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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv


(Excerpt) Read more at freerepublic.com ...


TOPICS: Agriculture; Astronomy; Books/Literature; Education; History; Hobbies; Miscellaneous; Reference; Science; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: alphaorder; archaeology; catastrophism; dallasabbott; davidrohl; economic; emiliospedicato; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; impact; paleontology; rohl; science; spedicato
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #405 · v 8 · n 41
Saturday, April 21, 2012
 
36 topics
2874830 to 2755887
809 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 36 topic issue #405. That's a lot of topics. Many of them were dredged up from the FRchives. Last week I doofused up the count, we had ten topics, not 28. Probably no one noticed.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Spotted this late Sunday evening and immediately knew it would be the quote this week:
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,401 posted on 04/21/2012 11:45:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topic links, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #406
Saturday, April 28, 2012

Roman Empire

 Smuggled Cargo Found on Ancient Roman Ship

· 04/28/2012 7:12:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Wednesday, April 25, 2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Following an analysis of the jars and their contents, Tusa and colleagues concluded that the 52- by 16-foot ship was sailing from North Africa when she sank some 1,700 years ago, probably while trying to enter the local river Birgi. In North Africa the vaulting tubes cost a quarter of what builders paid for them in Rome. "It was a somewhat tolerated smuggling activity, used by sailors to round their poor salaries. They bought these small tubes cheaper in Africa, hid them everywhere within the ship, and then re-sold them in Rome," Tusa said. According to Frank Sear, professor of...


 In a bronze inscription, a remnant of Roman might

· 04/22/2012 8:41:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· Saturday, April 21, 2012 ·
· Matti Friedman ·

We do not know the name of the Roman war veteran who owned this bronze certificate, which marked his discharge from active service 1,922 years ago. His name was engraved on the tablet when it was issued in Rome, but that part is missing. We do know that he was discharged in 90 CE and that he served in one of the empire's combat units stationed in the unruly province of Judea. Because a Roman soldier served 25 years before being released, we can deduce that this anonymous fighter was in active service as a younger man during one of...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Archaeological Find Supports Biblical Portrait of the Davidic Kingdom

· 04/23/2012 6:45:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 37 replies ·
· The Sacred Page ·
· April 20, 2012 ·

In 2008 I first ran a story about a major archaeological discovery at Khirbet Qeiyafa. The Israeli Antiquities Authority is releasing the preliminary report of the finds at Khirbet Qeiyafa. As I explained then, the findings are challenging skeptical scholars' claims. As I explained then, according to skeptical scholars the accounts of the kingdoms of David and Solomon are myths--essentially the Israelite equivalent of Arthurian legends of Camelot and the Roundtable. In short, in their view, it was simply fabricated. After Israel's Babylonian exile, the Jewish leaders invented these stories. The Israelites simply "idealized" their past; the Davidic traditions...

Faith & Philosophy

 Israeli researcher: Mikvehs show that Galilee cave dwellers were likely kohanim

· 04/28/2012 7:56:11 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Ha'aretz ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Eli Ashkenazi ·

The caves in which the purification baths were found were 'caves of refuge,' where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule. A fifth mikveh has been found in the caves on the Galilee's Cliffs of Arbel, indicating that the people who lived there under Roman rule were most likely kohanim, Jews of the priestly class, said Yinon Shivtiel, one of the researchers who found the ritual bath... The caves in which the purification baths were found were "caves of refuge," where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule, particularly during the Jewish...

Religion of Pieces

 Temple Denial

· 04/24/2012 4:42:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 15 replies ·
· Daily Beast ·
· Apr 24, 2012 ·
· Benny Morris ·

Leafing through a popular Palestinian tourist guidebook, Palestine: A Guide, by Mariam Shahin, I came across the following sentence concerning the Temple Mount compound (in Arabic, al-haram al-sharif, the noble sanctuary) on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem's Old City: "It is this whole area that fanatic Israelis want to destroy in order to 'rebuild' a temple, which they claim once stood there." Of course, there are a handful of Israeli "fanatics" who would like to destroy the compound's two Muslim mosques -- the Dome of the Rock and al-Aksa -- and rebuild the Jewish Temple on the site. The overwhelming majority of Israelis reject them...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Robert Spencer Asks: Did Muhammad Exist?

· 04/23/2012 4:47:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 93 replies ·
· FrontPage Magazine ·
· April 23, 2012 ·
· Bruce Thornton ·

Editor's note: Robert Spencer's acclaimed new book, Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins, is now available. One of the jihadists' most potent psychological weapons is the double standard Muslims have imposed on the West. Temples and churches are destroyed and vandalized, Christians murdered and driven from the lands of Christianity's birth, anti-Semitic lunacy propagated by high-ranking Muslim clerics, and Christian territory like northern Cyprus ethnically cleansed...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ancient Egyptian Mummy Suffered Rare and Painful Disease

· 04/28/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

Around 2,900 years ago, an ancient Egyptian man, likely in his 20s, passed away after suffering from a rare, cancerlike disease that may also have left him with a type of diabetes. When he died he was mummified, following the procedure of the time. The embalmers removed his brain (through the nose it appears), poured resin-like fluid into his head and pelvis, took out some of his organs and inserted four linen "packets" into his body. At some point the mummy was transferred to the 2,300 year-old sarcophagus of a woman named Kareset, an artifact that is now in the...

Diet & Cuisine

 Spaniards once ate elephant meat

· 04/24/2012 1:07:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 18 replies ·
· Spero News ·
· April 24, 2012 06:00 ·

Spaniards once ate elephant meat Tuesday, April 24, 2012 By Spero News Researchers have found cut and percussion marks in elephant bones in the site of Preresa. Article Tools Discuss Humans that populated the banks of the river Manzanares (Madrid, Spain) during the Middle Palaeolithic (between 127,000 and 40,000 years ago) fed themselves on pachyderm meat and bone marrow. This is what a Spanish study shows and has found percussion and cut marks on elephant remains in the site of Preresa (Madrid). In prehistoric times, hunting animals implied a risk and required a considerable amount of energy. Therefore, when the...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Evidence of the earliest human activity found in Chile's south

· 04/28/2012 8:46:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Santiago Times ·
· 22 April 2012 ·
· Jason Suder ·

University archaeologists found 14,000-year-old knives while studying elephant ancestors. Archaeologists and anthropologists excavating a site in the south of Chile have uncovered stones that are believed to have been used as tools by humans 14,000 years ago. Scientists from Universidad Cat√›lica de Temuco and Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh) were able to determine these were tools because they exhibit the marking congruent with ancient knives and cutting utensils. The Volcano of Osorno nearby the site where scientists uncovered 14,000-year-old tools. (Photo by Claudio Sep˙lveda Geoffroy/Flickr) "There are rock detachments from a simple, intentional blow that demonstrate that they were doctored,...

Underwater Archaeology

 Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

· 04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· Wednesday, April 25, 2012 ·
· Frank Nowikowski ·

One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...

Navigation

 Japanese kayaker hopes to show Kennewick Man could have traveled by boat

· 04/23/2012 9:44:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 30 replies ·
· Tri-City Herald ·
· 10 April 2012 ·
· John Trumbo ·

By week's end, Ryota Yamada hopes to slip his sea kayak gently into the Columbia River at Clover Island, embarking on the first leg of a 10,000-mile adventure to Japan. The retired scientist who did nanotechnological research intends to paddle downriver to the ocean, then via the Inland Passage north to Alaska, and eventually across the Bering Strait to the Asian continent. It will take him four summers, but if he succeeds in reaching his homeland, Yamada said, he will have shown that Kennewick Man could have made his way by boat 9,300 years ago from Japan to North America....


 Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

· 04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 27 replies ·
· The Tyee ·
· 03 April 2012 ·
· Daniel Wood ·

Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...

Age of Sail

 Anniversary of Mutiny on the "Bounty": Pitcairn Island Photos

· 04/28/2012 2:20:14 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 15 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· April 27, 2012 ·
· Andrew Howley ·

223 years ago this Sunday, on April 29, 1789, Fletcher Christian and 24 other sailors held the domineering Captain Bligh at bayonet point against the mast of His Majesty's Armed Vessel Bounty in the most famous mutiny in history. One month ago, National Geographic embarked on a journey through their footsteps, but with the very different goal of studying the pristine coral reefs of the area (read blogs). Bligh was set adrift in the ship's small launch with 18 loyal shipmates, a compass, his journals, some tools, supplies, cutlasses, and food, rum, wine, and water. He navigated the castaways through...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 'Junk DNA' Can Sense Viral Infection: Promising Tool in the Battle Between Pathogen and Host

· 04/28/2012 3:27:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 11 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Apr. 24, 2012 ·
· NA ·

Once considered unimportant "junk DNA," scientists have learned that non-coding RNA (ncRNA) -- RNA molecules that do not translate into proteins -- play a crucial role in cellular function. Mutations in ncRNA are associated with a number of conditions, such as cancer, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Now, through the use of "deep sequencing," a technology used to sequence the genetic materials of the human genome, Dr. Noam Shomron of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine has discovered that when infected with a virus, ncRNA gives off biological signals that indicate the presence of an infectious agent, known as a...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Researchers make alternatives to DNA and RNA

· 04/21/2012 10:34:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by OldNavyVet ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Los Angeles Times ·
· 21 April 2012 ·
· Eryn Brown ·

DNA and RNA molecules are the basis for all life on Earth, but they don't necessarily have to be the basis for all life everywhere, scientists have shown.


 Enzymes grow artificial DNA

· 04/28/2012 11:37:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 4 replies ·
· Nature News ·
· 19 April 2012 ·
· Helen Shen ·

Synthetic strands with different backbones replicate and evolve just like the real thing. Nearly all organisms share a single genetic language: DNA. But scientists have now demonstrated that several lab-made variants of DNA can store and transmit information much like the genuine article. Researchers led by Philipp Holliger, a synthetic biologist at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, say that the alternative molecules could help others to develop new drugs and nanotechnologies. They publish their results today in Science1. DNA is made up of nucleic acid bases -- labelled A, C, G and T -- ...

India

 Ancient hero stone with inscriptions unearthed

· 04/28/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Hindu ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Special Correspondent ·

An ancient hero stone with inscriptions has been unearthed at Karattampatti near Thuraiyur, about 35 km from here. The hero stone was discovered from a field at a village during a field study taken up by a research team led by Subash Chandira Bose, advisor for the archaeological wing of the Centre for Cultural Studies, Coimbatore, following a tip-off given by Durairaj, a local resident. Mr.Bose, in a press release, said the bas-relief hero stone measuring 30 centimetres in width and 92 centimetres in height has been carved within a rectangular vertical frame with excellent craftsmanship. It depicts a warrior...

Greece

 Ancient Temple Discovered in Messinia

· 04/28/2012 4:54:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Greek Reporter ·
· April 24, 2012 ·
· Areti Kotseli ·

Archaeological research reveals an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, opposite the well-known imposing temple of Epicurean Apollo. The area around the newly discovered temple was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Dr. Xeni Arapogianni explains that when the small temple was demolished in order to build a new one, topmasts, triglyphs and other parts of the ancient temple were found. The excavation started back in 2010, revealing the temple as well as bronze items and a great number of...

Epigraphy & Language

 The History of U.S. Paper Money

· 04/24/2012 6:25:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 19 replies ·
· Numismaster.com ·
· April 23, 2012 ·
· Arlyn G. Sieber ·

Excerpted from Warman's Coins and Paper Money by Arlyn G. Sieber, available from http://www.ShopNumisMaster.com. During the Revolutionary War, the states and Continental Congress continued to issue paper money, but its backing in hard currency was spotty at best. Inflation ensued, and the notes' values plummeted. Some were called "shinplasters" because early Americans put them in their boots to help keep their feet warm. The saying "not worth a Continental" had its roots in the devaluation of Continental currency. Designs on state notes varied, but most featured inscriptions within elaborate borders. Coats of arms and crowns were also common. During the...

Longer Perspectives

 Powerful Government Equals Powerful Problems

· 04/19/2012 12:54:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Kaslin ·
· 8 replies ·
· Townhall.com ·
· April 19, 2012 ·
· Jackie Gingrich Cushman ·

History is not simply dates, events and results. Instead, it's people's lives, their hopes and dreams, their situation and their outcomes based on their and other people's actions. While history is learned by looking backward, knowing the outcome, life is lived marching forward, unsure of what might happen. To understand history, it helps to understand the circumstances of the time. How did people live, who was in charge, who had rights, power and money? What is commonplace in one time and place would be unthinkable in another. For example, most Americans understand that by law, they have individual rights....

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Never-before-seen photos from 100 years ago tell vivid story of gritty New York City

· 04/27/2012 1:25:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by lowbridge ·
· 37 replies ·
· ap/daily mail ·
· april 24, 2012 ·

Almost a million images of New York and its municipal operations have been made public for the first time on the internet. The city's Department of Records officially announced the debut of the photo database. Culled from the Municipal Archives collection of more than 2.2 million images going back to the mid-1800s, the 870,000 photographs feature all manner of city oversight --from stately ports and bridges to grisly gangland killings.

end of digest #406 20120428


1,402 posted on 04/28/2012 8:51:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

EPIC WORK! Thanks for all you do for us here on FR.


1,403 posted on 04/28/2012 8:55:10 PM PDT by Graewoulf ((Dictator Baby-Doc Barack's obama"care" violates Sherman Anti-Trust Law, AND U.S. Constitution.))
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #406 · v 8 · n 42
Saturday, April 28, 2012
 
21 topics
2877700 to 2874855
809 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 21 topic issue #406, rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: I may have used this before, but regardless, I'm using it now:
  • "The demon that you can swallow gives you it's power, and the greater life's pain, the greater life's reply." -- Joseph Campbell [cited by bigheadfred on his profile page>]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,404 posted on 04/28/2012 8:55:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks, Civ
Appreciate your hard work and excellent product.
Always interesting, always challenging.


1,405 posted on 04/28/2012 10:08:14 PM PDT by Cincinna ( *** NOBAMA 2012 ***)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1404 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

Thanks Graewoulf!


1,406 posted on 04/29/2012 4:56:56 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Cincinna

Thanks Cincinna!


