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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv


(Excerpt) Read more at freerepublic.com ...


TOPICS: Agriculture; Astronomy; Books/Literature; Education; History; Hobbies; Miscellaneous; Reference; Science; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: alphaorder; archaeology; economic; emiliospedicato; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; paleontology; science; spedicato
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #405 · v 8 · n 41
Saturday, April 21, 2012
 
36 topics
2874830 to 2755887
809 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 36 topic issue #405. That's a lot of topics. Many of them were dredged up from the FRchives. Last week I doofused up the count, we had ten topics, not 28. Probably no one noticed.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Spotted this late Sunday evening and immediately knew it would be the quote this week:
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,401 posted on 04/21/2012 11:45:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topic links, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #406
Saturday, April 28, 2012

Roman Empire

 Smuggled Cargo Found on Ancient Roman Ship

· 04/28/2012 7:12:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Wednesday, April 25, 2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Following an analysis of the jars and their contents, Tusa and colleagues concluded that the 52- by 16-foot ship was sailing from North Africa when she sank some 1,700 years ago, probably while trying to enter the local river Birgi. In North Africa the vaulting tubes cost a quarter of what builders paid for them in Rome. "It was a somewhat tolerated smuggling activity, used by sailors to round their poor salaries. They bought these small tubes cheaper in Africa, hid them everywhere within the ship, and then re-sold them in Rome," Tusa said. According to Frank Sear, professor of...


 In a bronze inscription, a remnant of Roman might

· 04/22/2012 8:41:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· Saturday, April 21, 2012 ·
· Matti Friedman ·

We do not know the name of the Roman war veteran who owned this bronze certificate, which marked his discharge from active service 1,922 years ago. His name was engraved on the tablet when it was issued in Rome, but that part is missing. We do know that he was discharged in 90 CE and that he served in one of the empire's combat units stationed in the unruly province of Judea. Because a Roman soldier served 25 years before being released, we can deduce that this anonymous fighter was in active service as a younger man during one of...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Archaeological Find Supports Biblical Portrait of the Davidic Kingdom

· 04/23/2012 6:45:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 37 replies ·
· The Sacred Page ·
· April 20, 2012 ·

In 2008 I first ran a story about a major archaeological discovery at Khirbet Qeiyafa. The Israeli Antiquities Authority is releasing the preliminary report of the finds at Khirbet Qeiyafa. As I explained then, the findings are challenging skeptical scholars' claims. As I explained then, according to skeptical scholars the accounts of the kingdoms of David and Solomon are myths--essentially the Israelite equivalent of Arthurian legends of Camelot and the Roundtable. In short, in their view, it was simply fabricated. After Israel's Babylonian exile, the Jewish leaders invented these stories. The Israelites simply "idealized" their past; the Davidic traditions...

Faith & Philosophy

 Israeli researcher: Mikvehs show that Galilee cave dwellers were likely kohanim

· 04/28/2012 7:56:11 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Ha'aretz ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Eli Ashkenazi ·

The caves in which the purification baths were found were 'caves of refuge,' where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule. A fifth mikveh has been found in the caves on the Galilee's Cliffs of Arbel, indicating that the people who lived there under Roman rule were most likely kohanim, Jews of the priestly class, said Yinon Shivtiel, one of the researchers who found the ritual bath... The caves in which the purification baths were found were "caves of refuge," where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule, particularly during the Jewish...

Religion of Pieces

 Temple Denial

· 04/24/2012 4:42:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 15 replies ·
· Daily Beast ·
· Apr 24, 2012 ·
· Benny Morris ·

Leafing through a popular Palestinian tourist guidebook, Palestine: A Guide, by Mariam Shahin, I came across the following sentence concerning the Temple Mount compound (in Arabic, al-haram al-sharif, the noble sanctuary) on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem's Old City: "It is this whole area that fanatic Israelis want to destroy in order to 'rebuild' a temple, which they claim once stood there." Of course, there are a handful of Israeli "fanatics" who would like to destroy the compound's two Muslim mosques -- the Dome of the Rock and al-Aksa -- and rebuild the Jewish Temple on the site. The overwhelming majority of Israelis reject them...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Robert Spencer Asks: Did Muhammad Exist?

· 04/23/2012 4:47:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 93 replies ·
· FrontPage Magazine ·
· April 23, 2012 ·
· Bruce Thornton ·

Editor's note: Robert Spencer's acclaimed new book, Did Muhammad Exist?: An Inquiry into Islam's Obscure Origins, is now available. One of the jihadists' most potent psychological weapons is the double standard Muslims have imposed on the West. Temples and churches are destroyed and vandalized, Christians murdered and driven from the lands of Christianity's birth, anti-Semitic lunacy propagated by high-ranking Muslim clerics, and Christian territory like northern Cyprus ethnically cleansed...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ancient Egyptian Mummy Suffered Rare and Painful Disease

· 04/28/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

Around 2,900 years ago, an ancient Egyptian man, likely in his 20s, passed away after suffering from a rare, cancerlike disease that may also have left him with a type of diabetes. When he died he was mummified, following the procedure of the time. The embalmers removed his brain (through the nose it appears), poured resin-like fluid into his head and pelvis, took out some of his organs and inserted four linen "packets" into his body. At some point the mummy was transferred to the 2,300 year-old sarcophagus of a woman named Kareset, an artifact that is now in the...

Diet & Cuisine

 Spaniards once ate elephant meat

· 04/24/2012 1:07:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 18 replies ·
· Spero News ·
· April 24, 2012 06:00 ·

Spaniards once ate elephant meat Tuesday, April 24, 2012 By Spero News Researchers have found cut and percussion marks in elephant bones in the site of Preresa. Article Tools Discuss Humans that populated the banks of the river Manzanares (Madrid, Spain) during the Middle Palaeolithic (between 127,000 and 40,000 years ago) fed themselves on pachyderm meat and bone marrow. This is what a Spanish study shows and has found percussion and cut marks on elephant remains in the site of Preresa (Madrid). In prehistoric times, hunting animals implied a risk and required a considerable amount of energy. Therefore, when the...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Evidence of the earliest human activity found in Chile's south

· 04/28/2012 8:46:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Santiago Times ·
· 22 April 2012 ·
· Jason Suder ·

University archaeologists found 14,000-year-old knives while studying elephant ancestors. Archaeologists and anthropologists excavating a site in the south of Chile have uncovered stones that are believed to have been used as tools by humans 14,000 years ago. Scientists from Universidad Cat√›lica de Temuco and Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh) were able to determine these were tools because they exhibit the marking congruent with ancient knives and cutting utensils. The Volcano of Osorno nearby the site where scientists uncovered 14,000-year-old tools. (Photo by Claudio Sep˙lveda Geoffroy/Flickr) "There are rock detachments from a simple, intentional blow that demonstrate that they were doctored,...

Underwater Archaeology

 Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

· 04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· Wednesday, April 25, 2012 ·
· Frank Nowikowski ·

One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...

Navigation

 Japanese kayaker hopes to show Kennewick Man could have traveled by boat

· 04/23/2012 9:44:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 30 replies ·
· Tri-City Herald ·
· 10 April 2012 ·
· John Trumbo ·

By week's end, Ryota Yamada hopes to slip his sea kayak gently into the Columbia River at Clover Island, embarking on the first leg of a 10,000-mile adventure to Japan. The retired scientist who did nanotechnological research intends to paddle downriver to the ocean, then via the Inland Passage north to Alaska, and eventually across the Bering Strait to the Asian continent. It will take him four summers, but if he succeeds in reaching his homeland, Yamada said, he will have shown that Kennewick Man could have made his way by boat 9,300 years ago from Japan to North America....


 Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

· 04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 27 replies ·
· The Tyee ·
· 03 April 2012 ·
· Daniel Wood ·

Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...

Age of Sail

 Anniversary of Mutiny on the "Bounty": Pitcairn Island Photos

· 04/28/2012 2:20:14 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 15 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· April 27, 2012 ·
· Andrew Howley ·

223 years ago this Sunday, on April 29, 1789, Fletcher Christian and 24 other sailors held the domineering Captain Bligh at bayonet point against the mast of His Majesty's Armed Vessel Bounty in the most famous mutiny in history. One month ago, National Geographic embarked on a journey through their footsteps, but with the very different goal of studying the pristine coral reefs of the area (read blogs). Bligh was set adrift in the ship's small launch with 18 loyal shipmates, a compass, his journals, some tools, supplies, cutlasses, and food, rum, wine, and water. He navigated the castaways through...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 'Junk DNA' Can Sense Viral Infection: Promising Tool in the Battle Between Pathogen and Host

· 04/28/2012 3:27:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 11 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Apr. 24, 2012 ·
· NA ·

Once considered unimportant "junk DNA," scientists have learned that non-coding RNA (ncRNA) -- RNA molecules that do not translate into proteins -- play a crucial role in cellular function. Mutations in ncRNA are associated with a number of conditions, such as cancer, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Now, through the use of "deep sequencing," a technology used to sequence the genetic materials of the human genome, Dr. Noam Shomron of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine has discovered that when infected with a virus, ncRNA gives off biological signals that indicate the presence of an infectious agent, known as a...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Researchers make alternatives to DNA and RNA

· 04/21/2012 10:34:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by OldNavyVet ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Los Angeles Times ·
· 21 April 2012 ·
· Eryn Brown ·

DNA and RNA molecules are the basis for all life on Earth, but they don't necessarily have to be the basis for all life everywhere, scientists have shown.


 Enzymes grow artificial DNA

· 04/28/2012 11:37:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 4 replies ·
· Nature News ·
· 19 April 2012 ·
· Helen Shen ·

Synthetic strands with different backbones replicate and evolve just like the real thing. Nearly all organisms share a single genetic language: DNA. But scientists have now demonstrated that several lab-made variants of DNA can store and transmit information much like the genuine article. Researchers led by Philipp Holliger, a synthetic biologist at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, say that the alternative molecules could help others to develop new drugs and nanotechnologies. They publish their results today in Science1. DNA is made up of nucleic acid bases -- labelled A, C, G and T -- ...

India

 Ancient hero stone with inscriptions unearthed

· 04/28/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Hindu ·
· Friday, April 27, 2012 ·
· Special Correspondent ·

An ancient hero stone with inscriptions has been unearthed at Karattampatti near Thuraiyur, about 35 km from here. The hero stone was discovered from a field at a village during a field study taken up by a research team led by Subash Chandira Bose, advisor for the archaeological wing of the Centre for Cultural Studies, Coimbatore, following a tip-off given by Durairaj, a local resident. Mr.Bose, in a press release, said the bas-relief hero stone measuring 30 centimetres in width and 92 centimetres in height has been carved within a rectangular vertical frame with excellent craftsmanship. It depicts a warrior...

Greece

 Ancient Temple Discovered in Messinia

· 04/28/2012 4:54:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Greek Reporter ·
· April 24, 2012 ·
· Areti Kotseli ·

Archaeological research reveals an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, opposite the well-known imposing temple of Epicurean Apollo. The area around the newly discovered temple was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Dr. Xeni Arapogianni explains that when the small temple was demolished in order to build a new one, topmasts, triglyphs and other parts of the ancient temple were found. The excavation started back in 2010, revealing the temple as well as bronze items and a great number of...

Epigraphy & Language

 The History of U.S. Paper Money

· 04/24/2012 6:25:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 19 replies ·
· Numismaster.com ·
· April 23, 2012 ·
· Arlyn G. Sieber ·

Excerpted from Warman's Coins and Paper Money by Arlyn G. Sieber, available from http://www.ShopNumisMaster.com. During the Revolutionary War, the states and Continental Congress continued to issue paper money, but its backing in hard currency was spotty at best. Inflation ensued, and the notes' values plummeted. Some were called "shinplasters" because early Americans put them in their boots to help keep their feet warm. The saying "not worth a Continental" had its roots in the devaluation of Continental currency. Designs on state notes varied, but most featured inscriptions within elaborate borders. Coats of arms and crowns were also common. During the...

Longer Perspectives

 Powerful Government Equals Powerful Problems

· 04/19/2012 12:54:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Kaslin ·
· 8 replies ·
· Townhall.com ·
· April 19, 2012 ·
· Jackie Gingrich Cushman ·

History is not simply dates, events and results. Instead, it's people's lives, their hopes and dreams, their situation and their outcomes based on their and other people's actions. While history is learned by looking backward, knowing the outcome, life is lived marching forward, unsure of what might happen. To understand history, it helps to understand the circumstances of the time. How did people live, who was in charge, who had rights, power and money? What is commonplace in one time and place would be unthinkable in another. For example, most Americans understand that by law, they have individual rights....

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Never-before-seen photos from 100 years ago tell vivid story of gritty New York City

· 04/27/2012 1:25:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by lowbridge ·
· 37 replies ·
· ap/daily mail ·
· april 24, 2012 ·

Almost a million images of New York and its municipal operations have been made public for the first time on the internet. The city's Department of Records officially announced the debut of the photo database. Culled from the Municipal Archives collection of more than 2.2 million images going back to the mid-1800s, the 870,000 photographs feature all manner of city oversight --from stately ports and bridges to grisly gangland killings.

end of digest #406 20120428


1,402 posted on 04/28/2012 8:51:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

EPIC WORK! Thanks for all you do for us here on FR.


1,403 posted on 04/28/2012 8:55:10 PM PDT by Graewoulf ((Dictator Baby-Doc Barack's obama"care" violates Sherman Anti-Trust Law, AND U.S. Constitution.))
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #406 · v 8 · n 42
Saturday, April 28, 2012
 
21 topics
2877700 to 2874855
809 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 21 topic issue #406, rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: I may have used this before, but regardless, I'm using it now:
  • "The demon that you can swallow gives you it's power, and the greater life's pain, the greater life's reply." -- Joseph Campbell [cited by bigheadfred on his profile page>]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,404 posted on 04/28/2012 8:55:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks, Civ
Appreciate your hard work and excellent product.
Always interesting, always challenging.


1,405 posted on 04/28/2012 10:08:14 PM PDT by Cincinna ( *** NOBAMA 2012 ***)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1404 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

Thanks Graewoulf!


1,406 posted on 04/29/2012 4:56:56 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Cincinna

Thanks Cincinna!


1,407 posted on 04/29/2012 5:06:31 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1405 | View Replies]



This week's topic links, order added, newest to oldest, plus the first topic for next week (it duplicates two earlier topics):

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #407
Saturday, May 5, 2012

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Ancient migration: Coming to America

· 05/02/2012 10:12:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 76 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 02 May 2012 ·
· Adam Curry ·

For decades, scientists thought that the Clovis hunters were the first to cross the Arctic to America. They were wrong --- and now they need a better theory The mastodon was old, its teeth worn to nubs. It was perfect prey for a band of hunters, wielding spears tipped with needle-sharp points made from bone. Sensing an easy target, they closed in for the kill. Almost 14,000 years later, there is no way to tell how many hits it took to bring the beast to the ground near the coast of present-day Washington state. But at least one struck home,...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Experts solve mystery of ancient stone monument near Atlanta

· 04/12/2011 12:01:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Palter ·
· 29 replies ·
· Examiner ·
· 11 April 2011 ·
· Richard Thornton ·

Rock art specialists from around North America have finally solved this century old archaeological riddle. The stone slab is evidence that native peoples from Puerto Rico or Cuba once lived within the interior of Eastern North America. One day, long before Christopher Columbus claimed to have landed on the eastern edge of Asia, a forgotten people cut steps in the rocks leading up a steep bluff near the Chattahoochee River in the northwest section of the State of Georgia. They carved a supernatural figure on a four feet by one foot granite slab and erected it on the top of...

Australia & the Pacific

 Did humans devastate Easter Island on arrival?

· 03/10/2006 4:17:24 AM PST ·
· Posted by S0122017 ·
· 27 replies ·
· 482+ views ·
· New Scientist ·
· 9 March 2006 ·
· Bob Holmes ·

Early settlers to the remote Easter Island stripped the island's natural resources to erect towering stone statues (Image: Terry L Hunt)Related Articles What caused the collapse of Easter Island civilisation? 25 September 2004 Last of the great migrations 24 April 2004 Histories: Carteret's South Sea trouble 11 February 2006 The first humans may have arrived on Easter Island several centuries later than previously supposed, suggests a new study. If so, these Polynesian settlers must have begun destroying the island's forests almost immediately after their arrival. Easter Island...

Climate

 Ancient network of rivers and lakes found in Arabian Desert

· 05/03/2012 3:57:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 27 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 1, 2012 ·
· Oxford U ·

Satellite images have revealed that a network of ancient rivers once coursed their way through the sand of the Arabian Desert, leading scientists to believe that the region experienced wetter periods in the past... Over the course of five years the researchers will study the landscape features and excavate sites of likely archaeological interest, using the network of water courses as a map. They will use the latest dating techniques to pinpoint the ages of fossils of animals, plants and different stone tool technologies and compare the similarities and differences displayed in the region's rock art. The team's main focus...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

· 04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, April 24, 2012 ·
· Inst. of Vertebrate Paleontology
  and Paleoanthropology ·

The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 MtDNA tests trace all modern horses back to single ancestor 140,000 years ago

· 04/29/2012 5:53:32 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· January 31, 2012 ·
· Bob Yirka ·

For many years archeologists and other scientists have debated the origins of the domesticated horse. Nailing down a time frame is important because many historians view the relationship between man and horse as one of the most important in the development of our species. Horses allowed early people to hunt for faster prey, to wander farther than before and to create much bigger farms due to pulling plows. Now, new evidence has come to light suggesting that all modern horses, which are believed to have been domesticated approximately 10,000 years ago, descended from one mare around 140,000 years ago. The...

Navigation

 Another Genetic Quirk of the Solomon Islands: Blond Hair

· 05/04/2012 7:46:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 14 replies ·
· The New York Times ·
· 03 May 2012 ·
· Sindya N. Bhanoo ·

In the Solomon Islands, about 10 percent of the dark-skinned indigenous people have strikingly blond hair. Some islanders theorize that the coloring could be a result of excess sun exposure, or a diet rich in fish. Another explanation is that the blondness was inherited from distant ancestors --- European traders and explorers who came to the islands. But that's not the case, researchers now report. The gene variant responsible for blond hair in the islanders is distinctly different from the gene that causes blond hair in Europeans. "For me it breaks down any kind of simple notions you might have...

