
· Bruce Bower ·

Croatia does not have a reputation as a hotbed of ancient agriculture. But new excavations, described January 7 in San Antonio at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, unveil a Mediterranean Sea-hugging strip of southern Croatia as a hub for early farmers who spread their sedentary lifestyle from the Middle East into Europe. Farming villages sprouted swiftly in this coastal region, called Dalmatia, nearly 8,000 years ago, apparently with the arrival of Middle Easterners already adept at growing crops and herding animals, says archaeologist Andrew Moore of Rochester Institute of Technology in New York... Plant cultivation and...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 At 6,000 years old, wine press is oldest yet found

· 01/11/2011 10:39:07 AM PST ·
· Posted by La Lydia ·
· 36 replies ·
· Yahoo News ·
· January 11, 2011 ·
· Maggie Fox ·

Archeologists have unearthed the oldest wine-making facility ever found, using biochemical techniques to identify a dry red vintage made about 6,000 years ago in what is now southern Armenia. The excavation paints a picture of a complex society where mourners tasted a special vintage made at a caveside cemetery, the researchers reported on Tuesday in the Journal of Archaeological Science. "This is the world's oldest known installation to make wine," Gregory Areshian of the University of California Los Angeles, who helped lead the study, said ... Carbon dating showed a desiccated grape vine found near a wine press was grown...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Is there a genius in all of us?

· 01/13/2011 3:39:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 33 replies ·
· BBC ·
· January 12, 2011 ·
· David Shenk ·

Where do athletic and artistic abilities come from? With phrases like "gifted musician", "natural athlete" and "innate intelligence", we have long assumed that talent is a genetic thing some of us have and others don't. But new science suggests the source of abilities is much more interesting and improvisational. It turns out that everything we are is a developmental process and this includes what we get from our genes. A century ago, geneticists saw genes as robot actors, always uttering the same lines in exactly the same way, and much of the public is still stuck with this old idea....

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Effective use of power in the Bronze Age societies of Central Europe

· 01/11/2011 7:00:06 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 13 replies ·
· University of Gothenburg ·
· January 11, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

During the first part of the Bronze Age in the Carpathian Basin in Central Europe, a large proportion of the population lived in what are known as tell-building societies. A thesis in archaeology from the University of Gothenburg shows that the leaders of these societies had the ability to combine several sources of power in an effective way in order to dominate the rest of the population, which contributed towards creating a notably stable social system. Tell-building societies are named after a distinct form of settlements with a high density of population and construction, which over the course of time...

Egypt

 Egypt Threatens Removal of Ancient Central Park Obelisk

· 01/08/2011 3:58:28 PM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 44 replies ·
· livescience ·
· 06 January 2011 ·
· Andrea Leontiou ·

Since 1881, the obelisk known as Cleopatra's Needle has stood in New York's Central Park, but a letter from the secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities indicates that this may change if the monument is not taken better care of. Recently, Zahi Hawass, the aforementioned secretary general and archaeologist, wrote to the Central Park Conservancy and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to inform them that if steps are not taken to protect the obelisk, it would be removed. "I am glad that this monument has become such an integral part of New York City, but I am...

The Revolution

 Today in History January 14th 1784
  Revolutionary War ends; Congress ratifies Treaty of Paris


· 01/14/2011 4:14:24 PM PST ·
· Posted by mdittmar ·
· 5 replies ·
· various ·
· January 14th 2011 ·
· various ·

The Definitive Treaty of Peace 1783 In the name of the most holy and undivided Trinity. It having pleased the Divine Providence to dispose the hearts of the most serene and most potent Prince George the Third, by the grace of God, king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, duke of Brunswick and Lunebourg, arch- treasurer and prince elector of the Holy Roman Empire etc., and of the United States of America, to forget all past misunderstandings and differences that have unhappily interrupted the good correspondence and friendship which they mutually wish to restore, and to...

The War of 1812

 196 Years Ago - The American Agincourt and Thermopylae

· 01/08/2011 7:45:49 AM PST ·
· Posted by SES1066 ·
· 25 replies ·
· Self ·
· 01/08/2011 ·
· Self ·

Like so many other things in history, the further back that they are, the more we take them for granted. In this case, it would be a mistake to not reflect upon this 196th Anniversary of the "Battle of New Orleans" and the fact that it could be referred to as the United States' "Agincourt". The British military intent in the "War of 1812" was to emasculate their former North American Colonies by shutting off their abilities to trade with the rest of the world. The British were flush from completing the defeat of Napoleon and had the experienced and...


 The War of 1812 revisited

· 09/28/2007 7:17:34 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Squawk 8888 ·
· 160 replies · 739+ views ·
· National Post ·
· September 28, 2007 ·
· Chris Wattie ·

As early preparations for the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 get underway in Canada and the United States, organizers in Canada have run into an unexpected hitch: Their American counterparts seem to think they won. The historical disconnect between American and Canadian interpretations of the war, during which tens of thousands of American troops invaded Canada - then still a British colony - and were repulsed by the outnumbered defenders, has left Canadian organizers of the bicentennial events shaking their heads in bemusement at their American colleagues' staunch insistence that the war was a victory for the then-young...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Mammoth 'could be reborn in four years'

· 01/13/2011 7:32:15 PM PST ·
· Posted by Nachum ·
· 75 replies ·
· Telegraph [UK] ·
· 1/13/11 ·
· Julian Ryall ·

The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years thanks to a breakthrough in cloning technology. Previous efforts in the 1990s to recover nuclei in cells from the skin and muscle tissue from mammoths found in the Siberian permafrost failed because they had been too badly damaged by the extreme cold. But a technique pioneered in 2008 by Dr. Teruhiko Wakayama, of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, was successful in cloning a mouse from the cells of another mouse that had been frozen for 16 years.


 Mammoth 'could be reborn in four years'

· 01/14/2011 12:08:20 AM PST ·
· Posted by bogusname ·
· 33 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 13 Jan 2011 ·
· Julian Ryall ·

The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years thanks to a breakthrough in cloning technology.

Paleontology

 Fossil fuels age debate (560 million year old vertebrate)

· 10/22/2003 6:31:11 AM PDT ·
· Posted by dead ·
· 68 replies · 604+ views ·
· Sydney Morning Herald ·
· October 22, 2003 ·

A fossil, believed to be the oldest vertebrate ever found, has been uncovered in South Australia. The five-centimetre fossil, which looks like an elongated tadpole and is believed to be at least 560 million years old, was unearthed in sandstone by station owner Ross Fargher at a secret location in SA's Flinders Ranges. The SA Museum today said the fossil was part of a marine animal known as the Ediacara Chordate. The Ediacara Chordate discovered in South Australia.Photo: South Australian Museum A fin on its back, a set of inclined muscle bars and a head were clearly visible, the museum...

end of digest #339 20110115


1,226 posted on 01/15/2011 12:41:51 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1222 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #339 20110115
· Saturday, January 15, 2011 · 16 topics · 2657396 to 2653433 · 763 members ·

 
Saturday
Jan 15
2011
v 7
n 27

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Happy New Year!

Welcome to the 339th issue. A tiny 16 topic digest.

My thanks to all those who contribute topics, and to those who posted the many thoughtful replies.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: From Frontpage Interview with Dr. Theodore Dalrymple:
Our Culture, What's Left Of It
[August 31, 2005]:
Political correctness is communist propaganda writ small. In my study of communist societies, I came to the conclusion that the purpose of communist propaganda was not to persuade or convince, nor to inform, but to humiliate; and therefore, the less it corresponded to reality the better. When people are forced to remain silent when they are being told the most obvious lies, or even worse when they are forced to repeat the lies themselves, they lose once and for all their sense of probity. To assent to obvious lies is to co-operate with evil, and in some small way to become evil oneself. One's standing to resist anything is thus eroded, and even destroyed. A society of emasculated liars is easy to control. I think if you examine political correctness, it has the same effect and is intended to."

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,227 posted on 01/15/2011 12:48:36 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1226 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #340
Saturday, January 8, 2011

Brewing

 Reviving the taste of an Iron Age beer
  [ancient Celtic malt beverage]


· 01/18/2011 6:27:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Friday, January 14th, 2011 ·
· Bruce Bower ·

At the Celtic site, barley was soaked in the specially constructed ditches until it sprouted, Stika proposes. Grains were then dried by lighting fires at the ends of the ditches, giving the malt a smoky taste and a darkened color. Lactic acid bacteria stimulated by slow drying of soaked grains, a well-known phenomenon, added sourness to the brew. Unlike modern beers that are flavored with flowers of the hop plant, the Eberdingen-Hochdorf brew probably contained spices such as mugwort, carrot seeds or henbane, in Stika's opinion. Beer makers are known to have used these additives by medieval times. Excavations at...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Livestock and people in a Middle Chalcolithic settlement...

· 01/18/2011 7:02:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Antiquity ·
· Vol 84:326, 2010 pp 1123-1134 ·
· Emily M. Hubbard ·

Round and rectangular buildings with grain silos at a Copper Age site in Israel suggested social stratification to the excavators. Using micromorphology, the author demonstrates that while the rectangular building was occupied by people, the round ones had contained animals, perhaps as providers of milk, and dung for fuel. While this removes the direct indication of social variance, it strengthens the argument that animals, as well as grain, formed the basis for the creation of surplus.

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Remains Of Oldest Fruit Trees In Iberian Peninsula Found

· 01/18/2011 6:31:05 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Arch News ·
· Friday, January 14, 2011 ·
· Stephen Russell ·

This research has enabled the recording of numerous fleshy fruits such as plums of various types, cherries, peaches, sloes, grapes, apples, figs, quince and medlar and, in a token manner, olives. The overall collection of nuts is interesting, significant being the presence of hazel nuts, acorns, walnuts, pine kernels and, sporadically, beechnuts. As regards cereals, wheat, barley and oats have been identified. Also of particular important are the various seeds of the bottle (or calabash) gourd, a species of water pumpkin, very rarely recorded in archaeological contexts.

Climate

 BBC:Roman Rise, Fall 'Recorded in Trees'
  (Climate Change Led to Fall of Empire)


· 01/16/2011 9:19:55 AM PST ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 60 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· January 14, 2010 ·
· Mark Kinver ·

An extensive study of tree growth rings says there could be a link between the rise and fall of past civilisations and sudden shifts in Europe's climate. A team of researchers based their findings on data from 9,000 wooden artifacts from the past 2,500 years. They found that periods of warm, wet summers coincided with prosperity, while political turmoil occurred during times of climate instability. The findings have been published online by the journal Science. "Looking back on 2,500 years, there are examples where climate change impacted human history," co-author Ulf Buntgen, a paleoclimatologist at the Swiss Federal Research Institute...


 Fall of Rome Recorded in Trees

· 01/18/2011 10:49:18 PM PST ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 38 replies ·
· ScienceNOW ·
· 13 January 2011 ·
· Andrew Curry ·

Enlarge Image Preserved. Climate changes recorded in tree rings correlate with important events in European history, such as the Black Death. Credit: Wikimedia When empires rise and fall and plagues sweep over the land, people have traditionally cursed the stars. But perhaps they should blame the weather. A new analysis of European tree-ring samples suggests that mild summers may have been the key to the rise of the Roman Empire‚Ä"and that prolonged droughts, cold snaps, and other climate changes might have played a part in historical upheavals, from the barbarian invasions that brought about Rome's collapse to the Black...

Roman Empire

 Caligula Statue Hints at Lavish Villa

· 01/18/2011 5:43:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 43 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Tuesday, January 18, 2011 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Italian police might have found intriguing evidence pointing to the long-lost villa of the incestuous and lunatic emperor Caligula, according to a report by the Italian daily Corriere della Sera. The special art squad police arrested last week near Lake Nemi, south of Rome, a man trying to load part of an eight-foot-tall statue onto his truck... Thought to be worth about $1.6 million, the statue would represent Caligula sitting on the throne as the god Jupiter, supporting the theory that the insane and capricious emperor, who is said to have made his favorite horse Incitatus a senator, believed himself...


 Caligula's tomb found after police arrest man trying to smuggle statue

· 01/18/2011 6:29:08 PM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 15 replies ·
· Guardian UK ·
· Mon 17 Jan 2011 20.10 GMT ·
· Tom Kington in Rome ·

Police arrest tomb raider loading part of 2.5 metre statue into lorry near Lake Nemi, south of Rome, where Caligula had a villa. The lost tomb of Caligula has been found, according to Italian police, after the arrest of a man trying to smuggle abroad a statue of the notorious Roman emperor recovered from the site After reportedly sleeping with his sisters, killing for pleasure and seeking to appoint his horse a consul during his rule from AD37 to 41, Caligula was described by contemporaries as insane With many of Caligula's monuments destroyed after he was killed by his Praetorian...

On the Same Page

 Forget Mars and Venus: men and woman are on the same planet

· 01/17/2011 3:08:57 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Telegraph.co.uk ·
· December 30, 2010 ·
· Richard Alleyne ·

The 20th century adage that "Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus" is a myth, according to new research suggesting that our brains are wired exactly the same way when it comes to love. The self-help bestseller, published in 1992, suggested that when it came to relationships men and women thought and acted very differently -- in other words it was as if they came from different planets. But new scientific research shows we actually act very similarly when we are in love -- whether we are male, female, heterosexual or homosexual. Professor Semir Zeki and John Romaya at...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Museum of Science explores science, concept of race
  (race doesn't exist, according to Liberals)


· 01/20/2011 11:23:52 AM PST ·
· Posted by pabianice ·
· 27 replies ·
· MetroWest Daily ·
· 1/20/11 ·
· Bergeron ·

"...Combining scientific, anthropological and historical evidence, the exhibit argues the fundamental concept of race and racial differences has no biological basis but is a man-made distinction with immeasurable social consequences over the centuries. Developed by the American Anthropological Association and Science Museum of Minnesota, "Race" invites visitors to examine race and racism through exhibits, interactive stations and artifacts..."