1,407 posted on 04/29/2012 5:06:31 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topic links, order added, newest to oldest, plus the first topic for next week (it duplicates two earlier topics):

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #407
Saturday, May 5, 2012

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Ancient migration: Coming to America

· 05/02/2012 10:12:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 76 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 02 May 2012 ·
· Adam Curry ·

For decades, scientists thought that the Clovis hunters were the first to cross the Arctic to America. They were wrong --- and now they need a better theory The mastodon was old, its teeth worn to nubs. It was perfect prey for a band of hunters, wielding spears tipped with needle-sharp points made from bone. Sensing an easy target, they closed in for the kill. Almost 14,000 years later, there is no way to tell how many hits it took to bring the beast to the ground near the coast of present-day Washington state. But at least one struck home,...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Experts solve mystery of ancient stone monument near Atlanta

· 04/12/2011 12:01:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 29 replies ·
· Examiner ·
· 11 April 2011 ·
· Richard Thornton ·

Rock art specialists from around North America have finally solved this century old archaeological riddle. The stone slab is evidence that native peoples from Puerto Rico or Cuba once lived within the interior of Eastern North America. One day, long before Christopher Columbus claimed to have landed on the eastern edge of Asia, a forgotten people cut steps in the rocks leading up a steep bluff near the Chattahoochee River in the northwest section of the State of Georgia. They carved a supernatural figure on a four feet by one foot granite slab and erected it on the top of...

Australia & the Pacific

 Did humans devastate Easter Island on arrival?

· 03/10/2006 4:17:24 AM PST ·
· Posted by S0122017 ·
· 27 replies ·
· 482+ views ·
· New Scientist ·
· 9 March 2006 ·
· Bob Holmes ·

Early settlers to the remote Easter Island stripped the island's natural resources to erect towering stone statues (Image: Terry L Hunt)Related Articles What caused the collapse of Easter Island civilisation? 25 September 2004 Last of the great migrations 24 April 2004 Histories: Carteret's South Sea trouble 11 February 2006 The first humans may have arrived on Easter Island several centuries later than previously supposed, suggests a new study. If so, these Polynesian settlers must have begun destroying the island's forests almost immediately after their arrival. Easter Island...

Climate

 Ancient network of rivers and lakes found in Arabian Desert

· 05/03/2012 3:57:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 27 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 1, 2012 ·
· Oxford U ·

Satellite images have revealed that a network of ancient rivers once coursed their way through the sand of the Arabian Desert, leading scientists to believe that the region experienced wetter periods in the past... Over the course of five years the researchers will study the landscape features and excavate sites of likely archaeological interest, using the network of water courses as a map. They will use the latest dating techniques to pinpoint the ages of fossils of animals, plants and different stone tool technologies and compare the similarities and differences displayed in the region's rock art. The team's main focus...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

· 04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, April 24, 2012 ·
· Inst. of Vertebrate Paleontology
  and Paleoanthropology ·

The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 MtDNA tests trace all modern horses back to single ancestor 140,000 years ago

· 04/29/2012 5:53:32 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· January 31, 2012 ·
· Bob Yirka ·

For many years archeologists and other scientists have debated the origins of the domesticated horse. Nailing down a time frame is important because many historians view the relationship between man and horse as one of the most important in the development of our species. Horses allowed early people to hunt for faster prey, to wander farther than before and to create much bigger farms due to pulling plows. Now, new evidence has come to light suggesting that all modern horses, which are believed to have been domesticated approximately 10,000 years ago, descended from one mare around 140,000 years ago. The...

Navigation

 Another Genetic Quirk of the Solomon Islands: Blond Hair

· 05/04/2012 7:46:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 14 replies ·
· The New York Times ·
· 03 May 2012 ·
· Sindya N. Bhanoo ·

In the Solomon Islands, about 10 percent of the dark-skinned indigenous people have strikingly blond hair. Some islanders theorize that the coloring could be a result of excess sun exposure, or a diet rich in fish. Another explanation is that the blondness was inherited from distant ancestors --- European traders and explorers who came to the islands. But that's not the case, researchers now report. The gene variant responsible for blond hair in the islanders is distinctly different from the gene that causes blond hair in Europeans. "For me it breaks down any kind of simple notions you might have...

Epigraphy & Language

 Hebrew seal bearing the name 'Matanyahu' uncovered in Jerusalem

· 05/03/2012 3:51:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs ·
· 1 May 2012 ·
· Israel Antiquities Authority ·

The remains of a building dating to the end of the First Temple period were discovered below the base of the ancient drainage channel that is currently being exposed in Israel Antiquities Authority excavations beneath Robinson's Arch in the Jerusalem Archaeological Garden, adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount. This building is the closest structure to the First Temple found to date in archaeological excavations. According to Eli Shukron, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "the name Matanyahu, like the name Netanyahu, means giving to God. These names are mentioned several times in the...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ötzi the Iceman: scientists find 5,000-year-old blood sample

· 05/03/2012 12:42:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Guardian (UK) ·
· Wednesday, May 2, 2012 ·
· Tom Kington ·

As cold cases go, it does not get much colder than ÷tzi the Iceman, whose body was found frozen solid in the Italian Alps 5,300 years after he died from an arrow wound. Since he was discovered by trekkers in 1991, scientists have mapped his DNA and figured out everything from what ailments he suffered from (Lyme disease and a weak heart) to the last meal he ate (venison and ibex) before he was shot in the back, probably by an enemy tribesman. Now, using advanced nanotechnology, they have located traces of ÷tzi's blood, the oldest blood sample ever retrieved....

Not-so-Ancient Autopsies

 Synchrotron scientists and international team reveal tales told by old bones

· 05/03/2012 12:47:54 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· April 30, 2012 ·
· U of Saskatchewan ·

Using the presence of trace amounts of lead and strontium as clues, the team is using the CLS to hunt for the presence of these elements in tiny shards of bones from sailors and others interred in a Royal Navy cemetery in the late 1700s to early 1800s. The work is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Bone is a living tissue, formed as we grow and healing after it breaks. It is also constantly being rebuilt and recycled by the body. As new bone is laid down, there is the chance that metals in the body will...

Age of Sail

 Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot

· 05/04/2012 8:05:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by kiryandil ·
· 14 replies ·
· web.mac.com ·
· Sunday, July 11, 2010 ·
· Douglas Hunter ·

Alwyn Ruddock, an 89-year-old historian, had all her notes & research materials detailing perhaps tremendous discoveries relating to John Cabot's voyages to the New World in the late 1490s posthumously destroyed. This article, Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot, gives a lengthy retelling of that tale. From what I can tell, it looks as though our good friend "Peer Review" or its relatives, well-known to us from the phony Global Warming money scam, is mostly responsible for the destruction of her astonishing research on Cabot and his predecessors. Dr Evan Jones and his research partner, Margaret Condon, have set...

Early America

 Is this Walter Raleigh's 'lost colony' drawn in invisible ink?..

· 05/03/2012 11:57:48 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 20 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 3, 2012 ·
· Simon Tomlinson ·

It is a mystery that has perplexed historians for more than 400 years - what ever became of the 120 settlers who tried to establish England's first colony on the north-east coast of America? Queen Elizabeth I and famed explorer Sir Walter Raleigh had hoped the expedition in the 1580s would create a capital in the New World, but something went terribly wrong. The men, women and children simply vanished - possibly massacred by native American Indians - any evidence of a settlement disappeared and the infamous 'lost colony' became rooted in American folklore. But solving the centuries-old mystery may...


 Researchers say they have new clue to Lost Colony

· 05/04/2012 9:48:24 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 18 replies ·
· http://phys.org ·
· 05-04-12 ·
· Martha Waggoner ·

A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalizing clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from North Carolina's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginea Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 African Slaves Brought First Rice Riches to U.S.?

· 12/20/2007 7:49:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by Lorianne ·
· 45 replies ·
· 236+ views ·
· National Geographic News ·
· November 28, 2007 ·
· John Roach ·

A rice variety that made many a colonial plantation owner rich was brought to the United States from West Africa, according to preliminary genetic research. The finding suggests that African slaves are responsible for nearly every facet of one of the first rice varieties grown in the U.S., as well as one of the most lucrative crops in early American history. "Not only did they bring the technology, the how-to, they brought the cultivar," said Anna McClung, a genetic researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Stuttgart, Arkansas. West Africans had been growing varieties of rice for several thousand...

Farty Shades of Green

 The Fungus That Conquered Europe

· 03/19/2008 11:33:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 68 replies ·
· 1,617+ views ·
· NY Times ·
· March 17, 2008 ·
· John Reader ·

The feast of Ireland's patron saint has always been an occasion for saluting the beautiful land "where the praties grow," but it's also a time to look again at the disaster that established around the world the Irish communities that today celebrate St. Patrick's Day: the Great Potato Famine of 1845-6. In its wake, the Irish left the old country, with more than half a million settling in United States. The famine and the migrations changed Irish and American history, of course, but they drastically changed Britain too. Americans may think of the disease that destroyed Ireland's potato crops, late...

Diet & Cuisine

 Atkins diet beats low-fat fare

· 11/18/2002 5:32:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by Paradox ·
· 211 replies ·
· 4,114+ views ·
· MSNBC ·
· 11-18-02 ·
· AP ·

Nov. 18 --- Multitudes swear by the high-fat, low-carbohydrate Atkins diet, and now a carefully controlled study backs them up: Low-carb may actually take off more weight than low-fat and may be surprisingly better for cholesterol, too. ... Westman studied 120 overweight volunteers, who were randomly assigned to the Atkins diet or the heart association's Step 1 diet, a widely used low-fat approach. On the Atkins diet, people limited their carbs to less than 20 grams a day, and 60 percent of their calories came from fat. "It was high fat, off the scale," he said. After six months, the...

Longer Perspectives

 Science and the Republican Brain

· 04/30/2012 2:21:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 47 replies ·
· The American Magazine ·
· April 30, 2012 ·
· Lee Harris ·

The so-called Republican brain, with its deep resistance to yielding before mere scientific evidence, has played an indispensable role in the making of modern science, long before the emergence of the Grand Old Party. A new term of political opprobrium has been loosed upon the world: anti-science. Like many terms of abuse, it is easier to convey its meaning by an illustration than by a rigorous definition. For example, "If those damn Republicans weren't so anti-science, we might have a chance of dealing with global warming." Here's another example: "Those damn Republicans are so anti-science that they want to see...

Religion of Pieces

 Inventing Muhammad? (Which of the many accounts of the Prophet Muhammad's life is true?)

· 04/23/2012 4:17:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 68 replies ·
· American Thinker ·
· 04/23/2012 ·
· Robert Spencer ·

Why would it matter if Muhammad never existed? Certainly the accepted story of Islam's origins is taken for granted as historically accurate; while many don't accept Muhammad's claim to have been a prophet, few doubt that there was a man named Muhammad who in the early seventh century began to claim that he was receiving messages from Allah through the angel Gabriel. Many who hear about my new book "Did Muhammad Exist? An Inquiry Into Islam's Obscure Origins" ask why it would matter whether or not Muhammad existed --- after all, a billion Muslims believe he did, and they are...

Paleontology

 Large, Mysterious Monster Fossil Puzzles Experts

· 05/04/2012 10:07:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 18 replies ·
· Scientific Computing ·
· 5/1/12 ·

UC Paleontologist David Meyer, left and Carlton Brett, right, flank Ron Fine, who discovered the large fossil spread out on the table. Around 450 million years ago, shallow seas covered the Cincinnati region and harbored one very large and now very mysterious organism. Despite its size, no one has ever found a fossil of this "monster" until its discovery by an amateur paleontologist last year. The fossilized specimen, a roughly elliptical shape with multiple lobes, totaling almost seven feet in length, was unveiled at the North-Central Section 46th Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America in Dayton, OH....

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Rising from the Ooze

· 05/01/2012 9:33:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 15 replies ·
· The Daily Scan ·
· May 1, 2012 ·

Researchers from the University of Oslo have discovered a protozoan species that may belong to a new branch of the tree of life, says Popular Science's Rebecca Boyle. The researchers, who describe their findings in Molecular Biology and Evolution, say they found the microorganism --- called Collodictyon --- in lake sludge in Norway, and that it may be related to some of the planet's earliest life forms. "It is not a fungus, alga, parasite, plant, or animal, yet it has features associated with other kingdoms of life," Boyle says. "It could be a founding member of the newest kingdom on...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 History's Most Overlooked Mysteries

· 04/29/2012 7:17:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wildbill ·
· 38 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· July 25, 2007 ·
· Tuan C. Nguyen ·

1. Disappearance of the Indus Valley Civilization With a culture that stretched from western India to Afghanistan and a population numbering over five million, the ancient Indus Valley people --- India's oldest known civilization --- were an impressive and apparently sanitary bronze-age bunch. The scale of their baffling and abrupt collapse rivals that of the great Mayan decline. But it wasn't until 1922 that excavations revealed a hygienically-advanced culture which maintained a sophisticated sewage drainage system and immaculate bathrooms. Strangely, there is no archaeological evidence of armies, slaves, social conflicts or other vices prevalent in ancient societies. Even to the very end, it seems,...

end of digest #407 20120505


1,408 posted on 05/05/2012 3:31:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #407 · v 8 · n 43
Saturday, May 5, 2012
 
21 topics
2879539 to 2877922
808 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 21 topic issue #407, rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.