Epigraphy & Language

 Hebrew seal bearing the name 'Matanyahu' uncovered in Jerusalem

· 05/03/2012 3:51:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs ·
· 1 May 2012 ·
· Israel Antiquities Authority ·

The remains of a building dating to the end of the First Temple period were discovered below the base of the ancient drainage channel that is currently being exposed in Israel Antiquities Authority excavations beneath Robinson's Arch in the Jerusalem Archaeological Garden, adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount. This building is the closest structure to the First Temple found to date in archaeological excavations. According to Eli Shukron, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "the name Matanyahu, like the name Netanyahu, means giving to God. These names are mentioned several times in the...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ötzi the Iceman: scientists find 5,000-year-old blood sample

· 05/03/2012 12:42:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Guardian (UK) ·
· Wednesday, May 2, 2012 ·
· Tom Kington ·

As cold cases go, it does not get much colder than ÷tzi the Iceman, whose body was found frozen solid in the Italian Alps 5,300 years after he died from an arrow wound. Since he was discovered by trekkers in 1991, scientists have mapped his DNA and figured out everything from what ailments he suffered from (Lyme disease and a weak heart) to the last meal he ate (venison and ibex) before he was shot in the back, probably by an enemy tribesman. Now, using advanced nanotechnology, they have located traces of ÷tzi's blood, the oldest blood sample ever retrieved....

Not-so-Ancient Autopsies

 Synchrotron scientists and international team reveal tales told by old bones

· 05/03/2012 12:47:54 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· April 30, 2012 ·
· U of Saskatchewan ·

Using the presence of trace amounts of lead and strontium as clues, the team is using the CLS to hunt for the presence of these elements in tiny shards of bones from sailors and others interred in a Royal Navy cemetery in the late 1700s to early 1800s. The work is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Bone is a living tissue, formed as we grow and healing after it breaks. It is also constantly being rebuilt and recycled by the body. As new bone is laid down, there is the chance that metals in the body will...

Age of Sail

 Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot

· 05/04/2012 8:05:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by kiryandil ·
· 14 replies ·
· web.mac.com ·
· Sunday, July 11, 2010 ·
· Douglas Hunter ·

Alwyn Ruddock, an 89-year-old historian, had all her notes & research materials detailing perhaps tremendous discoveries relating to John Cabot's voyages to the New World in the late 1490s posthumously destroyed. This article, Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot, gives a lengthy retelling of that tale. From what I can tell, it looks as though our good friend "Peer Review" or its relatives, well-known to us from the phony Global Warming money scam, is mostly responsible for the destruction of her astonishing research on Cabot and his predecessors. Dr Evan Jones and his research partner, Margaret Condon, have set...

Early America

 Is this Walter Raleigh's 'lost colony' drawn in invisible ink?..

· 05/03/2012 11:57:48 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 20 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 3, 2012 ·
· Simon Tomlinson ·

It is a mystery that has perplexed historians for more than 400 years - what ever became of the 120 settlers who tried to establish England's first colony on the north-east coast of America? Queen Elizabeth I and famed explorer Sir Walter Raleigh had hoped the expedition in the 1580s would create a capital in the New World, but something went terribly wrong. The men, women and children simply vanished - possibly massacred by native American Indians - any evidence of a settlement disappeared and the infamous 'lost colony' became rooted in American folklore. But solving the centuries-old mystery may...


 Researchers say they have new clue to Lost Colony

· 05/04/2012 9:48:24 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 18 replies ·
· http://phys.org ·
· 05-04-12 ·
· Martha Waggoner ·

A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalizing clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from North Carolina's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginea Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 African Slaves Brought First Rice Riches to U.S.?

· 12/20/2007 7:49:21 PM PST ·
· Posted by Lorianne ·
· 45 replies ·
· 236+ views ·
· National Geographic News ·
· November 28, 2007 ·
· John Roach ·

A rice variety that made many a colonial plantation owner rich was brought to the United States from West Africa, according to preliminary genetic research. The finding suggests that African slaves are responsible for nearly every facet of one of the first rice varieties grown in the U.S., as well as one of the most lucrative crops in early American history. "Not only did they bring the technology, the how-to, they brought the cultivar," said Anna McClung, a genetic researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Stuttgart, Arkansas. West Africans had been growing varieties of rice for several thousand...

Farty Shades of Green

 The Fungus That Conquered Europe

· 03/19/2008 11:33:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 68 replies ·
· 1,617+ views ·
· NY Times ·
· March 17, 2008 ·
· John Reader ·

The feast of Ireland's patron saint has always been an occasion for saluting the beautiful land "where the praties grow," but it's also a time to look again at the disaster that established around the world the Irish communities that today celebrate St. Patrick's Day: the Great Potato Famine of 1845-6. In its wake, the Irish left the old country, with more than half a million settling in United States. The famine and the migrations changed Irish and American history, of course, but they drastically changed Britain too. Americans may think of the disease that destroyed Ireland's potato crops, late...

Diet & Cuisine

 Atkins diet beats low-fat fare

· 11/18/2002 5:32:27 PM PST ·
· Posted by Paradox ·
· 211 replies ·
· 4,114+ views ·
· MSNBC ·
· 11-18-02 ·
· AP ·

Nov. 18 --- Multitudes swear by the high-fat, low-carbohydrate Atkins diet, and now a carefully controlled study backs them up: Low-carb may actually take off more weight than low-fat and may be surprisingly better for cholesterol, too. ... Westman studied 120 overweight volunteers, who were randomly assigned to the Atkins diet or the heart association's Step 1 diet, a widely used low-fat approach. On the Atkins diet, people limited their carbs to less than 20 grams a day, and 60 percent of their calories came from fat. "It was high fat, off the scale," he said. After six months, the...

Longer Perspectives

 Science and the Republican Brain

· 04/30/2012 2:21:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 47 replies ·
· The American Magazine ·
· April 30, 2012 ·
· Lee Harris ·

The so-called Republican brain, with its deep resistance to yielding before mere scientific evidence, has played an indispensable role in the making of modern science, long before the emergence of the Grand Old Party. A new term of political opprobrium has been loosed upon the world: anti-science. Like many terms of abuse, it is easier to convey its meaning by an illustration than by a rigorous definition. For example, "If those damn Republicans weren't so anti-science, we might have a chance of dealing with global warming." Here's another example: "Those damn Republicans are so anti-science that they want to see...

Religion of Pieces

 Inventing Muhammad? (Which of the many accounts of the Prophet Muhammad's life is true?)

· 04/23/2012 4:17:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 68 replies ·
· American Thinker ·
· 04/23/2012 ·
· Robert Spencer ·

Why would it matter if Muhammad never existed? Certainly the accepted story of Islam's origins is taken for granted as historically accurate; while many don't accept Muhammad's claim to have been a prophet, few doubt that there was a man named Muhammad who in the early seventh century began to claim that he was receiving messages from Allah through the angel Gabriel. Many who hear about my new book "Did Muhammad Exist? An Inquiry Into Islam's Obscure Origins" ask why it would matter whether or not Muhammad existed --- after all, a billion Muslims believe he did, and they are...

Paleontology

 Large, Mysterious Monster Fossil Puzzles Experts

· 05/04/2012 10:07:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 18 replies ·
· Scientific Computing ·
· 5/1/12 ·

UC Paleontologist David Meyer, left and Carlton Brett, right, flank Ron Fine, who discovered the large fossil spread out on the table. Around 450 million years ago, shallow seas covered the Cincinnati region and harbored one very large and now very mysterious organism. Despite its size, no one has ever found a fossil of this "monster" until its discovery by an amateur paleontologist last year. The fossilized specimen, a roughly elliptical shape with multiple lobes, totaling almost seven feet in length, was unveiled at the North-Central Section 46th Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America in Dayton, OH....

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Rising from the Ooze

· 05/01/2012 9:33:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 15 replies ·
· The Daily Scan ·
· May 1, 2012 ·

Researchers from the University of Oslo have discovered a protozoan species that may belong to a new branch of the tree of life, says Popular Science's Rebecca Boyle. The researchers, who describe their findings in Molecular Biology and Evolution, say they found the microorganism --- called Collodictyon --- in lake sludge in Norway, and that it may be related to some of the planet's earliest life forms. "It is not a fungus, alga, parasite, plant, or animal, yet it has features associated with other kingdoms of life," Boyle says. "It could be a founding member of the newest kingdom on...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 History's Most Overlooked Mysteries

· 04/29/2012 7:17:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wildbill ·
· 38 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· July 25, 2007 ·
· Tuan C. Nguyen ·

1. Disappearance of the Indus Valley Civilization With a culture that stretched from western India to Afghanistan and a population numbering over five million, the ancient Indus Valley people --- India's oldest known civilization --- were an impressive and apparently sanitary bronze-age bunch. The scale of their baffling and abrupt collapse rivals that of the great Mayan decline. But it wasn't until 1922 that excavations revealed a hygienically-advanced culture which maintained a sophisticated sewage drainage system and immaculate bathrooms. Strangely, there is no archaeological evidence of armies, slaves, social conflicts or other vices prevalent in ancient societies. Even to the very end, it seems,...

end of digest #407 20120505


1,408 posted on 05/05/2012 3:31:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #407 · v 8 · n 43
Saturday, May 5, 2012
 
21 topics
2879539 to 2877922
808 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 21 topic issue #407, rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.

There has been a slight uptick in troll activity, but I'd not bothered to mention it the past three weeks or so.
· view this issue ·
Here's something that didn't get posted (AFAIK) or pinged, obviously a link to an offsite story: Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Have a great weekend, great week, and great month of May.
  • "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson [cited by Jean S on FR profile page>]
 
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1,409 posted on 05/05/2012 9:34:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #408
Saturday, May 12, 2012
Let's Have Jerusalem

3,000-year-old artifacts fuel Biblical archaeology debate
· 05/08/2012 1:00:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 36 replies ·
· The Times of Israel ·
· May 8, 2012 ·
· MATTI FRIEDMAN ·
New finds presented Tuesday from an intriguing site in the Judean Hills are part of a scholarly argument about the accuracy of the Bible The excavation at Hirbet Qeiyafa is currently one of the most important in the world of Biblical archaeology (Courtesy of Hebrew University of Jerusalem)Two rare 3,000-year-old models of ancient shrines were among artifacts presented by an Israeli archaeologist on Tuesday as finds he said offered new support for the historical veracity of the Bible. The archaeologist, Yosef Garfinkel of Hebrew University, is excavating a site known as Hirbet Qeiyafa, located in the Judean hills not far...
Earliest Evidence of Biblical Cult Discovered (From time of King David)
· 05/11/2012 8:30:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 8 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· May 10, 2012 ·
· Wynne Parry ·
For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered shrines from the time of the early Biblical kings in the Holy Land, providing the earliest evidence of a cult, they say. Excavation within the remains of the roughly 3,000-year-old fortified city of Khirbet Qeiyafa, located about 19 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem, have revealed three large rooms used as shrines, along with artifacts, including tools, pottery and objects, such as alters associated with worship.
Archaeologists: Israeli artifacts support Solomon's Temple
· 05/12/2012 10:53:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 4 replies ·
· Sun Herald ·
· 05/12/2012 ·
· MICHELE CHABIN - Religion News Service ·
JERUSALEM -- Archaeologists have unearthed a trove of artifacts dating back to the time of the biblical King David that they say closely correspond to the description of Solomon's Temple found in the Book of Kings. Hebrew University archaeologist Yosef Garfinkel said the find "is extraordinary" first because it marks the first time that shrines from the time of the early Israelite kings were found. In addition, two small, well-preserved models discovered in the excavations closely resemble elements described in the Bible. The multiyear excavations took place at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem, adjacent...
Faith & Philosophy

Revealed: The scandalous history of Judaism's most precious book
· 05/11/2012 7:51:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 3 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· 10 May 2012 ·
· Times of Israel ·
Theft, espionage, corruption and a cover-up lasting decades -- a new book by a Times of Israel reporter exposes the extraordinary saga of the uniquely revered, 1,100-year-old Aleppo Codex A new book by a Times of Israel reporter reveals dramatic new information about the fate of a manuscript many consider Judaism's most important book -- the 1,100-year-old Aleppo Codex.The manuscript -- or the part of it that did not go mysteriously missing in the mid-20th century -- is currently held alongside the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. It is revered as the authoritative version of the Hebrew...
Neandertals / Neanderthals

Neanderthals in Color
· 05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 50 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65, n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Zach Zorich ·
In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvèdère, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
Central Asia & Climate

Rethinking the Thundering Hordes
· 05/06/2012 7:31:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65 n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Andrew Lawler ·
Vast stretches of Central Asia feel eerily uninhabited. Fly at 30,000 feet over... Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan -- and there are long moments when no town or road or field is visible from your window. Wandering bands and tribes roamed this immense area for 5,000 years, herding goat, sheep, cattle, and horses across immense steppes, through narrow valleys, and over high snowy passes. They left occasional tombs that survived the ages, and on rare occasions settled down and built towns or even cities. But for the most part, these peoples left behind few physical traces of their origins, beliefs, or ways...
Epigraphy & Language

Unknown Ancient Language Found on Clay Tablet
· 05/12/2012 11:32:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Sci-News ·
· Fri, May 11th, 2012 ·
· Enrico de Lazaro ·
The archaeologists working at Ziyaret Tepe, the probable site of the ancient Assyrian city of Tushan, believe that this language may have been spoken by deportees originally from the Zagros Mountains, on the border of modern-day Iran and Iraq. In keeping with a policy widely practiced across the Assyrian Empire, these people may have been forcibly moved from their homeland and resettled in what is now south-east Turkey, where they would have been set to work building the new frontier city and farming its hinterland. The evidence for the language they spoke comes from a single clay tablet, which was...
Prehistory & Origins

Ancient Germany's Metal Traders
· 05/06/2012 8:53:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65, n 3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Andrew Curry ·
....May 11, 2011, Mario Küssner looked on as a bulldozer shaved a layer of soil a few inches deep from a roadside field near the eastern German village of Dermsdorf. Küssner, a staff archaeologist for the state of Thuringia, was brought in before the scheduled construction of a highway on-ramp would begin... the bulldozer uncovered something even more surprising -- a handful of dull green ax heads lying in the soil... careful work revealed a clay jar standing a foot-and-a-half tall packed with 100 bronze ax heads dating to the Bronze Age -- more than 3,000 years ago. The ax...
The Roman Empire

Trash Talk [ Monte Testaccio, imperial Roman landfill ]
· 05/05/2012 8:34:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Archaeology, Volume 62 Number 2 ·
· March/April 2009 ·
· Jarrett A. Lobell ·
In the middle of Rome's trendiest neighborhood, surrounded by sushi restaurants and nightclubs with names like Rodeo Steakhouse and Love Story, sits the ancient world's biggest garbage dump--a 150-foot-tall mountain of discarded Roman amphorae, the shipping drums of the ancient world. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around Monte Testaccio, from the Latin testa and Italian cocci, both meaning "potsherd." But despite its size--almost a mile in circumference--it's easy to walk by and not really notice unless you are headed for some excellent pizza at Velavevodetto, a restaurant literally stuck into the mountain's side. Most local residents don't know...
Middle Ages & Renaissance

The Battle of Brunanburh -- The Great Debate
· 05/06/2012 8:18:14 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· Wirral Learning Grid ·
· since 2004 ·
· Prof Stephen Harding ·
By 937 A.D. 35 years after the initial settlement, Wirral may have been the site of a huge battle between the Anglo Saxons coming from the South and Midlands and a combined army of Viking raiders coming from Dublin and their Scottish allies coming mainly from Strathclyde. No-one is quite sure where this battle took place, although the majority of experts favour Wirral. The main reason is that the contemporary record of the Battle -- the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes the battle having taking place (around Brunanburh) -- which happens to be the old name for Bromborough... The Chronicle also...
PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

Games Ancient People Played [ 3000 BC Mexico ]
· 05/06/2012 7:18:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Archaeology, v65 n3 ·
· May/June 2012 ·
· Barbara Voorhies ·
The site of Tlacuachero in southern Mexico is an island in a mangrove swamp made up almost entirely of clamshells. Material recovered from the site shows that it was a place where people harvested shellfish and fish between 5,050 and 4,230 years ago -- long before the great civilizations of Mesoamerica would build their city-states. Over the years, the island grew as clams were harvested from the swamp and the shells were discarded there. While the shell mound was accumulating, the early people at Tlacuachero built several superimposed clay floors at the island center to create smooth surfaces that were...
Catastrophism & Astronomy

Nevermind the Apocalypse: Earliest Mayan Calendar Found
· 05/10/2012 5:09:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 21 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 05/10/2012 ·
· Stephanie Pappas ·
The oldest-known version of the ancient Maya calendar has been discovered adorning a lavishly painted wall in the ruins of a city deep in the Guatemalan rainforest. The hieroglyphs, painted in black and red, along with a colorful mural of a king and his mysterious attendants, seem to have been a sort of handy reference chart for court scribes in A.D. 800 -- the astronomers and mathematicians of their day. Contrary to popular myth, this calendar isn't a countdown to the end of the world in December 2012, the study researchers said.
Navigation

New evidence suggests Cabot may have known of New World before voyage
· 05/07/2012 11:58:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 19 replies ·
· Ottawa Citizen ·
· 29 April 2012 ·
· Randy Boswell ·
An Italian historian has unveiled a previously unknown document that sheds fresh light on explorer John Cabot's discovery of Canada -- a brief entry in a 516-year-old accounting ledger that shows Cabot had financial backing from a Florence-based bank in England and, most intriguingly, may have had prior knowledge of the distant land his famous 1497 voyage would put on the world map. The Italian-born Cabot is known to have sailed from England in search of the New World three times between 1496 and 1498. He is believed to have reached Newfoundland aboard the Matthew in 1497, but Cabot disappears...
Early America

Ancient Map Gives Clue to Fate of 'Lost Colony' (Britain's Roanoke Island in the Late 16th Century)
· 05/05/2012 1:51:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 04 May 2012 ·
· The Telegraph ·
A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalising clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from Britain's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginia Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof that...
The Revolution

2 NY sites recall Benedict Arnold's early heroics
· 05/10/2012 6:54:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 41 replies ·
· AP via boston.com ·
· 5-10-12 ·
· Chris Carola ·
This undated sketch portrait of Gen. Benedict Arnold by an unknown artist was provided by the Library of Congress. While most Americans know Arnold as the man who betrayed his nation by trying to turn over the American fortifications at West Point to the British, then joining the redcoats when the plot was uncovered, his heroic actions at the Revolutionary War's Battles of Saratoga are detailed in a new exhibit opening Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Saratoga National Historical Park. ALBANY, N.Y. -- Benedict Arnold is a hero again, at least temporarily, at two upstate New York historic sites where his...
The Framers