Prehistory & Origins

 The 30,000 Year Old Cave that Descends into Hell

· 01/21/2011 2:53:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 57 replies ·
· Gizmodo ·
· 1-20-2011 ·
· Jesus Diaz ·

There's a cave in France where no humans have been in 26,000 years. The walls are full of fantastic, perfectly-preserved paintings of animals, ending in a chamber full of monsters 1312-feet underground, where CO2 and radon gas concentrations provoke hallucinations. It's called the the Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave, a really weird and mysterious place. The walls contain hundreds of animals -- like the typical Paleolithic horses and bisons -- but some of them are not supposed to be there, like lions, panthers, rhinos and hyenas. A few are not even supposed to exist, like weird butterflyish animals or chimerical figures half bison half woman. These may...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 34,000-year-old bacteria discovered...and it's still alive

· 01/19/2011 5:36:07 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· Christian Science Monitor ·
· January 13, 2011 ·
· Andrea Mustain ·

Salt crystals grow very quickly, imprisoning whatever happens to be floating -- or living -- nearby inside tiny bubbles just a few microns across, akin to naturally made, miniature snow-globes... Lowenstein said new research indicates this process occurs in modern saline lakes, further backing up Schubert's astounding discovery, which was first revealed about a year ago... Schubert, now an assistant researcher at the University of Hawaii, said the bacteria -- a salt-loving sort still found on Earth today -- were shrunken and small, and suspended in a kind of hibernation state... The key to the microbes' millennia-long survival may be...

Brick (dah dah dah dah) House

 A New Way to Date Old Ceramics

· 01/19/2011 2:49:11 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· Michigan Tech News ·
· January 10, 2011 ·
· Marcia Goodrich ·

Patrick Bowen, a senior majoring in materials science and engineering at Michigan Technological University, is refining a new way of dating ceramic artifacts that could one day shave thousands of dollars off the cost of doing archaeological research. Called rehydroxylation dating, the technique was recently developed by researchers at the University of Manchester and the University of Edinburgh. It takes advantage of ceramics' predictable tendency to bond chemically with water over time. ...First, dry the sample at 105 degrees Celcius. This removes any dampness that the ceramic might have absorbed. Then, weigh the sample and put it in a furnace...

The Greeks

 2,100 year-old Greek coin may have marked rare astronomical event

· 01/17/2011 9:57:11 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 36 replies ·
· Unreported Heritage News ·
· Friday, January 14, 2011 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

New research suggests that this coin marks an eclipse of Jupiter by the moon. It happened on January 17, 121 BC and was visible in Antioch, the capital of the Seleucid Empire. The coin itself show Zeus with a crescent moon above his head and a star like object hovering above the palm of his right hand... On one side is a portrait of Antiochos VIII, the king who minted it. On the reverse is a depiction of Zeus, either nude or half-draped, holding a sceptre in his left hand. Above the god's head is the crescent of the moon,...

Faith & Philosophy

 King James Bible: How it changed the way we speak (and how it didn't)

· 01/17/2011 4:13:05 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 16 replies ·
· BBC ·
· January 17, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

The impact of the King James Bible, which was published 400 years ago, is still being felt in the way we speak and write, says Stephen Tomkins.No other book, or indeed any piece of culture, seems to have influenced the English language as much as the King James Bible. Its turns of phrase have permeated the everyday language of English speakers, whether or not they've ever opened a copy. The Sun says Aston Villa "refused to give up the ghost". Wendy Richard calls her EastEnders character Pauline Fowler "the salt of the earth". The England cricket coach tells reporters, "You...

Epigraphy & Language

 Who Invented the Alphabet: The Semites or the Greeks?

· 01/17/2011 6:27:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 49 replies ·
· Archaeolgy Odyssey ·
· Winter 1998 ·
· Barry B. Powell ·

I would make the startling suggestion that the alphabet was invented by a single human being, who created this remarkable technology to record the Greek hexameters of the poet we call Homer. Certainly everyone agrees that the invention of the alphabet made possible the development of philosophy, science and democracy, some of the finest achievements in the history of human culture. But who invented the alphabet? Was it really the Semitic-speaking Phoenicians, as many of us learned in grammar school? Or was it actually the Greeks, to whom the Phoenicians supposedly passed it? I don't believe the Phoenicians actually had...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 A Is for Ancient, Describing an Alphabet Found Near Jerusalem

· 11/09/2005 10:22:28 AM PST ·
· Posted by Sabramerican ·
· 18 replies · 919+ views ·
· New York Times ·
· November 9, 2005 ·
· John Noble Wilford ·

In the 10th century B.C., in the hill country south of Jerusalem, a scribe carved his A B C's on a limestone boulder - actually, his aleph-beth-gimel's, for the string of letters appears to be an early rendering of the emergent Hebrew alphabet. Archaeologists digging in July at the site, Tel Zayit, found the inscribed stone in the wall of an ancient building. After an analysis of the layers of ruins, the discoverers concluded that this was the earliest known specimen of the Hebrew alphabet and...

Asia

 Co Loa: an investigation of Vietnam's ancient capital

· 01/18/2011 7:04:57 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Antiquity ·
· Vol 84:326, 2010 pp 1011-1027 ·
· Nam C. Kim, Lai Van Toi, Trinh Hoang Hiep ·

History, legend and memory have long pointed to Co Loa, an earthwork enclosure outside Hanoi, as the seat of an indigenous power that gave identity to the people of the Bac Bo region, north Vietnam. Survey, excavation and a set of radiocarbon dates now put this site on the historical map. The main rampart of the middle circuit was built in the later centuries BC, before the coming of Han Imperial China. Nor was this rampart the first defence. The authors show the potential of archaeology for revealing the creation and development of a polity among the prosperous people of...

Egypt

 Did the ancient Egyptians know of pygmy mammoths? Well, there is that tomb painting.

· 01/20/2011 6:38:56 AM PST ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 22 replies ·
· Tetrapod Zoology ·
· 19 Jan 2011 ·
· Darren Naish ·

One of the things that came up in the many comments appended to the article on Bob's painting of extinct Maltese animals was the famous Egyptian tomb painting of the 'pygmy mammoth'. You're likely already familiar with this (now well known) case: here's the image, as it appears on the beautifully decorated tomb wall of Rekhmire, 'Governor of the Town' of Thebes, and vizier of Egypt during the reigns of Tuthmose III and Amenhotep II (c. 1479 to 1401 BCE) during the XVIII dynasty... In 1994, Baruch Rosen published a brief article in Nature in which he drew attention to...

PreColumbian, Clovis, and PreClovis

 Researchers aim to resurrect mammoth in five years

· 01/17/2011 7:17:28 PM PST ·
· Posted by Germanicus Cretorian ·
· 62 replies ·
· Yahoo/AFP ·
· Jan. 17 ·
· Shingo Ito ·

Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time. The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported. "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily. Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an elephant's egg cell...


 Researchers aim to resurrect Mammoth in five years

· 01/18/2011 8:21:13 AM PST ·
· Posted by Scythian ·
· 48 replies ·
· YahooNews ·

TOKYO (AFP) -- Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time. The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported. "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily. Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an...

Navigation

 Blackbeard's Sword?

· 01/17/2011 3:51:15 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 41 replies ·
· National Geographic Society ·
· January 12, 2011 ·
· Willie Drye ·

Could this partly gilded hilt have held Blackbeard's sword? There's no way to know for sure, though it was found amid the North Carolina wreck of the Queen Anne's Revenge, the flagship of the infamous 18th-century pirate... After running aground on a sandbar in 1718 near the town of Beaufort, the ship was abandoned but likely remained intact and partly above water for as long as a year before collapsing and disintegrating... The newfound hilt may have been left behind because it was unwanted, or it may have been inaccessible, according to Moore's colleague Wendy Welsh, a conservator on the...

The General

 George Washington: The Reluctant President

· 01/20/2011 8:29:26 AM PST ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 6 replies ·
· Smithsonian Magazine ·
· Feb 2011 ·
· Ron Chernow ·

It seemed as if everyone rejoiced at the election of our first chief executive except the man himself Even as the Constitution was being ratified, Americans looked toward a figure of singular probity to fill the new office of the presidency. On February 4, 1789, the 69 members of the Electoral College made George Washington the only chief executive to be unanimously elected. Congress was supposed to make the choice official that March but could not muster a quorum until April. The reason -- bad roads -- suggests the condition of the country Washington would lead. In a new biography, Washington: A Life, Ron...

Pages

 War in the Wilderness [Book Review of George Washington's First War]

· 01/20/2011 5:29:35 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 29 replies ·
· Wall St Journal ·
· Jan 20, 2011 ·
· Stephen Brumwell ·

A callow youngster's thirst for honor triggered the Seven Years' War. Unlike many of his fellow Founding Fathers, George Washington never wrote an autobiography...His sole effort at memoir emerged from notes he wrote clarifying points for a proposed biography by a former aide and trusted friend, David Humphreys. These "Remarks" were written in 1787-88, when Washington was in his mid-50s and pondering the daunting prospect of becoming the first president....Washington chose to reminisce about the five years when he had labored as a loyal subject of the British Empire to thwart French designs on the Ohio Valley. In late 1753,...

The Revolution

 Meigs native recounts controversy over battle [WV]

· 01/21/2011 5:55:54 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 31 replies ·
· Parkersburg News and Sentinel ·
· January 21, 2011 ·
· Jess Mancini ·

PARKERSBURG - A Meigs County native has written a book about the Battle of Point Pleasant and whether it was the first fought in the Revolutionary War. Charles S. Badgley of the Badgley Publishing Co., Canal Winchester, Ohio, says he often heard while growing up along the river in Meigs County that the battle was the first in the war, the basis of his most recent novel, "A Point of Controversy." Conventional wisdom was the battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775 were the first in the war of independence. "The controversy has been around a long time, it actually...


 Give back Valley Forge, Rendell says

· 12/21/2005 4:39:42 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 54 replies · 1,327+ views ·
· Philadelphia Inquirer ·
· Dec. 21, 2005 ·
· Nancy Petersen ·

Maintenance complaints and obstacles to a new museum prompted his letter to the Interior Department. In 1976, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania sold Valley Forge State Park to the federal government for $1. Now the state may want it back. Angry over inadequate maintenance and the federal government's failure to approve plans for a new museum at Valley Forge National Historical Park, Gov. Rendell wrote to Interior Secretary Gale Norton last week offering a do-over. If the United States "is unwilling or unable to protect and preserve Valley Forge... the commonwealth is prepared to accept that responsibility," Rendell wrote. "One option...

The Civil War

 Amazing Original Photographs from the Civil War

· 01/19/2011 3:36:51 PM PST ·
· Posted by navysealdad ·
· 29 replies ·
· Angelfire ·

These are pretty amazing considering they were taken up to 145 years ago: A compendium of photos from the Civil War era. Truly fortunate that so many of these have survived.


 Amazing Original Photographs from the Civil War

· 06/28/2010 6:26:36 PM PDT ·
· Posted by navysealdad ·
· 69 replies · 3+ views ·
· Angelfire ·

Whether you like history or not... These are pretty amazing considering they were taken up to 145 years ago: A compendium of photos from the Civil War era. Truly fortunate that so many of these have survived. Probably a million wet plate photos were made during the civil war on glass plate. Popular during the war, they lost their appeal afterwards and so many were sold for the glass.


 Original Photographs from the Civil War

· 03/21/2010 2:21:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by navysealdad ·
· 29 replies · 1,527+ views ·
· Angelfire ·

These are pretty amazing considering they were taken up to 145 years ago: A compendium of photos from the Civil War era. Truly fortunate that so many of these have survived. Probably a million wet plate photos were made during the civil war on glass plate. Popular during the war, they lost their appeal afterwards and so many were sold for the glass.

World War Eleven

Revealed: How even German civilians took part
  in killing concentration camp survivors


· 01/17/2011 2:18:57 PM PST ·
· Posted by Nachum ·
· 141 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 1/17/11 ·
· Allan Hall ·

A new book about the closing days of WW2 chronicles how German civilians murdered many concentration camp survivors as they moved through their towns and villages on infamous 'death marches' back into the shrinking Reich. The violence shows how even with their nation in ruins, the Allies advancing on all fronts and the war hopeless, ordinary people were so indoctrinated with Nazi hate they were prepared to kill defenceless people in cold blood.

Obituary

 Man who notified world of Pearl Harbor attack dies

· 01/18/2011 4:20:20 PM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 12 replies ·
· hosted ·
· Jan 18 ·

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) -- Ed Chlapowski, the man who notified the world that Pearl Harbor was being bombed by the Japanese, has died at 88. The former Navy radio man's family said he died Sunday at his home in Billings a few weeks after being diagnosed with cancer.

Sticky, Sticky

 92nd anniversary of the Great Boston Molasses Flood

· 01/19/2011 6:29:25 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 39 replies ·
· Dateline Zero ·
· Sunday, January 16, 2011 ·
· Daniel La Ponsie ·

Yesterday was the 92nd anniversary of one of the strangest tragedies ever to take place on American soil. It's the stuff of Weekly World News or The Onion. Yet it was a very real, deadly, (and delicious) disaster. To this day on hot summer days in an old Boston neighborhood, residents swear that they can smell a vague odor of molasses. It's a sweet-smelling reminder of a day when some 150 people were injured; 21 people and several horses were killed by a sudden flood of molasses... Purity Distilling Company was doing big business. A large quantity of stored molasses...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 New Jersey Historical Society is criticized
  for selling historical collection in effort to raise funds


· 01/15/2011 5:14:47 PM PST ·
· Posted by Coleus ·
· 18 replies ·
· the star ledger ·
· January 13, 2011 ·
· Peggy McGlone ·

The New Jersey Historical Society has sold one of its prized possessions -- an incredibly rare, hand-colored map of the United States from 1784 -- because the Newark institution is hard up for cash. But in the museum world, some experts are calling the sale unethical because museums are not supposed to sell their treasures to raise money. The Abel Buell map, which brought in almost $2.1 million at the Christie's auction, was described by a cartography expert as "one of the most coveted of all American maps." It is the first map of United State published in America, the...

end of digest #340 20110122


1,228 posted on 01/22/2011 8:42:58 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #340 20110122
· Saturday, January 22, 2011 · 31 topics · 2660472 to 2657612 · 764 members ·

 
Saturday
Jan 22
2011
v 7
n 28

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Happy New Year!

Welcome to the 338th issue. A couple weeks ago we passed the halfway point through the seventh year of the Digest version of GGG, which means this was handed off to me over six and a half years ago. It doesn't seem possible.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged, by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions, even on important subjects, which I once thought right but found to be otherwise. -- Benjamin Franklin

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,229 posted on 01/22/2011 8:45:14 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: Silentgypsy

:’) Thanks Silentgypsy. I appear to have not done issue #340. Or, maybe the database took down more than just my drivel.


1,230 posted on 01/29/2011 8:51:06 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #341
Saturday, January 29, 2011

Asia

 Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror?