There has been a slight uptick in troll activity, but I'd not bothered to mention it the past three weeks or so.
· view this issue ·
Here's something that didn't get posted (AFAIK) or pinged, obviously a link to an offsite story: Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Have a great weekend, great week, and great month of May.
  • "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson [cited by Jean S on FR profile page>]
 
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1,409 posted on 05/05/2012 9:34:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #408
Saturday, May 12, 2012
Let's Have Jerusalem

3,000-year-old artifacts fuel Biblical archaeology debate
· 05/08/2012 1:00:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 36 replies ·
· The Times of Israel ·
· May 8, 2012 ·
· MATTI FRIEDMAN ·
New finds presented Tuesday from an intriguing site in the Judean Hills are part of a scholarly argument about the accuracy of the Bible The excavation at Hirbet Qeiyafa is currently one of the most important in the world of Biblical archaeology (Courtesy of Hebrew University of Jerusalem)Two rare 3,000-year-old models of ancient shrines were among artifacts presented by an Israeli archaeologist on Tuesday as finds he said offered new support for the historical veracity of the Bible. The archaeologist, Yosef Garfinkel of Hebrew University, is excavating a site known as Hirbet Qeiyafa, located in the Judean hills not far...
Earliest Evidence of Biblical Cult Discovered (From time of King David)
· 05/11/2012 8:30:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 8 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· May 10, 2012 ·
· Wynne Parry ·
For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered shrines from the time of the early Biblical kings in the Holy Land, providing the earliest evidence of a cult, they say. Excavation within the remains of the roughly 3,000-year-old fortified city of Khirbet Qeiyafa, located about 19 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem, have revealed three large rooms used as shrines, along with artifacts, including tools, pottery and objects, such as alters associated with worship.
Archaeologists: Israeli artifacts support Solomon's Temple
· 05/12/2012 10:53:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 4 replies ·
· Sun Herald ·
· 05/12/2012 ·
· MICHELE CHABIN - Religion News Service ·
JERUSALEM -- Archaeologists have unearthed a trove of artifacts dating back to the time of the biblical King David that they say closely correspond to the description of Solomon's Temple found in the Book of Kings. Hebrew University archaeologist Yosef Garfinkel said the find "is extraordinary" first because it marks the first time that shrines from the time of the early Israelite kings were found. In addition, two small, well-preserved models discovered in the excavations closely resemble elements described in the Bible. The multiyear excavations took place at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem, adjacent...
Faith & Philosophy

Revealed: The scandalous history of Judaism's most precious book
· 05/11/2012 7:51:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 3 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· 10 May 2012 ·
· Times of Israel ·
Theft, espionage, corruption and a cover-up lasting decades -- a new book by a Times of Israel reporter exposes the extraordinary saga of the uniquely revered, 1,100-year-old Aleppo Codex A new book by a Times of Israel reporter reveals dramatic new information about the fate of a manuscript many consider Judaism's most important book -- the 1,100-year-old Aleppo Codex.The manuscript -- or the part of it that did not go mysteriously missing in the mid-20th century -- is currently held alongside the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. It is revered as the authoritative version of the Hebrew...
Neandertals / Neanderthals

Neanderthals in Color
· 05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 50 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65, n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Zach Zorich ·
In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvèdère, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
Central Asia & Climate

Rethinking the Thundering Hordes
· 05/06/2012 7:31:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65 n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Andrew Lawler ·
Vast stretches of Central Asia feel eerily uninhabited. Fly at 30,000 feet over... Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan -- and there are long moments when no town or road or field is visible from your window. Wandering bands and tribes roamed this immense area for 5,000 years, herding goat, sheep, cattle, and horses across immense steppes, through narrow valleys, and over high snowy passes. They left occasional tombs that survived the ages, and on rare occasions settled down and built towns or even cities. But for the most part, these peoples left behind few physical traces of their origins, beliefs, or ways...
Epigraphy & Language

Unknown Ancient Language Found on Clay Tablet
· 05/12/2012 11:32:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Sci-News ·
· Fri, May 11th, 2012 ·
· Enrico de Lazaro ·
The archaeologists working at Ziyaret Tepe, the probable site of the ancient Assyrian city of Tushan, believe that this language may have been spoken by deportees originally from the Zagros Mountains, on the border of modern-day Iran and Iraq. In keeping with a policy widely practiced across the Assyrian Empire, these people may have been forcibly moved from their homeland and resettled in what is now south-east Turkey, where they would have been set to work building the new frontier city and farming its hinterland. The evidence for the language they spoke comes from a single clay tablet, which was...
Prehistory & Origins

Ancient Germany's Metal Traders
· 05/06/2012 8:53:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65, n 3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Andrew Curry ·
....May 11, 2011, Mario Küssner looked on as a bulldozer shaved a layer of soil a few inches deep from a roadside field near the eastern German village of Dermsdorf. Küssner, a staff archaeologist for the state of Thuringia, was brought in before the scheduled construction of a highway on-ramp would begin... the bulldozer uncovered something even more surprising -- a handful of dull green ax heads lying in the soil... careful work revealed a clay jar standing a foot-and-a-half tall packed with 100 bronze ax heads dating to the Bronze Age -- more than 3,000 years ago. The ax...
The Roman Empire

Trash Talk [ Monte Testaccio, imperial Roman landfill ]
· 05/05/2012 8:34:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Archaeology, Volume 62 Number 2 ·
· March/April 2009 ·
· Jarrett A. Lobell ·
In the middle of Rome's trendiest neighborhood, surrounded by sushi restaurants and nightclubs with names like Rodeo Steakhouse and Love Story, sits the ancient world's biggest garbage dump--a 150-foot-tall mountain of discarded Roman amphorae, the shipping drums of the ancient world. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around Monte Testaccio, from the Latin testa and Italian cocci, both meaning "potsherd." But despite its size--almost a mile in circumference--it's easy to walk by and not really notice unless you are headed for some excellent pizza at Velavevodetto, a restaurant literally stuck into the mountain's side. Most local residents don't know...
Middle Ages & Renaissance

The Battle of Brunanburh -- The Great Debate
· 05/06/2012 8:18:14 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· Wirral Learning Grid ·
· since 2004 ·
· Prof Stephen Harding ·
By 937 A.D. 35 years after the initial settlement, Wirral may have been the site of a huge battle between the Anglo Saxons coming from the South and Midlands and a combined army of Viking raiders coming from Dublin and their Scottish allies coming mainly from Strathclyde. No-one is quite sure where this battle took place, although the majority of experts favour Wirral. The main reason is that the contemporary record of the Battle -- the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes the battle having taking place (around Brunanburh) -- which happens to be the old name for Bromborough... The Chronicle also...
PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

Games Ancient People Played [ 3000 BC Mexico ]
· 05/06/2012 7:18:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65 n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Barbara Voorhies ·
The site of Tlacuachero in southern Mexico is an island in a mangrove swamp made up almost entirely of clamshells. Material recovered from the site shows that it was a place where people harvested shellfish and fish between 5,050 and 4,230 years ago -- long before the great civilizations of Mesoamerica would build their city-states. Over the years, the island grew as clams were harvested from the swamp and the shells were discarded there. While the shell mound was accumulating, the early people at Tlacuachero built several superimposed clay floors at the island center to create smooth surfaces that were...
Catastrophism & Astronomy

Nevermind the Apocalypse: Earliest Mayan Calendar Found
· 05/10/2012 5:09:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 21 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 05/10/2012 ·
· Stephanie Pappas ·
The oldest-known version of the ancient Maya calendar has been discovered adorning a lavishly painted wall in the ruins of a city deep in the Guatemalan rainforest. The hieroglyphs, painted in black and red, along with a colorful mural of a king and his mysterious attendants, seem to have been a sort of handy reference chart for court scribes in A.D. 800 -- the astronomers and mathematicians of their day. Contrary to popular myth, this calendar isn't a countdown to the end of the world in December 2012, the study researchers said.
Navigation

New evidence suggests Cabot may have known of New World before voyage
· 05/07/2012 11:58:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 19 replies ·
· Ottawa Citizen ·
· 29 April 2012 ·
· Randy Boswell ·
An Italian historian has unveiled a previously unknown document that sheds fresh light on explorer John Cabot's discovery of Canada -- a brief entry in a 516-year-old accounting ledger that shows Cabot had financial backing from a Florence-based bank in England and, most intriguingly, may have had prior knowledge of the distant land his famous 1497 voyage would put on the world map. The Italian-born Cabot is known to have sailed from England in search of the New World three times between 1496 and 1498. He is believed to have reached Newfoundland aboard the Matthew in 1497, but Cabot disappears...
Early America

Ancient Map Gives Clue to Fate of 'Lost Colony' (Britain's Roanoke Island in the Late 16th Century)
· 05/05/2012 1:51:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 04 May 2012 ·
· The Telegraph ·
A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalising clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from Britain's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginia Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof that...
The Revolution

2 NY sites recall Benedict Arnold's early heroics
· 05/10/2012 6:54:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 41 replies ·
· AP via boston.com ·
· 5-10-12 ·
· Chris Carola ·
This undated sketch portrait of Gen. Benedict Arnold by an unknown artist was provided by the Library of Congress. While most Americans know Arnold as the man who betrayed his nation by trying to turn over the American fortifications at West Point to the British, then joining the redcoats when the plot was uncovered, his heroic actions at the Revolutionary War's Battles of Saratoga are detailed in a new exhibit opening Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Saratoga National Historical Park. ALBANY, N.Y. -- Benedict Arnold is a hero again, at least temporarily, at two upstate New York historic sites where his...
The Framers

James Madison explains the uniqueness of the American Revolution
· 05/06/2012 9:17:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ProgressingAmerica ·
· 5 replies ·
· PGA Weblog ·
In "Charters", James Madison wrote the following: In Europe, charters of liberty have been granted by power. America has set the example and France has followed it, of charters of power granted by liberty. This is what makes modern revolutionaries so backward. They are stuck on stupid in old-think - that is, that power grants liberty. If only government could get bigger, we could grant the rights to _________________ for whatever special interest group they have in mind at the moment. Like the "right" to healthcare. In the comment "America has set the example", he makes it clear that it's...
The Civil War

Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government's $653M plan
· 05/05/2012 6:24:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by JerseyanExile ·
· 19 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· May 5, 2012 ·
· AP ·
Before government engineers can deepen one of the nation's busiest seaports to accommodate future trade, they first need to remove a $14 million obstacle from the past -- a Confederate warship rotting on the Savannah River bottom for nearly 150 years. Confederate troops scuttled the ironclad CSS Georgia to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union troops took Savannah in December 1864. It's been on the river bottom ever since. Now, the Civil War shipwreck sits in the way of a government agency's $653 million plan to deepen the waterway that links the nation's fourth-busiest container...
Not-so-Ancient Autopsies

What Killed Lenin? Poison Called Possibility
· 05/06/2012 8:59:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 24 replies ·
· Washington Times ·
· Sunday, May 6, 2012 ·
· Alex Dominguez ·
Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the Soviet Union's founder, a UCLA neurologist said. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the deaths of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have re-examined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar and Abraham Lincoln.
Medical Sleuths Discuss the Forensics of Death (Lenin, Lincoln, Custer, etc.)
· 05/07/2012 1:52:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 27 replies ·
· Washington Post ·
· May 6 ·
· Manuel Roig-Franzia ·
Death never dies here. It just keeps getting more interesting, more beguiling. More, well, alive. Alive in every cringe-worthy detail, in every clue about its causes, in every shard of evidence waiting to be spliced to another shard ... and another shard until a picture starts to form, an image assembled from nuggets of information collected decades or centuries ago. Death, at least for the doctors and history buffs who gather each year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is the coolest of puzzles, leading them to the coolest of theories. Could Abraham Lincoln have been saved? (Yes.)...
World War Eleven

WWII Fighter Plane Hailed the 'Aviation Equivalent of Tutankhamun's Tomb' Found Preserved (Sahara)
· 05/10/2012 3:33:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 37 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· Richard Alleyne ·
WWII fighter plane hailed the 'aviation equivalent of Tutankhamun's Tomb' found preserved in the Sahara A Second World War aeroplane that crash landed in the Sahara Desert before the British pilot walked to his death has been found almost perfectly preserved 70 years later. Most of its cockpit instruments are intact and it still had it guns and ammunition before they were seized by the Egyptian military. There are also signs of the makeshift camp the pilot made alongside the fuselage. No human remains have been found but it is thought the pilot may lie within a 20 mile radius...
Oh So Mysteriouso

Did the Prophet Muhammad Really Exist? This Is Robert Spencer's Shocking Answer
· 05/07/2012 4:12:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 27 replies ·
· The Blaze ·
· May 5, 2012 ·
· Billy Hallowell ·
Did the Prophet Muhammad really exist? This question, which may seem bizarre on the surface, is at the root of a new book by Robert Spencer, a prominent author and the director of Jihad Watch. Spencer, a figure who is praised by his fans and loathed by his detractors, has written numerous books on Islam. Earlier this week, The Blaze spoke with the expert about his controversial, new book, "Did Muhammad Exist?" As can be derived from the title, the text delves into some uncomfortable subject matter, as Spencer examines the historical documentation surrounding the Muslim prophet. The book's official...
Religion of Pieces

NOI angry at ACT's research on Islamic slavery; Muhammad's massacre of Medina Innocent Jews
· 05/08/2012 8:14:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by PRePublic ·
· 15 replies ·
Some young Muslim, at Nation of Islam's " FinalCall,' just published a childish "reply" to a thorough research by B Gabrielle's ACT for America. It's so silly I am too lazy to copy/paste it here. I am glad he publicizes ACT further. For research on Muhammad's anger of Medina Native Jews because they refused to change their religion and take him as a "Prophet" one can also see: This is from 1912, before the modern PC language: The Jewish Encyclopedia, by I Singer, C. Adler, 1912, p. 423 .. He first summoned them to accept his religion, and...
Longer Perspectives

In Egypt Turmoil, Thieves Hunt Pharaonic Treasures
· 05/12/2012 11:27:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ColdOne ·
· 2 replies ·
· abcnews.go.com ·
· 5/12/12 ·
· AP/ Hamza Hendawi ·
Taking advantage of Egypt's political upheaval, thieves have gone on a treasure hunt with a spree of illegal digging, preying on the country's ancient pharaonic heritage. Illegal digs near ancient temples and in isolated desert sites have swelled a staggering 100-fold over the past 16 months
Paleontology

Dinosaur gases 'warmed the Earth'
· 05/07/2012 10:39:16 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 30 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· May 7, 2012 ·
Giant dinosaurs could have warmed the planet with their flatulence, say researchers. British scientists have calculated the methane output of sauropods, including the species known as Brontosaurus. By scaling up the digestive wind of cows, they estimate that the population of dinosaurs - as a whole - produced 520 million tonnes of gas annually. They suggest the gas could have been a key factor in the warm climate 150 million years ago. David Wilkinson from Liverpool John Moore's University, and colleagues from the University of London and the University of Glasgow published their results in the journal Current Biology. Sauropods,...

end of digest #408 20120512


1,410 posted on 05/12/2012 1:13:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #408 · v 8 · n 44
Saturday, May 12, 2012
 
27 topics
2883013 to 2880335
808 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 27-topic issue #408, like last week's it's rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Spring's turning to Summer, but just be there for all of us in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,411 posted on 05/12/2012 1:17:52 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #409
Saturday, May 19, 2012

Cave Art


 Earliest wall art is found in France

· 05/15/2012 12:04:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by 2ndDivisionVet ·
· 11 replies ·
· Expatica ·
· May 14, 2012 ·

A massive block of limestone in France contains what scientists believe are the earliest known engravings of wall art dating back some 37,000 years, according to a study published Monday. The 1.5 metric ton ceiling piece was first discovered in 2007 at Abri Castanet, a well known archeological site in southwestern France which holds some of the earliest forms of artwork, beads and pierced shells. According to New York University anthropology professor Randall White, lead author of the paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the art was likely meant to adorn the interior of a shelter...