James Madison explains the uniqueness of the American Revolution
· 05/06/2012 9:17:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ProgressingAmerica ·
· 5 replies ·
· PGA Weblog ·
In "Charters", James Madison wrote the following: In Europe, charters of liberty have been granted by power. America has set the example and France has followed it, of charters of power granted by liberty. This is what makes modern revolutionaries so backward. They are stuck on stupid in old-think - that is, that power grants liberty. If only government could get bigger, we could grant the rights to _________________ for whatever special interest group they have in mind at the moment. Like the "right" to healthcare. In the comment "America has set the example", he makes it clear that it's...
The Civil War

Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government's $653M plan
· 05/05/2012 6:24:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by JerseyanExile ·
· 19 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· May 5, 2012 ·
· AP ·
Before government engineers can deepen one of the nation's busiest seaports to accommodate future trade, they first need to remove a $14 million obstacle from the past -- a Confederate warship rotting on the Savannah River bottom for nearly 150 years. Confederate troops scuttled the ironclad CSS Georgia to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union troops took Savannah in December 1864. It's been on the river bottom ever since. Now, the Civil War shipwreck sits in the way of a government agency's $653 million plan to deepen the waterway that links the nation's fourth-busiest container...
Not-so-Ancient Autopsies

What Killed Lenin? Poison Called Possibility
· 05/06/2012 8:59:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 24 replies ·
· Washington Times ·
· Sunday, May 6, 2012 ·
· Alex Dominguez ·
Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the Soviet Union's founder, a UCLA neurologist said. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the deaths of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have re-examined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar and Abraham Lincoln.
Medical Sleuths Discuss the Forensics of Death (Lenin, Lincoln, Custer, etc.)
· 05/07/2012 1:52:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 27 replies ·
· Washington Post ·
· May 6 ·
· Manuel Roig-Franzia ·
Death never dies here. It just keeps getting more interesting, more beguiling. More, well, alive. Alive in every cringe-worthy detail, in every clue about its causes, in every shard of evidence waiting to be spliced to another shard ... and another shard until a picture starts to form, an image assembled from nuggets of information collected decades or centuries ago. Death, at least for the doctors and history buffs who gather each year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is the coolest of puzzles, leading them to the coolest of theories. Could Abraham Lincoln have been saved? (Yes.)...
World War Eleven

WWII Fighter Plane Hailed the 'Aviation Equivalent of Tutankhamun's Tomb' Found Preserved (Sahara)
· 05/10/2012 3:33:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 37 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· Richard Alleyne ·
WWII fighter plane hailed the 'aviation equivalent of Tutankhamun's Tomb' found preserved in the Sahara A Second World War aeroplane that crash landed in the Sahara Desert before the British pilot walked to his death has been found almost perfectly preserved 70 years later. Most of its cockpit instruments are intact and it still had it guns and ammunition before they were seized by the Egyptian military. There are also signs of the makeshift camp the pilot made alongside the fuselage. No human remains have been found but it is thought the pilot may lie within a 20 mile radius...
Oh So Mysteriouso

Did the Prophet Muhammad Really Exist? This Is Robert Spencer's Shocking Answer
· 05/07/2012 4:12:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 27 replies ·
· The Blaze ·
· May 5, 2012 ·
· Billy Hallowell ·
Did the Prophet Muhammad really exist? This question, which may seem bizarre on the surface, is at the root of a new book by Robert Spencer, a prominent author and the director of Jihad Watch. Spencer, a figure who is praised by his fans and loathed by his detractors, has written numerous books on Islam. Earlier this week, The Blaze spoke with the expert about his controversial, new book, "Did Muhammad Exist?" As can be derived from the title, the text delves into some uncomfortable subject matter, as Spencer examines the historical documentation surrounding the Muslim prophet. The book's official...
Religion of Pieces

NOI angry at ACT's research on Islamic slavery; Muhammad's massacre of Medina Innocent Jews
· 05/08/2012 8:14:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by PRePublic ·
· 15 replies ·
Some young Muslim, at Nation of Islam's " FinalCall,' just published a childish "reply" to a thorough research by B Gabrielle's ACT for America. It's so silly I am too lazy to copy/paste it here. I am glad he publicizes ACT further. For research on Muhammad's anger of Medina Native Jews because they refused to change their religion and take him as a "Prophet" one can also see: This is from 1912, before the modern PC language: The Jewish Encyclopedia, by I Singer, C. Adler, 1912, p. 423 .. He first summoned them to accept his religion, and...
Longer Perspectives

In Egypt Turmoil, Thieves Hunt Pharaonic Treasures
· 05/12/2012 11:27:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ColdOne ·
· 2 replies ·
· abcnews.go.com ·
· 5/12/12 ·
· AP/ Hamza Hendawi ·
Taking advantage of Egypt's political upheaval, thieves have gone on a treasure hunt with a spree of illegal digging, preying on the country's ancient pharaonic heritage. Illegal digs near ancient temples and in isolated desert sites have swelled a staggering 100-fold over the past 16 months
Paleontology

Dinosaur gases 'warmed the Earth'
· 05/07/2012 10:39:16 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 30 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· May 7, 2012 ·
Giant dinosaurs could have warmed the planet with their flatulence, say researchers. British scientists have calculated the methane output of sauropods, including the species known as Brontosaurus. By scaling up the digestive wind of cows, they estimate that the population of dinosaurs - as a whole - produced 520 million tonnes of gas annually. They suggest the gas could have been a key factor in the warm climate 150 million years ago. David Wilkinson from Liverpool John Moore's University, and colleagues from the University of London and the University of Glasgow published their results in the journal Current Biology. Sauropods,...

end of digest #408 20120512


1,410 posted on 05/12/2012 1:13:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #408 · v 8 · n 44
Saturday, May 12, 2012
 
27 topics
2883013 to 2880335
808 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 27-topic issue #408, like last week's it's rife with modern or other non-ancient history topics, as well as some dredged up from the FRchives.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Spring's turning to Summer, but just be there for all of us in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,411 posted on 05/12/2012 1:17:52 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #409
Saturday, May 19, 2012

Cave Art


 Earliest wall art is found in France

· 05/15/2012 12:04:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by 2ndDivisionVet ·
· 11 replies ·
· Expatica ·
· May 14, 2012 ·

A massive block of limestone in France contains what scientists believe are the earliest known engravings of wall art dating back some 37,000 years, according to a study published Monday. The 1.5 metric ton ceiling piece was first discovered in 2007 at Abri Castanet, a well known archeological site in southwestern France which holds some of the earliest forms of artwork, beads and pierced shells. According to New York University anthropology professor Randall White, lead author of the paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the art was likely meant to adorn the interior of a shelter...


 The Top Four Candidates for Europe's Oldest Work of Art

· 05/19/2012 6:34:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· Smithsonian 'blogs ·
· May 16, 2012 ·
· Erin Wayman ·

In 1940, a group of teenagers discovered the paintings of bison, bulls and horses adorning the walls of France's Lascaux Cave. Roughly 17,000 years old, the paintings are Europe's most famous cave art, but hardly the oldest. This week archaeologists announced finding in another cave in France art dating to about 37,000 years ago, making it a candidate for Europe's most ancient artwork. Here's a look at the new discovery and the other top contenders for the title of Europe's oldest work of art. Nerja Caves (possibly about 43,000 years ago)... by Neanderthals, the [humans] that lived in this part...

Epigraphy & Language


 Bronze Age 'Facebook' discovered by Cambridge experts

· 05/19/2012 6:28:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Cambridge News ·
· May 2012 ·
· Leanne Ehren ·

Mark Sapwell believes he has discovered an 'archaic version' of social networking site Facebook. Mark Sapwell, who is a PhD archaeology student at St John's College, believes he has discovered an "archaic version" of the social networking site, where users share thoughts and emotions and give stamps of approval to other contributions --- similar to the Facebook "like". Images of animals and events were drawn on the rock faces in Russian and Northern Sweden to communicate with distant tribes and descendants during the Bronze Age. They form a timeline preserved in stone encompassing thousands of years. Mr Sapwell said: "Like...

Diet & Cuisine


 How the Cavemen Ate: Cookbook Reveals 77 Recipes Stretching Right Back to the Stone Age

· 05/12/2012 11:02:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 18 replies ·
· Daily Mail (UK) ·
· 4 May 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

(and they taste surprisingly good!) Fancy something new for dinner tonight? Well if you don't fancy a Chinese or a Thai, researchers have pulled together 77 recipes which were eaten during the Stone Ages. And the surprise is how delicious the recipes, some of them 16,000 years old, sound - with your typical Neolithic families spicing up their meals and using plenty of fresh fruit and herbs along with the simmering main dishes of game. A Culinary Journey Through Time can join Jamie Oliver and...

Mediterranean


 The oldest farming village in the Mediterranean islands is discovered in Cyprus

· 05/15/2012 7:39:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· CNRS ·

Previously it was believed that, due to the island's geographic isolation, the first Neolithic farming societies did not reach Cyprus until a thousand years after the birth of agriculture in the Middle East... However, the discovery of Klimonas, a village that dates from nearly 9000 years before Christ, proves that early cultivators migrated to Cyprus from the Middle Eastern continent shortly after the emergence of agriculture there, bringing with them wheat as well as dogs and cats... The archaeologists have found a few votive offerings inside the building, including flint arrowheads and green stone beads. A great many remnants of...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 Neolithic farmers brought deer to Ireland

· 05/14/2012 3:13:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Past Horizons Archaeology ·
· April 18, 2012 ·
· School of Biology and Env Sci ·
· U College Dublin ·

By comparing DNA from ancient bone specimens to DNA obtained from modern animals, the researchers discovered that the Kerry red deer are the direct descendants of deer present in Ireland 5000 years ago. Further analysis using DNA from European deer proves that Neolithic people from Britain first brought the species to Ireland. Although proving the red deer is not native to Ireland, researchers believe that the Kerry population is unique as it is directly related to the original herd and are worthy of special conservation status. Fossil bone samples from the National Museum of Ireland, some up to 30,000 years...

Prehistory & Origins


 Humanity's Best Friend: How Dogs May Have Helped Humans Beat the Neanderthals

· 05/15/2012 11:00:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 44 replies ·
· The Atlantic ·
· 14 May 2012 ·
· Megan Garber ·

Over 20,000 years ago, humans won the evolutionary battle against Neanderthals. They may have had some assistance in that from their best friends. One of the most compelling --- and enduring --- mysteries in archaeology concerns the rise of early humans and the decline of Neanderthals. For about 250,000 years, Neanderthals lived and evolved, quite successfully, in the area that is now Europe. Somewhere between 45,000 and 35,000 years ago, early humans came along.They proliferated in their new environment, their population increasing tenfold in the 10,000 years after they arrived; Neanderthals declined and finally died away. What happened? What went...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Bigger and brainier: did dingoes kill thylacines?

· 05/15/2012 11:49:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by presidio9 ·
· 23 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· May 3, 2012 ·

A comparison of museum specimens has found that thylacines on mainland Australia were smaller than those that persisted into modern times in Tasmania, and significantly smaller than dingoes. The last known Tasmanian thylacine died in 1936. Measurements of the head size and thickness of limb bones of the semi-fossilised remains of thylacines and dingoes from caves in Western Australia have revealed that, on average, dingoes were larger than thylacines. "In particular, dingoes were almost twice as large as female thylacines, which were not much bigger than a fox," says ecologist Dr Mike Letnic, an ARC Future Fellow in the UNSW...

Australia & the Pacific


 Remains may be ancient [Australia]

· 05/17/2012 11:44:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 14 replies ·
· The Area News ·
· 16 May 2012 ·
· Emily Tinker ·

ARCHAEOLOGISTS are on the cusp of unravelling the mystery behind a set of "hugely significant" ancient Aboriginal remains discovered in the region last year. Former local man Robert Harris Jnr found the remains near an old water course late last February while working on a property outside Lake Cargelligo. The remains -- confirmed to be tens of thousands of years old -- have been hailed as the greatest discovery in more than half a century. "They're more significant than first thought," local Aboriginal site recorder and brother of Robert, Max Harris said. "They are as old, or even older than Mungo...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy


 Bodies of Easter Island's famous heads revealed

· 05/14/2012 12:31:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bkopto ·
· 73 replies ·
· AllTop ·
· 5/12/2012 ·
· staff ·

The head statuary of Easter Island is instantly recognizable to people all over the world, but who would have guessed that, lurking beneath the soil, these famous mugs also had bodies? The Easter Island Statue Project Conservation Initiative, which is funded by the Archaeological Institute of America, has been excavating two of the enormous figures for the last several years, and have found unique petroglyphs carved on their backs that had been conserved in the soil. Their research has also yielded evidence of how the carvers were paid with food such as tuna and lobster, as well as clues to...

Navigation


 Modern Man Tries to Build a 3,500 Year Old Boat from the Bronze Age and Fails

· 05/15/2012 7:13:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 55 replies ·
· IO9 ·
· May 14, 2012 ·
· Casey Chan ·

A team of people from 2012 tried to re-create and build a boat from 1550 BC, the Bronze Age, but failed spectacularly. When the ship was lowered into the ocean, it immediately filled with water and started sinking. Yikes, we suck. The team was made up of British archaeologists and craftsmen who have been hammering away and building the boat with Bronze Age tools and methods for the past three months. The boat it was based on, used oak planks sewn together with yew...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 Scientists illuminate the ancient history of circumarctic peoples

· 05/19/2012 6:17:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

...The team's results indicate several new genetic markers that define previously unknown branches of the family tree of circumarctic groups. One marker, found in the Inuvialuit but not the other two groups, suggests that this group arose from an Arctic migration event somewhere between 4,000 and 8,000 years ago, separate from the migration that gave rise to many of the speakers of the Na-Dene language group. "If we're correct, [this lineage] was present across the entire Arctic and in Beringia," Schurr said. "This means it traces a separate expansion of Eskimo-Aleut-speaking peoples across this region." ... "Perhaps the most extraordinary...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Maya Artwork Uncovered In A Guatemalan Forest

· 05/13/2012 8:34:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 18 replies ·
· NPR ·
· 13 May 2012 ·
· Christopher Joyce ·

Conservator Angelyn Bass cleans and stabilizes the surface of a wall of a Mayan house that dates to the ninth century. The figure of a man who may have been the town scribe appears on the wall to her left. Archaeologists working in one of the most impenetrable rain forests in Guatemala have stumbled on a remarkable discovery: a room full of wall paintings and numerical calculations. The buried room apparently was a workshop used by scribes or astronomers working for a Mayan king. The paintings depict the king and members of his court. The numbers mark important periods in...

China


 New Paleolithic remains found near the Liuhuaishan site in Bose Basin, Guangxi

· 05/19/2012 6:23:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· Acta Anthropologica Sinica ·

The Liuhuaishan site is an important early Paleolithic site found in the Bose Basin. In December 2008, Scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Youjiang Museum for Nationalities, Bose, carried out a short survey around this site and found three new Paleolithic localities with a collection of 37 stone artifacts. This new finds will help better understand the human behavior at open-air sites in south China, researchers reported in the latest issue of Acta Anthropologica Sinica 2012 (2). The stone artifact assemblage included cores, flakes, chunks, choppers and chopping tools, and picks,...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 6,000-year-old settlement poses tsunami mystery

· 05/13/2012 6:22:14 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Irish Examiner ·
· Wednesday, May 09, 2012 ·
· Andrew Hamilton ·

Archeologists have uncovered evidence of pre-farming people living in the Burren more than 6,000 years ago --- one of the oldest habitations ever unearthed in Ireland. Radiocarbon dating of a shellfish midden on Fanore Beach in north Clare have revealed it to be at least 6,000 years old --- hundreds of years older than the nearby Poulnabrone dolmen. The midden --- a cooking area where nomad hunter-gatherers boiled or roasted shellfish --- contained Stone Age implements, including two axes and a number of smaller stone tools... The midden was discovered by local woman Elaine O'Malley in 2009 and a major...

Greece


 Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

· 05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· EurekAlert! ·
· April 19, 2012 ·
· Nan Broadbent ·

In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...

The Roman Empire


 Students find rare Roman temple on practice dig [Poppelsdorf, Germany]

· 05/15/2012 9:33:56 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· The Local ·
· Friday, May 4, 2012 ·
· jcw ·

Lecturers at Bonn University had set up a mock archaeological dig at a building site on campus to teach hopeful historians digging techniques. What they did not expect to find were the 2,000-year-old foundations of a building, nestled into the dense, clayish mud. While the initial discovery was made in March, it was only in the past fortnight that the team realised the foundations were from a temple from the Roman era, the floor of which was scattered with broken pottery dating as far back as 800 BC. The building, which could have been part of a wealthy country estate,...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible

· 05/11/2012 8:54:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 27 replies ·
· CBN News ·
· Friday, May 11, 2012 ·
· Julie Stahl ·

Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible By Julie Stahl CBN News Mideast Correspondent Friday, May 11, 2012 JERUSALEM, Israel --- Was the Bible's King David man or myth? That's the question Israeli archeologists are answering with new archeological finds. Their discoveries also shed light on how the first Jewish temple was built. Khirbet Qeiyafa is in the Elah Valley. Not far from here the Bible says David killed the giant, Goliath. "We don't know much about the history, the politics really and about urbanization in the time of David," archaeologist Prof. Yosef Garfinkel of the Institute of Archaeology at...

Religion of Pieces


 Stone carvers defy Taliban to return to the Bamiyan valley

· 05/16/2012 1:13:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by huldah1776 ·
· 15 replies ·
· The Guardian ·
· 16 May 2012 ·
· Emma Graham-Harrison ·

"Afghan students learn the centuries-old skills that carved out the giant buddhas blown up by extremists. ... The cave-hall was part of a complex built around two giant buddhas that loomed serenely over Bamiyan for about 15 centuries -- until the Taliban government condemned them as un-Islamic in early 2001 and blew them up. "I was interested in this course because I want to restore our culture," said Ismael Wahidi, a 22-year-old student of archeology at Bamiyan University, who set aside more conventional studies for a week to learn how to turn a lump of stone into a sculpture. "If...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Photos: "Body Jars," Cliff Coffins Are Clues to Unknown Tribe [ Cambodia ]

· 05/19/2012 6:06:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· John Miksic ·

Skulls and other human bones poke from large ceramic jars at Khnorng Sroal, one of the newly dated mountainside burials in southwestern Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The bones were placed in the 20-inch-tall (50-centimeter-tall) body jars only after the bodies had decomposed or had been picked clean by scavenging animals, according to the study, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Radiocarbon. "The Cardamom highlanders may have used some form of exposure of the body to de-flesh the bones, like the 'sky burials' known in other cultures," study leader Beavan said. Placing the sky-high burials couldn't have been...