· 01/24/2011 3:54:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by Fractal Trader ·
· 77 replies ·
· Mother Nature Network ·
· 24 January 2011 ·
· Bryan Nelson ·

Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Earn Points What's this? Comments (21) Email Facebook Twitter Stumble Digg Share Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion actually cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how exactly did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card?...


 Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror?
  (Mongol invasion scrubbed 700 million tons of carbon)


· 01/25/2011 9:08:45 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 35 replies ·
· Mother Nature Network ·
· 01/25/2011 ·
· Bryan Nelson ·

Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card? The reality may be a bit difficult for today's environmentalists to stomach, but Khan...


 Genghis Khan--environmentalist
  (Mass slaughter appears to be an environmental plus)


· 01/26/2011 7:17:45 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 22 replies ·
· American Thinker ·
· 01/26/2011 ·
· Ethel C. Fenig ·

Environmentalists have a new role model--Genghis Khan. According to this report in England's Daily Mail , Khan was a real greenie whose actions during his long career ultimately improved the atmosphere and reforested the land. But...but...some might sputter, he was an incredibly cruel, murdering invader--not an environmentalist! Uh, well yes on all counts; that's how he improved the environment. Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest.The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th...

Climate

 Commentary- Hansen Draft Paper:
  Paleoclimate Implications for Human-Made Climate Change


· 01/24/2011 1:21:37 PM PST ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 17 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· January 24, 2011 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

Precession of Earth's rotational axis due to the tidal force raised on Earth by the gravity of the Moon and Sun. -- As the saying goes:"If all you have in your hand is a hammer, then everything looks like a nail".It is hopeless to expect that Hansen could possibly analyze data objectively -- all he has in his head is "CO2 climate forcing" and everything else has to be "forced" into that ridiculous paradigm. It makes no difference to him that the predictions...


 Easterbrook on the magnitude of Greenland GISP2 ice core data

· 01/24/2011 9:39:00 PM PST ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 26 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· January 24, 2011 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

The GISP2 Greenland ice core has proven to be a great source of climatic data from the geologic past. Ancient temperatures can be measured using oxygen isotopes in the ice and ages can be determined from annual dust accumulation layers in the ice. The oxygen isotope ratios of thousands of ice core samples were measured by Minze Stuiver and Peter Grootes at the University of Washington (1993, 1999) and these data have become a world standard.The ratio of 18O to 16O depends on...


 New paleo reconstruction shows warmer periods in Alaska over the past 3000 years

· 01/29/2011 6:52:36 AM PST ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 13 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· January 29, 2011 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

For those worried about tundra melt and methane outgassing, this study might dampen those worries a bit. A new peer-reviewed study by Clegg et al. demonstrates that modern global warming is significantly less than the global warming experienced in the higher latitudes, specifically Alaska, during the summers of the last 3,000 years. It demonstrate that the Current Warm Period (CWP) is not unprecedented, at least for Alaska. The authors suggest a tie in to solar variability.From CO2 science:What was done The authors conducted a high-resolution analysis of midge assemblages found in the sediments of Moose Lake (61°22.45'N, 143°35.93'W) in the...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Clovis Find Reveals Humans Hunted Gompotheres in North America

· 01/26/2011 7:57:13 AM PST ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 21 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 1-25-2011 ·

Mexican archaeologists found three projectile points from the Clovis culture, associated with remains of a Gomphotheres -- a now extinct type of elephant - dating back at least 12,000 years, in northern Sonora. The find is of major importance, as this is the first evidence in North America that this animal was contemporary with early humans. The location and date of these remains opens the possibility that in North America the Gomphotheres was still alive, in contrast with previous theories that suggest it had disappeared 30,000 years previously. The finds were made in early January at the site of "World's...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Genetic Origin of Cultivated Citrus Determined: Researchers Find
  Evidence of Origins of Orange, Lime, Lemon, Grapefruit, Other Citrus Species


· 01/26/2011 5:47:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 44 replies ·
· Sciencedaily ·
· 01-26-2011 ·
· Staff ·

Citrus species are among the most important fruit trees in the world. Citrus has a long history of cultivation, often thought to be more than 4,000 years. Until now, however, the exact genetic origins of cultivated citrus such as sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), lemon (C. limon), and grapefruit (C. paradisi) have been a mystery. A team of researchers from China has published a study in the Journal of the American Society of Horticultural Science that provides genetic evidence of the origins of a variety species of today's cultivated citrus. The research team, led by Zhiqin Zhou from Southwest University, analyzed...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 Genetic sequencing alone doesn't offer a true picture of human disease

· 01/23/2011 3:33:17 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 28 replies ·
· Duke University Medical Center ·
· January 23, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

DURHAM, N.C. -- Despite what you might have heard, genetic sequencing alone is not enough to understand human disease. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have shown that functional tests are absolutely necessary to understand the biological relevance of the results of sequencing studies as they relate to disease, using a suite of diseases known as the ciliopathies which can cause patients to have many different traits. "Right now the paradigm is to sequence a number of patients and see what may be there in terms of variants," said Nicholas Katsanis, Ph.D. "The key finding of this study says that...

Africa

 Humans 'left Africa much earlier'

· 01/27/2011 4:03:33 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 82 replies ·
· BBC ·
· January 27, 2011 ·
· Paul Rincon ·

Modern humans may have emerged from Africa up to 50,000 years earlier than previously thought, a study suggests.Researchers have uncovered stone tools in the Arabian peninsula that they say were made by modern humans about 125,000 years ago. The tools were unearthed at the site of Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates, a team reports in the journal Science. The results are controversial: genetic data strongly points to an exodus from Africa 60,000-70,000 years ago. Simon Armitage, from Royal Holloway, University of London, Hans-Peter Uerpmann, from the University of Tuebingen, Germany, and colleagues, uncovered 125,000-year-old stone tools at Jebel...

Prehistory & Origins

 Humans Would Beat Neanderthals In Marathon

· 01/29/2011 4:56:25 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 35 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Jan 28, 2011 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Humans, versus other great apes, are built for running fast and long as opposed to very impressive strength, but what about Neanderthals? If a modern human and a Neanderthal competed in a marathon, who would win? (Comparison of Neanderthal and Modern Human skeletons. Credit: K. Mowbray, Reconstruction: G. Sawyer and B. Maley, Copyright: Ian Tattersall) In a short sprint, the Neanderthal might have had a chance, but most fit humans would always win longer races, suggests new research accepted for publication in the Journal of Human Evolution. Anthropologist David Raichlen of the University of Arizona and his colleagues determined that...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Lawsuit Filed Against Evolution

· 01/27/2011 6:49:36 AM PST ·
· Posted by Sopater ·
· 137 replies ·
· Christian News Wire ·
· Jan. 27, 2011 ·

Tom Ritter, who taught physics and chemistry for over a decade, has filed a federal lawsuit against The Blue Mountain School District in the Middle District of Pennsylvania (13:11 - CV - 116), where he resides. This same district that rendered the infamous Kitzmiller decision in 2005. The argument presented in full: Evolution is Unscientific "The theory of evolution by cumulative natural selection is the only theory we know of that is in principle capable of explaining the existence of organized complexity." -- Richard Dawkins, famous Atheist Biology studies organisms. It can also explain how organisms got that way, but...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Nobel Laureate Claims Teleported DNA

· 01/22/2011 1:32:46 PM PST ·
· Posted by The Comedian ·
· 64 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· via Kurzweil ·
· 12 January 2011 ·
· Andy Coghlan ·

A Nobel prizewinner is reporting that DNA can be generated from its teleported "quantum imprint" A STORM of scepticism has greeted experimental results emerging from the lab of a Nobel laureate which, if confirmed, would shake the foundations of several fields of science. "If the results are correct," says theoretical chemist Jeff Reimers of the University of Sydney, Australia, "these would be the most significant experiments performed in the past 90 years, demanding re-evaluation of the whole conceptual framework of modern chemistry." Luc Montagnier, who shared the Nobel prize for medicine in 2008 for his part in establishing that...

Paleotology

 CSI: Manchester -- University team gets forensic on dinosaurs (TV series)

· 01/25/2011 12:53:45 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 3 replies ·
· U of Manchester ·
· January 25, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

A new TV series featuring dinosaur detectives from The University of Manchester looking at how dinosaurs once lived, looked and functioned begins in the UK this week. Presented by University of Manchester palaeontologist Dr Phil Manning, the series will be aired on the National Geographic Channel, starting in the UK on Thursday February 3rd, before being transmitted to many countries around the world. It is the first ever series on dinosaurs commissioned by National Geographic, as previously documentaries have only aired as one or two-hour specials. Jurassic CSI will for the first time provide a detailed forensic look at dinosaurs...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Dating sheds new light on dawn of the dinosaurs

· 01/24/2011 2:55:25 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 18 replies ·
· UC Davis ·
· January 24, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Careful dating of new dinosaur fossils and volcanic ash around them by researchers from UC Davis and UC Berkeley casts doubt on the idea that dinosaurs appeared and opportunistically replaced other animals. Instead -- at least in one South American valley -- they seem to have existed side by side and gone through similar periods of extinction. Geologists from Argentina and the United States announced earlier this month the discovery of a new dinosaur that roamed what is now South America 230 million years ago, at the beginning of the age of the dinosaurs. The newly discovered Eodramaeus, or "dawn...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 US Textbooks: Muslims Discovered America

· 01/22/2011 10:42:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by ventanax5 ·
· 64 replies ·
· you tube ·

"This is a very disturbing video about how our high school students are being brainwashed by Moslems in favor of Islam because our textbook publishers, school principals and teachers do not have the knowledge about Islam to know what is true and what is false. The textbooks are loaded with false positive statements about Islam and false negative statements about Christianity and Judaism."

Scotland Yet

 My Love is Like a Red Red Rose

· 01/25/2011 5:31:19 AM PST ·
· Posted by Sparky1776 ·
· 25 replies ·
· YouTube ·
· May 13, 2006 ·
· Dayfornight ·

0, my love is like a red, red rose, that's newly sprung in June. 0, my love is like a melody, that's sweetly play'd in tune. As fair thou art, my bonnie lass, so deep in love am I, And I will love thee still, my dear, till a' the seas gang dry. Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear, and the rocks melt wi' the sun! And I will love thee still, my dear, while the sands of life shall run. And fare the weel, my only love! And fare the well awhile! And I will come again,...

World War Eleven

 The piece of paper that proved Hitler was fooled (D-Day)

· 01/26/2011 8:08:04 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 41 replies ·
· BBC ·
· January 26, 2011 ·
· Jon Kelly ·

It was an audacious double-cross that fooled the Nazis and shortened World War II. Now a newly-released document reveals the crucial role played by Britain's code-breaking experts in the 1944 invasion of France.All the ingredients of a gripping spy thriller are there - intrigue, espionage, lies and black propaganda. An elaborate British wartime plot succeeded in convincing Hitler that the Allies were about to stage the bulk of the D-Day landings in Pas de Calais rather than on the Normandy coast - a diversion that proved crucial in guaranteeing the invasion's success. Behind the story of this crucial message...

The Revolution

 How Peter Townsend saved the nation [RevWar]

· 01/28/2011 9:56:49 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Chronicle ·
· (Orange County, NY) ·
· Jan. 27, 2011 ·
· Ginny Privitar ·

The exterior of Peter Townsend's house in Chester, now torn down. Contract for West Point's Great Chain signed in Chester 233 years ago. In these days of intercontinental ballistic missile shields and missile-tracking radar, it's hard to imagine that the national defense once depended on a simple iron chain. During the Revolutionary War, a patriot named Peter Townsend lived on a three-acre lot not far from the corner of present-day Elm and Main streets in Chester. He was a member of an important family from Oyster Bay, Long Island. The family home, Raynham Hall, is today a museum, and...

Longer Perspectives

 Education as Neurotoxin: How Public Schools Were Dumbed Down

· 01/27/2011 2:02:38 PM PST ·
· Posted by BruceDeitrickPrice ·
· 52 replies ·
· YouTube ·
· Jan 23, 2011 ·
· Bruce Deitrick Price ·

[New YouTube video is short, graphical, and has good jazz; this is script for it--] A century ago, Maria Montessori reached a brilliant insight. Observing children at a mental institution, she wondered: "Suppose we created a jazzed-up environment that constantly challenged and inspired young minds...?" Montessori created a new kind of school for impaired children. Quickly, her students were equal to "normal" children. She became the toast of Europe; as she deserved to be. Montessori's vision has to inspire all true educators. But what, after all, is Montessori telling us but common sense? If you want intellectual and cognitive development,...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 40 Years Ago This Month: Apollo 14

· 01/25/2011 12:35:40 PM PST ·
· Posted by chimera ·
· 27 replies ·
· various ·
· 01/25/2011 ·
· chimera ·

After the near-disaster of Apollo 13 some ten months earlier, NASA and the Apollo program badly needed a successful mission. Apollo 14 delivered this more than adequately, although at times it was a close call. The landing site for this mission was the Fra Mauro Formation at the edge of the Imbrium Basin, re-targeted from the ill-fated Apollo 13 flight. Apollo 14 is significant as the first lunar mission to make landfall in a region other than the flat mare topography of the earlier landings. It features a hilly, hummocky, ridge-like topography, and was thought likely to contain ejecta from...

end of digest #341 20110129


1,231 posted on 01/29/2011 9:49:15 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1228 | View Replies]

To: 1010RD; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #341 20110129
· Saturday, January 29, 2011 · 21 topics · 2664915 to 2661541 · 763 members ·

 
Saturday
Jan 29
2011
v 7
n 29

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 341st issue. It's the 29th issue of the volume, issued on the 29th. Tiny little thing, 21 topics. Should have added 8 topics, no reason.

Something's up with my recordkeeping I think, but hopefully it isn't serious.

Oh, okay, I forgot to change the "welcome to" number. I was a child prodigy, but in my case the child is not the father to the man. I was in a terrible rush last weekend.