 The Top Four Candidates for Europe's Oldest Work of Art

· 05/19/2012 6:34:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· Smithsonian 'blogs ·
· May 16, 2012 ·
· Erin Wayman ·

In 1940, a group of teenagers discovered the paintings of bison, bulls and horses adorning the walls of France's Lascaux Cave. Roughly 17,000 years old, the paintings are Europe's most famous cave art, but hardly the oldest. This week archaeologists announced finding in another cave in France art dating to about 37,000 years ago, making it a candidate for Europe's most ancient artwork. Here's a look at the new discovery and the other top contenders for the title of Europe's oldest work of art. Nerja Caves (possibly about 43,000 years ago)... by Neanderthals, the [humans] that lived in this part...

Epigraphy & Language


 Bronze Age 'Facebook' discovered by Cambridge experts

· 05/19/2012 6:28:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Cambridge News ·
· May 2012 ·
· Leanne Ehren ·

Mark Sapwell believes he has discovered an 'archaic version' of social networking site Facebook. Mark Sapwell, who is a PhD archaeology student at St John's College, believes he has discovered an "archaic version" of the social networking site, where users share thoughts and emotions and give stamps of approval to other contributions --- similar to the Facebook "like". Images of animals and events were drawn on the rock faces in Russian and Northern Sweden to communicate with distant tribes and descendants during the Bronze Age. They form a timeline preserved in stone encompassing thousands of years. Mr Sapwell said: "Like...

Diet & Cuisine


 How the Cavemen Ate: Cookbook Reveals 77 Recipes Stretching Right Back to the Stone Age

· 05/12/2012 11:02:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 18 replies ·
· Daily Mail (UK) ·
· 4 May 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

(and they taste surprisingly good!) Fancy something new for dinner tonight? Well if you don't fancy a Chinese or a Thai, researchers have pulled together 77 recipes which were eaten during the Stone Ages. And the surprise is how delicious the recipes, some of them 16,000 years old, sound - with your typical Neolithic families spicing up their meals and using plenty of fresh fruit and herbs along with the simmering main dishes of game. A Culinary Journey Through Time can join Jamie Oliver and...

Mediterranean


 The oldest farming village in the Mediterranean islands is discovered in Cyprus

· 05/15/2012 7:39:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· CNRS ·

Previously it was believed that, due to the island's geographic isolation, the first Neolithic farming societies did not reach Cyprus until a thousand years after the birth of agriculture in the Middle East... However, the discovery of Klimonas, a village that dates from nearly 9000 years before Christ, proves that early cultivators migrated to Cyprus from the Middle Eastern continent shortly after the emergence of agriculture there, bringing with them wheat as well as dogs and cats... The archaeologists have found a few votive offerings inside the building, including flint arrowheads and green stone beads. A great many remnants of...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 Neolithic farmers brought deer to Ireland

· 05/14/2012 3:13:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Past Horizons Archaeology ·
· April 18, 2012 ·
· School of Biology and Env Sci ·
· U College Dublin ·

By comparing DNA from ancient bone specimens to DNA obtained from modern animals, the researchers discovered that the Kerry red deer are the direct descendants of deer present in Ireland 5000 years ago. Further analysis using DNA from European deer proves that Neolithic people from Britain first brought the species to Ireland. Although proving the red deer is not native to Ireland, researchers believe that the Kerry population is unique as it is directly related to the original herd and are worthy of special conservation status. Fossil bone samples from the National Museum of Ireland, some up to 30,000 years...

Prehistory & Origins


 Humanity's Best Friend: How Dogs May Have Helped Humans Beat the Neanderthals

· 05/15/2012 11:00:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 44 replies ·
· The Atlantic ·
· 14 May 2012 ·
· Megan Garber ·

Over 20,000 years ago, humans won the evolutionary battle against Neanderthals. They may have had some assistance in that from their best friends. One of the most compelling --- and enduring --- mysteries in archaeology concerns the rise of early humans and the decline of Neanderthals. For about 250,000 years, Neanderthals lived and evolved, quite successfully, in the area that is now Europe. Somewhere between 45,000 and 35,000 years ago, early humans came along.They proliferated in their new environment, their population increasing tenfold in the 10,000 years after they arrived; Neanderthals declined and finally died away. What happened? What went...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Bigger and brainier: did dingoes kill thylacines?

· 05/15/2012 11:49:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by presidio9 ·
· 23 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· May 3, 2012 ·

A comparison of museum specimens has found that thylacines on mainland Australia were smaller than those that persisted into modern times in Tasmania, and significantly smaller than dingoes. The last known Tasmanian thylacine died in 1936. Measurements of the head size and thickness of limb bones of the semi-fossilised remains of thylacines and dingoes from caves in Western Australia have revealed that, on average, dingoes were larger than thylacines. "In particular, dingoes were almost twice as large as female thylacines, which were not much bigger than a fox," says ecologist Dr Mike Letnic, an ARC Future Fellow in the UNSW...

Australia & the Pacific


 Remains may be ancient [Australia]

· 05/17/2012 11:44:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 14 replies ·
· The Area News ·
· 16 May 2012 ·
· Emily Tinker ·

ARCHAEOLOGISTS are on the cusp of unravelling the mystery behind a set of "hugely significant" ancient Aboriginal remains discovered in the region last year. Former local man Robert Harris Jnr found the remains near an old water course late last February while working on a property outside Lake Cargelligo. The remains -- confirmed to be tens of thousands of years old -- have been hailed as the greatest discovery in more than half a century. "They're more significant than first thought," local Aboriginal site recorder and brother of Robert, Max Harris said. "They are as old, or even older than Mungo...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy


 Bodies of Easter Island's famous heads revealed

· 05/14/2012 12:31:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bkopto ·
· 73 replies ·
· AllTop ·
· 5/12/2012 ·
· staff ·

The head statuary of Easter Island is instantly recognizable to people all over the world, but who would have guessed that, lurking beneath the soil, these famous mugs also had bodies? The Easter Island Statue Project Conservation Initiative, which is funded by the Archaeological Institute of America, has been excavating two of the enormous figures for the last several years, and have found unique petroglyphs carved on their backs that had been conserved in the soil. Their research has also yielded evidence of how the carvers were paid with food such as tuna and lobster, as well as clues to...

Navigation


 Modern Man Tries to Build a 3,500 Year Old Boat from the Bronze Age and Fails

· 05/15/2012 7:13:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 55 replies ·
· IO9 ·
· May 14, 2012 ·
· Casey Chan ·

A team of people from 2012 tried to re-create and build a boat from 1550 BC, the Bronze Age, but failed spectacularly. When the ship was lowered into the ocean, it immediately filled with water and started sinking. Yikes, we suck. The team was made up of British archaeologists and craftsmen who have been hammering away and building the boat with Bronze Age tools and methods for the past three months. The boat it was based on, used oak planks sewn together with yew...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 Scientists illuminate the ancient history of circumarctic peoples

· 05/19/2012 6:17:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

...The team's results indicate several new genetic markers that define previously unknown branches of the family tree of circumarctic groups. One marker, found in the Inuvialuit but not the other two groups, suggests that this group arose from an Arctic migration event somewhere between 4,000 and 8,000 years ago, separate from the migration that gave rise to many of the speakers of the Na-Dene language group. "If we're correct, [this lineage] was present across the entire Arctic and in Beringia," Schurr said. "This means it traces a separate expansion of Eskimo-Aleut-speaking peoples across this region." ... "Perhaps the most extraordinary...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Maya Artwork Uncovered In A Guatemalan Forest

· 05/13/2012 8:34:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 18 replies ·
· NPR ·
· 13 May 2012 ·
· Christopher Joyce ·

Conservator Angelyn Bass cleans and stabilizes the surface of a wall of a Mayan house that dates to the ninth century. The figure of a man who may have been the town scribe appears on the wall to her left. Archaeologists working in one of the most impenetrable rain forests in Guatemala have stumbled on a remarkable discovery: a room full of wall paintings and numerical calculations. The buried room apparently was a workshop used by scribes or astronomers working for a Mayan king. The paintings depict the king and members of his court. The numbers mark important periods in...

China


 New Paleolithic remains found near the Liuhuaishan site in Bose Basin, Guangxi

· 05/19/2012 6:23:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· Acta Anthropologica Sinica ·

The Liuhuaishan site is an important early Paleolithic site found in the Bose Basin. In December 2008, Scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Youjiang Museum for Nationalities, Bose, carried out a short survey around this site and found three new Paleolithic localities with a collection of 37 stone artifacts. This new finds will help better understand the human behavior at open-air sites in south China, researchers reported in the latest issue of Acta Anthropologica Sinica 2012 (2). The stone artifact assemblage included cores, flakes, chunks, choppers and chopping tools, and picks,...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 6,000-year-old settlement poses tsunami mystery

· 05/13/2012 6:22:14 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Irish Examiner ·
· Wednesday, May 09, 2012 ·
· Andrew Hamilton ·

Archeologists have uncovered evidence of pre-farming people living in the Burren more than 6,000 years ago --- one of the oldest habitations ever unearthed in Ireland. Radiocarbon dating of a shellfish midden on Fanore Beach in north Clare have revealed it to be at least 6,000 years old --- hundreds of years older than the nearby Poulnabrone dolmen. The midden --- a cooking area where nomad hunter-gatherers boiled or roasted shellfish --- contained Stone Age implements, including two axes and a number of smaller stone tools... The midden was discovered by local woman Elaine O'Malley in 2009 and a major...

Greece


 Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

· 05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· EurekAlert! ·
· April 19, 2012 ·
· Nan Broadbent ·

In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...

The Roman Empire


 Students find rare Roman temple on practice dig [Poppelsdorf, Germany]

· 05/15/2012 9:33:56 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· The Local ·
· Friday, May 4, 2012 ·
· jcw ·

Lecturers at Bonn University had set up a mock archaeological dig at a building site on campus to teach hopeful historians digging techniques. What they did not expect to find were the 2,000-year-old foundations of a building, nestled into the dense, clayish mud. While the initial discovery was made in March, it was only in the past fortnight that the team realised the foundations were from a temple from the Roman era, the floor of which was scattered with broken pottery dating as far back as 800 BC. The building, which could have been part of a wealthy country estate,...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible

· 05/11/2012 8:54:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 27 replies ·
· CBN News ·
· Friday, May 11, 2012 ·
· Julie Stahl ·

Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible By Julie Stahl CBN News Mideast Correspondent Friday, May 11, 2012 JERUSALEM, Israel --- Was the Bible's King David man or myth? That's the question Israeli archeologists are answering with new archeological finds. Their discoveries also shed light on how the first Jewish temple was built. Khirbet Qeiyafa is in the Elah Valley. Not far from here the Bible says David killed the giant, Goliath. "We don't know much about the history, the politics really and about urbanization in the time of David," archaeologist Prof. Yosef Garfinkel of the Institute of Archaeology at...

Religion of Pieces


 Stone carvers defy Taliban to return to the Bamiyan valley

· 05/16/2012 1:13:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by huldah1776 ·
· 15 replies ·
· The Guardian ·
· 16 May 2012 ·
· Emma Graham-Harrison ·

"Afghan students learn the centuries-old skills that carved out the giant buddhas blown up by extremists. ... The cave-hall was part of a complex built around two giant buddhas that loomed serenely over Bamiyan for about 15 centuries -- until the Taliban government condemned them as un-Islamic in early 2001 and blew them up. "I was interested in this course because I want to restore our culture," said Ismael Wahidi, a 22-year-old student of archeology at Bamiyan University, who set aside more conventional studies for a week to learn how to turn a lump of stone into a sculpture. "If...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Photos: "Body Jars," Cliff Coffins Are Clues to Unknown Tribe [ Cambodia ]

· 05/19/2012 6:06:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· John Miksic ·

Skulls and other human bones poke from large ceramic jars at Khnorng Sroal, one of the newly dated mountainside burials in southwestern Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The bones were placed in the 20-inch-tall (50-centimeter-tall) body jars only after the bodies had decomposed or had been picked clean by scavenging animals, according to the study, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Radiocarbon. "The Cardamom highlanders may have used some form of exposure of the body to de-flesh the bones, like the 'sky burials' known in other cultures," study leader Beavan said. Placing the sky-high burials couldn't have been...

Paleontology


 Jurassic Pain: Giant Flea-like Insects Plagued Dinosaurs 165 Million Years Ago

· 05/16/2012 7:37:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 23 replies ·
· Scientific Computing ·
· 5/15/2012 ·

This ancient "flea-like" insect, Pseudopulex jurassicus, lived 165 million years ago. It used a long proboscis to feed on the blood of dinosaurs, with a bite that would have been unusually painful. Illustration by Wang Cheng, courtesy of Oregon State University It takes a gutsy insect to sneak up on a huge dinosaur while it sleeps, crawl onto its soft underbelly and give it a bite that might have felt like a needle going in --- but giant "flea-like" animals, possibly the oldest of their type ever discovered, probably did just that. And a few actually lived through the experience,...

Underwater Archaeology


 Scientists discover 200-year-old shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico

· 05/17/2012 8:04:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Dysart ·
· 7 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 5-17-12 ·
· Nina Golgowski ·

A 19th century shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico has been discovered by scientists and online viewers on land using an underwater robot and camera, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports. The wooden ship that has nearly all except its copper-sheathed hull disintegrated is approximated to have sunk 200 years ago leaving behind ceramic plates, glass bottles and boxes of muskets across the ocean floor. Artefacts in and around the wreck and the hull's copper sheathing may date the vessel to the early to mid-19th century,' Dr Jack Irion, a maritime archaeologist with the Department of Interior's Bureau of...