Paleontology


 Jurassic Pain: Giant Flea-like Insects Plagued Dinosaurs 165 Million Years Ago

· 05/16/2012 7:37:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 23 replies ·
· Scientific Computing ·
· 5/15/2012 ·

This ancient "flea-like" insect, Pseudopulex jurassicus, lived 165 million years ago. It used a long proboscis to feed on the blood of dinosaurs, with a bite that would have been unusually painful. Illustration by Wang Cheng, courtesy of Oregon State University It takes a gutsy insect to sneak up on a huge dinosaur while it sleeps, crawl onto its soft underbelly and give it a bite that might have felt like a needle going in --- but giant "flea-like" animals, possibly the oldest of their type ever discovered, probably did just that. And a few actually lived through the experience,...

Underwater Archaeology


 Scientists discover 200-year-old shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico

· 05/17/2012 8:04:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Dysart ·
· 7 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 5-17-12 ·
· Nina Golgowski ·

A 19th century shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico has been discovered by scientists and online viewers on land using an underwater robot and camera, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports. The wooden ship that has nearly all except its copper-sheathed hull disintegrated is approximated to have sunk 200 years ago leaving behind ceramic plates, glass bottles and boxes of muskets across the ocean floor. Artefacts in and around the wreck and the hull's copper sheathing may date the vessel to the early to mid-19th century,' Dr Jack Irion, a maritime archaeologist with the Department of Interior's Bureau of...

The Revolution


 Washington's Iconic Letter To Be Displayed

· 05/14/2012 5:03:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 10 replies ·
· The Jewish Daily Forward ·
· May 09, 2012 ·
· Paul Berger ·

After Decade, Message of Tolerance Comes to Jewish Museum -- After a decade hidden from view, one of the most important documents in American history is set to burst back onto public display, the Forward has learned. George Washington's 1790 letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, Rhode Island, in which the first president vowed that America would give "to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance," will form the centerpiece of a special show at the National Museum of American Jewish History, opening on June 29. Ivy Barsky, the NMAJH's director and chief operating officer, said she was "absolutely thrilled"...


end of digest #409 20120519


1,412 posted on 05/19/2012 7:34:37 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1410 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #409 · v 8 · n 44
Saturday, May 19, 2012
 
23 topics
2885639 to 2882584
808 members
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Freeper Profiles


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 & archive
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 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
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 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
It's the 23-topic mostly prehistoric issue #409. Have a great weekend, all.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Tell me somethin' good, buh buh, tell me, tell me, tell me, tell me that you like it, yeah.
  • "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." -- Samuel Adams, speech at the Philadelphia State House, August 1, 1776 [cited by Michigan Bowhunter on FR profile page>]
 
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1,413 posted on 05/19/2012 7:39:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1412 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #410
Saturday, May 26, 2012

Central Asia


 4000-year-old rock art discovered in Mongolia

· 05/22/2012 5:21:42 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Stone Pages ·
· Saturday, May 12, 2012 ·
· Edited from China Daily ·

Eighteen rock art sites dating back over 4,000 years have been discovered by archaeologists in northern China's Inner Mongolia autonomous region. The prehistoric art was discovered in the Yinshan Mountains in Urad Middle Banner (an administration division of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region), said Liu Binjie, head of the Cultural Relics Bureau of Urad Middle Banner. The rock art is still clear and Liu added that they are the finest of their kind that have been unearthed so far. Among the carvings, seven faces were exaggerated and monstrous, and have been interpreted as the seven stars of the 'Big Dipper'...

Cave Art


 Bronze Age Facebook

· 05/21/2012 6:18:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 11 replies ·
· http://phys.org ·
· May 21, 2012 ·
· U of Cambridge ·

Large clusters of rock art spanning thousands of years but located at the same site may hold key to detecting massive cultural changes in prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the north. Updating a virtual wall with details of our lives, and checking it to catch up with others, is part of the daily routine for millions. But imagine a prehistoric version -- with a timeline preserved in actual stone encompassing thousands of years, on which our ancestors used symbolic interpretations of animals and events to communicate with distant tribes and their own descendants -- allowing us to trace societal developments in these...

Epigraphy & Language


 Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

· 05/22/2012 1:44:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...


 Ancient Clay Tablets Recovered from 9/11 Attack Restored and Translated

· 05/22/2012 1:44:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

They were stored in the basement of the Customs House at 6 World Trade Center... when the building was destroyed by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The ancient, 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets, 302 in all, were looted from a site in southern Iraq sometime before the attacks. They had been confiscated by U.S. customs while they were in the process of being smuggled into Newark, N.J. and then placed temporarily in the basement of the Trade Center... Scholars now know that the tablets resided in an archive near the city of Nippur, the religious capital of Sumeria, and 145...

Egypt


 Astronomers discovered ancient Egyptian observations of a variable star [ Algol ]

· 05/20/2012 12:29:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 16, 2012 ·
· U of Helsinki ·

The study of the "Demon star", Algol, made by a research group of the University of Helsinki, Finland, has received both scientific and public attention. The period of the brightness variation of this eclipsing binary star has been connected to good prognoses three millennia ago. This result has raised a lot of discussion and the news has spread widely in the Internet. The Egyptian papyrus Cairo 86637 calendar is probably the oldest preserved historical document of bare eye observations of a variable star. Each day of one Egyptian year was divided into three parts in this calendar. A good or...

Ancient Autopsies


 A Mummy Switcheroo

· 05/20/2012 4:57:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Tuesday, May 15, 2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Min, the ancient Egyptian god of phallus and fertility, might have brought some worldy advantages to his male worshippers, but offered little protection when it came to spiritual life. Researchers at the Mummy Project-Fatebenefratelli hospital in Milan, Italy, established that one of Min's priests at Akhmim, Ankhpakhered, was not resting peacefully in his finely painted sarcophagus. "We discovered that the sarcophagus does not contain the mummy of the priest, but the remains of another man dating between 400 and 100 BC," Egyptologist Sabina Malgora said. According to the researchers, the finding could point to a theft more than 2000 years...

Curses *Foiled* Again


 Black Magic Revealed in Two Ancient Curses

· 05/23/2012 11:05:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 23 replies ·
· livescience.com ·
· 5-22-2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

At a time when black magic was relatively common, two curses involving snakes were cast, one targeting a senator and the other an animal doctor, says a Spanish researcher who has just deciphered the 1,600-year-old curses. Both curses feature a depiction of a deity, possibly the Greek goddess Hekate, with serpents coming out of her hair, possibly meant to strike at the victims. Both curses contain Greek invocations similar to examples known to call upon Hekate....

The Roman Empire


 ORBIS -- The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World

· 05/22/2012 5:33:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Stanford University ·
· May 2012 ·
· Walter Scheidel & Elijah Meeks ·

In the aggregate, our model simulations make it possible to reconfigure conventional maps of the Roman Empire to express the relative cost of transfers from or to a central point as distance. This perspective captures the structural properties of the imperial system as a whole by identifying the relative position of particular elements of the network and illustrating the impact of travel speed and especially transport prices on overall connectivity. Distance cartograms show that due to massive cost differences between aquatic and terrestrial modes of transport, peripheries were far more remote from the center in terms of price than...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 Italy busts eBay looted artefacts ring

· 05/23/2012 6:42:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· VancouverDesi ·
· May 18, 2012 ·
· AFP str-glr/dt/har ·

Italian police on Friday said they were investigating 70 people for trading thousands of looted archaeological artefacts including ancient coins and vases on Internet auction site eBay. The investigation began when the police found an eBay announcement in 2009 and they tracked down a father and son team of tomb raiders in a village in Calabria in southern Italy who had dug up Byzantine, Greek and Roman burials. Police said in a statement they had seized 16,344 artefacts including bronze and silver coins, rings and ceramic vases, as well as 10 metal detectors. Most of the pieces came from the...

Windows on the Past


 Exploring Pella's Bronze Age Temple Complex

· 05/24/2012 9:33:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· May 2012 ·
· Stephen J. Bourke ·

Pella is located in the eastern foothills of the north Jordan valley, around five kilometres east of the Jordan River in the modern-day Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. It overlooks the north/south road that runs up the Jordan Valley, as well as the east/west trade route west down the Jezreel Valley to the coast at Haifa. Verdant agricultural flatlands stretch away to the north of the site, and broken uplands well suited to horticulture rise sharply to the east. The high cone-shaped largely natural hill of Tell Husn dominates the southern approaches to the site. ... The landscape surrounding the main...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Archaeologists unearth ancient Bethlehem seal

· 05/23/2012 5:57:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 22 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· May 23, 2012 ·

Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 2,700-year-old seal that bears the inscription "Bethlehem," the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday, in what experts believe to be the oldest artifact with the name of Jesus' traditional birthplace. The tiny clay seal's existence and age provide vivid evidence that Bethlehem was not just the name of a fabled biblical town, but also a bustling place of trade linked to the nearby city of Jerusalem, archaeologists said. Eli Shukron, the authority's director of excavations, said the find was significant because it is the first time the name "Bethlehem" appears outside of a biblical...

Facts In the Ground


 Archaeologists Explore Ancient Judahite Fortress

· 05/20/2012 12:45:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· with contributions by Shmuel Browns ·

Azekah was an important strategic Judahite border-stronghold during the turbulent times of the Assyrian and Babylonian invasions, which brought destruction on the kingdoms of Israel and Judah centuries before the time of Christ. The mighty Assyrian king Sennacherib called it "an eagle's nest...with towers that project to the sky like swords". The town continued to play a strategic role hundreds of years later during the Hasmonean period, as was evidenced by the the Bliss/Macalister excavations when they uncovered part of a massive fortress built by the Hasmonean king, John Hyrcanus 1. Now, preliminary surveys conducted by a joint Israel-Germany excavation...

Go Tel it on Megiddo


 Unique Gold Earring Found in Intriguing Collection of Ancient Jewelry at Tel Megiddo

· 05/22/2012 1:57:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· American Friends of Tel Aviv U ·
· Monday, May 21, 2012 ·
· Tel Aviv U ·

Researchers from Tel Aviv University have recently discovered a collection of gold and silver jewelry, dated from around 1100 B.C., hidden in a vessel at the archaeological site of Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel. One piece -- a gold earring decorated with molded ibexes, or wild goats -- is "without parallel," they believe. According to Prof. Israel Finkelstein of TAU's Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures, the vessel was found in 2010, but remained uncleaned while awaiting a molecular analysis of its content. When they were finally able to wash out the dirt, pieces of...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 Quake reveals day of Jesus' crucifixion, researchers believe

· 05/24/2012 8:35:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by caldera599 ·
· 26 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5/24/2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Geologists say Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, in the year 33. The latest investigation, reported in International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem. The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion: "And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open."


 Historical *Evidence* for the Crucifixion Darkness (Solar Eclipse?)

· 04/02/2010 9:27:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by CondoleezzaProtege ·
· 28 replies ·
· 1,037+ views ·
· biblehistory.net ·

The first reference found outside of the bible mentioning this darkness which fell over the land during the crucifixion of Christ, comes from a Samaritan historian named Thallus, who wrote around 52 A.D. His work was quoted by another early historian by the name of Julius Africanus who researched the topic of this darkness and wrote the following: "Upon the whole world there came a most fearful darkness. Many rocks were split in two by an earthquake, and many places in Judea and other districts were thrown down. It seems very unreasonable to me that Thallus, in the third book...

Oh So Mysteriouso


 The Ark of the Covenant found burred under a trash pile in Jerusalem.

· 02/06/2012 5:49:40 AM PST ·
· Posted by kquinn856 ·
· 27 replies ·
· Ron Wyatt ·
· Dec. 22, 2011 ·
· Kevin Quinn ·

They found the Ark of the Covenant where Moses placed the 10 Commandments, in a cave under Golgotha. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior. Who would have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus. Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time. 1 Tim 2:3-6 Rom 3:28-30 Is he the God of the Jews only? Is he not also of the Gentiles? Yes of the...

Longer Perspectives


 Roots of Racism

· 05/23/2012 2:41:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 20 replies ·
· Science ·
· 18 May 2012 ·
· Elizabeth Culotta ·

Racial prejudice apparently stems from deep evolutionary roots and a universal tendency to form coalitions and favor our own side. And yet what makes a "group" is mercurial: In experiments, people easily form coalitions based on meaningless traits or preferences -- and then favor others in their "group." Researchers have explored these innate biases and begun to ask why such biases exist. What factors in our evolutionary past have shaped our coalitionary present -- and what, if anything, can we do about it now? Several avenues of research are probing the origins of what many psychologists call in-group love and out-group...

Religion of Pieces


 Mohammed in the "Gospel" of Barnabas - ZOT for the Theologians

· 07/17/2006 9:05:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by parakletos ·
· 3,619 replies ·
· 13,640+ views ·

The GREAT PROPHET MOHAMMED was mentioned by name in the forgotten gospel of Barnabas,who was one of the disciples of THE GREAT PROPHET JESUS CHRIST. The gospel is here: www.barnabas.net/ in the aforementioned site,make a search for the word "mohammed". heres a sample: from part 97 Then said the priest: -- How shall the Messiah be called, and what sign shall reveal his coming?' Jesus answered: -- The name of the Messiah is admirable, for God himself gave him the name when he had created his soul, and placed it in a celestial splendour. God said: "Wait Mohammed; for thy sake I...


 Secret £14million Bible in which 'Jesus predicts coming of Prophet Muhammad' unearthed in Turkey

· 02/29/2012 9:13:30 AM PST ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 50 replies ·
· 1+ views ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 02/28/2012 ·

A secret Bible in which Jesus is believed to predict the coming of the Prophet Muhammad to Earth has sparked serious interest from the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI is claimed to want to see the 1,500-year-old book, which many say is the Gospel of Barnabas, that has been hidden by the Turkish state for the last 12 years. The £14million handwritten gold lettered tome, penned in Jesus' native Aramaic language, is said to contain his early teachings and a prediction of the Prophet's coming. The leather-bound text, written on animal hide, was discovered by Turkish police during an anti-smuggling operation...


 Iran: Discovery will collapse Christianity [Barf Alert}

· 05/24/2012 8:35:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Gamecock ·
· 46 replies ·
· WND ·
· May 24, 2012 ·
· Reza Kahlili ·

Iran's Basij Press is claiming that a version of the Gospel of Barnabas, found in 2000, will prove that Islam is the final and righteous religion and the revelation will cause the collapse worldwide of Christianity Turkish authorities believe the text could be an authentic version of the Gospel of Barnabas, one of Jesus' apostles and an associate of the apostle Paul. This version of the Barnabas Gospel was written in the 5th or 6th century and it predicted the coming of the Prophet Mohammad and the religion of Islam, the Basij Press claims. The Christian world, it says, denies...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 West Bank barrier threatens villagers' way of life

· 05/22/2012 3:48:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Eleutheria5 ·
· 8 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 10/5/12 ·

Israel is being urged to reroute its controversial West Bank barrier away from the lands of an ancient Palestinian village with a unique agricultural system. The BBC's Wyre Davies visited Battir, whose inhabitants fear their traditional way of life will disappear. In this part of the world, the supply and control of water is a major logistical and political issue. Yet the quaint village of Battir must be one of the luckiest and most blessed communities around - because Battir has water in abundance. For more than 2,000 years, seven natural springs have given life to the village and its...

Farty Shades of Green


 Dublin patron saint's heart stolen from Christ Church Cathedral

· 03/05/2012 5:43:29 AM PST ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 12 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· 3-3-2012 ·

The preserved heart of Dublin's patron saint has been stolen from the city's Christ Church Cathedral, officials say. The thief would have needed metal cutters to prise open the iron bars protecting the wooden heart-shaped box holding St Laurence O'Toole's heart. Police believe it happened some time between Friday night and about 12.30 GMT on Saturday. "They specifically targeted this, they wanted the heart of St Laurence O'Toole," a church spokeswoman said....

Scotland Yet


 Rare Canna stone's a blessing and a curse [ Scotland ]

· 05/20/2012 12:25:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Scotsman ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· Emma Cowing ·

An ancient "cursing stone" used by Christian pilgrims more than a thousand years ago to bring harm to their enemies has been discovered on Canna. The round stone with an early Christian cross engraved on it, also known as a "bullaun" stone, is believed to be the first of its type to be found in Scotland, and was discovered by chance in an old graveyard on the island. More commonly found in Ireland, the stones were used by ancient Christian pilgrims, who would turn them either while praying or when laying a curse, and were often to be found on...

Paleontology


 Discovered: The turtle the size of a SmartCar..

· 05/18/2012 6:35:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 28 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 18, 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

Picture a turtle the size of a Smart car, with a shell large enough to double as a children's pool. Paleontologists from North Carolina State University have found just such a specimen -- the fossilised remains of a 60-million-year-old South American giant that lived in what is now Colombia. The turtle in question is Carbonemys cofrinii, which means 'coal turtle', and it is part of a group of turtles known as pelomedusoides. The specimen's skull measures 24 centimeters, and the shell, which was recovered nearby and is believed to belong to the same animal - measures 172 centimeters, or about...


 They didn't mess with ancient turtle the size of a car

· 05/19/2012 8:12:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 10 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5-17-2012 ·
· Jeanna Bryner ·

A turtle the size of a small car once roamed what is now South America 60 million years ago, suggests its fossilized remains. Discovered in a coal mine in Colombia in 2005, the turtle was given the name Carbonemys cofrinii, which means "coal turtle." It wasn't until now that the turtle was examined and described in a scientific journal; the findings are detailed online Thursday in the Journal of Systematic Paleontology. The researchers say C. cofrinii belongs to a group of side-necked turtles known as pelomedusoides. The turtle's skull, roughly the size of an NFL football, was the most complete...

Ursa Major


 Biggest Bear Ever Found -- "It Blew My Mind," Expert Says

· 05/20/2012 8:01:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· February 3, 2011 ·
· Christine Dell'Amore ·

There's a new titleholder for the biggest, baddest bear ever found. A prehistoric South American giant short-faced bear tipped the scales at up to 3,500 pounds (1,600 kilograms) and towered at least 11 feet (3.4 meters) standing up, according to a new study. The previous heavyweight was a North American giant short-faced bear -- a related extinct species -- that weighed up to 2,500 pounds (1,134 kilograms). The largest bear on record in modern times was a 2,200-pound (998-kilogram) polar bear shot in Alaska in the 19th century. The South American giant short-faced bear roamed its namesake continent about 500,000...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Bigfoot and Yeti DNA Study Gets Serious

· 05/22/2012 6:44:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 47 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· 22 May 2012 ·
· Jeanna Bryner ·

A new university-backed project aims to investigate cryptic species such as the yeti whose existence is unproven, through genetic testing. Researchers from Oxford University and the Lausanne Museum of Zoology are asking anyone with a collection of cryptozoological material to submit descriptions of it. The researchers will then ask for hair and other samples for genetic identification. "I'm challenging and inviting the cryptozoologists to come up with the evidence instead of complaining that science is rejecting what they have to say," said geneticist Bryan Sykes of the University of Oxford. While Sykes doesn't expect to find solid evidence of a...