And for some reason the membership count dropped by one. If you're supposed to be on the GGG ping list, and didn't get this message, drop me a FReepmail. ;')

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here: This, to me, is the ultimately heroic trait of ordinary people; they say no to the tyrant and they calmly take the consequences of this resistance. -- Philip K. Dick

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,232 posted on 01/29/2011 9:51:59 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1231 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #342
Saturday, February 05, 2011

Prehistory & Origins

 University of Toronto anthropologists discover earliest cemetery in Middle East

· 02/02/2011 11:17:10 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 15 replies ·
· University of Toronto ·
· February 2, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

TORONTO, ON -- Anthropologists at the University of Toronto and the University of Cambridge have discovered the oldest cemetery in the Middle East at a site in northern Jordan. The cemetery includes graves containing human remains buried alongside those of a red fox, suggesting that the animal was possibly kept as a pet by humans long before dogs ever were. The 16,500-year-old site at 'Uyun al-Hammam was discovered in 2000 by an expedition led by University of Toronto professor Edward (Ted) Banning and Lisa Maher, an assistant professor of anthropology at U of T and research associate at the University...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Grave robber chase reveals ancient Holy Land church

· 02/03/2011 6:30:06 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· Wednesday, February 2, 2011 ·
· Ari Rabinovitch ·
· ed by Tim Pearce ·

The hill-top church was destroyed by an earthquake some 1,300 years ago and lay partly buried until detectives from Israel's Antiquities Authority, pursuing a gang of antiquity thieves, noticed an elaborate doorpost poking through the earth. The robbers got away -- they were caught a few months later at a site nearby -- but after weeks of digging, archaeologists uncovered the remains of the church. It was about the size of a basketball court and contained fallen marble pillars and a nearly pristine 10-meter-long mosaic floor. Beneath the church's altar is a burial chamber that the Antiquities Authority said may...


 Archaeologists May Have Found Tomb of Prophet Zechariah

· 02/03/2011 6:58:03 PM PST ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 45 replies ·
· AOL ·
· Feb 3, 2011 ·

Archaeologists in Israel believe they may have stumbled upon the tomb of the biblical Prophet Zechariah in a newly discovered church. The church, which is more than 1,300 years old, contains massive marble columns as well as exquisite mosaics, the Israel Antiquities Authority said in a statement. Archaeologists believe that the church, uncovered in Hirbet Madras in central Israel, is the location marked on the Madaba Map as the tomb of Zechariah, according to Haaertz. "The researchers believe that in light of an analysis of the Christian sources, including the Madaba Map, the church at Hirbet Madras is a memorial...

Byzantine Empire

 1,500-year-old church found in Israel

· 02/02/2011 2:37:27 PM PST ·
· DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis ·
· 27 replies ·
· Yahoo News ·
· January 2011 ·
· Matti Friedman ·

Israeli archaeologists presented a newly uncovered 1,500-year-old church in the Judean hills on Wednesday, including an unusually well-preserved mosaic floor with images of lions, foxes, fish and peacocks...


 1,500 Year Old Church Found In Israel

· 02/02/2011 2:50:25 PM PST ·
· Posted by madison10 ·
· 24 replies ·
· Associated Press Via Yahoo ·
· February 2, 2011 ·
· Matti Friedman ·

Israeli archaeologists presented a newly uncovered 1,500-year-old church in the Judean hills on Wednesday, including an unusually well-preserved mosaic floor with images of lions, foxes, fish and peacocks...

Faith & Philosophy

 Turkey: 'Seventh Church' of the Apocalypse is Found

· 02/02/2011 5:58:00 AM PST ·
· Posted by 0beron ·
· 20 replies ·
· The Eponymous Flower ·
· 02/02/11 ·
· Tancred ·

Turkey: 'Seventh Church' of the Apocalypse is Found "Church in Laodicea" has been located with underground radar signals -- The structure is in its basic and original state. Ankara (kath.net/KAP) Archeologists have found the so-called "Seventh Church of Asia" from the biblical testimony of St. John. Turkish Minister of Culture, Ertugrul Gunay said for the Turkish press service [Tuesday] upon a visit to the excavation. The antique city Ladoicea [Laodikeia on Lykos today's Cürüksu Cayi] in the city of Phrygia mentioned in the cryptic Apocalypse at the end of the New Testament mentioned as the place of the seventh Christian...


 Ancient church discovered in western Turkey

· 02/02/2011 7:49:49 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· Hurriyet Daily News ·
· Monday, January 31, 2011 ·
· unattributed ·

Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay visited the ancient city of Laodicea on Sunday in Denizli province and was briefed by Professor Celal Simsek, head of the excavation team. The professor said they have discovered the Laodicea Church, one of the seven mentioned in the Bible. Simsek said the church from the fourth century A.D. was found by underground radar search, a system they have tried this year for the first time. "The major part of the church, which is built on an area of 2,000 square meters, has kept its original [status]."

...The minister said the church added to...


Middle Ages & Renaissance

 VMI Celebrates Muslim Invasion, Brutal 781-year Occupation of Spain

· 02/03/2011 9:41:04 PM PST ·
· Posted by Islander7 ·
· 134 replies ·
· Big Peace ·
· Feb 3, 2011 ·
· Patrick S. Poole ·

Stonewall Jackson is rolling over in his grave. Next month his beloved Virginia Military Institute will be convening a celebration commemorating the 1300th anniversary of the invasion and occupation of Spain under the Muslim warlord Tariq ibn Ziyad in 711 A.D. The March 23-25 celebration entitled "711-2011: East Meets West" and organized by VMI's Center for Leadership and Ethics, is scheduled to feature standard Muslim apologists Reza Aslan and Akbar Ahmed. VMI Superintendent Gen. J.H. Binford Peay has even filmed an invitation to the celebration.

Egypt

 About 30 Egyptian mummies found in ancient cache [2009]

· 01/29/2011 9:14:13 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· Monday, February 9, 2009 ·
· Jonathan Wright ·
· ed. by Janet Lawrence ·

Egyptian archaeologists have found about 30 mummies and at least one unopened sarcophagus in a burial chamber about 4,300 years old... in the desert on the western side of the Step Pyramid of Saqqara, one of the earliest large stone structures in the world, dating from about 2,650 BC. The mummies appear to vary in age. One dates from about 640 BC while the unopened sarcophagus, which is made of limestone and sealed with plaster, is probably much older... ...another sarcophagus, made of wood, had not been opened since pharaohnic times but Karar said ancient grave robbers probably reached it...

Pyramid Schemes

 Great Pyramid May Hold Two Hidden Chambers

· 02/02/2011 4:58:08 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 48 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Thursday, January 27, 2011 ·
· Content provided by AFP ·

Jean-Pierre Houdin -- who was rebuffed three years ago by Egypt in his appeal for a probe into how the Pyramid was built -- said 3-D simulation and data from a U.S. egyptologist, Bob Brier, pointed to two secret chambers in the heart of the structure. The rooms would have housed furniture for use in the afterlife by the pharaoh Khufu, also known as Cheops in Greek, he told a press conference. "I am convinced there are antechambers in this pyramid. What I want is to find them," he said. In March 2007, Houdin advanced the theory that the Great...

Religion of Pieces

 Looters destroy mummies in Egyptian Museum

· 01/29/2011 7:52:22 AM PST ·
· Posted by chessplayer ·
· 81 replies ·
· Reuters ·

Looters broke into the Egyptian Museum during anti-government protests late Friday and destroyed two Pharaonic mummies, Egypt's top archaeologist told state television.


 Breaking: Images of Egyptian Museum Damage

· 01/29/2011 11:56:48 AM PST ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 150 replies ·
· hyperallergic.com ·
· Jan. 29, 2011 ·
· Hrag Vartanian ·

Al-Jazeera has broadcast video of the damage at the National Museum, aka Egyptian Museum. The strange this about these images is that they demonstrate that the damage is certainly more than a few mummies, which is what Reuters reported that Zahi Hawass, chairman of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said: "Egyptian citizens tried to prevent them and were joined by the tourism police, but some (looters) managed to enter from above and they destroyed two of the mummies," he said. Moreas it develops, though it certainly appears that there are soldiers in the Museum.


 Egyptian army storms museum to protect from looters
  (but not before the "street" drew a line)


· 01/29/2011 12:23:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by Cincinatus' Wife ·
· 32 replies ·
· Christian Science Monitor ·
· January 29, 2011 ·
· Maggie Michael ·

...Then dozens of would-be thieves started entering the grounds surrounding the museum, climbing over the metal fence or jumping inside from trees lining the sidewalk outside. One man pleaded with people outside the museum's gates on Tahrir Square not to loot the building, shouting at the crowd: "We are not like Baghdad." After the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, thieves carted off thousands of artifacts from the National Museum in Baghdad -- only a fraction of which have been recovered. Suddenly other young men -- some armed with truncheons taken from the police -- formed a human chain outside the...


 Looters Destroy Mummies in Egyptian Museum: Official

· 01/29/2011 1:34:02 PM PST ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 49 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· january 29, 2011 ·
· Staff ·

Looters broke into the Egyptian Museum during anti-government protests late Friday and destroyed two Pharaonic mummies, Egypt's top archaeologist told state television. The museum in central Cairo, which has the world's biggest collection of Pharaonic antiquities, is adjacent to the headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party that protesters had earlier set ablaze. Flames were seen still pouring out of the party headquarters early Saturday. "I felt deeply sorry today when I came this morning to the Egyptian Museum and found that some had tried to raid the museum by force last night," Zahi Hawass, chairman of the Supreme Council...


 Were Tut's treasures damaged? (Egyptian Museum Looted)

· 01/29/2011 10:03:43 PM PST ·
· Posted by americanophile ·
· 32 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· January 28, 2001 ·
· By Alan Boyle ·

Despite the best efforts of the Egyptian army and a human shield, some of the artifacts inside the century-old Egyptian Museum were damaged during a brief wave of looting, authorities in Cairo say. And it sounds as if the damaged goods include treasures from the tomb of Tutankhamun, based on comments from the country's top archaeologist as well as a little sleuthing by archaeologists looking at video footage shot inside the museum. Margaret Maitland, an Egyptologist at Oxford University in England, matched up shots of the damage with pictures of artifacts from Tut's tomb and said that three gilded wooden...


 Would-Be Looters Rip Heads Off Two Egyptian Museum Mummies

· 01/30/2011 7:13:45 AM PST ·
· Posted by KeyLargo ·
· 24 replies ·
· The Blaze ·
· Jan 29, 2011 ·
· Jonathon M. Seidl ·

CAIRO (The Blaze/AP) -- Would-be looters broke into Cairo's famed Egyptian Museum, ripping the heads off two mummies and damaging about 10 small artifacts before being caught and detained by soldiers, Egypt's antiquities chief said Saturday. Zahi Hawass said the vandals did not manage to steal any of the museum's antiquities, and that the prized collection was now safe and under military guard.


 Ancient Treasures Looted, Destroyed in Egypt's Chaos (Zahi Hawass interview)

· 01/30/2011 10:42:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by pillut48 ·
· 45 replies ·
· NatGeo ·
· January 30, 2011 ·
· David Braun ·

Archaeologist Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, reports that several of the country's museums have been attacked by looters taking advantage of the political turmoil in the country. In the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, looters stole jewelry from the museum shop and smashed a statue of Tutankhamun and other artifacts. In a Sinai store containing antiquities from the Port Said Museum, "a large group, armed with guns and a truck, entered the store, opened the boxes in the magazine and took the precious objects. Other groups attempted to enter the Coptic Museum, Royal Jewellery Museum, National...


 Fox News Live Coverage:
  Cairo Museum Reportedly Catches Fire After Molotov Cocktail Thrown


· 02/02/2011 9:11:42 AM PST ·
· Posted by Zakeet ·
· 183 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· February 2, 2011 ·

All that's in at the present time is the announcement and a link taking the viewer to the live satellite feed.


 Dr Zahi Hawass appointed to new Egyptian cabinet as Minister for Antiquities

· 02/02/2011 4:23:22 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 27 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· Tuesday, February 1, 2011 ·
· unknown ·

On Sunday, 31st January 2011 Dr. Zahi Hawass was appointed to the post of Minister of Antiquities, heading a newly created department that will be charged with the care and protection of all Egyptian monuments and museums. This department will absorb the Supreme Council of Antiquities. ...Hawass[:] The commanders of the army are now protecting the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and all of the major sites of Egypt (Luxor, Aswan, Saqqara, and the pyramids of Giza) are safe. The twenty-four museums in Egypt, including the Coptic and Islamic museums in Cairo, are all safe, as well. I would like to say...


 Egypt Update: Rare Tomb May Have Been Destroyed

· 02/05/2011 4:29:15 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· ScienceInsider ·
· Thursday, February 3, 2011 ·
· Andrew Lawler ·

Reports of damage to one of the few ancient Egyptian tombs devoted solely to a woman have tempered the news that most of Egypt's priceless antiquities have escaped damage and that teams of foreign archaeologists are safe... One archaeologist present at the famous cemetery of Saqqara, south of Cairo, said that as many as 200 looters were digging for treasure in the area this past weekend before police resecured the area. The excavator, who requested anonymity, added that the tomb of Maya, the wet nurse of King Tutankhamun, was "completely destroyed." Another Western archaeologist said, "We still don't know the...

Africa

 Czech team excavates ancient sites dedicated to Nubian gods

· 02/02/2011 7:22:10 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Radio.cz ·
· Thursday, January 27, 2011 ·
· Jan Velinger ·

"The site of Wad ban Naqa is one of the most important archaeological sites in the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Meroe. Most of the structures that are located there, some of them were already archaeologically surveyed in the past. During our second excavation season we focussed mainly on the so-called 'small temple', a structure built in either the first century BC or first century AD and continually used as a sacred building until the collapse of the Meroe Kingdom in thefourth century. The temple was likely dedicated to one of the native Nubian lion gods, either Apedemak...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Northern hunters slowed down advance of Neolithic farmers

· 02/03/2011 7:52:53 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 13 replies ·
· FECYT ·
· February 3, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

One of the most significant socioeconomic changes in the history of humanity took place around 10,000 years ago, when the Near East went from an economy based on hunting and gathering (Mesolithic) to another kind on agriculture (Neolithic). Farmers rapidly entered the Balkan Peninsula and then advanced gradually throughout the rest of Europe. Various theories have been proposed over recent years to explain this process, and now physicists from the University of Girona (UdG) have for the first time presented a new model to explain how the Neolithic front slowed down as it moved towards the north of the continent....

Biology & Cryptobiology

Scientists Find DNA Change Accounting for White Skin
  (White People "Greatest Cause of Strife"!)


· 01/30/2011 5:47:11 PM PST ·
· Posted by Williams ·
· 133 replies ·
· Washington Post ·
· 1/28/11 ·
· Rick Weiss ·

Scientists said yesterday that they have discovered a tiny genetic mutation that largely explains the first appearance of white skin in humans tens of thousands of years ago, a finding that helps solve one of biology's most enduring mysteries and illuminates one of humanity's greatest sources of strife.