The Revolution


 Washington's Iconic Letter To Be Displayed

· 05/14/2012 5:03:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 10 replies ·
· The Jewish Daily Forward ·
· May 09, 2012 ·
· Paul Berger ·

After Decade, Message of Tolerance Comes to Jewish Museum -- After a decade hidden from view, one of the most important documents in American history is set to burst back onto public display, the Forward has learned. George Washington's 1790 letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, Rhode Island, in which the first president vowed that America would give "to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance," will form the centerpiece of a special show at the National Museum of American Jewish History, opening on June 29. Ivy Barsky, the NMAJH's director and chief operating officer, said she was "absolutely thrilled"...


end of digest #409 20120519


1,412 posted on 05/19/2012 7:34:37 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1410 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #409 · v 8 · n 44
Saturday, May 19, 2012
 
23 topics
2885639 to 2882584
808 members
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Freeper Profiles


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 & archive
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 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
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 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 23-topic mostly prehistoric issue #409. Have a great weekend, all.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Tell me somethin' good, buh buh, tell me, tell me, tell me, tell me that you like it, yeah.
  • "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." -- Samuel Adams, speech at the Philadelphia State House, August 1, 1776 [cited by Michigan Bowhunter on FR profile page>]
 
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1,413 posted on 05/19/2012 7:39:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1412 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #410
Saturday, May 26, 2012

Central Asia


 4000-year-old rock art discovered in Mongolia

· 05/22/2012 5:21:42 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Stone Pages ·
· Saturday, May 12, 2012 ·
· Edited from China Daily ·

Eighteen rock art sites dating back over 4,000 years have been discovered by archaeologists in northern China's Inner Mongolia autonomous region. The prehistoric art was discovered in the Yinshan Mountains in Urad Middle Banner (an administration division of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region), said Liu Binjie, head of the Cultural Relics Bureau of Urad Middle Banner. The rock art is still clear and Liu added that they are the finest of their kind that have been unearthed so far. Among the carvings, seven faces were exaggerated and monstrous, and have been interpreted as the seven stars of the 'Big Dipper'...

Cave Art


 Bronze Age Facebook

· 05/21/2012 6:18:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 11 replies ·
· http://phys.org ·
· May 21, 2012 ·
· U of Cambridge ·

Large clusters of rock art spanning thousands of years but located at the same site may hold key to detecting massive cultural changes in prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the north. Updating a virtual wall with details of our lives, and checking it to catch up with others, is part of the daily routine for millions. But imagine a prehistoric version -- with a timeline preserved in actual stone encompassing thousands of years, on which our ancestors used symbolic interpretations of animals and events to communicate with distant tribes and their own descendants -- allowing us to trace societal developments in these...

Epigraphy & Language


 Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

· 05/22/2012 1:44:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...


 Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

· 05/22/2012 1:44:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...

Egypt


 Astronomers discovered ancient Egyptian observations of a variable star [ Algol ]

· 05/20/2012 12:29:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 16, 2012 ·
· U of Helsinki ·

The study of the "Demon star", Algol, made by a research group of the University of Helsinki, Finland, has received both scientific and public attention. The period of the brightness variation of this eclipsing binary star has been connected to good prognoses three millennia ago. This result has raised a lot of discussion and the news has spread widely in the Internet. The Egyptian papyrus Cairo 86637 calendar is probably the oldest preserved historical document of bare eye observations of a variable star. Each day of one Egyptian year was divided into three parts in this calendar. A good or...

Ancient Autopsies


 A Mummy Switcheroo

· 05/20/2012 4:57:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Tuesday, May 15, 2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Min, the ancient Egyptian god of phallus and fertility, might have brought some worldy advantages to his male worshippers, but offered little protection when it came to spiritual life. Researchers at the Mummy Project-Fatebenefratelli hospital in Milan, Italy, established that one of Min's priests at Akhmim, Ankhpakhered, was not resting peacefully in his finely painted sarcophagus. "We discovered that the sarcophagus does not contain the mummy of the priest, but the remains of another man dating between 400 and 100 BC," Egyptologist Sabina Malgora said. According to the researchers, the finding could point to a theft more than 2000 years...

Curses *Foiled* Again


 Black Magic Revealed in Two Ancient Curses

· 05/23/2012 11:05:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 23 replies ·
· livescience.com ·
· 5-22-2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

At a time when black magic was relatively common, two curses involving snakes were cast, one targeting a senator and the other an animal doctor, says a Spanish researcher who has just deciphered the 1,600-year-old curses. Both curses feature a depiction of a deity, possibly the Greek goddess Hekate, with serpents coming out of her hair, possibly meant to strike at the victims. Both curses contain Greek invocations similar to examples known to call upon Hekate....

The Roman Empire


 ORBIS -- The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World

· 05/22/2012 5:33:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Stanford University ·
· May 2012 ·
· Walter Scheidel & Elijah Meeks ·

In the aggregate, our model simulations make it possible to reconfigure conventional maps of the Roman Empire to express the relative cost of transfers from or to a central point as distance. This perspective captures the structural properties of the imperial system as a whole by identifying the relative position of particular elements of the network and illustrating the impact of travel speed and especially transport prices on overall connectivity. Distance cartograms show that due to massive cost differences between aquatic and terrestrial modes of transport, peripheries were far more remote from the center in terms of price than...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 Italy busts eBay looted artefacts ring

· 05/23/2012 6:42:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· VancouverDesi ·
· May 18, 2012 ·
· AFP str-glr/dt/har ·

Italian police on Friday said they were investigating 70 people for trading thousands of looted archaeological artefacts including ancient coins and vases on Internet auction site eBay. The investigation began when the police found an eBay announcement in 2009 and they tracked down a father and son team of tomb raiders in a village in Calabria in southern Italy who had dug up Byzantine, Greek and Roman burials. Police said in a statement they had seized 16,344 artefacts including bronze and silver coins, rings and ceramic vases, as well as 10 metal detectors. Most of the pieces came from the...

Windows on the Past


 Exploring Pella's Bronze Age Temple Complex

· 05/24/2012 9:33:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· May 2012 ·
· Stephen J. Bourke ·

Pella is located in the eastern foothills of the north Jordan valley, around five kilometres east of the Jordan River in the modern-day Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. It overlooks the north/south road that runs up the Jordan Valley, as well as the east/west trade route west down the Jezreel Valley to the coast at Haifa. Verdant agricultural flatlands stretch away to the north of the site, and broken uplands well suited to horticulture rise sharply to the east. The high cone-shaped largely natural hill of Tell Husn dominates the southern approaches to the site. ... The landscape surrounding the main...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Archaeologists unearth ancient Bethlehem seal

· 05/23/2012 5:57:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 22 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· May 23, 2012 ·

Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 2,700-year-old seal that bears the inscription "Bethlehem," the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday, in what experts believe to be the oldest artifact with the name of Jesus' traditional birthplace. The tiny clay seal's existence and age provide vivid evidence that Bethlehem was not just the name of a fabled biblical town, but also a bustling place of trade linked to the nearby city of Jerusalem, archaeologists said. Eli Shukron, the authority's director of excavations, said the find was significant because it is the first time the name "Bethlehem" appears outside of a biblical...

Facts In the Ground


 Archaeologists Explore Ancient Judahite Fortress

· 05/20/2012 12:45:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· with contributions by Shmuel Browns ·

Azekah was an important strategic Judahite border-stronghold during the turbulent times of the Assyrian and Babylonian invasions, which brought destruction on the kingdoms of Israel and Judah centuries before the time of Christ. The mighty Assyrian king Sennacherib called it "an eagle's nest...with towers that project to the sky like swords". The town continued to play a strategic role hundreds of years later during the Hasmonean period, as was evidenced by the the Bliss/Macalister excavations when they uncovered part of a massive fortress built by the Hasmonean king, John Hyrcanus 1. Now, preliminary surveys conducted by a joint Israel-Germany excavation...

Go Tel it on Megiddo


 Unique Gold Earring Found in Intriguing Collection of Ancient Jewelry at Tel Megiddo

· 05/22/2012 1:57:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· American Friends of Tel Aviv U ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· Tel Aviv U ·

Researchers from Tel Aviv University have recently discovered a collection of gold and silver jewelry, dated from around 1100 B.C., hidden in a vessel at the archaeological site of Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel. One piece -- a gold earring decorated with molded ibexes, or wild goats -- is "without parallel," they believe. According to Prof. Israel Finkelstein of TAU's Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures, the vessel was found in 2010, but remained uncleaned while awaiting a molecular analysis of its content. When they were finally able to wash out the dirt, pieces of...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 Quake reveals day of Jesus' crucifixion, researchers believe

· 05/24/2012 8:35:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by caldera599 ·
· 26 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5/24/2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Geologists say Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, in the year 33. The latest investigation, reported in International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem. The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion: "And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open."


 Historical *Evidence* for the Crucifixion Darkness (Solar Eclipse?)

· 04/02/2010 9:27:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by CondoleezzaProtege ·
· 28 replies ·
· 1,037+ views ·
· biblehistory.net ·

The first reference found outside of the bible mentioning this darkness which fell over the land during the crucifixion of Christ, comes from a Samaritan historian named Thallus, who wrote around 52 A.D. His work was quoted by another early historian by the name of Julius Africanus who researched the topic of this darkness and wrote the following: "Upon the whole world there came a most fearful darkness. Many rocks were split in two by an earthquake, and many places in Judea and other districts were thrown down. It seems very unreasonable to me that Thallus, in the third book...

Oh So Mysteriouso


 The Ark of the Covenant found burred under a trash pile in Jerusalem.

· 02/06/2012 5:49:40 AM PST ·
· Posted by kquinn856 ·
· 27 replies ·
· Ron Wyatt ·
· Dec. 22, 2011 ·
· Kevin Quinn ·

They found the Ark of the Covenant where Moses placed the 10 Commandments, in a cave under Golgotha. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior. Who would have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus. Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time. 1 Tim 2:3-6 Rom 3:28-30 Is he the God of the Jews only? Is he not also of the Gentiles? Yes of the...

Longer Perspectives


 Roots of Racism

· 05/23/2012 2:41:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 20 replies ·
· Science ·
· 18 May 2012 ·
· Elizabeth Culotta ·

Racial prejudice apparently stems from deep evolutionary roots and a universal tendency to form coalitions and favor our own side. And yet what makes a "group" is mercurial: In experiments, people easily form coalitions based on meaningless traits or preferences -- and then favor others in their "group." Researchers have explored these innate biases and begun to ask why such biases exist. What factors in our evolutionary past have shaped our coalitionary present -- and what, if anything, can we do about it now? Several avenues of research are probing the origins of what many psychologists call in-group love and out-group...

Religion of Pieces


 Mohammed in the "Gospel" of Barnabas - ZOT for the Theologians

· 07/17/2006 9:05:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by parakletos ·
· 3,619 replies ·
· 13,640+ views ·

The GREAT PROPHET MOHAMMED was mentioned by name in the forgotten gospel of Barnabas,who was one of the disciples of THE GREAT PROPHET JESUS CHRIST. The gospel is here: www.barnabas.net/ in the aforementioned site,make a search for the word "mohammed". heres a sample: from part 97 Then said the priest: -- How shall the Messiah be called, and what sign shall reveal his coming?' Jesus answered: -- The name of the Messiah is admirable, for God himself gave him the name when he had created his soul, and placed it in a celestial splendour. God said: "Wait Mohammed; for thy sake I...


 Secret £14million Bible in which 'Jesus predicts coming of Prophet Muhammad' unearthed in Turkey

· 02/29/2012 9:13:30 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 50 replies ·
· 1+ views ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 02/28/2012 ·

A secret Bible in which Jesus is believed to predict the coming of the Prophet Muhammad to Earth has sparked serious interest from the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI is claimed to want to see the 1,500-year-old book, which many say is the Gospel of Barnabas, that has been hidden by the Turkish state for the last 12 years. The £14million handwritten gold lettered tome, penned in Jesus' native Aramaic language, is said to contain his early teachings and a prediction of the Prophet's coming. The leather-bound text, written on animal hide, was discovered by Turkish police during an anti-smuggling operation...


 Iran: Discovery will collapse Christianity [Barf Alert}

· 05/24/2012 8:35:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Gamecock ·
· 46 replies ·
· WND ·
· May 24, 2012 ·
· Reza Kahlili ·

Iran's Basij Press is claiming that a version of the Gospel of Barnabas, found in 2000, will prove that Islam is the final and righteous religion and the revelation will cause the collapse worldwide of Christianity Turkish authorities believe the text could be an authentic version of the Gospel of Barnabas, one of Jesus' apostles and an associate of the apostle Paul. This version of the Barnabas Gospel was written in the 5th or 6th century and it predicted the coming of the Prophet Mohammad and the religion of Islam, the Basij Press claims. The Christian world, it says, denies...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 West Bank barrier threatens villagers' way of life

· 05/22/2012 3:48:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Eleutheria5 ·
· 8 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 10/5/12 ·

Israel is being urged to reroute its controversial West Bank barrier away from the lands of an ancient Palestinian village with a unique agricultural system. The BBC's Wyre Davies visited Battir, whose inhabitants fear their traditional way of life will disappear. In this part of the world, the supply and control of water is a major logistical and political issue. Yet the quaint village of Battir must be one of the luckiest and most blessed communities around - because Battir has water in abundance. For more than 2,000 years, seven natural springs have given life to the village and its...

Farty Shades of Green


 Dublin patron saint's heart stolen from Christ Church Cathedral

· 03/05/2012 5:43:29 AM PST ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 12 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· 3-3-2012 ·

The preserved heart of Dublin's patron saint has been stolen from the city's Christ Church Cathedral, officials say. The thief would have needed metal cutters to prise open the iron bars protecting the wooden heart-shaped box holding St Laurence O'Toole's heart. Police believe it happened some time between Friday night and about 12.30 GMT on Saturday. "They specifically targeted this, they wanted the heart of St Laurence O'Toole," a church spokeswoman said....

Scotland Yet


 Rare Canna stone's a blessing and a curse [ Scotland ]

· 05/20/2012 12:25:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Scotsman ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· Emma Cowing ·

An ancient "cursing stone" used by Christian pilgrims more than a thousand years ago to bring harm to their enemies has been discovered on Canna. The round stone with an early Christian cross engraved on it, also known as a "bullaun" stone, is believed to be the first of its type to be found in Scotland, and was discovered by chance in an old graveyard on the island. More commonly found in Ireland, the stones were used by ancient Christian pilgrims, who would turn them either while praying or when laying a curse, and were often to be found on...

Paleontology


 Discovered: The turtle the size of a SmartCar..

· 05/18/2012 6:35:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 28 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 18, 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

Picture a turtle the size of a Smart car, with a shell large enough to double as a children's pool. Paleontologists from North Carolina State University have found just such a specimen -- the fossilised remains of a 60-million-year-old South American giant that lived in what is now Colombia. The turtle in question is Carbonemys cofrinii, which means 'coal turtle', and it is part of a group of turtles known as pelomedusoides. The specimen's skull measures 24 centimeters, and the shell, which was recovered nearby and is believed to belong to the same animal - measures 172 centimeters, or about...


 They didn't mess with ancient turtle the size of a car

· 05/19/2012 8:12:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 10 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5-17-2012 ·
· Jeanna Bryner ·

A turtle the size of a small car once roamed what is now South America 60 million years ago, suggests its fossilized remains. Discovered in a coal mine in Colombia in 2005, the turtle was given the name Carbonemys cofrinii, which means "coal turtle." It wasn't until now that the turtle was examined and described in a scientific journal; the findings are detailed online Thursday in the Journal of Systematic Paleontology. The researchers say C. cofrinii belongs to a group of side-necked turtles known as pelomedusoides. The turtle's skull, roughly the size of an NFL football, was the most complete...