Prehistory & Origins


 Preview: Were mermaids aquatic apes?

· 05/23/2012 3:28:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 28 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· 22 May 2012 ·
· Hollie McKay ·

In the two-hour CGI Special "Mermaids: The Body Found," Animal Planet dives deep into the idea that mermaids may have been real, and, even better -- related to humans! "It's a very radical theory on human evolution, but we have approached an age-old myth and really chased its origins," Animal Planet honcho Charlie Foley told FOX411's Pop Tarts column. "It has been compiled in a way that is very compelling, making us think that mermaids might not just be mythical creatures." The show unravels mysterious underwater sound recordings and presents a bone-chilling argument for the Aquatic Ape Theory, which suggests...

Sunken Civilizations


 Atlantis: The Evidence [ Thera, Crete, the usual modern myths ]

· 05/20/2012 5:46:36 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 59 replies ·
· Watchumentary ·
· January 1st, 2011 ·
· BBC, Timewatch, Natalie Maynes, Bettany Hughes ·

In this Timewatch special, historian Bettany Hughes unravels one of the most intriguing mysteries of all time. She presents a series of geological, archaeological and historical clues to show that the legend of Atlantis was inspired by a real historical event -- the greatest natural disaster of the ancient world. She is tracing the origins of the Atlantis myth and presenting evidence that the Thera eruption inspired Plato's account of the mystical land. 2,400 years ago Greek philosopher Plato wrote of an ancient island civilization of unparalleled wealth and splendor, which was struck by earthquakes and floods and was swallowed...

Navigation


 Suppressed By Scholars: Twin Ancient Cultures On Opposite Sides Of The Pacific

· 05/19/2012 8:28:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 34 replies ·
· Frontiers of Anthropology ·
· 5-14-2012 ·
· Dale Drinnon ·

One of the greatest archaeological riddles -- and one of the grossest academic omissions -- of our time is the untold story of the parallel ruins left by two seemingly unrelated ancient civilizations: the ancient Mayans on one side of the Pacific Ocean and the ancient Balinese on the other. The mysterious and unexplained similarities in their architecture, iconography, and religion are so striking and profound that the Mayans and Balinese seem to have been twin civilizations -- as if children of the same parent. Yet, incredibly, this mystery is not only being ignored by American scholars, it's being suppressed. What does archaeology have to do...

Australia & the Pacific


 Thousands of rubber ducks to land on British shores after 15 year journey(E Pacific to N Atlantic)

· 06/28/2007 7:57:54 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TigerLikesRooster ·
· 33 replies ·
· 3,511+ views ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 06/27/07 ·
· Ben Clerkin ·

They were toys destined only to bob up and down in nothing bigger than a child's bath - but so far they have floated halfway around the world. The armada of 29,000 plastic yellow ducks, blue turtles and green frogs broke free from a cargo ship 15 years ago. Since then they have travelled 17,000 miles, floating over the site where the Titanic sank, landing in Hawaii and even spending years...


 Rubber Duckies to Help Track Speed of Melting Glaciers

· 11/23/2008 1:47:48 AM PST ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 28 replies ·
· 533+ views ·
· foxnews ·

Challenged to probe under Greenland's glaciers, NASA robotics expert Alberto Behar wondered what mechanism might endure sub-zero cold, the pressure of mile-thick ice and currents that sometimes exceed the flow rate of Niagara Falls. As Dr. Behar at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory soon discovered, though, there isn't much money for global-warming experiments in Greenland... Unfazed, he thought of one device that might survive such extremes at a cost his field expedition could readily afford -- a two-dollar rubber duck. Each duck was imprinted with an e-mail address and, in three languages, the offer of a reward.

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Prehistoric Texans May Have Been First Humans in U.S.

· 03/24/2011 5:55:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 50 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· March 24, 2011 ·
· Unknown ·

Humans camped by the shores of a small creek in Texas possibly even before the Clovis society, classically regarded as the first human inhabitants of the Americas, settled in the West. The site, located in central Texas on the bank of Buttermilk Creek, has produced almost 16,000 artifacts, including stone chips and blade-like objects, in soil dating up to 15,500 years old, more than 2,000 years before the first evidence of Clovis culture. Many of the items are flakes from cutting or sharpening of tools, but the research team also found about 50 tools, including several cutting surfaces -- including...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 Spectacular Tomb Containing More Than 80 Individuals Discovered in Peru

· 05/24/2012 8:28:44 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· May 22, 2012 ·
· AlphaGalileo ·

A team of archaeologists from the UniversitÈ libre de Bruxelles (ULB) has discovered a spectacular tomb containing more than eighty individuals of different ages. This discovery -- provisionally dated to around 1000 years ago -- was made at the site of Pachacamac, which is currently under review for UNESCO World Heritage status. Pachacamac, situated on the Pacific coast about thirty kilometres from Lima, is one of the largest Prehispanic sites in South America... It was here -- directly in front of the Temple of Pachacamac -- that the most important discovery was made. A scatter of later period burials was...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Archeologists to Study Pre-Settlement Hut in Iceland

· 05/22/2012 1:52:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Iceland Review ·
· Sunday, May 20, 2012 ·
· ESA ·

The first archeological research in Iceland this year will begin at Hafnir in Reykjanes, southwest Iceland, on Monday. Archeologists will continue their study of a hut which may originate from 770-880 AD, the latter part of the Iron Age, and predate the historical settlement of Iceland in 874. Excavation has been ongoing in the area around the hut, which has been given the name Vogur, with intermission since 2003, Frattabla reports. Last summer archeologist Bjarni F. Einarsson revealed that carbon age analysis indicated that the hut may have been constructed in the aforementioned period, which garnered considerable attention. Archeologists now...

Age of Sail


 Flinders finds clues to early Dutch postal system

· 05/19/2012 3:40:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· May 17, 2012 ·
· Flinders U ·

Ancient maritime inscriptions dating back to the early 1600s have been found on the coast of Madagascar by Flinders University researchers. The team of researchers, including Flinders archaeology research associate Mark Polzer and Jane Fyfe, a PhD candidate and rock art specialist from the University of Western Australia, discovered the messages carved into rock outcrops and boulders on an island in the Bay of Antongil, on the northeast corner of Madagascar. While some of the inscriptions were originally found in the 1920s, researchers have always believed there were no more than a dozen "postal stones". Dr. van Duivenvoorde said the...

Early America


 Government by Gentry in Colonial Virginia

· 05/20/2012 11:17:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Jacquerie ·
· 11 replies ·
· class="attrib">1958 ·
· Daniel J. Boorstin ·

It would be a great mistake to assume that the cozy, aristocratic character of Virginia society had nothing to do with its civic virtues. Only a perverse hindsight has made the political institutions of colonial Virginia a leveling democracy in embryo. When George Washington feared for the preservation of self government and the rights of Englishmen, it was the political customs of mid-18th century Virginia that he must have had in mind, for he knew no others. Those customs were the representative institutions of a Virginia-bred aristocracy, whose peculiarly aristocratic virtues nourished American representative government at its roots. And those...

The Revolution


 Like namesake, Dublin park rises to little fanfare [new Ohio RevWar Memorial]

· 05/21/2012 9:22:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 13 replies ·
· AP via Columbus Dispatch ·
· May 21, 2012 ·
· Lisa Cornwell ·

Land awarded to a Polish freedom fighter more than 200 years ago by a grateful United States has been turned into a park bearing the name of the man who spent his life championing liberty and equality in America and Poland. The 36-acre Thaddeus Kosciuszko Park in Dublin, which opened this month, was part of a grant of 500 acres awarded by Congress for Kosciuszko's contributions as a military engineer and Continental Army colonel during the Revolutionary War. Alex Storozynski, president and executive director of the Kosciuszko Foundation based in New York, said Kosciuszko was ahead of his time in...

Underwater Archaeology


 Underwater archaeologists searching for lost village [ Empire, Michigan ]

· 05/19/2012 3:34:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· UpNorthLive.com ·
· Friday, May 18, 2012 ·
· Lauren Amstutz ·

A group of underwater archaeologists are preparing for a project off the shores of Empire. The goal is to discover clues about the village's booming history, a history that currently lies several feet below Lake Michigan. The action will begin on June 8th, when a team of divers will employ the latest electronic and underwater sonar technology to find evidence of a once thriving lumber town. More than 100 years ago, the small village of Empire boasted one of the largest hardwood millis in the state of Michigan. Dave Taghon, with the Empire Museum built a scale model of the...


end of digest #410 20120526


1,414 posted on 05/25/2012 5:49:00 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1412 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #410 · v 8 · n 45
Saturday, May 26, 2012
 
39 topics
2842957 to 2885668
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the recent newbies.

Issue #410 has a lot of Roman Empire stuff, but also a startling variety -- 39 topics, including some archival stuff.

Troll activity has been on the increase again these past couple of weeks, new nicknames, same tired old thread hijacks. If you received this ping message, this isn't directed at you -- the trolls are *always* people who emerge from under the bridge on their own. Anyway, stop by a few topics, spot some trolls, point and laugh!

I may be out of contact a lot this week, don't worry, I'll be back.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • "'The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism' by Emmanuel Goldstein... Chapter I. Ignorance is Strength. Throughout recorded time, and probably since the end of the Neolithic Age, there have been three kinds of people in the world, the High, the Middle, and the Low. They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude towards one another, have varied from age to age: but the essential structure of society has never altered. Even after enormous upheavals and seemingly irrevocable changes, the same pattern has always reasserted itself, just as a gyroscope will always return to equilibrium, however far it is pushed one way or the other. The aims of these groups are entirely irreconcilable..." [George Orwell, "1984" chapter 17]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,415 posted on 05/25/2012 5:54:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1414 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

“The more things change, the more they stay the same.”


1,416 posted on 05/25/2012 12:13:46 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1415 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #411
Saturday, June 2, 2012

Prehistory & Origins


 Earliest music instruments found (42,000 year-old flutes)

· 05/25/2012 6:43:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 30 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 5/25/12 ·

Researchers have identified what they say are the oldest-known musical instruments in the world.The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens. Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old. The findings are described in the Journal of Human Evolution. A team led by Prof Tom Higham at Oxford University dated animal bones in the same ground layers as the flutes at Geissenkloesterle Cave in Germany's Swabian Jura. Prof Nick...

Cave Art


 Decoding the Ancient Secrets of White Shaman

· 06/01/2012 5:35:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Discover magazine ·
· May 2012 ·
· Will Hunt ·

Rock paintings near the Rio Grande contain hidden messages about a mysterious 4,000-year-old religion. Now one archaeologist has learned to read them. The figures at the White Shaman rock shelter seem to depict a journey through the spirit world... The region known as the Lower Pecos is an arid 21,000-square-mile expanse of southwest Texas and northern Mexico surrounding the confluence of the Pecos River and the Rio Grande. The land is barbed with cacti, teeming with rattlesnakes, and riven with impassable canyons. But more than 4,000 years ago, these barrens were home to a flourishing culture of hunter-gatherers, creators of...

Longer Perspectives


 Inequality Dates Back to Stone Age

· 05/30/2012 4:40:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Makana ·
· 20 replies ·
· Science ·
· May 28, 2012 ·
· Professor Alex Bentley ·

Hereditary inequality began over 7,000 years ago in the early Neolithic era, with new evidence showing that farmers buried with tools had access to better land than those buried without.

Climate


 Huge Ancient Civilization's Collapse Explained

· 05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 42 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· 5-28-2012 ·
· Charles Choi ·

The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit -- ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Bible-era earthquake reveals year of Jesus' crucifixion

· 05/25/2012 8:42:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYFreeper ·
· 47 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· May 24, 2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday April 3, 33 A.D. The latest investigation, reported in the journal International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem. The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion.


 Archeologist Says New Finds Support Bible's Accuracy

· 05/28/2012 11:45:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by GiovannaNicoletta ·
· 4 replies ·
· Israel Today Magazine ·
· May 15, 2012 ·
· Ryan Jones ·

A Hebrew University archeologist says finds at a new dig site near Jerusalem are backing up the biblical narrative of an Israelite kingdom centered on Jerusalem in 1000 BC, around the time of King David and his son, King Solomon. Professor Yosef Garfinkel has been digging at Khirbet Qeiyafa near the Jerusalem suburb of Beit Shemesh since 2007. Carbon dating of unearthed olive pits has put the period of activity at Khirbet Qeiyafa at 1020 BC - 980 BC, almost exactly the period of time the Bible says David and Solomon were active in the region. The dating, together with...


 What's the Oldest Hebrew Inscription?

· 05/28/2012 9:24:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· May/Jun 2012 ·
· Christopher A. Rollston ·

Four contenders vie for the honor of the oldest Hebrew inscription. To decide we must determine (1) whether they are in Hebrew script and/or language and (2) when they date. Not easy! The first contender, the already famous Qeiyafa Ostracon, was discovered only in 2008 at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a site in the borderland of ancient Judah and Philistia.a The five-line ostracon (an ink inscription on a piece of broken pottery) is not well preserved and is subject to varying readings. As the Qeiyafa Ostracon is a recent find, so the Gezer Calendar is an old one. It was discovered exactly...


 Century-old Archaeological Find [Gabriel's Revelation tablet]

· 03/22/2012 7:09:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 8 replies ·
· La Stampa-Vatican Insider ·
· 3/15/12 ·
· Giacomo Galeazzi ·

[Full title: Century-old Archaeological Find Could Prove Authenticity of Jesus' Prophesy of the Resurrection] Gabriel's Revelation tablet (on show in the "Verbum Domini" exhibition in the Vatican) has been said to be an important piece of evidence for the authenticity of Jesus' prophesies on the resurrection -- Vatican Insider spoke to Biblicist and writer, Professor Simone Venturini on the subject. Professor Venturini works in the Vatican Secret Archives and teaches Biblical Science at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross. He is also the author of a number of works, including Il libro di Gesu Segreto (The secret book of Jesus) published by Newton Compton. Professor, what is the Gabriel's Revelation stela on show in the...


 More Observations on the Stone Dead Sea Scroll Text

· 07/16/2008 1:19:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Oyarsa ·
· 13 replies ·
· 179+ views ·
· Bock's Blog ·
· 7/08/2008 ·
· Darrell L. Bock ·

(from Taiwan) ... am writing from Taiwan, but I am not immune to the news about the new Stone "Dead Sea Scroll". I have made available by link in the News We Are Watching window Time's latest article on this. Thanks to Craig Blomberg for noting where access to the text can be found. The BAR site also in the News We Are Watching window gives access to both English and to the Hebrew text. Now you do not have to...

Facts In the Ground


 "Castle of the Slave" -- Mystery Solved [ Jordan ]

· 05/28/2012 8:45:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· May/Jun 2012 ·
· Stephen Rosenberg ·

One of the most dramatic archaeological monuments in Jordan -- an admittedly Jewish one -- has been repeatedly misidentified. French historian Ernest Will called it the "Finest Hellenistic monument in the Near East" and considered it a chateau. The structure is known locally as Qasr al-Abd, or "Castle of the Slave (or Servant)." It is part of a 75-acre estate called Airaq al-Amir (also spelled 'Iraq el-Emir), lying 12 miles southwest of the Jordanian capital, Amman. The site was entered via a monumental gateway, much of which remains in a ruined state and hidden by undergrowth. The glory of the...

Epigraphy & Language


 Oldest Jewish archaeological evidence on the Iberian Peninsula

· 05/27/2012 8:31:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Eurekalert ·
· Friday, May 25, 2012 ·
· Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena ·

On a marble plate, measuring 40 by 60 centimetres, the name "Yehiel" can be read, followed by further letters which have not yet been deciphered... the new discovery might be a tomb slab... "The organic material of the antlers could be dated by radiocarbon analysis with certainty to about 390 AD," excavation leader Dr. Dennis Graen of the Jena University explains... ...Not only is the early date exceptional in this case, but also the place of the discovery: Never before have Jewish discoveries been made in a Roman villa, the Jena Archaelogist explains. In the Roman Empire at that time...

Faith & Philosophy


 Babylonian Talmud Translated into Arabic

· 05/28/2012 9:46:19 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 23 replies ·
· Bible History Daily (BAR website) ·
· Thursday, May 17, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

After a controversial six-year-long translation project, a Jordanian think tank based in Amman published an Arabic translation of the Babylonian Talmud. After gaining enthusiastic responses to the project from the Arab League, 96 scholars began work on the translation. The editors are happy with the project, stating that the lack of an Arabic Talmud "has always been an obstacle to understanding Judaism." Despite some polarized and politicized responses, most have adopted a positive impression of the massive scholarly work. Dr. Raquel Ukeles of the Israeli National Library states that the project stemmed from scientific curiosity, and the introduction discusses the...

Religion of Pieces


 Indiana Jones meets the Da Vinci Code

· 01/14/2008 12:56:52 PM PST ·
· Posted by rellimpank ·
· 33 replies ·
· 40+ views ·
· Asia times ·
· 14 jan 08 ·
· Spengler ·

Islam watchers blogged all weekend about news that a secret archive of ancient Islamic texts had surfaced after 60 years of suppression. Andrew Higgins' Wall Street Journal report that the photographic record of Koranic manuscripts, supposedly destroyed during World War II but occulted by a scholar of alleged Nazi sympathies, reads like a conflation of the Da Vinci Code with Indiana Jones and the Holy Grail. The Da Vinci Code offered a silly fantasy in which Opus Dei, homicidal monks and twisted billionaires chased after proof that Christianity is a hoax. But the story of the photographic archive...


 Coast-to-coast AM 01.18.08.(2am EST) Glenn Kimball will discuss history of the Koran

· 01/19/2008 10:41:22 PM PST ·
· Posted by Perdogg ·
· 9 replies ·
· 212+ views ·
· C2C AM ·
· 01.19.08 ·

Expert in ancient manuscripts, Glenn Kimball will discuss new information on the history and origins of the Koran and ancient libraries.