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Johns Hopkins researchers capture jumping genes

· 02/04/2011 2:05:50 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 11 replies ·
· Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions ·
· February 4, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

RIPs are alive and well -- and moving -- in the human genome. An ambitious hunt by Johns Hopkins scientists for actively "jumping genes" in humans has yielded compelling new evidence that the genome, anything but static, contains numerous pesky mobile elements that may help to explain why people have such a variety of physical traits and disease risks. Using bioinformatics to compare the standard assembly of genetic elements as outlined in the reference human genome to raw whole-genome data from 310 individuals recently made available by the 1000 Genomes Project, the team revealed 1,016 new insertions of RIPs, or retrotransposon...

Australia & the Pacific

 Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

· 02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Thursday, February 3, 2011 ·
· University of Leeds ·

The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...

Navigation

 Did Vikings navigate by polarized light?

· 01/31/2011 8:30:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 29 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 31 Jan 2011 ·
· Jo Marchant ·

'Sunstone' crystals may have helped seafarers to find the Sun on cloudy days. A Viking legend tells of a glowing 'sunstone' that, when held up to the sky, revealed the position of the Sun even on a cloudy day. It sounds like magic, but scientists measuring the properties of light in the sky say that polarizing crystals -- which function in the same way as the mythical sunstone -- could have helped ancient sailors to cross the northern Atlantic. A review of their evidence is publishedtoday in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B1. The Vikings, seafarers from Scandinavia...

Farty Shades of Green

 Ireland's Viking Fortress

· 02/03/2011 7:02:44 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 19 replies ·
· Archaeology, V 64 N 1 ·
· January/February 2011 ·
· Erin Mullally ·

Linn Duachaill was founded in A.D. 841, the same year as Viking Dublin. The fortress was used as a center by the Vikings to trade goods, organize attacks against inland Irish monasteries, and send captured Irish slaves abroad. For more than 70 years, Linn Duachaill rivaled Dublin as the preeminent Viking holding on the east coast of Ireland before it was eventually abandoned. The discovery of Linn Duachaill will finally allow archeologists to compare the actual site with medieval documents. The names of leaders of the garrison are recorded, along with extensive accounts of attacks they carried out. The site...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 The enigmatic Mzora stone ring in Morocco

· 02/02/2011 7:29:43 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 21 replies ·
· Stone Pages ·
· Monday, January 31, 2011 ·
· The Heritage Journal ·

In Morocco, not far from the Atlantic coast and away from major tourist attractions, lies a remarkable and enigmatic megalithic site. The Mzora stone ring (also spelled variously as Msoura/Mezorah) is situated roughly 11km from the nearest town of Asilah and about 27km from the ruins of ancient Lixus. It is not easy to reach and a small display in the archaeological museum at Tetouan is the most the majority of visitors see or hear of this very interesting site. Plutarch, in the first century CE, may have referred to Mzora in his Life of Sertorius. He describes the Roman...


 A new henge discovered at Stonehenge

· 02/02/2011 7:39:33 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Physorg ·
· Monday, January 31, 2011 ·
· Provided by University of Birmingham ·

An archaeology team led by the University of Birmingham and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria discovered a major ceremonial monument less than one kilometre away from the iconic Stonehenge. History is set to be rewritten after an archaeology team led by the University of Birmingham and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria discovered a major ceremonial monument less than one kilometer away from the iconic Stonehenge. The incredible find has been hailed by Professor Vince Gaffney, from the University's IBM Visual and Spatial Technology Centre... "This finding...

Epigraphy & Language

 Top 10 uncracked codes

· 02/03/2011 12:33:31 AM PST ·
· Posted by Daffynition ·
· 47 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 01 Feb 2011 ·
· Nick Britten ·

1. The Phaistos Disk is considered the most important example of hieroglyphic inscription from Crete. Discovered in 1903, both sides of the clay disc are covered with hieroglyphs arranged in a spiral zone, impressed on the clay when it was damp. Forty five different types of signs have been distinguished, of which a few can be identified with the hieroglyphs in use in the Proto- palatial period. [snip]

Mammoth Told Me...

 Japanese Scientists plan to clone a woolly mammoth

· 02/01/2011 11:47:26 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 45 replies ·
· Digital Trends ·
· 02/01/2011 ·
· Jeffrey Van Camp ·

Japanese scientists believe they have the technology and know-how to create a living woolly mammoth, a clone of a species that died thousands of years ago. Finding a fully intact frozen woolly mammoth isn't enough, it seems. Now, a professor at Kyoto University in Japan is planning to bring the species back from extinction through cloning, reports the AFP. Dr. Akira Iritani plans to insert the nuclei of mammoth cells into a modern elephant's egg cell, creating a woolly mammoth embryothat will be brought to term by an elephant mother. The elephant was chosen because it is the nearest...

Paleontology

 Cache in Chinese Mountain Reveals 20,000 Prehistoric Fossils
  (some with soft tissues preserved!)


· 02/03/2011 12:44:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 37 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· Dec 2010 ·
· Charles Q. Choi ·

A giant cache of nearly 20,000 fossil reptiles, shellfish and a host of other prehistoric creatures unearthed from a mountain in China is now revealing how life recovered after the most devastating mass extinction on Earth. This research could help point out which species might be more or less susceptible to extinction nowadays, and how the world might recover from the damage caused by humanity, scientists added. Life was nearly completely wiped out approximately 250 million years ago by massive volcanic eruptions and devastating global warming. Only one in 10 species survived this cataclysmic end-Permian event. Much was uncertain regarding...


 Fossil female pterosaur found with preserved egg

· 02/01/2011 11:58:12 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 81 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· 02/01/2011 ·
· Jonathan Amos ·

For fossil hunters, it represents one of those breakthrough moments. A pterosaur has been found in China beautifully preserved with an egg. The egg indicates this ancient flying reptile was a female, and that realisation has allowed researchers to sex these creatures for the first time. Writing in Science magazine, the palaeontologists make some broad statements about differences in pterosaurs, including the observation that only males sported a head-crest. David Unwin, a palaeobiologist in the Department of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester, was part of the research team. He told the BBC the discovery was astonishing: "If somebody...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 A New Theory for "Mona Lisa"

· 02/02/2011 4:26:26 PM PST ·
· DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis ·
· 42 replies ·
· Yahoo News ·
· February 2 2011 ·
· Mike Krumboltz ·

For centuries, people have been speculating about who modeled for Leonardo Da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." Was it Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a Florentine merchant? Was it Isabella of Aragon? Was it the artist himself, as some experts believe? Or was it, as new research suggests, none of the above? An Italian art historian, Silvano Vinceti, believes the model for the "Mona Lisa" was a man named Gian Giacomo Caprotti, better known as Salai, a male apprentice (and possiblelover) of da Vinci...

Roman Empire

 Rome reopens House of Vestal Virgins

· 01/28/2011 3:13:31 AM PST ·
· Posted by markomalley ·
· 72 replies ·
· ANSA ·
· 1/27/11 ·

After twenty years, Rome has reopened the House of the Vestal Virgins, remains of an ancient Roman palace flanking ruins of the imperial seat of government in the Roman Forum. Major renovations to the structure were inaugurated Thursday with the opening of a new visitors' route through the ruins called Via Nova, which traverses the northwest slope of the Palatine Hill overlooking the Forum and ends at the Atrium Vestae, or ancient palace. The configuration of Via Nova is believed to date back to urban planning made in the wake of a blaze that razed much of Rome in 64...

Early America

 New Milford historian unearths account of America's first mass murder

· 01/29/2011 8:27:40 PM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 23 replies ·
· newstimes (Danbury) ·
· 1-28-11 ·
· Nanci G. Hutson ·

New Milford historian and researcher Michael-John Cavallaro, vice-chairman of the Conservation Commission, with a one-of-a-kind Revolutionary War era confession of a local man hanged for a mass murder of the Mallory family in Washington, Ct. Cavallaro tracked down the illusive, 14-page document at the University of Virginia. He will be giving lectures about the murders in New Milford and Washington in February. Photo: Nanci Hutson / The News-Times ·
· WASHINGTON -- In this sleepy town during the Revolutionary War, a 19-year-old Continental Army soldier committed a murder so gruesome the local historian who unearthed his treachery still mourns the long-dead...



 Hot looks for 1775

· 01/16/2011 9:11:15 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 72 replies ·
· Corsican (TX) Daily Sun ·
· January 15, 2011 ·
· Janet Jacobs ·

Revolutionary war fashion show comes to Corsicana Corsicana -- Yards and yards of embroidered silk and damask, wool and linen swirled through the Kinsloe House as part of a special 1700s fashion show hosted by the James Blair Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution Wednesday. The creator of the dresses was Carolyn Schiewe of the Captain Molly Corbin Chapter of the DAR in Grapevine. Schiewe researched the dresses and then sewed them for herself and her friends. "Ladies during the revolutionary war were just as interested in fashion as we are today," Schiewe explained. And although she had...

The Revolution

 James Madison chess pieces unearthed at Va. estate

· 02/03/2011 8:28:43 AM PST ·
· Posted by Daffynition ·
· 26 replies ·
· WTOP ·
· February 3, 2011 ·

ORANGE, Va. (AP) -- Archaeologists have unearthed a few pieces of history at former president James Madison's country estate: portions of two pawns from his chess set. Montpelier officials think the pieces are likely from the same set Madison and Thomas Jefferson used in their frequent matches during Jefferson's visits.


 Thomas Jefferson's Beer Returns

· 01/29/2011 4:34:02 PM PST ·
· Posted by re_tail20 ·
· 28 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· Jan. 28, 2011 ·
· Fox News ·

Thomas Jefferson's mountaintop home is teaming up with a local brewery to launch a new ale inspired by the past. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation says it's working with Starr Hill Brewery to offer Monticello Reserve Ale, inspired by what was produced and consumed regularly at Monticello.

end of digest #342 20110205


1,233 posted on 02/05/2011 7:40:49 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1231 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #342 20110205
· Saturday, February 05, 2011 · 39 topics · 2668975 to 2665323 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Feb 05
2011
v 7
n 30

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 342nd issue. The flag is back. Oh, and the link under the other graphic I'd been using for months? I didn't work. Thanks for not noticing. ;')

Last week I misspelled "Paleontology" in the header (left out the "t"), thanks again for not noticing. Not that it matters, I also put in two target modifiers in some of the topic links last week, it probably wouldn't have any impact, but regardless, I've fixed it. I may take the time I normally spend assing off during the week and finally build my Chipmunk BASIC soup-to-nuts quick 'n' dirty digest builder. The key word is "may". We all know what the rough winds do.

Not posted (yet) -- Paddy Lambert has contributed "A Roman Legion Lost in China?" (Part 1 & Part 2) to ArchNews. We've seen a topic or two about this, they're somewhere in the FRchives.

Also (probably) coming up this week, the UK's answer to the US NAGPRA fiasco -- Legislation forces archaeologists to rebury finds, -and- Bronze Age petroglyphs found in Norway (NTNU, AlphaGalileo, and Past Horizons) as well as an 11,000 year old Polish find described in "Stone Age Fertility Ritual Object Found".

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
"Elections belong to the people. It is their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters." -- Abraham Lincoln

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,234 posted on 02/05/2011 7:44:08 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1233 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #343
Saturday, February 12, 2011

Ancient Autopsies

 Mystery of the Chinese mummy's travel ban

· 02/05/2011 1:25:40 PM PST ·
· Posted by The Comedian ·
· 37 replies ·
· Sloppyunruh ·
· Feb. 5, 2011 ·
· Aggregator ·

China's first contact with the West dates back to 200BC when China's emperor Wu Di wanted to establish an alliance with the West against the marauding Huns, then based in Mongolia. However, the discovery of the mummies suggests that Caucasians were settled in a part of China thousands of years before Wu Di: the notion that they arrived in Xinjiang before the first East Asians is truly explosive. Xinjiang is dominated by the Uighurs, who resent what they see as intrusion by the Han Chinese. The tensions which have spilled over into violent clashes in recent years. Whatever the reason...

China

 Counterfeit coins from China turning up in Wash. state

· 02/11/2011 7:56:44 PM PST ·
· Posted by FromLori ·
· 22 replies ·
· komo news ·
· 2/11/2011 ·
· Bryan Johnson and KOMO Staff ·

Summary Counterfeit coins by the thousands are turning up in Washington state, and authorities are warning coin collectors to be on the lookout for them. Click on link for video

Epigraphy & Language

 University of Arizona experts determine age of book 'nobody can read' (Voynich manuscript)

· 02/10/2011 5:02:38 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 95 replies ·
· University of Arizona ·
· February 10, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

While enthusiasts across the world pored over the Voynich manuscript, penned by an unknown author in a language no one understands, a research team at the University of Arizona solved one of its biggest mysteries: When was the book made?University of Arizona researchers have cracked one of the puzzles surrounding what has been called "the world's most mysterious manuscript" -- the Voynich manuscript, a book filled with drawings and writings nobody has been able to make sense of to this day. Using radiocarbon dating, a team led by Greg Hodgins in the UA's department of physics has found the manuscript's...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Conceptualizing cancer cells as ancient 'toolkit'

· 02/08/2011 5:47:18 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 42 replies ·
· Arizona State University ·
· February 7, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

TEMPE, Ariz. -- Despite decades of research and billions of dollars, cancer remains a major killer, with an uncanny ability to evade both the body's defenses and medical intervention. Now an Arizona State University scientist believes he has an explanation. "Cancer is not a random bunch of selfish rogue cells behaving badly, but a highly-efficient pre-programmed response to stress, honed by a long period of evolution," claims professor Paul Davies, director of the BEYOND Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at ASU and principal investigator of a major research program funded by the National Cancer Institute designed to bring insights...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 New evolutionary research disproves living missing link theories

· 02/10/2011 4:52:11 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 33 replies ·
· University of Montreal ·
· February 10, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Genetic research proves worm has evolved to be less sophisticated than its ancestorsEvolution is not a steady march towards ever more sophisticated beings and therefore the search for the living "missing links" is pointless, according to findings published by a team of researchers led by Dr. Hervé Philippe of the Université de Montréal's Department of Biochemistry. "Aristotle was the first to classify organisms -- from the least to the most sophisticated. Darwin's theory of evolution continued this idea, with the concept of a hierarchy of evolution. This way of thinking has led researchers and skeptics alike to look for less...