Ursa Major


 Biggest Bear Ever Found -- "It Blew My Mind," Expert Says

· 05/20/2012 8:01:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· February 3, 2011 ·
· Christine Dell'Amore ·

There's a new titleholder for the biggest, baddest bear ever found. A prehistoric South American giant short-faced bear tipped the scales at up to 3,500 pounds (1,600 kilograms) and towered at least 11 feet (3.4 meters) standing up, according to a new study. The previous heavyweight was a North American giant short-faced bear -- a related extinct species -- that weighed up to 2,500 pounds (1,134 kilograms). The largest bear on record in modern times was a 2,200-pound (998-kilogram) polar bear shot in Alaska in the 19th century. The South American giant short-faced bear roamed its namesake continent about 500,000...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Bigfoot and Yeti DNA Study Gets Serious

· 05/22/2012 6:44:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 47 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· 22 May 2012 ·
· Jeanna Bryner ·

A new university-backed project aims to investigate cryptic species such as the yeti whose existence is unproven, through genetic testing. Researchers from Oxford University and the Lausanne Museum of Zoology are asking anyone with a collection of cryptozoological material to submit descriptions of it. The researchers will then ask for hair and other samples for genetic identification. "I'm challenging and inviting the cryptozoologists to come up with the evidence instead of complaining that science is rejecting what they have to say," said geneticist Bryan Sykes of the University of Oxford. While Sykes doesn't expect to find solid evidence of a...

Prehistory & Origins


 Preview: Were mermaids aquatic apes?

· 05/23/2012 3:28:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 28 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· 22 May 2012 ·
· Hollie McKay ·

In the two-hour CGI Special "Mermaids: The Body Found," Animal Planet dives deep into the idea that mermaids may have been real, and, even better -- related to humans! "It's a very radical theory on human evolution, but we have approached an age-old myth and really chased its origins," Animal Planet honcho Charlie Foley told FOX411's Pop Tarts column. "It has been compiled in a way that is very compelling, making us think that mermaids might not just be mythical creatures." The show unravels mysterious underwater sound recordings and presents a bone-chilling argument for the Aquatic Ape Theory, which suggests...

Sunken Civilizations


 Atlantis: The Evidence [ Thera, Crete, the usual modern myths ]

· 05/20/2012 5:46:36 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 59 replies ·
· Watchumentary ·
· January 1st, 2011 ·
· BBC, Timewatch, Natalie Maynes, Bettany Hughes ·

In this Timewatch special, historian Bettany Hughes unravels one of the most intriguing mysteries of all time. She presents a series of geological, archaeological and historical clues to show that the legend of Atlantis was inspired by a real historical event -- the greatest natural disaster of the ancient world. She is tracing the origins of the Atlantis myth and presenting evidence that the Thera eruption inspired Plato's account of the mystical land. 2,400 years ago Greek philosopher Plato wrote of an ancient island civilization of unparalleled wealth and splendor, which was struck by earthquakes and floods and was swallowed...

Navigation


 Suppressed By Scholars: Twin Ancient Cultures On Opposite Sides Of The Pacific

· 05/19/2012 8:28:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 34 replies ·
· Frontiers of Anthropology ·
· 5-14-2012 ·
· Dale Drinnon ·

One of the greatest archaeological riddles -- and one of the grossest academic omissions -- of our time is the untold story of the parallel ruins left by two seemingly unrelated ancient civilizations: the ancient Mayans on one side of the Pacific Ocean and the ancient Balinese on the other. The mysterious and unexplained similarities in their architecture, iconography, and religion are so striking and profound that the Mayans and Balinese seem to have been twin civilizations -- as if children of the same parent. Yet, incredibly, this mystery is not only being ignored by American scholars, it's being suppressed. What does archaeology have to do...

Australia & the Pacific


 Thousands of rubber ducks to land on British shores after 15 year journey(E Pacific to N Atlantic)

· 06/28/2007 7:57:54 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TigerLikesRooster ·
· 33 replies ·
· 3,511+ views ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 06/27/07 ·
· Ben Clerkin ·

They were toys destined only to bob up and down in nothing bigger than a child's bath - but so far they have floated halfway around the world. The armada of 29,000 plastic yellow ducks, blue turtles and green frogs broke free from a cargo ship 15 years ago. Since then they have travelled 17,000 miles, floating over the site where the Titanic sank, landing in Hawaii and even spending years...


 Rubber Duckies to Help Track Speed of Melting Glaciers

· 11/23/2008 1:47:48 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 28 replies ·
· 533+ views ·
· foxnews ·

Challenged to probe under Greenland's glaciers, NASA robotics expert Alberto Behar wondered what mechanism might endure sub-zero cold, the pressure of mile-thick ice and currents that sometimes exceed the flow rate of Niagara Falls. As Dr. Behar at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory soon discovered, though, there isn't much money for global-warming experiments in Greenland... Unfazed, he thought of one device that might survive such extremes at a cost his field expedition could readily afford -- a two-dollar rubber duck. Each duck was imprinted with an e-mail address and, in three languages, the offer of a reward.

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Prehistoric Texans May Have Been First Humans in U.S.

· 03/24/2011 5:55:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 50 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· March 24, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Humans camped by the shores of a small creek in Texas possibly even before the Clovis society, classically regarded as the first human inhabitants of the Americas, settled in the West. The site, located in central Texas on the bank of Buttermilk Creek, has produced almost 16,000 artifacts, including stone chips and blade-like objects, in soil dating up to 15,500 years old, more than 2,000 years before the first evidence of Clovis culture. Many of the items are flakes from cutting or sharpening of tools, but the research team also found about 50 tools, including several cutting surfaces -- including...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 Spectacular Tomb Containing More Than 80 Individuals Discovered in Peru

· 05/24/2012 8:28:44 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· May 22, 2012 ·
· AlphaGalileo ·

A team of archaeologists from the UniversitÈ libre de Bruxelles (ULB) has discovered a spectacular tomb containing more than eighty individuals of different ages. This discovery -- provisionally dated to around 1000 years ago -- was made at the site of Pachacamac, which is currently under review for UNESCO World Heritage status. Pachacamac, situated on the Pacific coast about thirty kilometres from Lima, is one of the largest Prehispanic sites in South America... It was here -- directly in front of the Temple of Pachacamac -- that the most important discovery was made. A scatter of later period burials was...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Archeologists to Study Pre-Settlement Hut in Iceland

· 05/22/2012 1:52:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Iceland Review ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· ESA ·

The first archeological research in Iceland this year will begin at Hafnir in Reykjanes, southwest Iceland, on Monday. Archeologists will continue their study of a hut which may originate from 770-880 AD, the latter part of the Iron Age, and predate the historical settlement of Iceland in 874. Excavation has been ongoing in the area around the hut, which has been given the name Vogur, with intermission since 2003, Frattabla reports. Last summer archeologist Bjarni F. Einarsson revealed that carbon age analysis indicated that the hut may have been constructed in the aforementioned period, which garnered considerable attention. Archeologists now...

Age of Sail


 Flinders finds clues to early Dutch postal system

· 05/19/2012 3:40:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· Flinders U ·

Ancient maritime inscriptions dating back to the early 1600s have been found on the coast of Madagascar by Flinders University researchers. The team of researchers, including Flinders archaeology research associate Mark Polzer and Jane Fyfe, a PhD candidate and rock art specialist from the University of Western Australia, discovered the messages carved into rock outcrops and boulders on an island in the Bay of Antongil, on the northeast corner of Madagascar. While some of the inscriptions were originally found in the 1920s, researchers have always believed there were no more than a dozen "postal stones". Dr. van Duivenvoorde said the...

Early America


 Government by Gentry in Colonial Virginia

· 05/20/2012 11:17:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Jacquerie ·
· 11 replies ·
· class="attrib">1958 ·
· Daniel J. Boorstin ·

It would be a great mistake to assume that the cozy, aristocratic character of Virginia society had nothing to do with its civic virtues. Only a perverse hindsight has made the political institutions of colonial Virginia a leveling democracy in embryo. When George Washington feared for the preservation of self government and the rights of Englishmen, it was the political customs of mid-18th century Virginia that he must have had in mind, for he knew no others. Those customs were the representative institutions of a Virginia-bred aristocracy, whose peculiarly aristocratic virtues nourished American representative government at its roots. And those...

The Revolution


 Like namesake, Dublin park rises to little fanfare [new Ohio RevWar Memorial]

· 05/21/2012 9:22:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 13 replies ·
· AP via Columbus Dispatch ·
· May 21, 2012 ·
· Lisa Cornwell ·

Land awarded to a Polish freedom fighter more than 200 years ago by a grateful United States has been turned into a park bearing the name of the man who spent his life championing liberty and equality in America and Poland. The 36-acre Thaddeus Kosciuszko Park in Dublin, which opened this month, was part of a grant of 500 acres awarded by Congress for Kosciuszko's contributions as a military engineer and Continental Army colonel during the Revolutionary War. Alex Storozynski, president and executive director of the Kosciuszko Foundation based in New York, said Kosciuszko was ahead of his time in...

Underwater Archaeology


 Underwater archaeologists searching for lost village [ Empire, Michigan ]

· 05/19/2012 3:34:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· UpNorthLive.com ·
· Friday, May 18, 2012 ·
· Lauren Amstutz ·

A group of underwater archaeologists are preparing for a project off the shores of Empire. The goal is to discover clues about the village's booming history, a history that currently lies several feet below Lake Michigan. The action will begin on June 8th, when a team of divers will employ the latest electronic and underwater sonar technology to find evidence of a once thriving lumber town. More than 100 years ago, the small village of Empire boasted one of the largest hardwood millis in the state of Michigan. Dave Taghon, with the Empire Museum built a scale model of the...


end of digest #410 20120526


1,414 posted on 05/25/2012 5:49:00 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1412 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #410 · v 8 · n 45
Saturday, May 26, 2012
 
39 topics
2842957 to 2885668
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the recent newbies.

Issue #410 has a lot of Roman Empire stuff, but also a startling variety -- 39 topics, including some archival stuff.

Troll activity has been on the increase again these past couple of weeks, new nicknames, same tired old thread hijacks. If you received this ping message, this isn't directed at you -- the trolls are *always* people who emerge from under the bridge on their own. Anyway, stop by a few topics, spot some trolls, point and laugh!

I may be out of contact a lot this week, don't worry, I'll be back.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • "'The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism' by Emmanuel Goldstein... Chapter I. Ignorance is Strength. Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age, there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle, and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude towards one another, have varied from age to age: but the essential structure of society has never altered. Even after enormous upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium, however far it is pushed one way or the other. The aims of these groups are entirely irreconcilable..." [George Orwell, "1984" chapter 17]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,415 posted on 05/25/2012 5:54:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1414 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

“The more things change, the more they stay the same.”


1,416 posted on 05/25/2012 12:13:46 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1415 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #411
Saturday, June 2, 2012

Prehistory & Origins


 Earliest music instruments found (42,000 year-old flutes)

· 05/25/2012 6:43:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 30 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 5/25/12 ·

Researchers have identified what they say are the oldest-known musical instruments in the world.The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens. Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old. The findings are described in the Journal of Human Evolution. A team led by Prof Tom Higham at Oxford University dated animal bones in the same ground layers as the flutes at Geissenkloesterle Cave in Germany's Swabian Jura. Prof Nick...

Cave Art


 Decoding the Ancient Secrets of White Shaman

· 06/01/2012 5:35:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Discover magazine ·
· May 2012 ·
· Will Hunt ·

Rock paintings near the Rio Grande contain hidden messages about a mysterious 4,000-year-old religion. Now one archaeologist has learned to read them. The figures at the White Shaman rock shelter seem to depict a journey through the spirit world... The region known as the Lower Pecos is an arid 21,000-square-mile expanse of southwest Texas and northern Mexico surrounding the confluence of the Pecos River and the Rio Grande. The land is barbed with cacti, teeming with rattlesnakes, and riven with impassable canyons. But more than 4,000 years ago, these barrens were home to a flourishing culture of hunter-gatherers, creators of...

Longer Perspectives


 Inequality Dates Back to Stone Age

· 05/30/2012 4:40:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Makana ·
· 20 replies ·
· Science ·
· May 28, 2012 ·
· Professor Alex Bentley ·

Hereditary inequality began over 7,000 years ago in the early Neolithic era, with new evidence showing that farmers buried with tools had access to better land than those buried without.

Climate


 Huge Ancient Civilization's Collapse Explained

· 05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 42 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· 5-28-2012 ·
· Charles Choi ·

The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit -- ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Bible-era earthquake reveals year of Jesus' crucifixion

· 05/25/2012 8:42:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYFreeper ·
· 47 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· May 24, 2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday April 3, 33 A.D. The latest investigation, reported in the journal International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem. The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion.


 Archeologist Says New Finds Support Bible's Accuracy

· 05/28/2012 11:45:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by GiovannaNicoletta ·
· 4 replies ·
· Israel Today Magazine ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· Ryan Jones ·

A Hebrew University archeologist says finds at a new dig site near Jerusalem are backing up the biblical narrative of an Israelite kingdom centered on Jerusalem in 1000 BC, around the time of King David and his son, King Solomon. Professor Yosef Garfinkel has been digging at Khirbet Qeiyafa near the Jerusalem suburb of Beit Shemesh since 2007. Carbon dating of unearthed olive pits has put the period of activity at Khirbet Qeiyafa at 1020 BC - 980 BC, almost exactly the period of time the Bible says David and Solomon were active in the region. The dating, together with...


 What's the Oldest Hebrew Inscription?

· 05/28/2012 9:24:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· May/Jun 2012 ·
· Christopher A. Rollston ·

Four contenders vie for the honor of the oldest Hebrew inscription. To decide we must determine (1) whether they are in Hebrew script and/or language and (2) when they date. Not easy! The first contender, the already famous Qeiyafa Ostracon, was discovered only in 2008 at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a site in the borderland of ancient Judah and Philistia.a The five-line ostracon (an ink inscription on a piece of broken pottery) is not well preserved and is subject to varying readings. As the Qeiyafa Ostracon is a recent find, so the Gezer Calendar is an old one. It was discovered exactly...