The Roman Empire


 Lead poisoning in Rome: The skeletal evidence

· 05/31/2012 5:10:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 14 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 2-24-2012 ·
· http://www.poweredbyosteons.org/ ·

A recent article in the online publication io9, "The First Artificial Sweetener Poisoned Lots of Romans" provided a (very) brief look at some of the uses of lead (Pb) in the Roman world, including the tired old hypothesis that it was rampant lead poisoning that led to the downfall of Rome - along with gonorrhoea, Christianity, slavery, and the kitchen sink. The fact the Romans loved their lead is not in question, with plenty of textual and archaeological sources that inform us of the uses of lead -- as cosmetics, ballistics, sarcophagi, pipes, jewellery, curse tablets, utensils and cooking pots,...

Ancient Autopsies


 Uncovering the Great Theater of Apamea

· 06/02/2012 7:48:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Thursday, May 31, 2012 ·
· Cynthia Finlayson ·

The Great Theater at Apamea in northern Syria vies with the Large Theater at Ephesus, Turkey for the honor of being the largest extant Roman edifice of its type to have survived the ravages of time. Both buildings are estimated to have held audiences of over 20,000 persons, and both may have had their origins in an earlier Greek Hellenistic structure that was overbuilt in the Roman Era. Only one other theater, the Theater of Pompey in Rome, is known to have been larger. However, Pompey's lavish building is buried under the modern streets of the city, and its surviving...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Mexican archaeologists find 2,500-year-old altar

· 05/28/2012 7:23:38 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 14 replies ·
· Fox News Latino ·
· May 25, 2012 ·
· EFE ·

An altar and a stela estimated to date from as early as 800 B.C. were found at the Chalcatzingo archaeological site in the central state of Morelos, Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, or INAH, said. The altar is rectangular and covered with engravings representing rain. A few meters (yards) away from the altar was an unfinished stela standing 1.7 meters (5 feet 6 inches) tall. The pieces are thought to have been made between 800 and 500 B.C., about the same age as another altar and a relief depicting three cats that archaeologists from INAH's Morelos Center found...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 DNA study seeks origin of Appalachia's Melungeons

· 05/27/2012 4:49:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 64 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 5-25-2012 ·
· Travis Loller ·

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- For years, varied and sometimes wild claims have been made about the origins of a group of dark-skinned Appalachian residents once known derisively as the Melungeons. Some speculated they were descended from Portuguese explorers, or perhaps from Turkish slaves or Gypsies. Now a new DNA study in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy attempts to separate truth from oral tradition and wishful thinking. The study found the truth to be somewhat less exotic: Genetic evidence shows that the families historically called Melungeons are the offspring of sub-Saharan African men and white women of northern or central European origin.....

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles


 Ancient Mummy Child Had Hepatitis B

· 06/02/2012 7:34:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

A mummified child in Korea whose organs were relatively well preserved has produced the oldest full viral genome description. A liver biopsy of the mummy revealed a unique hepatitis B virus (HBV) known as a genotype C2 sequence, which is said to be common in Southeast Asia. The first discovery of hepatitis in a Korean mummy came in 2007. The new work provided more detailed analysis... Carbon 14 tests of the clothing of the mummy suggests that the boy lived around the 16th century during the Korean Joseon Dynasty. The viral DNA sequences recovered from the liver biopsy enabled the...

Not-so-Ancient Autopsies


 Skeletal Trauma from Medieval Oslo

· 05/31/2012 5:21:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 11 replies ·
· Bones Don't Lie ·
· 5-1-2012 ·
· Katy Meyers ·

The Medieval period is one characterized throughout the Western world as one of violence. Artwork from this era shows not only violence done towards other cultural groups, but dangers and suffering from daily life. Historical texts document the violence of heroes and villains, their phrases often loaded with drama. Scholars have argued that this violence was part of the social environment and to some extent was institutionalized. However, judgements from text and art alone are limited by individual perception and bias. Human remains have been vital in understanding the extent and manner of violence in the Medieval period. While they...

Egypt


 Burial site revealing ancient Egyptian funerary rites uncovered [ Middle Kdm Egypt ]

· 06/02/2012 7:17:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· Al-Ahram ·
· Wednesday, May 30, 2012 ·
· Nevine El-Aref ·

The well preserved coffin of an unidentified Middle Kingdom provincial governor was found in the Deir Al-Barsha necropolis near the upper Egyptian city of Minya In the course of routine excavation work at the tomb of the first Middle Kingdom governor of the Hare Nome or province, the nomarch Ahanakht I at the Deir Al-Barsha site in Minya, Belgian archaeologists from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven stumbled on what is believed to be an important burial going back to the beginning of the Middle Kingdom... Harco Willems, field director of the Belgian mission, told Ahram Online that the coffin remains discovered...

Underwater Archaeology


 Deepest Roman shipwrecks found near Greece

· 05/30/2012 6:18:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 18 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· May 30, 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

Two Roman-era shipwrecks have been found in deep water off a western Greek island, challenging the idea that ancient shipmasters stuck to coastal routes. The merchant ships were sunk nearly a mile deep between Corfu and Italy - proving that ancient traders didn't 'hug the shore'. Greece's culture ministry said the two third-century wrecks were discovered earlier this month during a survey of an area where a Greek-Italian gas pipeline is to be sunk.

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Discovered: The 128million-year-old grandfather of the modern squid..

· 06/01/2012 6:42:36 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 16 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 1, 2012 ·
· Eddie Wrenn ·

Scientists have managed to re-create the appearance of a previously unknown fossil - a spiky creature thought to be the ultimate ancestor of the modern-day squid and octopus. The Austria National History Museum team used 3D scanning technology to unearth the fossil of 'Dissimilites intermedius' a layer at a time, and then created a video of how the creature lived and moved. The ammonite was discovered in sediment which formed at the bottom of the ocean during the Cretaceous period - on a surface which, 128 million years, later would lie at the top of the Dolomite mountains in the...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 It Took Earth Ten Million Years to Recover from Greatest Mass Extinction

· 05/28/2012 7:25:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 42 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· May 27, 2012 ·
· U of Bristol ·

It took some 10 million years for Earth to recover from the greatest mass extinction of all time, latest research has revealed. Life was nearly wiped out 250 million years ago, with only 10 per cent of plants and animals surviving. It is currently much debated how life recovered from this cataclysm, whether quickly or slowly. Recent evidence for a rapid bounce-back is evaluated in a new review article by Dr Zhong-Qiang Chen, from the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan, and Professor Michael Benton from the University of Bristol. They find that recovery from the crisis lasted some 10...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 Israeli researchers find American Indians with Jewish genetic markers

· 05/30/2012 5:51:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 143 replies ·
· Xinhuanet ·
· 5-30-12 ·

JERUSALEM, May 30 (Xinhua) -- Geneticists at an Israeli hospital said they have found a unique Jewish genetic mutation among an American Indian tribe, indicating that they are descendants of Jews expelled from Spain 600 years ago, local Haaretz daily reported on Wednesday. The findings of the study, conducted at the Sheba Medical Center near Tel Aviv, show that a group of Indians from the State of Colorado bear the so-called "Ashkenazi mutation," on the BRCA1 gene - a marker unique to European Jews. While such so-called "secret Jews," or "Anusim" in Hebrew, whose families assimilated into various north and...

Early America


 Our Forgotten Fallen, from an earlier war.

· 05/28/2012 12:01:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SES1066 ·
· 8 replies ·
· 05/28/2012 ·
· Self ·

Today is Memorial Day, once also known as Decoration Day, hallowed to honor our military dead. Started to honor our Civil War dead, it has been expanded to honor all of our military dead of the United States from the Revolutionary War on (1775 to present). Yet in doing so, we still leave some out unless we become more expansive yet and include the 10,000+[1] of an even earlier conflict. I request those who read this, cast their minds back to a war that too many have forgotten but that forged an unbreakable mold upon our continent, "The French and...

The Revolution


 The Lesson of Alexander Hamilton

· 05/28/2012 3:36:36 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 141 replies ·
· The American Thinker ·
· 5-28-12 ·
· Jeremy Meister ·

How many things are in a person's pocket that they don't even know about? We take money for granted -- most people can't tell us which way George Washington is facing on the quarter. They can tell us that Ben Franklin is on the front of the hundred, but they can't tell us that Independence Hall (where he helped draft the Constitution) is on the back. One might think that as denominations get smaller and more common, the pictures on them would become more famous and well-known. The ten-dollar bill features Alexander Hamilton on the front. Since he was never...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 America's 21st-Century Population Edge
  (The 21st century will still be the American Century)


· 05/27/2012 6:05:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 35 replies ·
· WSJ ·
· 05/24/2012 ·
· Ben Wattenberg ·

Look around you. For most nations of the world, birth and fertility rates have never fallen so far, so fast, so long, so surprisingly, all across the globe. Except for America. Seen globally, the population explosion -- or what Stanford's Paul Ehrlich called "the population bomb" in the 1960s -- is now stone-cold dead. The ramifications are enormous economically, geopolitically, culturally and personally. For one, the United States will become stronger than ever in the games nations play. Every other major modern nation and every developing country has low or falling birth rates. Japan and Poland see 1.3 children per woman, Brazil and China...


end of digest #411 20120602


1,417 posted on 06/03/2012 4:56:20 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1414 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

:’) Especially here.


1,418 posted on 06/03/2012 4:57:44 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1416 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #411 · v 8 · n 46
Saturday, June 2, 2012
 
39 topics
2890885 to 2887890
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the recent newbies.

Issue #411 has 28 topics, including a little bit of FRarchival stuff, some of which was newly added. The recent spate of Roman Empire topics slows down, and I sprinkled them throughout. There's a lot this week of both new and FRarchival topics about OT- and NT-related archaeology, grouped under "Let's Have Jerusalem". Overall, another week with a startling variety.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • Pastor Derek McCoy, executive director of the Maryland Marriage Alliance, said that the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's "unfortunate" stance on the issue will contribute to the "further demise of the family." McCoy told CNA on May 21 that the NAACP is "endorsing an epidemic" of fatherless households, a "tragic" phenomenon in the United States and particularly in the African American community... McCoy said that despite its long record of important work, however, the NAACP's latest move does not reflect the views of its constituents... only 39 percent of African Americans are in favor of redefining marriage. Voters across the country have consistently affirmed measures to defend marriage as the union of one man and one woman... "Gay marriage" teaches that fathers and mothers are both dispensable, he explained, and "this is absolutely going to harm the family." -- [African American leaders blast NAACP 'gay marriage' support posted by markomalley]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,419 posted on 06/03/2012 5:00:06 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (FReepathon 2Q time -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1417 | View Replies]


This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #412
Saturday, June 9, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 Mysterious radiation burst recorded in tree rings

· 06/04/2012 10:58:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 46 replies ·
· Nature ·
· Sunday, June 3, 2012 ·
· Richard A. Lovett ·

Just over 1,200 years ago, the planet was hit by an extremely intense burst of high-energy radiation of unknown cause, scientists studying tree-ring data have found. The radiation burst, which seems to have hit between AD 774 and AD 775, was detected by looking at the amounts of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 in tree rings that formed during the AD 775 growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. The increase in 14C levels is so clear that the scientists, led by Fusa Miyake, a cosmic-ray physicist from Nagoya University in Japan, conclude that the atmospheric level of 14C must have jumped...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 The Cosmic Story of Carbon-14

· 06/05/2012 12:48:06 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 16 replies ·
· Starts with a Bang ·
· 6/4/12 ·
· Ethan Siegel ·

"Life exists in the universe only because the carbon atom possesses certain exceptional properties." --James Jeans Here on Earth, every living thing is based around four fundamental, elemental building blocks of life: hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and, perhaps most importantly, carbon.Image Credit: Robert Johnson / University of Pennsylvania. From diamonds to nanotubes to DNA, carbon is indispensable for constructing practically all of the most intricate structures we know of. Most of the carbon in our world comes from long-dead stars, in the form of Carbon-12: carbon atoms containing six neutrons in their nucleus. About 1.1% of all carbon is Carbon-13, with one...

Prehistory & Origins


 Fossil Discovery: More Evidence for Asia, Not Africa,
  as the Source of Earliest Anthropoid Primates


· 06/07/2012 2:49:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 28 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 06/07/2012 ·

An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of Afrasia djijidae, a new fossil primate from Myanmar that illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early anthropoids -- the group that includes humans, apes, and monkeys. The 37-million-year-old Afrasia closely resembles another early anthropoid, Afrotarsius libycus, recently discovered at a site of similar age in the Sahara Desert of Libya. The close similarity between Afrasia and Afrotarsius indicates that early anthropoids colonized Africa only shortly before the time when these animals lived. The colonization of Africa by early anthropoids was a pivotal step in primate and human evolution,...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis


 Old Vero Man Site History

· 06/04/2012 6:29:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Old Vero Ice Age Sites Committee ·
· obtained Sunday, June 3rd, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

In 1913 the Indian River Farms Company was dredging the Main Relief Canal in Vero Florida, in preparation to handle an expanding population. (It was not called Vero Beach until 1925.) The workers on this project kept seeing fossilized bones in the walls or banks of the freshly dredged canal. Some of these bones were presented to the state geologist, Dr E.H. Sellards. Dr. Sellards suggested that they also look for human bones during a visit to the site. In 1916 Dr Sellards, working with Frank Ayers, Isaac Wells, and others found more human bones in the strata known as...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 There IS a link between genius and madness - but we don't know why we evolved this 'gift'

· 06/04/2012 6:33:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 60 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 4, 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

There IS a link between creative genius and madness - with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder frequent in highly creative and intelligent people. The idea was investigated by a panel of scientists who had all suffered some form of mental disorder. Kay Redfield Jamison of John Hopkins school of Medicine, who suffers from bipolar disorder, said that intelligence tests on Swedish 16-year-olds had shown that highly intelligent children were most likely to go on to develop the disorder.

Epigraphy & Language


 New discovery at early Islamic site in Jordan:
  Uncovered inscription reveals name of Umayyad prince


· 06/07/2012 5:23:36 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· Art Daily ·
· Thursday, June 7, 2012 ·
· Art, or someone who knows him ·

The site is a small building dating to the Umayyad period and is known for its mural paintings. Gazelle and wild donkey hunts, dances, musicians, court scenes and allegories, and zodiac symbols are all painted on interior surfaces. The inscription, which previously could not be read due to accumulated dirt and previous unsuccessful cleaning attempts, is an invocation to Allah beginning with the formula "Allahumma aslih al-Walid ibn YazÓd" ("Oh God! Make al-WalÓd ibn YazÓd virtuous"). This inscription was painted in white above a window in old Kufic alphabet without any diacritical dots. Sections of the three-line inscription are...

Let's Have Jerusalem


 Vandals cause 'irreparable damage' to 1,600-year-old mosaics in Tiberias synagogue

· 06/05/2012 6:35:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Michal Shmulovich ·

An ancient Tiberias synagogue was extensively vandalized overnight Tuesday, causing irreversible damage and potentially necessitating millions of dollars in rehabilitation costs. Police opened an investigation, and officials said they suspected ultra-Orthodox Jewish extremists who oppose archaeological excavations of ancient tombs were to blame. "The damage is widespread. Some of the damage is irreversible," said Shaul Goldstein, executive director of the Nature and Parks Authority. The Hammat Tiberias site, which also serves as an archaeological park, boasts 1,600-year-old mosaics. The site's two synagogues date from 286 and 337 CE, when Tiberias was the seat of the Sanhedrin rabbinical court. Among the...

The Roman Empire


 Bulgarian Archaeologists Find Late Antiquity Church on Black Sea Coast

· 06/05/2012 4:02:17 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· Novinite ·
· Monday, May 28, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Bulgarian archaeologists have found a church dating back to the late Antiquity period, which is located near the village of Sarafovo, on the Black Sea coast. The site, which is close to the Bulgarian Black Sea city of Burgas, has been excavated by the team of Prof. Dr. Lyudmil Vagalinski, who is the Director of the National Archaeology Institute and Museum at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, since the start of May 2012. The excavations at Sarafovo (a village also known for hosting a military airfield) began after over the winter the sea waves uncovered parts of a Roman structures...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 Continuity down through the ages: Proof of a thousand years' use of a Sicilian farmland estate

· 06/05/2012 4:15:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, May 29, 2012 ·
· Australian Science Fund ·

Archaeological excavations have provided the first substantiation that a farmland estate in Sicily boasts a history which reaches back over a thousand years. Numerous finds demonstrate the continuous use of the land complex as a nexus of settlement and economic and religious life between the 5th and 16th century. The findings are the result of two projects of the Austrian Science Fund FWF which comprise the first in-depth archaeological exploration of Sicily's Byzantine period... While the ancient era saw the island dominated first by the Greeks and later the Roman Empire, in the High Middle Ages it was the centre...

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 The True Story Of Dracula (Interesting read)

· 08/05/2005 9:06:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 47 replies ·
· 4,142+ views ·
· Useless-knowledge.com ·
· October 18 , 2004 ·
· Mark Gelbart ·

Halloween is a time when friendly neighbors pretend to be tricked by children dressed up as ghosts, goblins, superheroes, clowns, fairies, and Teenaged Mutant Ninja Turtles. And in return the adults--feigning surprise--pass out sugary treats; a tradition that has helped those in the dental profession for many generations. Unlike most of the characters that make an annual appearance on our door steps, Dracula is based on a real person. Most people are familiar with the fictional version of Dracula created by Bram Stoker, but they are only vaguely aware...

Ancient Autopsies


 Ancient 'Vampire' Corpses Unearthed by Bulgarian Archaeologists

· 06/06/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 25 replies ·
· Medical Daily ·
· 5-5-2012 ·
· Christine Hsu ·

More than 100 "vampire" corpses have been dug out from graves across Bulgaria during historic excavations, according to the country's archaeologists. Bozhidar Dimitrov, head of the National History Museum in the Bulgarian capital, Sofia, said on Tuesday that Bulgarian archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the Middle Ages pierced through the chest with iron rods to keep them from turning into the undead. Dimitrov said that the two "vampire" remains were found last weekend near the Black Sea town of Sozopol. The tradition of hammering an iron rod through the chest bones and heart of 'evil' people to prevent them...

Religion of Pieces


 Muslims demand Hagia Sophia be converted into a mosque
  on anniversary of the fall of Constantinope

· 05/29/2012 3:56:54 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Gillibrand ·
· 4 replies ·
· Catholic Church Conservation ·
· 29 May 2012 ·
· Cathcon ·

Includes video of the 2012 annual celebrations of the fall of Constantinople which take place in Turkey


 Muslims demand Hagia Sophia be converted into a mosque
  on anniversary of the fall of Constantinope
 


· 05/29/2012 3:56:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Gillibrand ·
· 58 replies ·
· Catholic Church Conservation ·
· 29 May 2012 ·
· Cathcon ·

Includes video of the 2012 annual celebrations of the fall of Constantinople which take place in Turkey

Underwater Archaeology


 Chariots in Red Sea: 'Irrefutable evidence'

· 06/07/2012 6:56:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ReformationFan ·
· 79 replies ·
· World Net Daily ·
· June 7th, 2012 ·
· Joe Kovacs ·

A news report that stunned the world nine years ago about the discovery of possible ancient chariot wheels at the bottom of the Red Sea is suddenly gaining fresh attention with new video claiming "irrefutable evidence" that corroborates the find. In June 2003, WND interviewed Bible enthusiasts who dove the waters of the Red Sea, alleging they found and photographed parts of chariots that may be the actual remains of the catastrophe brought upon the Egyptian army which pursued the Israelites, according to the Book of Exodus in the Bible. "I am 99.9 percent sure I picked up a chariot...