Paleontology

 Studying how snakes got legless

· 02/08/2011 9:57:23 AM PST ·
· Posted by Natufian ·
· 147 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 8 February 2011 ·
· Jonathan Amos ·

A 95-million-year-old fossil is helping scientists understand how snakes lost their legs through evolutionary time. Found in Lebanon, the specimen is one of only three examples of an ancient snake with preserved leg bones. One rear leg is clearly visible but researchers had to use a novel X-ray technique to examine another leg hidden inside the fossil rock. Writing in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, the team says the snake records an early stage in limb loss.

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 MU Researcher Says the Next Large Central US Earthquake May Not Be In New Madrid

· 02/08/2011 10:36:15 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 32 replies ·
· University of Missouri ·
· February 8, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

2000 years of Chinese records shows migrating mid-continent earthquakes COLUMBIA, Mo. -- This December marks the bicentennial of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12, which are the biggest earthquakes known to have occurred in the central U.S. Now, based on the earthquake record in China, a University of Missouri researcher says that mid-continent earthquakes tend to move among fault systems, so the next big earthquake in the central U.S. may actually occur someplace else other than along the New Madrid faults. Mian Liu, professor of geological sciences in the College of Arts and Science at MU, examined records from China,...

Prehistory & Origins

 Google Ocean: Has Atlantis been found off Africa?

· 02/10/2011 3:51:02 PM PST ·
· Posted by djf ·
· 60 replies ·
· Telegraph ·

A truly spectacular find. This will probably re-write history as we know it. See link for details.

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Ancient teeth raise new questions about the origins of modern man

· 02/09/2011 7:22:36 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 29 replies ·
· Binghamton University ·
· February 9, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

BINGHAMTON, NY -- Eight small teeth found in a cave near Rosh Haain, central Israel, are raising big questions about the earliest existence of humans and where we may have originated, says Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam. Part of a team of international researchers led by Dr. Israel Hershovitz of Tel Aviv University, Qaum and his colleagues have been examining the dental discovery and recently published their joint findings in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Excavated at Qesem cave, a pre-historic site that was uncovered in 2000, the size and shape of the teeth are very similar to those...

Africa

 Fossil find puts 'Lucy' story on firm footing

· 02/11/2011 1:44:54 AM PST ·
· Posted by Natufian ·
· 41 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 10 February 2011 ·
· Jonathan Amos ·

New fossil evidence seems to confirm that a key ancestor of ours could walk upright consistently -- one of the major advances in human evolution. The evidence comes in the form of a 3.2 million-year-old bone that was found at Hadar, Ethiopia. Its shape indicates the diminutive, human-like species Australopithecus afarensis had arches in its feet. Arched feet, the discovery team tells the journal Science, are critical for walking the way modern humans do.

Australia & the Pacific

 Giant rats lead scientists to ancient face carvings (East Timor)

· 02/11/2011 9:20:34 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 14 replies ·
· CSIRO ·
· February 11, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Ancient stone faces carved into the walls of a well-known limestone cave in East Timor have been discovered by a team searching for fossils of extinct giant rats.The team of archaeologists and palaeontologists were working in Lene Hara Cave on the northeast tip of East Timor. "Looking up from the cave floor at a colleague sitting on a ledge, my head torch shone on what seemed to be a weathered carving," CSIRO's Dr Ken Aplin said. "I shone the torch around and saw a whole panel of engraved prehistoric human faces on the wall of the cave. "The local landowners...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Secrets in Stone: Rare Archaeological Find in Norway

· 02/05/2011 8:50:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 36 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 1-31-2011 ·
· Staff ·

It looked to be a routine excavation of what was thought to be a burial mound. But beneath the mound, archaeologists from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's Museum of Natura History and Archaeology found something more: unusual Bronze Age petroglyphs. "We believe these are very special in a Norwegian context," says museum researcher and project manager Anne Haug. The excavation in Stj¯rdal, just north of Trondheim, was necessitated by the expansion of a necessitated by the expansion of a gravel pit. Given that project archaeologists didn't anticipate that the dig would be very complicated the museum researchers dedicated...

Roman Empire

 Third-century Roman sculptures discovered

· 02/10/2011 11:05:03 AM PST ·
· Posted by greatdefender ·
· 17 replies ·
· AFP via Yahoo! ·

ROME (AFP) -- Archaeologists have unearthed a set of six marble sculptures in Rome that likely belonged to a high-ranking official of the Roman Empire, Italy's culture ministry said Wednesday. Led by Roberto Egidi, the group of archaeologists dug up five marble heads representing members of the Severan imperial dynasty as well as a statue of the Greek god Zeus while excavating a public site. The figures were buried in an ancient fountain of a lavish Roman villa along the Via Anagnina street in southeast Rome. The "extraordinary" discovery, one of the biggest and most important in recent memory in...

British Isles

 Motorway maximus: Unearthed, a stunning Roman super-highway built 1,900 years ago

· 02/09/2011 12:56:37 AM PST ·
· Posted by Islander7 ·
· 30 replies ·
· Daily mail ·
· Feb 7, 2011 ·
· reporter ·

* The 15ft-high road ran from London to Exeter It was a route once trod by legionnaires as they marched across a conquered land. But, eventually, the Romans left Britain and the magnificent highway they created was reclaimed by nature and seemingly lost for ever. Now, some 2,000 years after it was built, it has been uncovered in the depths of a forest in Dorset. And, remarkably, it shows no sign of the potholes that blight our modern roads.

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Learning and Performing Shakespeare

· 02/08/2011 3:06:17 PM PST ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 8 replies ·
· TribLocal ·
· 2/7/2011 ·
· Peter Tantillo ·

Reading lists for middle school and high school students routinely include Shakespearean plays, but most teens find themselves struggling to translate the plays into language they can understand. However, from day one back in October, Mrs. Mary Raithel assured the St. Alphonsus Liguori middle school students that they would not have to read Macbeth. They would be learning by performing Macbeth. And so they did, as the entire St. Alphonsus Middle School staged their outstanding performances of Scenes from Macbeth on Wednesday, January 26, for an audience of nearly 150 proud parents, family members and guests. Eight scenes from this...

Navigation

 Divers find shipwreck of doomed sailor
  who inspired classic tale of Moby Dick off coast of Hawaii


· 02/11/2011 11:50:12 AM PST ·
· Posted by Stoat ·
· 37 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail / various ·
· February 11, 2011 ·

Wreck of the The Two Brothers found 600 miles northwest of Honolulu Divers have found the shipwrecked vessel of a doomed sailor who inspired the classic American tale Moby Dick off the coast of Hawaii.When, in 1820, a fierce sperm whale sank George Pollard's first whaling ship -- Essex -- it captured the imagination of author Herman Melville, who published the book in 1851.And, just three years after his first ship sank, a second whaler captained by Pollard, 30, struck a coral reef during a night storm and sank in shallow water. Marine archaeologists scouring remote atolls 600 miles northwest...

The Civil War

 711-2011: East Meets West Conference

· 02/08/2011 12:47:50 PM PST ·
· Posted by triumphant values ·
· 17 replies ·
· Virginia Military Institute ·
· January, 2011 ·
· VMI ·

A fusion between two worlds began 1300 years ago with Tariq ibn Ziyad's crossing of the Strait of Gibraltar in 711. Please join us to commemorate the brilliant contributions resulting from the blending of eastern and western cultures. The agenda will tell the vital story of the achievements when Christians, Jews, and Muslims thrived side by side in Western Europe, building a society that lit the Dark Ages. Experts will discuss how to transform education, promote tolerance, civility, political reform, and advance human development so that we can emulate the spirit and triumphs of the early years. Diplomacy and Democratization...

Faith & Philosophy

 PBS to Air Docudrama on inquisition

· 02/04/2011 12:09:04 PM PST ·
· Posted by Trooper Keeton ·
· 78 replies ·
· pbs ·
· May 7, 2007 ·
· Bill Donohue ·

Subject: Cathars: The Bad Men Regarding the PBS video: The Secret Files of the Inquisition

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Third of Russians think sun spins round Earth?

· 02/11/2011 8:43:16 PM PST ·
· Posted by george76 ·
· 56 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· Feb 11, 2011 ·
· Alissa de Carbonnel ·

Does the sun revolve around the Earth? One in every three Russians thinks so, a spokeswoman for state pollster VsTIOM said on Friday. In a survey released this week, 32 percent of Russians believed the Earth was the center of the Solar system; 55 percent that all radioactivity is man-made; and 29 percent that the first humans lived when dinosaurs still roamed the Earth.

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Choices--not discrimination--determine women scientists' success, researchers say

· 02/08/2011 10:14:42 AM PST ·
· Posted by Behind Liberal Lines ·
· 19 replies ·
· Cornell Chronicle ·
· February 7, 2011 ·
· By Anne Ju ·

It's an incendiary topic in academia -- the pervasive belief that women are underrepresented in science, math and engineering fields because they face sex discrimination in the interviewing, hiring, and grant and manuscript review processes. In a study published Feb. 7 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cornell social scientists say it's just not true. It's not discrimination in these areas, but rather, differences in resources attributable to career and family-related choices that set women back in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields, say Stephen J. Ceci, the H.L. Carr Professor of Developmental Psychology, and...

end of digest #343 20110212


1,235 posted on 02/12/2011 9:13:02 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1233 | View Replies]

To: 1010RD; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #343 20110212
· Saturday, February 12, 2011 · 20 topics · 2669177 to 2669177 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Feb 12
2011
v 7
n 31

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 343rd issue.

Only twenty topics? See, that's what happens when the CIA puppet dictatorship of Egypt engineers riots against itself in order to address food shortages created by the U.S. ethanol subsidy.

In the coming week -- Mesolithic beads found at Welsh dolmen site, Scottish standing stone falls over, Contrary to Rumor, the Two 'Maya' Tombs Are Safe, A previously Unknown Son of Pakal II of Palenque, Experts set to study state of footprints at Laetoli riverbed, Play was important - even 4,000 years ago, Czech prehistoric engraved Venus has twin sister in USA, Excavating Ancient Tiberias, and US Virgin Islands rock carving. In addition, I'd like to finish up the ones mentioned in last week's Digest.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
Uninformed Statements and Clarifications
Zahi Hawass
February 4 (?)
In my recent interview with the BBC, I made it clear that all Egyptians, with no exception, are for democratic, constitutional, and economic reforms. However, in these very critical moments of Egypt's history, I believe that President Mubarak is capable of insuring a peaceful and democratic transition of power; especially since he has announced that he would not seek re-election. I also would like to remind everybody that Mubarak is a decorated war hero, and should be allowed to leave his office in dignity. I say that as an Egyptian who honors the war heroes of this country, but not as a cabinet member.
IOW, "as a cabinet minister, I want him to remain in his constitutionally mandated role. Unless he loses the power struggle -- in that case I want him gone."

I've rarely seen a more appropriate title for a 'blog post. :')

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,236 posted on 02/12/2011 9:16:40 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1235 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #344
Saturday, February 12, 2011

Egypt

 Is Indiana Jones the next victim of Egypt's revolution? (Zahi Hawass)

· 02/14/2011 6:59:00 PM PST ·
· Posted by Pan_Yan ·
· 24 replies ·
· Christian Science Monitor ·
· February 14, 2011 ·
· Dan Murphy ·

A few days ago, in the shadow of the great Pyramids at Giza, the Egyptian monuments that draw millions of tourists to visit Egypt every year, the opinion among workers on the lower rungs of the economy was unanimous: The big man had to go. No, they weren't talking about Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian dictator chased from power last Friday. On the president, opinions were mixed. But the answer to the question "what would you most like to see changed about the regime" could be boiled down to two words: Zahi Hawass. Mr. Hawass, who has run Egypt's Supreme Council...


 King Tut statue among missing Egypt treasures, minister says

· 02/13/2011 5:50:56 AM PST ·
· Posted by Pan_Yan ·
· 46 replies ·
· CNN ·
· February 13, 2011 -- Updated 1326 GMT (2126 HKT) ·
· CNN Wire Staff ·

Cairo, Egypt (CNN) -- At least 17 artifacts from the Egyptian Museum of Cairo are missing following a break-in, the country's minister of antiquities said Sunday. The missing objects include a gilded wood statue of King Tutankhamun being carried by a goddess; parts of a a gilded wood statue of Tutankhamun harpooning; a limestone statue of Akhenaten; a statue of Nefertiti making offerings; a sandstone head of an Amarna princess; a stone statuette of a scribe from Amarna; 11 wooden shabti statuettes of Yuya; and a heart scarab of Yuya. The discovery that the ancient treasures are missing came after...


 King Tut statue among missing Egypt treasures, minister says

· 02/13/2011 8:28:09 PM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 43 replies ·
· CNN NEWS WIRE ·
· 13 Feb 2011 ·
· Staff ·

Cairo, Egypt (CNN) -- At least 17 artifacts from the Egyptian Museum of Cairo are missing following a break-in, the country's minister of antiquities said Sunday. The missing objects include a gilded wood statue of King Tutankhamun being carried by a goddess; parts of a gilded wood statue of Tutankhamun harpooning; a limestone statue of Akhenaten; a statue of Nefertiti making offerings; a sandstone head of an Amarna princess; a stone statuette of a scribe from Amarna; 1 wooden shabti statuettes of Yuya; and a heart scarab of Yuya. The discovery that the ancient treasures are missing came after museum...

Ancient Autopsies

 Mummies' false toes helped ancient Egyptians walk

· 02/13/2011 4:58:18 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 21 replies ·
· U of Manchester ·
· February 13, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Two artificial big toes -- one found attached to the foot of an ancient Egyptian mummy -- may have been the world's earliest functional prosthetic body parts, says the scientist who tested replicas on volunteers. University of Manchester researcher, Dr Jacky Finch, has shown that a three-part wood and leather artefact housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, along with a second one, the Greville Chester artificial toe on display in the British Museum, not only looked the part but also helped their toeless owners walk like Egyptians. The toes date from before 600BC, predating what was hitherto thought to...

Africa

 Ethiopian Christ Icon Found 500 Years On

· 01/27/2011 9:53:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 15 replies ·
· The Daily Telegraph (UK) ·
· 12/23/10 ·

An 15th century Ethiopian icon of the infant Christ child sitting on his mother's knee was discovered after it was cleaned by a British charity.The central panel of the triptych had over the centuries become blackened with the sprinkling of perfume that the monks use as they worship. The hugely important and stunning painted wood panel is now visible in its original coloured glory, showing a pale-faced Jesus with black curly hair and rosy cheeks. His hand has three digits raised and two down as if blessing the person looking at him. He has a halo and is wearing a...