 Century-old Archaeological Find [Gabriel's Revelation tablet]

· 03/22/2012 7:09:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 8 replies ·
· La Stampa-Vatican Insider ·
· 3/15/12 ·
· Giacomo Galeazzi ·

[Full title: Century-old Archaeological Find Could Prove Authenticity of Jesus' Prophesy of the Resurrection] Gabriel's Revelation tablet (on show in the "Verbum Domini" exhibition in the Vatican) has been said to be an important piece of evidence for the authenticity of Jesus' prophesies on the resurrection -- Vatican Insider spoke to Biblicist and writer, Professor Simone Venturini on the subject. Professor Venturini works in the Vatican Secret Archives and teaches Biblical Science at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross. He is also the author of a number of works, including Il libro di Gesu Segreto (The secret book of Jesus) published by Newton Compton. Professor, what is the Gabriel's Revelation stela on show in the...


 More Observations on the Stone Dead Sea Scroll Text

· 07/16/2008 1:19:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Oyarsa ·
· 13 replies ·
· 179+ views ·
· Bock's Blog ·
· 7/08/2008 ·
· Darrell L. Bock ·

(from Taiwan) ... am writing from Taiwan, but I am not immune to the news about the new Stone "Dead Sea Scroll". I have made available by link in the News We Are Watching window Time's latest article on this. Thanks to Craig Blomberg for noting where access to the text can be found. The BAR site also in the News We Are Watching window gives access to both English and to the Hebrew text. Now you do not have to...

Facts In the Ground


 "Castle of the Slave" -- Mystery Solved [ Jordan ]

· 05/28/2012 8:45:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· May/Jun 2012 ·
· Stephen Rosenberg ·

One of the most dramatic archaeological monuments in Jordan -- an admittedly Jewish one -- has been repeatedly misidentified. French historian Ernest Will called it the "Finest Hellenistic monument in the Near East" and considered it a chateau. The structure is known locally as Qasr al-Abd, or "Castle of the Slave (or Servant)." It is part of a 75-acre estate called Airaq al-Amir (also spelled 'Iraq el-Emir), lying 12 miles southwest of the Jordanian capital, Amman. The site was entered via a monumental gateway, much of which remains in a ruined state and hidden by undergrowth. The glory of the...

Epigraphy & Language


 Oldest Jewish archaeological evidence on the Iberian Peninsula

· 05/27/2012 8:31:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Eurekalert ·
· Friday, May 25, 2012 ·
· Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena ·

On a marble plate, measuring 40 by 60 centimetres, the name "Yehiel" can be read, followed by further letters which have not yet been deciphered... the new discovery might be a tomb slab... "The organic material of the antlers could be dated by radiocarbon analysis with certainty to about 390 AD," excavation leader Dr. Dennis Graen of the Jena University explains... ...Not only is the early date exceptional in this case, but also the place of the discovery: Never before have Jewish discoveries been made in a Roman villa, the Jena Archaelogist explains. In the Roman Empire at that time...

Faith & Philosophy


 Babylonian Talmud Translated into Arabic

· 05/28/2012 9:46:19 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Bible History Daily (BAR website) ·
· Thursday, May 17, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

After a controversial six-year-long translation project, a Jordanian think tank based in Amman published an Arabic translation of the Babylonian Talmud. After gaining enthusiastic responses to the project from the Arab League, 96 scholars began work on the translation. The editors are happy with the project, stating that the lack of an Arabic Talmud "has always been an obstacle to understanding Judaism." Despite some polarized and politicized responses, most have adopted a positive impression of the massive scholarly work. Dr. Raquel Ukeles of the Israeli National Library states that the project stemmed from scientific curiosity, and the introduction discusses the...

Religion of Pieces


 Indiana Jones meets the Da Vinci Code

· 01/14/2008 12:56:52 PM PST ·
· Posted by rellimpank ·
· 33 replies ·
· 40+ views ·
· Asia times ·
· 14 jan 08 ·
· Spengler ·

Islam watchers blogged all weekend about news that a secret archive of ancient Islamic texts had surfaced after 60 years of suppression. Andrew Higgins' Wall Street Journal report that the photographic record of Koranic manuscripts, supposedly destroyed during World War II but occulted by a scholar of alleged Nazi sympathies, reads like a conflation of the Da Vinci Code with Indiana Jones and the Holy Grail. The Da Vinci Code offered a silly fantasy in which Opus Dei, homicidal monks and twisted billionaires chased after proof that Christianity is a hoax. But the story of the photographic archive...


 Coast-to-coast AM 01.18.08.(2am EST) Glenn Kimball will discuss history of the Koran

· 01/19/2008 10:41:22 PM PST ·
· Posted by Perdogg ·
· 9 replies ·
· 212+ views ·
· C2C AM ·
· 01.19.08 ·

Expert in ancient manuscripts, Glenn Kimball will discuss new information on the history and origins of the Koran and ancient libraries.

The Roman Empire


 Lead poisoning in Rome: The skeletal evidence

· 05/31/2012 5:10:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 14 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 2-24-2012 ·
· http://www.poweredbyosteons.org/ ·

A recent article in the online publication io9, "The First Artificial Sweetener Poisoned Lots of Romans" provided a (very) brief look at some of the uses of lead (Pb) in the Roman world, including the tired old hypothesis that it was rampant lead poisoning that led to the downfall of Rome - along with gonorrhoea, Christianity, slavery, and the kitchen sink. The fact the Romans loved their lead is not in question, with plenty of textual and archaeological sources that inform us of the uses of lead -- as cosmetics, ballistics, sarcophagi, pipes, jewellery, curse tablets, utensils and cooking pots,...

Ancient Autopsies


 Uncovering the Great Theater of Apamea

· 06/02/2012 7:48:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Thursday, May 31, 2012 ·
· Cynthia Finlayson ·

The Great Theater at Apamea in northern Syria vies with the Large Theater at Ephesus, Turkey for the honor of being the largest extant Roman edifice of its type to have survived the ravages of time. Both buildings are estimated to have held audiences of over 20,000 persons, and both may have had their origins in an earlier Greek Hellenistic structure that was overbuilt in the Roman Era. Only one other theater, the Theater of Pompey in Rome, is known to have been larger. However, Pompey's lavish building is buried under the modern streets of the city, and its surviving...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Mexican archaeologists find 2,500-year-old altar

· 05/28/2012 7:23:38 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· Fox News Latino ·
· May 25, 2012 ·
· EFE ·

An altar and a stela estimated to date from as early as 800 B.C. were found at the Chalcatzingo archaeological site in the central state of Morelos, Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, or INAH, said. The altar is rectangular and covered with engravings representing rain. A few meters (yards) away from the altar was an unfinished stela standing 1.7 meters (5 feet 6 inches) tall. The pieces are thought to have been made between 800 and 500 B.C., about the same age as another altar and a relief depicting three cats that archaeologists from INAH's Morelos Center found...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 DNA study seeks origin of Appalachia's Melungeons

· 05/27/2012 4:49:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 64 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5-25-2012 ·
· Travis Loller ·

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- For years, varied and sometimes wild claims have been made about the origins of a group of dark-skinned Appalachian residents once known derisively as the Melungeons. Some speculated they were descended from Portuguese explorers, or perhaps from Turkish slaves or Gypsies. Now a new DNA study in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy attempts to separate truth from oral tradition and wishful thinking. The study found the truth to be somewhat less exotic: Genetic evidence shows that the families historically called Melungeons are the offspring of sub-Saharan African men and white women of northern or central European origin.....

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles


 Ancient Mummy Child Had Hepatitis B

· 06/02/2012 7:34:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

A mummified child in Korea whose organs were relatively well preserved has produced the oldest full viral genome description. A liver biopsy of the mummy revealed a unique hepatitis B virus (HBV) known as a genotype C2 sequence, which is said to be common in Southeast Asia. The first discovery of hepatitis in a Korean mummy came in 2007. The new work provided more detailed analysis... Carbon 14 tests of the clothing of the mummy suggests that the boy lived around the 16th century during the Korean Joseon Dynasty. The viral DNA sequences recovered from the liver biopsy enabled the...

Not-so-Ancient Autopsies


 Skeletal Trauma from Medieval Oslo

· 05/31/2012 5:21:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 11 replies ·
· Bones Don't Lie ·
· 5-1-2012 ·
· Katy Meyers ·

The Medieval period is one characterized throughout the Western world as one of violence. Artwork from this era shows not only violence done towards other cultural groups, but dangers and suffering from daily life. Historical texts document the violence of heroes and villains, their phrases often loaded with drama. Scholars have argued that this violence was part of the social environment and to some extent was institutionalized. However, judgements from text and art alone are limited by individual perception and bias. Human remains have been vital in understanding the extent and manner of violence in the Medieval period. While they...

Egypt


 Burial site revealing ancient Egyptian funerary rites uncovered [ Middle Kdm Egypt ]

· 06/02/2012 7:17:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· Al-Ahram ·
· Wednesday, May 30, 2012 ·
· Nevine El-Aref ·

The well preserved coffin of an unidentified Middle Kingdom provincial governor was found in the Deir Al-Barsha necropolis near the upper Egyptian city of Minya In the course of routine excavation work at the tomb of the first Middle Kingdom governor of the Hare Nome or province, the nomarch Ahanakht I at the Deir Al-Barsha site in Minya, Belgian archaeologists from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven stumbled on what is believed to be an important burial going back to the beginning of the Middle Kingdom... Harco Willems, field director of the Belgian mission, told Ahram Online that the coffin remains discovered...

Underwater Archaeology


 Deepest Roman shipwrecks found near Greece

· 05/30/2012 6:18:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 18 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 30, 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

Two Roman-era shipwrecks have been found in deep water off a western Greek island, challenging the idea that ancient shipmasters stuck to coastal routes. The merchant ships were sunk nearly a mile deep between Corfu and Italy - proving that ancient traders didn't 'hug the shore'. Greece's culture ministry said the two third-century wrecks were discovered earlier this month during a survey of an area where a Greek-Italian gas pipeline is to be sunk.

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Discovered: The 128million-year-old grandfather of the modern squid..

· 06/01/2012 6:42:36 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 16 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 1, 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

Scientists have managed to re-create the appearance of a previously unknown fossil - a spiky creature thought to be the ultimate ancestor of the modern-day squid and octopus. The Austria National History Museum team used 3D scanning technology to unearth the fossil of 'Dissimilites intermedius' a layer at a time, and then created a video of how the creature lived and moved. The ammonite was discovered in sediment which formed at the bottom of the ocean during the Cretaceous period - on a surface which, 128 million years, later would lie at the top of the Dolomite mountains in the...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 It Took Earth Ten Million Years to Recover from Greatest Mass Extinction

· 05/28/2012 7:25:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 42 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· May 27, 2012 ·
· U of Bristol ·

It took some 10 million years for Earth to recover from the greatest mass extinction of all time, latest research has revealed. Life was nearly wiped out 250 million years ago, with only 10 per cent of plants and animals surviving. It is currently much debated how life recovered from this cataclysm, whether quickly or slowly. Recent evidence for a rapid bounce-back is evaluated in a new review article by Dr Zhong-Qiang Chen, from the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan, and Professor Michael Benton from the University of Bristol. They find that recovery from the crisis lasted some 10...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Israeli researchers find American Indians with Jewish genetic markers

· 05/30/2012 5:51:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 143 replies ·
· Xinhuanet ·
· 5-30-12 ·

JERUSALEM, May 30 (Xinhua) -- Geneticists at an Israeli hospital said they have found a unique Jewish genetic mutation among an American Indian tribe, indicating that they are descendants of Jews expelled from Spain 600 years ago, local Haaretz daily reported on Wednesday. The findings of the study, conducted at the Sheba Medical Center near Tel Aviv, show that a group of Indians from the State of Colorado bear the so-called "Ashkenazi mutation," on the BRCA1 gene - a marker unique to European Jews. While such so-called "secret Jews," or "Anusim" in Hebrew, whose families assimilated into various north and...

Early America


 Our Forgotten Fallen, from an earlier war.

· 05/28/2012 12:01:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SES1066 ·
· 8 replies ·
· 05/28/2012 ·
· Self ·

Today is Memorial Day, once also known as Decoration Day, hallowed to honor our military dead. Started to honor our Civil War dead, it has been expanded to honor all of our military dead of the United States from the Revolutionary War on (1775 to present). Yet in doing so, we still leave some out unless we become more expansive yet and include the 10,000+[1] of an even earlier conflict. I request those who read this, cast their minds back to a war that too many have forgotten but that forged an unbreakable mold upon our continent, "The French and...

The Revolution


 The Lesson of Alexander Hamilton

· 05/28/2012 3:36:36 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 141 replies ·
· The American Thinker ·
· 5-28-12 ·
· Jeremy Meister ·

How many things are in a person's pocket that they don't even know about? We take money for granted -- most people can't tell us which way George Washington is facing on the quarter. They can tell us that Ben Franklin is on the front of the hundred, but they can't tell us that Independence Hall (where he helped draft the Constitution) is on the back. One might think that as denominations get smaller and more common, the pictures on them would become more famous and well-known. The ten-dollar bill features Alexander Hamilton on the front. Since he was never...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 America's 21st-Century Population Edge
  (The 21st century will still be the American Century)


· 05/27/2012 6:05:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 35 replies ·
· WSJ ·
· 05/24/2012 ·
· Ben Wattenberg ·

Look around you. For most nations of the world, birth and fertility rates have never fallen so far, so fast, so long, so surprisingly, all across the globe. Except for America. Seen globally, the population explosion -- or what Stanford's Paul Ehrlich called "the population bomb" in the 1960s -- is now stone-cold dead. The ramifications are enormous economically, geopolitically, culturally and personally. For one, the United States will become stronger than ever in the games nations play. Every other major modern nation and every developing country has low or falling birth rates. Japan and Poland see 1.3 children per woman, Brazil and China...


end of digest #411 20120602


1,417 posted on 06/03/2012 4:56:20 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1414 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

:’) Especially here.


1,418 posted on 06/03/2012 4:57:44 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1416 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #411 · v 8 · n 46
Saturday, June 2, 2012
 
39 topics
2890885 to 2887890
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the recent newbies.