Pages


 Freeman Dyson: Science on the Rampage

· 05/09/2012 10:28:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 34 replies ·
· New York Review of Books ·
· April 5, 2012 ·
· Freeman Dyson ·

Physics on the Fringe: Smoke Rings, Circlons, and Alternative Theories of Everything by Margaret Wertheim Walker, 323 pp., $27.00, Pierpont Morgan Library/Art Resource: An engraving by William Blake from The Song of Los, 1795 -- Physics on the Fringe describes work done by amateurs, people rejected by the academic establishment and rejecting orthodox academic beliefs. They are often self-taught and ignorant of higher mathematics. Mathematics is the language spoken by the professionals. The amateurs offer an...

Paleontology


 Primeval Giant Among Giants
  (African Scientist find skull of 18,000 pound Dinosaur eating Crocodile)


· 10/29/2001 11:47:01 AM PST ·
· Posted by umbra ·
· 60 replies ·
· 1,051+ views ·
· Int'l Herald Tribune ·
· October 27, 2001 ·
· Guy Gugliotta ·

The crocodile was a silent stalker, as long as a school bus and weighing almost 18,000 pounds. It cruised the primordial rivers of what is now Saharan Africa, looking for unwary dinosaurs to eat."It was absolutely enormous, said a University of Chicago paleontologist, Paul Sereno, of the 8,165 kilogram creature. "There is nothing that would be able to handle that animal. It's like a torpedo of muscle five feet in diameter. (with body armour) The skull of the world's largest living crocdile looks like an hors d'oeuvre by comparison." In an age of giants 110 million years ago Sarcosuchus imperator ...

Dinosaurs


 Dinosaurs were lighter than previously thought, new study shows

· 06/05/2012 7:39:30 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Tuesday, June 5, 2012 ·
· U of Manchester ·

...University of Manchester biologists used lasers to measure the minimum amount of skin required to wrap around the skeletons of modern-day mammals, including reindeer, polar bears, giraffes and elephants. They discovered that the animals had almost exactly 21% more body mass than the minimum skeletal 'skin and bone' wrap volume, and applied this to a giant Brachiosaur skeleton in Berlin's Museum f¸r Naturkunde. Previous estimates of this Brachiosaur's weight have varied, with estimates as high as 80 tonnes, but the Manchester team's calculations -- published in the journal Biology Letters -- reduced that figure to just 23 tonnes. The team...


 Dinosaurs Skinnier Than Previously Thought

· 06/06/2012 3:57:55 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 13 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· 6-5-2012 ·
· Jennifer Viegas ·

Dinosaurs were often hefty, but not as plump as previously thought. A new study describes a new technique used to measure the weight and size of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals. It could forever change museum exhibits, book illustrations, and other recreations of these now-extinct species. The study appears in the latest issue of Biology Letters "This is a huge help for any sort of reconstruction," lead author William Sellers told Discovery News. "We now have a number that suggests how much flesh to add to the bones and that should help people produce animals that are the right balance...


 Ye olde vampire slaying kit: Victorian oak box complete with wooden stakes

· 06/07/2012 8:07:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 13 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 7, 2012 ·
· Tom Gardner ·

They say you can never be too prepared... but even for the most superstitious person this may be overkill. A 19th century Vampire slaying kit, which includes a wooden mallet and four oak stakes, glass vials of holy water and garlic paste is expected to fetch up £2,000 when auctioned later this month. The macabre artefact also has a percussion cap pistol - invented in the 1830 - and a steel bullet mold, all carefully crafted to offer the best protection against any creatures of the night.

The Revolution


 George Washington, Circular Letter to the States

· 06/08/2012 2:13:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Jacquerie ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Founders' Constitution ·
· June 8th, 1783 ·
· George Washington ·

When word that peace with Great Britain was assured, General Washington issued a blistering condemnation of Congress. In addition to demands for soldier's back pay, he called for reforms to the Articles of Confederation. His admonitions would culminate in 1788 with ratification of the Constitution. George Washington: When we consider the magnitude of the prize we contended for, the doubtful nature of the contest, and the favorable manner in which it has terminated, we shall find the greatest possible reason for gratitude and rejoicing; this is a theme that will afford infinite delight to every benevolent and liberal mind, whether...

The Civil War


 Dr Charles Leale's long-lost medical report details his treatment after Lincoln was shot

· 06/05/2012 9:07:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 16 replies ·
· dailymail.co.uk ·
· 5 June 2012 ·
· Beth Stebner ·

They were filed away and for nearly 150 years, but now researchers have found the report of the young army surgeon who was first to reach Abraham Lincoln after he was shot in the head in Ford Theatre. The 21-page report, written by Dr Charles Leale, a 23-year-old doctor just six weeks into his medical practice who happened to be 40 feet from Lincoln, details his original perceptions of the president's fatal injuries. The historians who discovered the report in the National Archives in Washington believe it was filed, packed in a box, stored at the archives and not seen...


end of digest #412 20120609


1,420 posted on 06/10/2012 10:22:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #412 · v 8 · n 47
Saturday, June 9, 2012
 
21 topics
2881727 to 559207
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the recent newbies.

Issue #412 has 21 topics, but due to real-life bidness, it's a couple days late, in addition to being a little short.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • "A strong America must also value the institution of marriage. I believe we should respect individuals as we take a principled stand for one of the most fundamental, enduring institutions of our civilization. Congress has already taken a stand on this issue by passing the Defense of Marriage Act, signed in 1996 by President Clinton. That statute protects marriage under federal law as the union of a man and a woman, and declares that one state may not redefine marriage for other states. Activist judges, however, have begun redefining marriage by court order, without regard for the will of the people and their elected representatives. On an issue of such great consequence, the people's voice must be heard. If judges insist on forcing their arbitrary will upon the people, the only alternative left to the people would be the constitutional process. Our nation must defend the sanctity of marriage. The outcome of this debate is important - and so is the way we conduct it. The same moral tradition that defines marriage also teaches that each individual has dignity and value in God's sight." -- [George W. Bush, 2003 State of The Union]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,421 posted on 06/10/2012 10:40:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #413
Saturday, June 16, 2012

Middle Ages & Renaissance


 13th century volcano mystery eruption may be solved (Little Ice Age cause?)

· 06/15/2012 1:49:41 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 18 replies ·
· watts Up With That? ·
· June 15, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

A photo of the Rinjani caldera in Indonesia, while Lavigne won't name the volcano until his paper is published, insiders suggest this a likely candidate for the missing 1258 AD eruption. Image: Wikipedia From ScienceNews: Indonesia implicated as location of biggest eruption in last seven millennia By Alexandra Witze SELFOSS, Iceland -- One of the biggest mysteries in volcanology may finally have a solution. An eruption long thought to have gone off in the year 1258, spreading cooling sulfur particles around the globe, happened the year before in Indonesia, scientists report.Until now, researchers have known a big volcano went off...

Catastrophism & Astronomy


 Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

· 06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 115 replies ·
· Indian Country Today ·
· June 13, 2012 ·
· ICTMN Staff ·

Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings "pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths," said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn't help, but it was not instrumental....

British Isles


 Monmouth ruin find could pre-date pyramids

· 06/16/2012 10:56:54 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 1 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· June 13, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Monmouth Archaeology, which found the wooden foundations, said they dated to at least the Bronze Age, but could be early Neolithic, about 6,500 years old... Steve Clarke of Monmouth Archaeology, who has 55 years' experience, claimed nothing like it had been discovered in Britain before and he was checking if something similar had been unearthed on mainland Europe. He said the structure, possibly a long house, had been built on the edge of a long-lost lake, which had silted up over time. The building's foundations were made from entire tree trunks, measuring about a metre wide... Mr Clarke said the...

Neandertals / Neanderthals


 Spain claims top spot for world's oldest cave art (Is it a Neanderthal "painting?")

· 06/15/2012 8:06:11 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 11 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 6/14/12 ·
· Ewen Callaway ·

Archaeologists say red disk that is more than 40,000 years old could have been painted by Neanderthals. [Snip... Photos at link] It's no Mona Lisa, but a smudged red disk in northern Spain has been crowned the world's earliest cave painting. Dated to more than 40,800 years ago, the shape was painted by some of the first modern humans to reach the Iberian Peninsula -- or it may have been done by Neanderthals, residents of the Iberian peninsula for more than 200,000 years. "There is a very good chance that this is Neanderthal," says Alistair Pike, an archaeological scientist at...

Prehistory & Origins


 Scientists are accused of distorting theory of human evolution by misdating bones

· 06/13/2012 3:28:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· The Observer ·
· Saturday, June 9, 2012 ·
· Robin McKie ·

Britain's leading expert on human evolution, Professor Chris Stringer, of the Natural History Museum, has warned in the journal Evolutionary Anthropology that the team in charge of La Sima has got the ages of its fossils wrong by 200,000 years and has incorrectly identified the species of ancient humans found there. Far from being a 600,000-year-old lair of a species called Homo heidelbergensis, he believes the pit is filled with Neanderthal remains that are no more than 400,000 years old. The difference in interpretation has crucial implications for understanding human evolution... La Sima de los Huesos was discovered by potholers...

The Revolution


 Book Review: George Washington's Military Genius

· 06/12/2012 7:10:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 48 replies ·
· Human Events ·
· 6/12/2012 ·
· Jarrett Stepman of review ·

George Washington is justifiably called the "Father of America" for his military and civilian leadership during the American Revolution and his two terms as America's first president, however, in the new book, George Washington's Military Genius, General David Palmer persuasively argues that Washington's strategic military talent was key to his success. Gen. Palmer, who is a former superintendent of West Point, attempts to bust the myths surrounding Washington's American Revolutionary War experience and to put the accomplishments on the battlefield in perspective. Some historians view Washington as an incompetent bungler who merely got lucky in a few engagements with the...

The Framers


 George Washington's Constitution Up for Grabs Next Week

· 06/14/2012 11:53:56 AM PDT ·
· Posted by iowamark ·
· 12 replies ·
· Webpronews ·
· 6/14/2012 ·
· Todd Rigney ·

George Washington's copies of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, both of which are 223 year-old, are scheduled to hit the auction block at Christie's next week. The documents, which are bound in a book containing notes by the first President of the United States himself, were made available to the press earlier this week. Those who are looking to own a piece of history will have an opportunity to do so on June 22nd. Potential bidders better have plenty of money in the bank, as the documents are expected to fetch upwards of $3 million. What separates this...

Longer Perspectives


 Presidential Election History from 1789 to 2008 [Re-elected Ones *Gain* Votes!]

· 06/12/2012 12:14:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SoFloFreeper ·
· 17 replies ·
· Procon,org ·
· 6/12/12 ·
· SFF ·

[The final call on Rush Limbaugh today referred to the history of Presidential elections and the re-election history of our Presidents. A review of this history shows the depth of the problems for Barack Hussein Obama.]The presidential candidates and their political parties, number of electoral and popular votes received, and vice presidential candidates for every election from 1789 to 2008 are listed below, in reverse chronological order. Every candidate that received either more than 100,000 popular votes or at least one electoral vote has been included.

Ancient Autopsies


 Is this the hand of John the Baptist?...

· 06/15/2012 6:12:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 38 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· June 15, 2012 ·
· Chris Brooke ·

When archaeologists claimed to have found the bones of John the Baptist amid the ruins of an ancient Bulgarian monastery experts were understandably sceptical. But carbon dating tests carried out at Oxford University have provided scientific evidence to support the extraordinary claim. A knucklebone has been dated to the 1st Century AD - a time when the revered Jewish prophet is believed to have lived.


 Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

· 06/15/2012 8:47:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by dead ·
· 80 replies ·
· NPR.org ·
· June 15, 2012 ·
· Christopher Joyce ·

The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art and a great leap forward for human culture. But now a novel method of determining the age of some of those cave paintings questions their provenance. Not that they're fakes -- only that it might not have been modern humans who made them. The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. Most depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held...


 New dating puts cave art in the age of Neanderthals

· 06/15/2012 9:26:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 25 replies ·
· post-gazette ·
· June 15, 2012 ·
· John Noble Wilford ·

Stone Age artists were painting red disks, handprints, clublike symbols and geometric patterns on European cave walls long before previously thought, in some cases more than 40,000 years ago, scientists reported Thursday, after completing more reliable dating tests that raised a possibility that Neanderthals were the artists. A more likely situation, the researchers said, is that the art -- 50 samples from 11 caves in northwestern Spain-- was created by anatomically modern humans fairly soon after their arrival in Europe. The findings seem to put an exclamation point to a run of recent discoveries: direct evidence from fossils that Homo...

Longer Perspectives


 The Birth of Bureaucracy (Where Long Lines, Red Tape & Arcane Rules Began; 1650 to 1100 B.C.)

· 06/13/2012 7:32:01 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 17 replies ·
· Archaeology ·
· July/August 2012 ·
· Amanda Summer ·

The Birth of Bureaucracy At the site of Iklaina, excavations are revealing new evidence of how the Mycenaean state functioned - Pylos, in Greece's southwestern Peloponnese, is known for its miles of soft sandy beaches, rocky islets soaring out of the water marking the edges of the Bay of Navarino, and the mountains that cut it off from the rest of Greece. The surrounding region, known as Messenia, is also home to dozens of archaeological sites. Since the nineteenth century, Messenia has attracted archaeologists hoping to uncover remains of Greece's Mycenaean age, the period from approximately 1650 to 1100 B.C.,...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 New book offers definitive account of Lindbergh kidnapping

· 06/12/2012 4:50:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Robwin ·
· 20 replies ·
· Daily Caller ·
· 06/12/2012 ·
· Arthur T. Vanderbilt, II ·

Through some incredibly persistent sleuthing, consultation with specialists in modern criminal investigative analysis, and a good dose of luck, author Robert Zorn has solved what has been correctly called "the crime of the century": the Lindbergh kidnapping. And so the [Hauptmann] case ended with as many questions open as answered, all of which are laid out in Cemetery John with precision. And then, with new evidence and equal precision, the author proceeds to answer each one.


end of digest #413 20120616


1,422 posted on 06/16/2012 12:02:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #413 · v 8 · n 48
Saturday, June 16, 2012
 
13 topics
2896035 to 2894631
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Happy mid-June, this is every Triskaidekaphobiacs nightmare --

the 13-topic Digest #413!!!

· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • Science Demands Big Government!
    Harvard professor Daniel E. Lieberman... was among those who publicly defended New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's plan to ban the sale of sugared soft drinks in cups larger than 16 ounces... "We have evolved," the professor concluded his piece, "to need coercion."
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,423 posted on 06/16/2012 12:09:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #414
Saturday, June 23, 2012

Multiregionalism


 Re-Examining the "Out of Africa" Theory and the Origin of Europeoids
  in Light of DNA Genealogy


· 06/20/2012 2:19:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 36 replies ·
· scirp.org ·
· May 2012 ·
· Anatole A. Klyosov, Igor L. Rozhanskii ·

Seven thousand five hundred fifty-six (7556) haplotypes of 46 subclades in 17 major haplogroups were considered in terms of their base (ancestral) haplotypes and timespans to their common ancestors, for the purposes of designing of time-balanced haplogroup tree. It was found that African haplogroup A (originated 132,000 ± 12,000 years before present) is very remote time-wise from all other haplogroups, which have a separate common ancestor, named β-haplogroup, and originated 64,000 ± 6000 ybp. It includes a family of Europeoid (Caucasoid) haplogroups from F through T that originated 58,000 ± 5000 ybp. A downstream common ancestor for haplogroup A and β-haplogroup, coined the α-haplogroup emerged 160,000 ± 12,000 ybp. A territorial origin of haplogroups α- and β-remains unknown; however, the most likely origin for each of them is a vast triangle stretched from Central Europe in the west through the Russian Plain to the east and to Levant to the south. Haplogroup B is descended from β-haplogroup (and not from haplogroup A, from which it is very distant, and separated by as much as 123,000 years of "lat- eral" mutational evolution) likely migrated to Africa after 46,000 ybp. The finding that the Europeoid haplogroups did not descend from "African" haplogroups A or B is supported by the fact that bearers of the Europeoid haplogroups, as well as all non-African haplogroups do not carry either SNPs M91, P97, M31, P82, M23, M114, P262, M32, M59, P289, P291, P102, M13, M171, M118 (haplogroup A and its subclades SNPs) or M60, M181, P90 (haplogroup B), as it was shown recently in "Walk through Y" FTDNA Project (the reference is incorporated therein) on several hundred people from various haplogroups.

British Isles


 Welsh people could be most ancient in UK, DNA suggests

· 06/20/2012 5:01:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 54 replies ·
· BBC ·
· Tuesday, June 19, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Professor Peter Donnelly, of Oxford University, said the Welsh carry DNA which could be traced back to the last Ice Age, 10,000 years ago. The project surveyed 2,000 people in rural areas across Britain. Participants, as well as their parents and grandparents, had to be born in those areas to be included in the study. Prof Donnelly, a professor of statistical science at Oxford University and director of the Wellcome Trust centre for human genetics, said DNA samples were analysed at about 500,000 different points. After comparing statistics, a map was compiled which showed Wales and Cornwall stood out. Prof...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry


 Ancient North Africans got milk: Herders began dairying around 7,000 years ago

· 06/22/2012 3:53:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Wednesday, June 20th, 2012 ·
· Bruce Bower ·

Animal herders living in what was a grassy part of North Africa's Sahara Desert around 7,000 years ago had a taste for cattle milk, or perhaps milk products such as butter. Researchers have identified a chemical signature of dairy fats on the inside surfaces of pottery from that time. Dairy products played a big part in the diets of these ancient Africans, even though they did not live in farming villages as the earliest European milk users did, reports a team led by biogeochemists Julie Dunne and Richard Evershed, both of the University of Bristol in England. Dairying may have...

Diet & Cuisine


 How the Chicken Conquered the World: The epic begins 10,000 years ago in an Asian jungle...