Paleontology

 Xenacoelomorpha -- a new phylum in the animal kingdom

· 02/16/2011 8:42:51 AM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 21 replies ·
· Max-Planck-Gesellschaft ·
· February 15, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Scientists reorganise the animal phylogenetic tree An international team of scientists including Albert Poustka from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has discovered that Xenoturbellida and the acoelomorph worms, both simple marine worms, are more closely related to complex organisms like humans and sea urchins than was previously assumed. As a result they have made a major revision to the phylogenetic history of animals. Up to now, the acoelomate worms were viewed as the crucial link between simple animals like sponges and jellyfish and more complex organisms. It has now emerged that these animals did not always...

Morphology

 Biological anthropologists question claims for human ancestry

· 02/18/2011 12:46:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 16 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· 02/17/2011 ·

"Too simple" and "not so fast" suggest biological anthropologists from the George Washington University and New York University about the origins of human ancestry. In the upcoming issue of the journal Nature, the anthropologists question the claims that several prominent fossil discoveries made in the last decade are our human ancestors. Instead, the authors offer a more nuanced explanation of the fossils' place in the Tree of Life. They conclude that instead of being our ancestors the fossils more likely belong to extinct distant cousins. "Don't get me wrong, these are all important finds," said co-author Bernard Wood, University Professor...

Prehistory & Origins

 Earliest humans not so different from us, research suggests

· 02/14/2011 2:33:19 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 26 replies ·
· U of Chicago Press Journals ·
· February 14, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

That human evolution follows a progressive trajectory is one of the most deeply-entrenched assumptions about our species. This assumption is often expressed in popular media by showing cavemen speaking in grunts and monosyllables (the GEICO Cavemen being a notable exception). But is this assumption correct? Were the earliest humans significantly different from us? In a paper published in the latest issue of Current Anthropology, archaeologist John Shea (Stony Brook University) shows they were not. The problem, Shea argues, is that archaeologists have been focusing on the wrong measurement of early human behavior. Archaeologists have been searching for evidence of "behavioral...

Spark of Life

 Rewrite the textbooks (yakkity axons)

· 02/17/2011 3:28:37 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 15 replies ·
· Northwestern University ·
· February 17, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Findings challenge conventional wisdom of how neurons operate -- Neurons are complicated, but the basic functional concept is that synapses transmit electrical signals to the dendrites and cell body (input), and axons carry signals away (output). In one of many surprise findings, Northwestern University scientists have discovered that axons can operate in reverse: they can send signals to the cell body, too. It also turns out axons can talk to each other. Before sending signals in reverse, axons can perform their own neural computations without any involvement from the cell body or dendrites. This is contrary to typical neuronal communication where an...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Gonorrhea acquires a piece of human DNA

· 02/13/2011 2:39:33 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 57 replies ·
· Northwestern University ·
· February 13, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

First evidence of gene transfer from human host to bacterial pathogen offers new view of evolution, diseaseCHICAGO --- If a human cell and a bacterial cell met at a speed-dating event, they would never be expected to exchange phone numbers, much less genetic material. In more scientific terms, a direct transfer of DNA has never been recorded from humans to bacteria. Until now. Northwestern Medicine researchers have discovered the first evidence of a human DNA fragment in a bacterial genome -- in this case, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea. Further research showed the gene transfer appears to be...

Near East

 Thousands of Tombs in Saudi Desert Spotted From Space

· 02/16/2011 8:15:23 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 83 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· February 15, 2011 ·
· Rebecca Kessler ·

Little is known about the archaeology of Saudi Arabia, as the government has historically forbid aerial photographs of the landscape and religious sensitivities have made access tricky. But Google Earth is changing that. Satellite images available via the Web-based 3-D map program show that large portions of the country hold a wealth of archaeological remains that predate Islam and may be several thousand years old. Researchers recently discovered nearly 2,000 tombs by peering through one high-resolution "window" at a rocky lava field east of the city of Jeddah -- all without having to set foot in the Saudi desert. Judging...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 'World's first skyscraper sought to intimidate masses'

· 02/14/2011 5:44:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Jerusalem Post ·
· Tuesday, February 15, 2011 ·
· Arieh O'Sullivan / The Media Line ·

Long before its Biblical walls came tumbling down, Jericho's residents were being enticed to give up hunting and gathering and start farming for a living. They settled in this oasis next to the Jordan River and built a mysterious 8.5-meter (28-foot) stone tower on the edge of town. When discovered by archaeologists in 1952, it was dated at over 11,000 years old, making it the first and oldest public building even found. But its purpose and the motivation for erecting it has been debated ever since. Now, using computer technology, Israeli archaeologists are saying it was built to mark the...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 The moment Britain became an island

· 02/14/2011 6:31:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 62 replies ·
· BBC News Magazine ·
· Monday, February 14, 2011 ·
· Megan Lane ·

The coastline and landscape of what would become modern Britain began to emerge at the end of the last Ice Age around 10,000 years ago. What had been a cold, dry tundra on the north-western edge of Europe grew warmer and wetter as the ice caps melted. The Irish Sea, North Sea and the Channel were all dry land, albeit land slowly being submerged as sea levels rose. But it wasn't until 6,100BC that Britain broke free of mainland Europe for good, during the Mesolithic period -- the Middle Stone Age. It is thought a landslide in Norway triggered one...

British Isles

 Ancient Britons 'drank from skulls'

· 02/16/2011 3:40:26 PM PST ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 45 replies ·
· BBC ·
· February 16, 2011 ·
· Jonathan Amos ·

Ancient Britons were not averse to using human skulls as drinking cups, skeletal remains unearthed in southwest England suggest. The braincases from three individuals were fashioned in such a meticulous way that their use as bowls to hold liquid seems the only reasonable explanation. The 14,700-year-old objects were discovered in Gough's Cave, Somerset. Scientists from London's Natural History Museum say the skull-cups were probably used in some kind of ritual. "If you look around the world there are examples of skull-cups in more recent times - in Tibetan culture, in Fiji in Oceania, and in India," said Dr Silvia Bello,...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Briton snaps pic of 'Bownessie'

· 02/19/2011 8:56:35 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 42 replies ·
· upi ·
· Feb. 18, 2011 ·

WINDERMERE, England - A British man said he used his cellphone to snap a picture of what he said is "Bownessie," a legendary creature in England's Lake Windermere. Tom Pickles, 24, said he snapped the picture of the creature, known as the English counterpart to Scotland's Loch Ness monster, Feb. 11 while on a kayaking exercise with his company, The Daily Telegraph reported Friday. Pickles said the creature was the size of three cars and was visible for about 20 seconds. "Its skin was like a seal's but its shape was completely abnormal -- it's not like any animal I've...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Learning and Performing Shakespeare

· 02/08/2011 3:06:17 PM PST ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 8 replies ·
· TribLocal ·
· 2/7/2011 ·
· Peter Tantillo ·

Reading lists for middle school and high school students routinely include Shakespearean plays, but most teens find themselves struggling to translate the plays into language they can understand. However, from day one back in October, Mrs. Mary Raithel assured the St. Alphonsus Liguori middle school students that they would not have to read Macbeth. They would be learning by performing Macbeth. And so they did, as the entire St. Alphonsus Middle School staged their outstanding performances of Scenes from Macbeth on Wednesday, January 26, for an audience of nearly 150 proud parents, family members and guests. Eight scenes from this...

Archaeoastronomy & Megaliths

 English Heritage steps in to rescue prehistoric earthwork ["Roman Ridge"]

· 02/14/2011 6:16:22 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Stone Pages ·
· Sunday, February 13, 2011 ·
· Archaeo News ·

The so-called Roman Ridge is a 2,000-year-old earthwork which pre-dates the arrival of the Romans in Britain. Experts believe it was constructed to mark territories or grazing areas for cattle in an area which once marked the southern borders of the Brigantes, the biggest tribe in Celtic Britain who lived in what is now northern England. The portion of the earthwork, which stands up to two metres tall and stretches for 730 metres into Swinton Wood, is a rare survivor. The feature once covered 12 miles between Wincobank and the area beyond Wath upon Dearne. It will now be repaired...

Roman Empire

 Roman child's footprints found

· 02/17/2011 7:26:28 AM PST ·
· Posted by Silentgypsy ·
· 34 replies ·
· Sky News ·
· 02/15/2011 ·
· Gerard Tubb ·

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/UK-News/2000-Year-Old-Roman-Childs-Footprints-Discovered-By-Archaeologists-In-North-Yorkshire/Article/201102315931164?f=rss Exclusive: Roman Child's Footprints Found 4:38pm UK, Tuesday February 15, 2011 Gerard Tubb, north of England correspondent Two thousand-year-old footprints left by a Roman child playing by the side of a road have been found in North Yorkshire.

The Vikings

 Secrets in Stone: Rare Archaeological Find in Norway

· 02/05/2011 8:50:14 PM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 36 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 1-31-2011 ·
· Staff ·

It looked to be a routine excavation of what was thought to be a burial mound. But beneath the mound, archaeologists from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's Museum of Natura History and Archaeology found something more: unusual Bronze Age petroglyphs. "We believe these are very special in a Norwegian context," says museum researcher and project manager Anne Haug. The excavation in Stjørdal, just north of Trondheim, was necessitated by the expansion of a necessitated by the expansion of a gravel pit. Given that project archaeologists didn't anticipate that the dig would be very complicated the museum researchers dedicated...

India

 Evidence of clan-based societies in Megalithic period

· 02/14/2011 5:55:40 PM PST ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· The Hindu ·
· Saturday, February 12, 2011 ·
· Giji K. Raman ·

Earthen burials were recently found in Amaravathy and Cheruthoni. This is in addition to such findings at Santhanpara, Chempakapara, Udumpanchola, Marayur, Adimaly, Anakkara, Thopramkudy, Murikkattukudy, Kambilikandam, Parathodu and Rajakkad, he said. The findings are evidence to the existence of a clan-based society in the Megalithic period in the High Ranges of Idukki district. Researchers have found evidence of settlers near the rock mountains at Anappara in Anakkara village, he said. Heavy man-made granite structures ('veerakkallu') were found at Anappara, Adayalakkallu and many other areas. Veerakkallu is a marked burial place of warriors in the pre-historic era. These urns and granite...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Ancient canals on the Suncoast?[FL]

· 02/15/2011 3:54:50 PM PST ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 54 replies ·
· WWSB ·
· 15 Feb 2011 ·
· Josh Taylor ·

A Central Florida man believes he has discovered what's left of a highly advanced ancient civilization by using some new technology, and says some of the evidence is right here on the Suncoast. "Looking further, I begin to find the real beauty in Cortez." John Jensen is no archaeologist. He says he's just an amatuer researcher of what's under the water. Well, what he says he's observed from the sky could rewrite the history of the world. "I recognize some patterns that appear to be man-made, or at least not natural." He's identified more than 60 sites in places like...

Peru & the Andes

 Incan artefacts at Yale to be returned to Peru (Yale returns stolen artifacts)

· 02/12/2011 8:41:59 AM PST ·
· Posted by eleni121 ·
· 158 replies ·
· Financial Times ·
· Feb 11, 2011 ·
· Naomi Mapstone ·

One hundred years after American explorer Hiram Bingham took tens of thousands of artefacts from the Incan city of Machu Picchu back to his alma mater, Yale University is sending them home.

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Secret of Voynich Manuscript, an Ancient Book Written in 'Alien' Code, Partly Revealed

· 02/12/2011 2:01:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by FTJM ·
· 61 replies ·
· FoxNews.com ·
· 2/11/11 ·

Part of the mystery behind an 'alien' book no one can read has at last been unraveled. Found in a chest of books outside Rome by a dealer in antique books, the Voynich manuscript is among literature's great mysteries. The book of aging parchment is written in alien characters, some resembling Latin letters, others unlike anything used in any known language, and arranged into what appear to be words and sentences -- except they don't resemble anything written or read by human beings. And for decades, the manuscript has mystified scientists. "Is it a code, a cipher of some kind?"...


 The Mystery Of The Voynich Manuscript (New)

· 06/27/2004 6:33:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 40 replies · 487+ views ·
· Scientific American ·
· 6-28-2004 ·
· Gordon Rugg ·

The Mystery of the Voynich ManuscriptNew analysis of a famously cryptic medieval document suggests that it contains nothing but gibberish By Gordon Rugg Image: BEINECKE RARE BOOK AND MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY, YALE UNIVERSITYSTRANGE IMAGES of heavenly spheres, fantastic plants and nude women adorn the pages of the Voynich manuscript, which is written in an odd script that does not match that of any known language. The manuscript now resides at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. Overview/A Medieval Mystery In 1912 Wilfrid Voynich, an American rare-book dealer, made the find of a lifetime in the library of...


 The Voynich manuscript - Another twist in the tale (((Democrat play book I'd guess)))

· 01/08/2004 6:41:17 PM PST ·
· Posted by Phil V. ·
· 9 replies · 187+ views ·
· The Economist print edition ·
· Jan 8th 2004 ·
· staff ·

The Voynich manuscript Another twist in the tale Jan 8th 2004 From The Economist print edition A possible explanation for the world's most enigmatic book Worth 600 ducats of anybody's money! THE Voynich manuscript, once owned by Emperor Rudolph II in 16th-century Bohemia, is filled with drawings of fantastic plants, zodiacal symbols and naked ladies. Far more intriguing than its illustrations, however, is the accompanying text: 234 pages of beautifully formed, yet completely unintelligible script. Modern scholars have pored over the book since 1912, when Wilfrid Voynich, an American antiquarian, bought the manuscript and started circulating copies in the...


 Strange Artifacts - Voynich Manuscript

· 01/18/2003 2:37:38 PM PST ·
· Posted by vannrox ·
· 13 replies · 751+ views ·
· World Mysteries ·
· Various - FR post 1-5-03 ·
· Various ·

Introduction The Voynich Manuscript is considered to be 'The Most Mysterious Manuscript in the World'. To this day this medieval artifact resists all efforts at translation. It is either an ingenious hoax or an unbreakable cipher. The manuscript is named after its discoverer, the American antique book dealer and collector, Wilfrid M. Voynich, who discovered it in 1912, amongst a collection of ancient manuscripts kept in villa Mondragone in Frascati, near Rome, which had been by then turned into a Jesuit College (closed in 1953). The Voynich Manuscript is a cipher manuscript, sometimes attributed to Roger Bacon. Scientific text...