Issue #411 has 28 topics, including a little bit of FRarchival stuff, some of which was newly added. The recent spate of Roman Empire topics slows down, and I sprinkled them throughout. There's a lot this week of both new and FRarchival topics about OT- and NT-related archaeology, grouped under "Let's Have Jerusalem". Overall, another week with a startling variety.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • Pastor Derek McCoy, executive director of the Maryland Marriage Alliance, said that the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's "unfortunate" stance on the issue will contribute to the "further demise of the family." McCoy told CNA on May 21 that the NAACP is "endorsing an epidemic" of fatherless households, a "tragic" phenomenon in the United States and particularly in the African American community... McCoy said that despite its long record of important work, however, the NAACP's latest move does not reflect the views of its constituents... only 39 percent of African Americans are in favor of redefining marriage. Voters across the country have consistently affirmed measures to defend marriage as the union of one man and one woman... "Gay marriage" teaches that fathers and mothers are both dispensable, he explained, and "this is absolutely going to harm the family." -- [African American leaders blast NAACP 'gay marriage' support posted by markomalley]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,419 posted on 06/03/2012 5:00:06 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1417 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #412
Saturday, June 9, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 Mysterious radiation burst recorded in tree rings

· 06/04/2012 10:58:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 46 replies ·
· Nature ·
· Sunday, June 3, 2012 ·
· Richard A. Lovett ·

Just over 1,200 years ago, the planet was hit by an extremely intense burst of high-energy radiation of unknown cause, scientists studying tree-ring data have found. The radiation burst, which seems to have hit between AD 774 and AD 775, was detected by looking at the amounts of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 in tree rings that formed during the AD 775 growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. The increase in 14C levels is so clear that the scientists, led by Fusa Miyake, a cosmic-ray physicist from Nagoya University in Japan, conclude that the atmospheric level of 14C must have jumped...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 The Cosmic Story of Carbon-14

· 06/05/2012 12:48:06 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 16 replies ·
· Starts with a Bang ·
· 6/4/12 ·
· Ethan Siegel ·

"Life exists in the universe only because the carbon atom possesses certain exceptional properties." --James Jeans Here on Earth, every living thing is based around four fundamental, elemental building blocks of life: hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and, perhaps most importantly, carbon.Image Credit: Robert Johnson / University of Pennsylvania. From diamonds to nanotubes to DNA, carbon is indispensable for constructing practically all of the most intricate structures we know of. Most of the carbon in our world comes from long-dead stars, in the form of Carbon-12: carbon atoms containing six neutrons in their nucleus. About 1.1% of all carbon is Carbon-13, with one...

Prehistory & Origins


 Fossil Discovery: More Evidence for Asia, Not Africa,
  as the Source of Earliest Anthropoid Primates


· 06/07/2012 2:49:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 28 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 06/07/2012 ·

An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of Afrasia djijidae, a new fossil primate from Myanmar that illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early anthropoids -- the group that includes humans, apes, and monkeys. The 37-million-year-old Afrasia closely resembles another early anthropoid, Afrotarsius libycus, recently discovered at a site of similar age in the Sahara Desert of Libya. The close similarity between Afrasia and Afrotarsius indicates that early anthropoids colonized Africa only shortly before the time when these animals lived. The colonization of Africa by early anthropoids was a pivotal step in primate and human evolution,...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Old Vero Man Site History

· 06/04/2012 6:29:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Old Vero Ice Age Sites Committee ·
· obtained Sunday, June 3rd, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

In 1913 the Indian River Farms Company was dredging the Main Relief Canal in Vero Florida, in preparation to handle an expanding population. (It was not called Vero Beach until 1925.) The workers on this project kept seeing fossilized bones in the walls or banks of the freshly dredged canal. Some of these bones were presented to the state geologist, Dr E.H. Sellards. Dr. Sellards suggested that they also look for human bones during a visit to the site. In 1916 Dr Sellards, working with Frank Ayers, Isaac Wells, and others found more human bones in the strata known as...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 There IS a link between genius and madness - but we don't know why we evolved this 'gift'

· 06/04/2012 6:33:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 60 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 4, 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

There IS a link between creative genius and madness - with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder frequent in highly creative and intelligent people. The idea was investigated by a panel of scientists who had all suffered some form of mental disorder. Kay Redfield Jamison of John Hopkins school of Medicine, who suffers from bipolar disorder, said that intelligence tests on Swedish 16-year-olds had shown that highly intelligent children were most likely to go on to develop the disorder.

Epigraphy & Language


 New discovery at early Islamic site in Jordan:
  Uncovered inscription reveals name of Umayyad prince


· 06/07/2012 5:23:36 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· Art Daily ·
· Thursday, June 7, 2012 ·
· Art, or someone who knows him ·

The site is a small building dating to the Umayyad period and is known for its mural paintings. Gazelle and wild donkey hunts, dances, musicians, court scenes and allegories, and zodiac symbols are all painted on interior surfaces. The inscription, which previously could not be read due to accumulated dirt and previous unsuccessful cleaning attempts, is an invocation to Allah beginning with the formula "Allahumma aslih al-Walid ibn YazÓd" ("Oh God! Make al-WalÓd ibn YazÓd virtuous"). This inscription was painted in white above a window in old Kufic alphabet without any diacritical dots. Sections of the three-line inscription are...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Vandals cause 'irreparable damage' to 1,600-year-old mosaics in Tiberias synagogue

· 06/05/2012 6:35:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Michal Shmulovich ·

An ancient Tiberias synagogue was extensively vandalized overnight Tuesday, causing irreversible damage and potentially necessitating millions of dollars in rehabilitation costs. Police opened an investigation, and officials said they suspected ultra-Orthodox Jewish extremists who oppose archaeological excavations of ancient tombs were to blame. "The damage is widespread. Some of the damage is irreversible," said Shaul Goldstein, executive director of the Nature and Parks Authority. The Hammat Tiberias site, which also serves as an archaeological park, boasts 1,600-year-old mosaics. The site's two synagogues date from 286 and 337 CE, when Tiberias was the seat of the Sanhedrin rabbinical court. Among the...

The Roman Empire


 Bulgarian Archaeologists Find Late Antiquity Church on Black Sea Coast

· 06/05/2012 4:02:17 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· Novinite ·
· Monday, May 28, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Bulgarian archaeologists have found a church dating back to the late Antiquity period, which is located near the village of Sarafovo, on the Black Sea coast. The site, which is close to the Bulgarian Black Sea city of Burgas, has been excavated by the team of Prof. Dr. Lyudmil Vagalinski, who is the Director of the National Archaeology Institute and Museum at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, since the start of May 2012. The excavations at Sarafovo (a village also known for hosting a military airfield) began after over the winter the sea waves uncovered parts of a Roman structures...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 Continuity down through the ages: Proof of a thousand years' use of a Sicilian farmland estate

· 06/05/2012 4:15:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Australian Science Fund ·

Archaeological excavations have provided the first substantiation that a farmland estate in Sicily boasts a history which reaches back over a thousand years. Numerous finds demonstrate the continuous use of the land complex as a nexus of settlement and economic and religious life between the 5th and 16th century. The findings are the result of two projects of the Austrian Science Fund FWF which comprise the first in-depth archaeological exploration of Sicily's Byzantine period... While the ancient era saw the island dominated first by the Greeks and later the Roman Empire, in the High Middle Ages it was the centre...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 The True Story Of Dracula (Interesting read)

· 08/05/2005 9:06:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 47 replies ·
· 4,142+ views ·
· Useless-knowledge.com ·
· October 18 , 2004 ·
· Mark Gelbart ·

Halloween is a time when friendly neighbors pretend to be tricked by children dressed up as ghosts, goblins, superheroes, clowns, fairies, and Teenaged Mutant Ninja Turtles. And in return the adults--feigning surprise--pass out sugary treats; a tradition that has helped those in the dental profession for many generations. Unlike most of the characters that make an annual appearance on our door steps, Dracula is based on a real person. Most people are familiar with the fictional version of Dracula created by Bram Stoker, but they are only vaguely aware...

Ancient Autopsies


 Ancient 'Vampire' Corpses Unearthed by Bulgarian Archaeologists

· 06/06/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 25 replies ·
· Medical Daily ·
· 5-5-2012 ·
· Christine Hsu ·

More than 100 "vampire" corpses have been dug out from graves across Bulgaria during historic excavations, according to the country's archaeologists. Bozhidar Dimitrov, head of the National History Museum in the Bulgarian capital, Sofia, said on Tuesday that Bulgarian archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the Middle Ages pierced through the chest with iron rods to keep them from turning into the undead. Dimitrov said that the two "vampire" remains were found last weekend near the Black Sea town of Sozopol. The tradition of hammering an iron rod through the chest bones and heart of 'evil' people to prevent them...

Religion of Pieces


 Muslims demand Hagia Sophia be converted into a mosque
  on anniversary of the fall of Constantinope

· 05/29/2012 3:56:54 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Gillibrand ·
· 4 replies ·
· Catholic Church Conservation ·
· 29 May 2012 ·
· Cathcon ·

Includes video of the 2012 annual celebrations of the fall of Constantinople which take place in Turkey


 Muslims demand Hagia Sophia be converted into a mosque
  on anniversary of the fall of Constantinope
 


· 05/29/2012 3:56:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Gillibrand ·
· 58 replies ·
· Catholic Church Conservation ·
· 29 May 2012 ·
· Cathcon ·

Includes video of the 2012 annual celebrations of the fall of Constantinople which take place in Turkey

Underwater Archaeology


 Chariots in Red Sea: 'Irrefutable evidence'

· 06/07/2012 6:56:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ReformationFan ·
· 79 replies ·
· World Net Daily ·
· June 7th, 2012 ·
· Joe Kovacs ·

A news report that stunned the world nine years ago about the discovery of possible ancient chariot wheels at the bottom of the Red Sea is suddenly gaining fresh attention with new video claiming "irrefutable evidence" that corroborates the find. In June 2003, WND interviewed Bible enthusiasts who dove the waters of the Red Sea, alleging they found and photographed parts of chariots that may be the actual remains of the catastrophe brought upon the Egyptian army which pursued the Israelites, according to the Book of Exodus in the Bible. "I am 99.9 percent sure I picked up a chariot...

Pages


 Freeman Dyson: Science on the Rampage

· 05/09/2012 10:28:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 34 replies ·
· New York Review of Books ·
· April 5, 2012 ·
· Freeman Dyson ·

Physics on the Fringe: Smoke Rings, Circlons, and Alternative Theories of Everything by Margaret Wertheim Walker, 323 pp., $27.00, Pierpont Morgan Library/Art Resource: An engraving by William Blake from The Song of Los, 1795 -- Physics on the Fringe describes work done by amateurs, people rejected by the academic establishment and rejecting orthodox academic beliefs. They are often self-taught and ignorant of higher mathematics. Mathematics is the language spoken by the professionals. The amateurs offer an...

Paleontology


 Primeval Giant Among Giants
  (African Scientist find skull of 18,000 pound Dinosaur eating Crocodile)


· 10/29/2001 11:47:01 AM PST ·
· Posted by umbra ·
· 60 replies ·
· 1,051+ views ·
· Int'l Herald Tribune ·
· October 27, 2001 ·
· Guy Gugliotta ·

The crocodile was a silent stalker, as long as a school bus and weighing almost 18,000 pounds. It cruised the primordial rivers of what is now Saharan Africa, looking for unwary dinosaurs to eat."It was absolutely enormous, said a University of Chicago paleontologist, Paul Sereno, of the 8,165 kilogram creature. "There is nothing that would be able to handle that animal. It's like a torpedo of muscle five feet in diameter. (with body armour) The skull of the world's largest living crocdile looks like an hors d'oeuvre by comparison." In an age of giants 110 million years ago Sarcosuchus imperator ...

Dinosaurs


 Dinosaurs were lighter than previously thought, new study shows

· 06/05/2012 7:39:30 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, June 5, 2012 ·
· U of Manchester ·

...University of Manchester biologists used lasers to measure the minimum amount of skin required to wrap around the skeletons of modern-day mammals, including reindeer, polar bears, giraffes and elephants. They discovered that the animals had almost exactly 21% more body mass than the minimum skeletal 'skin and bone' wrap volume, and applied this to a giant Brachiosaur skeleton in Berlin's Museum f¸r Naturkunde. Previous estimates of this Brachiosaur's weight have varied, with estimates as high as 80 tonnes, but the Manchester team's calculations -- published in the journal Biology Letters -- reduced that figure to just 23 tonnes. The team...


 Dinosaurs Skinnier Than Previously Thought

· 06/06/2012 3:57:55 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 13 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· 6-5-2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Dinosaurs were often hefty, but not as plump as previously thought. A new study describes a new technique used to measure the weight and size of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals. It could forever change museum exhibits, book illustrations, and other recreations of these now-extinct species. The study appears in the latest issue of Biology Letters "This is a huge help for any sort of reconstruction," lead author William Sellers told Discovery News. "We now have a number that suggests how much flesh to add to the bones and that should help people produce animals that are the right balance...


 Ye olde vampire slaying kit: Victorian oak box complete with wooden stakes

· 06/07/2012 8:07:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 13 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 7, 2012 ·
· Tom Gardner ·

They say you can never be too prepared... but even for the most superstitious person this may be overkill. A 19th century Vampire slaying kit, which includes a wooden mallet and four oak stakes, glass vials of holy water and garlic paste is expected to fetch up £2,000 when auctioned later this month. The macabre artefact also has a percussion cap pistol - invented in the 1830 - and a steel bullet mold, all carefully crafted to offer the best protection against any creatures of the night.

The Revolution


 George Washington, Circular Letter to the States

· 06/08/2012 2:13:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Jacquerie ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Founders' Constitution ·
· June 8th, 1783 ·
· George Washington ·

When word that peace with Great Britain was assured, General Washington issued a blistering condemnation of Congress. In addition to demands for soldier's back pay, he called for reforms to the Articles of Confederation. His admonitions would culminate in 1788 with ratification of the Constitution. George Washington: When we consider the magnitude of the prize we contended for, the doubtful nature of the contest, and the favorable manner in which it has terminated, we shall find the greatest possible reason for gratitude and rejoicing; this is a theme that will afford infinite delight to every benevolent and liberal mind, whether...

The Civil War


 Dr Charles Leale's long-lost medical report details his treatment after Lincoln was shot

· 06/05/2012 9:07:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 16 replies ·
· dailymail.co.uk ·
· 5 June 2012 ·
· Beth Stebner ·

They were filed away and for nearly 150 years, but now researchers have found the report of the young army surgeon who was first to reach Abraham Lincoln after he was shot in the head in Ford Theatre. The 21-page report, written by Dr Charles Leale, a 23-year-old doctor just six weeks into his medical practice who happened to be 40 feet from Lincoln, details his original perceptions of the president's fatal injuries. The historians who discovered the report in the National Archives in Washington believe it was filed, packed in a box, stored at the archives and not seen...


end of digest #412 20120609


1,420 posted on 06/10/2012 10:22:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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