 The Mysterious Voynich Manuscript (APOD)

· 08/27/2002 6:26:51 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Jalapeno ·
· 17 replies · 339+ views ·
· APOD (Astronomy Picture of the Day) ·

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 August 26 The Mysterious Voynich Manuscript Credit: Yale University ; Digital Copyright: B. E. Schaefer (U. Texas) Explanation: The ancient text has no known title, no known author, and is written in no known language: what does it say and why does it have many astronomy illustrations? The mysterious book was once bought by an emperor, forgotten on a library shelf, sold for thousands of dollars, and...


 Astronomy Picture of the Day 8-26-02

· 08/25/2002 10:16:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by petuniasevan ·
· 12 replies · 230+ views ·
· NASA ·
· 8-26-02 ·
· Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell ·

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 August 26 The Mysterious Voynich Manuscript Credit: Yale University ; Digital Copyright: B. E. Schaefer (U. Texas) Explanation: The ancient text has no known title, no known author, and is written in no known language: what does it say and why does it have many astronomy illustrations? The mysterious book was once bought by an emperor, forgotten on a library shelf, sold for thousands of dollars, and...

World War Eleven

 Third Reich 3D movies unearthed - Documaker Philippe Mora finds unknown pre-war pics

· 02/15/2011 11:57:42 AM PST ·
· Posted by Arec Barrwin ·
· 10 replies ·
· Variety ·
· February 15, 2011 ·
· Nick Holdsworth ·

Posted: Tue., Feb. 15, 2011, 6:59am PT Third Reich 3D movies unearthed Documaker Philippe Mora finds unknown pre-war pics By Nick Holdsworth BERLIN -- Films shot on 3D in pre-war Nazi German have been unearthed in Berlin's Federal Archives. Two 30 minute black and white propaganda films in 1936 were found by Australian director Philippe Mora, who is prepping a feature length documentary on how the Nazis used images to manipulate reality. Mora broke new ground with his first film "Swastika" when it was released in 1973 featuring previously unseen color footage from Hitler's "home" movies shot on a 16mm...


 If Only Democrats Loved America Like Pilsen Czechs

· 02/17/2011 5:16:29 PM PST ·
· Posted by maddog55 ·
· 7 replies ·
· Plancks Constant ·
· 15 Aug 2010 ·
· Bernie ·

Early in the morning of 6 May 1945, American soldiers from the 2d Cavalry Group, Third Army, under the command of General George S. Patton, reached south-western Bohemia and decisively helped in the liberation of the city of Pilsen in what is now the Czech Republic. It wasn't until the fall of Communism that the citizens of Pilsen finally learned who it was that liberated their city and so every year since 1990 the city has held a "Liberation Festival" to honor American soldiers. The festival has become a local tradition and many American and Allied veterans make it a...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 White House Science Advisor: Climate Change Skeptics Are "Heretics'

· 02/18/2011 11:09:51 AM PST ·
· Posted by jazusamo ·
· 79 replies ·
· CNSNews ·
· February 17, 2011 ·
· Chris Neefus ·

John Holdren, Director of White House Science and Technology Policy with President Barack Obama at The White House (CNSNews.com) -- President Obama's top science advisor, Dr. John Holdren, told a congressman asking about climate change skeptics that climate change is accepted science and that "there are always heretics" in the scientific community."This is not the view of a few isolated scientists, this is the overwhelming view of scientists who study this matter around the world," Holdren said, adding, "There are always skeptics, there are always heretics. That's in the nature of science. VIDEO 2:57 minutes Holdren, who heads the...

Longer Perspectives

 Time for a new rigorous Association of Scientists

· 02/14/2011 7:19:05 AM PST ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 34 replies ·
· JoNova ·
· February 14th, 2011 ·
· Joanne ·

Below is the O so apt resignation of Steven J. Welcenbach from the American Chemical Society (ACS). In it he describes how the largest scientific society in the world has become a non-scientific activist group bowing to political pressure and ignoring it's members objections. Such is his ire and dismay, he is not only pulling his membership but vows to do all he can to make sure ACS does not receive public money. He suggests that many former members will form a new society that rigorously follows the scientific method (hear hear). It's time to start talking about that new...

Religion of Pieces

 711-2011: East Meets West Conference

· 02/08/2011 12:47:50 PM PST ·
· Posted by triumphant values ·
· 17 replies ·
· Virginia Military Institute ·
· January, 2011 ·
· VMI ·

A fusion between two worlds began 1300 years ago with Tariq ibn Ziyad's crossing of the Strait of Gibraltar in 711. Please join us to commemorate the brilliant contributions resulting from the blending of eastern and western cultures. The agenda will tell the vital story of the achievements when Christians, Jews, and Muslims thrived side by side in Western Europe, building a society that lit the Dark Ages. Experts will discuss how to transform education, promote tolerance, civility, political reform, and advance human development so that we can emulate the spirit and triumphs of the early years. Diplomacy and Democratization...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 The Collapse of Arab Civilization?

· 02/13/2011 8:35:02 AM PST ·
· Posted by kingattax ·
· 89 replies ·
· American Thinker ·
· February 13, 2011 ·
· Michael Fraley ·

Five years ago, Lt. Col James G. Lacey published the article "The Impending Collapse of Arab Civilization" in The Naval Institute: Proceedings." He disputed the conclusions of two books which have particularly influenced recent foreign policy and grand strategy: The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror, by Bernard Lewis, and The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order by Samuel P. Huntington. In his article, he stated: A more accurate understanding of events leads to the conclusion that Arab, not Muslim, civilization is in a state of collapse, and it just happens that most Arabs are...

The Revolution

 This Presidents Day, A Lesson In Greatness

· 02/18/2011 4:48:35 PM PST ·
· Posted by Kaslin ·
· 4 replies ·
· IBD Editorials ·
· February 18, 2011 ·
· MICHAEL RAMIREZ ·

Presidents Day is a good time to reflect both on the accomplishments of presidents past and on the lessons of history. It's also a time to honor our truly great presidents: George Washington, the father of our country; Abraham Lincoln, the great emancipator; and Ronald Reagan, the great communicator. Reagan, the greatest president of modern times, provides all of us a lesson in presidential leadership. True, it was his oratorical skill that made Reagan such a potent force. But it was his ideas and his unwavering belief in America's greatness that made him great. Take America's Cold War with the...

The Framers

 Our new Jeffersonian Era

· 02/13/2011 5:30:20 PM PST ·
· Posted by Kaslin ·
· 17 replies ·
· Townhall.com ·
· February 13, 2011 ·
· Salena Zito ·

WASHINGTON- Apropos of our democracy, Alexander Hamilton's and Thomas Jefferson's statues stand miles apart here. America always has been at odds with these two Founders' philosophies of where the nation's exceptionalism would be found. Today we are in the midst of a cultural U-turn away from a Hamiltonian meritocratic-elitist, centralized-power society to a more Jeffersonian Main Street focus, with state and local governments as the primary powerbrokers. "When the country feels as though we have pushed too far in one direction, it swings back to the other side," says Dr. Lara Brown, author of "Jockeying for the American Presidency." Prone...

Pages

 History of compulsory education. 200 years in 6:25

· 02/18/2011 2:01:29 AM PST ·
· Posted by RJR_fan ·
· 10 replies ·
· youtube ·
· Feb. 17, 2011 ·
· unknown ·

HERE is a link to an amazing little video, 6 minutes 25 seconds long, that covers 200 years of compulsory education. Memorable quotes, worth sharing widely.

end of digest #344 20110219


1,237 posted on 02/19/2011 12:57:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: ~Kim4VRWC's~; ZULU; zeugma; Zechariah_8_13; zakbrow; YOUGOTIT; Yorlik803; yhwhsman; yellowhammer; ..

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #344 20110219
· Saturday, February 19, 2011 · 37 topics · 2670569 to 2672674 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Feb 19
2011
v 7
n 32

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 344th issue. The begin-end topic numbers were the same last week (2669177 to 2669177), which was a mistake, and of course no one noticed because no one uses those but me. :') I've had to figure out what's up with that. And this week I've again experienced a formatting problem, and frankly I'm not going to worry about it. :') I need to automate this process a bit more.

Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
"Socialists cry "Power to the people", and raise the clenched fist as they say it. We all know what they really mean -- power over people, power to the State." -- Margaret Thatcher

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1,238 posted on 02/19/2011 1:00:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #345 20110226
· Saturday, February 26, 2011 · 30 topics · 2678341 to 2676931 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Feb 26
2011
v 7
n 33

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this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 345th issue. I forgot to change the date on the main header for last week's digest. I messed up the begin and end topic numbers. Who knows what else. And today I'm again jammed for time, because unlike I sometimes do, I didn't work on the basics of this issue last night or earlier in the week, other than a bare-bones message. Had I done that, I might have noticed my earlier transgressions. So, my apologies, here's the topics that appeared this week: Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
Quiz:
  1. It's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease!
  2. It's the empty can that makes the most noise.
  3. It's the quacking duck that gets shot.
  4. All of the above.
  5. Some of the above.

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1,239 posted on 02/26/2011 8:14:11 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #346 20110305
· Saturday, March 05, 2011 · 30 topics · 1523984 to 2680655 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Mar 05
2011
v 7
n 34

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this
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Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 346th issue. If I've included anyone who's asked to be removed, or not included someone whom I've added, you have my apologies. I hope to resume my usual older way of doing the Digest. But for the second week in a row, here's the links to topics that appeared this week: Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
A feeble executive implies a feeble execution of the government. A feeble execution is but another phrase for a bad execution; and a government ill executed, whatever may be its theory, must be, in practice, a bad government. -- Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 70, 1788

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1,240 posted on 03/05/2011 5:47:50 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv; All

Can anyone put me in touch with someone who could transliterate an Egyptian 18th dynasty prayer-—one line?


1,241 posted on 03/09/2011 7:39:19 AM PST by stanz
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To: stanz

I can’t do it, but I’ll look for a couple of URLs for you. You’ll need a picture of the inscription; however, chances are that it’s been translated, and you’ll just need to know where the inscription is and what it’s a part of.


1,242 posted on 03/09/2011 6:09:04 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks. Actually, I was looking to transliterate from English to hieroglyphs. The quote is an 18th dynasty blessing..supposedly an inscription from the tomb of Tutankhamun which reads “God be between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk.” I tried doing an online search,but most of the websites translate things phonetically as in “your name on a cartouche.” Consulted Gardiner, but I don’t know enough grammar to do an authentic trasliteration


1,243 posted on 03/09/2011 6:31:02 PM PST by stanz
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To: stanz

“the empty places you must walk” is from the Book of the Dead, I believe. The Wiccans (giggle) among others have appropriated it.


1,244 posted on 03/11/2011 5:23:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I just went through the entirety of Budge’s “Book of the Dead” which is the Papyrus of Ani and could not find it.


1,245 posted on 03/12/2011 11:05:58 AM PST by stanz
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To: SunkenCiv


1,246 posted on 03/12/2011 11:15:36 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #347 20110312
· Saturday, March 12, 2011 · 30 topics · 1680722 to 2684571 · 765 members ·

 
Saturday
Mar 12
2011
v 7
n 35

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issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 347th issue. I'm closing in on the resumption of the old version of the Digest. Then again, I've been known to be fickle. Meanwhile, here's the links to topics that appeared this week (sorted newest to oldest): Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
Those who stand for nothing fall for anything. -- Alexander Hamilton

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1,247 posted on 03/12/2011 11:32:00 AM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: stanz

Rarnaby Budge? Sorry, Monty Python flashback.

http://www.worldprayers.org/frameit.cgi?/archive/prayers/celebrations/god_be_between_you_and.html

God be between you and harm in all the empty places you walk. [blessing of the 18th egyptian dynasty]

It popped into a lot of consciousnesses due to its use in Bab5. Wikiquote pointed here:

http://harlanellison.com/iwrite/paladin.htm

A blessing of the 18th Egyptian Dynasty:
God be between you and harm in all the empty places you walk.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paladin_of_the_Lost_Hour
http://harlanellison.com/iwrite/aboutpal.htm
http://harlanellison.com/iwrite/paladin.htm

http://www.b5tv.com/showthread.php?p=365603

It’s also claimed that its first appearance was in Bab5 and to check the dates. Here’s a bit more:

http://www.allsubs.org/search-movie-quotes/King%20Tut%27s%20Curse/1

Movie Name: Tut: The Boy King (1978)

Quote: [last lines]

Himself - Host: A final moment of contemplation, an early Egyptian grace note in the distant music of the Nile: God be between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk. Good night.

and here’s some other use of it:

http://circleoflifeservices.com/pages/baby_blessings.html

A Blessing For All Children
May God be between you and harm in all the empty places you walk.
May the power of water bring you life and sustenance, and the courage to feel through your way.
May the power of fire bring you strength and passion to go along your way.
May the power of earth bring you grounding in a strong body, to be centred in you way.
May the power of air bring you a clear mind to see your way.
Ann Arthur (With Hands Together)

Book of the Dead (Budge)
http://www.thenazareneway.com/ebod_full_text.html


1,248 posted on 03/12/2011 12:53:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: 1010RD; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #348 20110319
· Saturday, March 19, 2011 · 30 topics · 2691238 to 2687861 · 768 members ·

 
Saturday
Mar 19
2011
v 7
n 36

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 348th issue. I still haven't finished my lovely project, so again, here's the links to topics that appeared this week (sorted newest to oldest): Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
"Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war." -- Otto von Bismarck

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1,249 posted on 03/19/2011 9:02:21 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; Androcles; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods Graves Glyphs Digest #349 20110326
· Saturday, March 26, 2011 · 34 topics · 2691290 to 798384 · 769 members ·

 
Saturday
Mar 26
2011
v 7
n 37

view
this
issue


Freeper Profiles
Welcome to the 349th issue. Since starting this stopgap method of doing the Digest, I probably have neglected the topic count. My apologies. For what I hope is the last time before resuming the old Digest, here's the links to topics that appeared this week (sorted newest to oldest): Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR gets shared here:
"Every Rebel guerrilla and jayhawker, every man who ran to Canada to avoid the draft, every bounty-hunter, every deserter, every cowardly sneak that ran from danger and disgraced his flag, every man who loves slavery and hates liberty,... and every villain, of whatever name or crime, who loves power more than justice, slavery more than freedom, is a Democrat." -- James A. Garfield, 1866 [quoted by MediaMole]

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1,250 posted on 03/26/2011 7:36:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Thanks Cincinna for this link -- http://www.friendsofitamar.org)
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