· 06/18/2012 7:06:22 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 42 replies ·
· Smithsonian magazine ·
· June 2012 ·
· Jerry Adler and Andrew Lawler ·

The chickens that saved Western civilization were discovered, according to legend, by the side of a road in Greece in the first decade of the fifth century B.C. The Athenian general Themistocles, on his way to confront the invading Persian forces, stopped to watch two cocks fighting and summoned his troops, saying: "Behold, these do not fight for their household gods, for the monuments of their ancestors, for glory, for liberty or the safety of their children, but only because one will not give way to the other." The tale does not describe what happened to the loser, nor explain...

Prehistory & Origins


 Massive Gold Trove Sparks Archeological Dispute

· 06/21/2012 5:36:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 8 replies ·
· Spiegel Online ·
· 21 June 2012 ·
· Matthias Schulz ·

A 3,300-year-old treasure trove of gold found in northern Germany has stumped German archeologists. One theory suggests that traders transported it thousands of miles from a mine in Central Asia, but other experts are skeptical. Archeologists in Germany have an unlikely new hero: former Chancellor Gerhard Schröder. They have nothing but praise for the cigar-smoking veteran Social Democratic politician. Why? Because it was Schröder who, together with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, pushed through a plan to pump Russian natural gas to Western Europe. For that purpose, an embankment 440 kilometers (275 miles) long and up to 30 meters (100 feet)...


 Archaeological Dispute Erupts over Gold Trove

· 06/22/2012 3:50:22 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 3 replies ·
· Spiegel ·
· Solstice Day, June 21, 2012 ·
· Matthias Schulz, DPA ·

...former Chancellor Gerhard Schrˆder... pushed through a plan to pump Russian natural gas to Western Europe. For that purpose, an embankment 440 kilometers (275 miles) long and up to 30 meters (100 feet) wide had to be created from Lubmin, a coastal resort town in northeastern Germany, to Rehden in Lower Saxony near the northwestern city of Bremen. The result has been a veritable cornucopia of ancient discoveries. The most beautiful find was made in the Gessel district of Lower Saxony, where 117 pieces of gold were found stacked tightly together in a rotten linen cloth. The hidden treasure is...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy


 Research finds Stonehenge was monument marking unification of Britain

· 06/22/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· U of Sheffield ·
· Friday, June 22, 2012 ·
· Amy Stone ·

The teams, from the universities of Sheffield, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth and University College London, all working on the Stonehenge Riverside Project (SRP), explored not just Stonehenge and its landscape but also the wider social and economic context of the monument's main stages of construction around 3,000 BC and 2,500 BC... Previous theories have suggested the great stone circle was used as a prehistoric observatory, a sun temple, a place of healing, and a temple of the ancient druids. The Stonehenge Riverside Project's researchers have rejected all these possibilities after the largest programme of archaeological research ever mounted on this iconic...

Australia & the Pacific


 How Easter Island's statues walked

· 06/21/2012 3:47:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· Cosmic Log ·
· Wednesday, June 20, 2012 ·
· Alan Boyle ·

Did Easter Island's famous statues rock, or roll? After doing a little rocking out themselves, researchers say they're sure the natives raised the monumental figures upright, and then rocked them back and forth to "walk" them to their positions. Their findings mesh with a scenario that casts the Polynesian island's natives in the roles of resourceful engineers working with the little that they had on hand, rather than the victims of a self-inflicted environmental catastrophe. "A lot of what people think they know about the island turns out to be not true," Carl Lipo, an archaeologist at California State University...

Biology & Cryptobiology


 Australians Find Huge Mega-Wombat Graveyard

· 06/21/2012 7:34:41 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 46 replies ·
· Gulf Times ·
· 6/22/2012 ·

Australian scientists yesterday unveiled the biggest-ever graveyard of an ancient rhino-sized mega-wombat called diprotodon, with the site potentially holding valuable clues on the species' extinction. The remote fossil deposit in outback Queensland state is thought to contain up to 50 diprotodon skeletons including a huge specimen named Kenny, whose jawbone alone is 70cm long. Lead scientist on the dig, Scott Hocknull from the Queensland Museum in Brisbane, said Kenny was one of the largest diprotodons he had ever seen and one of the best preserved specimens. Pigeon-toed and with a backward-facing pouch large enough to carry an adult human, Hocknull...

Geography is Destiny


 How geography shapes cultural diversity

· 06/11/2012 5:43:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 10 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 11 June 2012 ·
· ZoÃŽ Corbyn ·

Study offers evidence that long countries give better protection to languages than those that are wide. One reason that Eurasian civilizations dominated the globe is because they came from a continent that was broader in an east-west direction than north-south, claimed geographer Jared Diamond in his famous 1997 book Guns, Germs and Steel. Now, a modelling study has found evidence to support this 'continental axis theory'.Continents that span narrower bands of latitude have less variation in climate, which means a set of plants and animals that are adapted to more similar conditions. That is an advantage, says Diamond, because it means...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles


 Deadly bubonic plague found in Oregon: Back to the Middle Ages?

· 06/17/2012 12:29:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Olog-hai ·
· 19 replies ·
· New Jersey Newsroom ·
· Saturday, 16 June 2012 11:00 ·
· Bob Holt ·

A man has been hospitalized in Oregon who is believed to be suffering from the black plague, a disease that killed about one-third of the population of Europe during the Middle Ages. The unidentified man in his 50s became ill several days after being bitten when he tried to get a mouse out of the mouth of a stray cat, according to OregonLive.com. The man was listed in critical condition in a Bend hospital on Tuesday. NZ Herald News reported that the man showed classic symptoms of the plague -- swollen lymph nodes in the groin and armpits. But doctors said he...

Epigraphy & Language


 New Indo-European Language Discovered

· 06/21/2012 5:14:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 12 replies ·
· Sci-News.com ·
· 6-19-2012 ·
· John Shanks ·

A linguistics researcher at the Macquarie University in Australia has discovered that the language, known as Burushaski, which is spoken by about 90,000 people who reside in a remote area of Pakistan, is Indo-European in origin. Prof Ilija Casule's discovery, which has now been verified by a number of the world's top linguists, has excited linguistics experts around the world. An entire issue of the eminent international linguistics journal the Journal of Indo-European Studies is devoted to a discussion of his findings later this month. More than fifty eminent linguists have tried over many years to determine the genetic relationship...

Navigation


 Roman jewellery found in ancient Japan tomb

· 06/22/2012 3:03:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Nineman.com.au ·
· Friday, June 22, 2012 ·
· AFP ·

Glass jewellery believed to have been made by Roman craftsmen has been found in an ancient tomb in Japan, researchers said Friday, in a sign the empire's influence may have reached the edge of Asia. Tests have revealed three glass beads discovered in the Fifth Century "Utsukushi" burial mound in Nagaoka, near Kyoto, were probably made some time between the first and the fourth century, the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties said. The government-backed institute has recently finished analysing components of the glass beads, measuring five millimetres (0.2 inches) in diametre, with tiny fragments of gilt attached. It...

The Roman Empire


 So what have the Romans ever done for us? Ireland's links with the Roman empire
  are being investigated in a new archaeological project in which science plays a large part


· 06/20/2012 6:42:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 40 replies ·
· Irish Times ·
· Thursday, February 16, 2012 ·
· Anthony King ·

Roman artifacts including coins, glass beads and brooches turn up in many Irish counties, especially in the east. Cahill Wilson investigated human remains... using strontium and isotope analysis and carbon dating. Remarkably, this allowed her say where they most likely spent their childhood. One burial site on a low ridge overlooking the sea in Bettystown, Co Meath, was dated to the 5th/6th century AD using radiocarbon dating. Most of the people were newcomers to the area, Cahill Wilson concluded. The clue was in their teeth. Enamel, one of the toughest substances in our body, completely mineralises around the age of...

Farty Shades of Green


 Did St. Patrick sell slaves to the Irish?

· 03/17/2012 3:03:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by caldera599 ·
· 35 replies ·
· 1+ views ·
· MSNBC ·
· 3/16/2012 ·
· MSNBC Staff ·

LONDON -- St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, may well have been a tax collector for the Romans who fled to Ireland where he could have traded slaves to pay his way, according to new research by a University of Cambridge academic published on Saturday. The generally accepted account of the saint's life, albeit based on scant evidence, says Patrick was abducted from western Britain as a teenager and forced into slavery in Ireland for six years during which time he developed a strong Christian faith. Afterwards, the account continues, he escaped his captors and went back to Britain before...

Ancient Autopsies


 Bones of John The Baptist Possibly Discovered

· 06/16/2012 6:14:34 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Aliska ·
· 36 replies ·
· ABC News Online ·
· June 16, 2012 ·
· Russell Goldman ·

A team of researchers believe a knuckle bone found buried beneath a Bulgarian church may belong to John the Baptist, the New Testament prophet who heralded the ministry of Jesus. (Photo Included in article)

Religion of Pieces


 The Moslem Conquest (of India)

· 02/14/2004 6:33:32 PM PST ·
· Posted by ml/nj ·
· 82 replies ·
· 8,838+ views ·
· Our Oriental Heritage ·
· 1936 ·
· Will Durant ·

The Mohammedan Conquest of India is probably the bloodiest story in history. It is a discouraging tale, for its evident moral is that civilization is a precarious thing, whose delicate complex of order and liberty, culture and peace may at any time be overthrown by barbarians invading from without or multiplying within. The Hindus ... had failed to organize their forces for the protection of their frontiers and their capitals, their wealth and their freedom, from the hordes of Scythians, Huns, Afghans, and Turks hovering about India's boundaries and waiting for national weakness to let them in. For four hundred...

Helix, Make Mine a Double


 Meet Your Cousin, the First Lady: DNA gives new insights into Michelle Obama's roots

· 06/17/2012 6:14:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Cronos ·
· 44 replies ·
· The New York Times ·
· 17 Jun 2012 ·
· Rachel L Swarns ·

Joan Tribble held tightly to her cane as she ventured into the overgrown cemetery where her people were buried. There lay the pioneers who once populated north Georgia's rugged frontier, where striving white men planted corn and cotton, fought for the Confederacy and owned slaves The settlers interred here were mostly forgotten over the decades as their progeny scattered across the South, embracing unassuming lives. But one line of her family took another path, heading north on a tumultuous, winding journey that ultimately led to the White House The white men and women buried here are the forebears of Mrs....


 Meet Your Cousin, the First Lady: A Family Story, Long Hidden [Her White Forbears]

· 06/17/2012 10:28:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Steelfish ·
· 29 replies ·
· NY Times ·
· June 16, 2012 ·
· Rachel L. Swarns ·

Joan Tribble at the grave of her great-great-grandfather, Henry W. Shields, a Georgia slave owner who is also an ancestor of Michelle Obama. -- Joan Tribble held tightly to her cane as she ventured into the overgrown cemetery where her people were buried. There lay the pioneers who once populated north Georgia's rugged frontier, where striving white men planted corn and cotton, fought for the Confederacy and owned slaves. The settlers interred here were mostly forgotten over...


 Michelle Obama's ancestors traced to Ulster slave owner

· 06/18/2012 2:16:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by 2ndDivisionVet ·
· 43 replies ·
· The Belfast Telegraph ·
· June 18, 2012 ·
· Paul Melia ·

US First Lady Michelle Obama's ancestry can be traced to a slave owner from what is now Northern Ireland, who emigrated to America in the 1700s. A new book claims that Andrew Shields, who fought against the British in the American War of Independence, was Mrs Obama's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather and his family were slave owners. Her great-great-great-grandmother Melvinia was a slave who had children by Charles Shields, grandson of Andrew Shields. One of those children, Dolphus Shields, born in 1859, was Michelle Obama's direct ancestor. The claims are made in American Tapestry: The Story of the Black, White and Multiracial Ancestors...

Early America


 Archives burst at seams with Maryland history

· 06/18/2012 4:40:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Tolerance Sucks Rocks ·
· 14 replies ·
· The Washington Times ·
· June 17, 2012 ·
· David Hill ·

Annapolis -- The Maryland State Archives collection is among the largest in the country with nearly 400 years of history, including Colonial-era paintings, keepsakes of the state's governors, and thousands of land, court and genealogy records. With all that history, the Archives has run out of space. The agency first filled its Annapolis headquarters to capacity in 2000, then leased and filled a warehouse. It leased a second warehouse and a third before brokering a deal to store some of its property at the Baltimore City Archives. All of the facilities are now full, and state archivists have been pushing...

The Revolution


 Washingtonianism -- The Father of his Country's vision for the American Founding

· 06/19/2012 2:54:22 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 14 replies ·
· City Journal ·
· Spring 2012 ·
· Myron Magnet ·

For we who believe that great men, not impersonal forces, make history, George Washington is Exhibit A. As the Revolution's commander in chief, president of the Constitutional Convention, and first president of the United States, he was luminously the Founding's indispensable man, in biographer James Flexner's pitch-perfect phrase. A pragmatic visionary -- that familiar American combination -- he conceived from his hard-won experience in the French and Indian War the central Founding ideas of an American union under a strong executive three decades before the Constitutional Convention, and his hardships in the Revolution led him to forge that vision into a plan. An ambitious...

The General


 James Madison Letter to General Washington

· 06/16/2012 12:52:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Jacquerie ·
· 32 replies ·
· The Constitution Society ·
· April 16th 1787 ·
· James Madison ·

Two hundred and twenty five years ago, and one month before the Philadelphia Convention, aka the Constitutional Convention, Congressional delegate James Madison responded to a letter from George Washington. He offered thoughts on his new plan of government, the Virginia Plan. Compared to the Articles of Confederation it was radical, yet it was structurally close enough to the mixed governments of the States to be familiar as well. It would emerge in modified form five months later as The Constitution of the United States of America.To George Washington New York, April 16 1787 Dear Sir, I have been honoured with...

The Framers


 George Washington's U.S. Constitution up for auction [today at New York City's Christie's]

· 06/22/2012 6:02:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ETL ·
· 27 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· June 13, 2012 ·
· Chris Michaud ·

(Reuters) -- A gold-embossed piece of U.S. history will go up for sale this month, when Christie's auctions off George Washington's personal copy of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. The documents, which date to 1789 and are signed and annotated by the first U.S. president, are poised to fetch from $2 million to $3 million when they hit the block on June 22, the auction house said on Wednesday. The bound papers constitute Washington's personal copy of the Acts of Congress. These include the Constitution, whose preamble promises to "secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our...

Longer Perspectives


 Reagan Remembers Dr. Joseph Warren, hero at Bunker Hill (June 17,1775)

· 06/17/2012 6:10:01 PM PDT ·
· Posted by gusopol3 ·
· 18 replies ·
· revolutionarywaranimated.com ·

"On the eve of our struggle for independence a man who might have been one of the greatest among the Founding Fathers, Dr. Joseph Warren, President of the Massachusetts Congress, said to his fellow Americans, 'Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of.... On you depend the fortunes of America. You are to decide the important questions upon which rests the happiness and the liberty of millions yet unborn. Act worthy of yourselves.'" Map animation of the battle fought today, 237 years ago.

The Second Amendment


 Arms and the Greeks

· 06/14/2012 9:13:24 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marktwain ·
· 17 replies ·
· davekopel.org ·
· August, 1999 ·
· David Kopel ·

The founders didn't conjure up the right to bear arms out of thin air. They learned its value from the founders of Western civilization. The creators of America's republican form of government did not make everything up as they went along. American political philosophy -- including the right to keep and bear arms -- was firmly grounded in historical experience and in the great works of philosophy from ancient Greece through 18th-century Britain. The Declaration of Independence was derived from what Thomas Jefferson called, "the elementary books of public right, as Aristotle, Cicero, Locke, Sidney, etc." What did Aristotle -- ...

Wild Wild West


 How the Wild West REALLY looked: Gorgeous sepia-tinted pictures ...

· 06/13/2012 12:22:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by brityank ·
· 48 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 25 May 2012 ·
· Rob Cooper ·

Gorgeous sepia-tinted pictures show the landscape as it was charted for the very first time. These remarkable 19th century sepia-tinted pictures show the American West as you have never seen it before -- as it was charted for the first time. The photos, by Timothy O'Sullivan, are the first ever taken of the rocky and barren landscape. At the time federal government officials were travelling across Arizona, Nevada, Utah and the rest of the west as they sought...

World War Eleven


 Germans recover Stuka bomber wreck from Baltic Sea

· 06/11/2012 1:43:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by greatdefender ·
· 45 replies ·
· AP-Yahoo! ·
· June 11, 2012 ·
· David Rising ·

Berlin (AP) -- German military divers are working to hoist the wreck of a Stuka dive bomber from the floor of the Baltic Sea, a rare example of the plane that once wreaked havoc over Europe as part of the Nazis' war machine. The single-engine monoplane carried sirens that produced a distinctive and terrifying screaming sound as it dove vertically to release its bombs or strafe targets with its machine guns. There are only two complete Stukas still around. The Stuka wreck, first discovered in the 1990s when a fisherman's nets snagged on it, lies about 10 kilometers (6 miles)...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany


 Happy Birthday Nikola Tesla

· 07/06/2006 7:02:41 PM PDT ·
· Posted by eleni121 ·
· 168 replies ·
· 2,380+ views ·
· NikolaTesla Memorial Society ·
· July 6, 2006 ·
· Me ·

The Nikola Tesla Monument within Queen Victoria Park, Niagara Falls (Canadian Side) will be unveiled on July 9, 2006 at 12 noon celebrating the 150th birthday of Nikola Tesla.


end of digest #414 20120623


1,424 posted on 06/23/2012 2:20:10 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #414 · v 8 · n 49
Saturday, June 23, 2012
 
29 topics
2898449 to 2896060
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Digest #414 is a prime one, with its 29 topics -- and we have but three more to go in the eighth year of the Digest. Lots of early America and modern or nearly-modern topics this week, some from the FRchives. You realize of course that the 4th of July is motoring up right now, right? That isn't about shootin' off fireworks.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
Ere many generations pass, our machinery will be driven by a power obtainable at any point of the universe. This idea is not novel. Men have been led to it long ago by instinct or reason; it has been expressed in many ways, and in many places, in the history of old and new. We find it in the delightful myth of Antheus, who derives power from the earth; we find it among the subtle speculations of one of your splendid mathematicians and in many hints and statements of thinkers of the present time. Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic! If static, our hopesare in vain; if kinetic -- and this we know it is, for certain -- then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of Nature. -- Nikola Tesla [Experiments with alternate currents of high potential and high frequency, February 1892]
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,425 posted on 06/23/2012 3:48:33 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

This week's topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #415
Saturday, June 30, 2012

The Revolution

 MI: Washington honored soldier he sent to spy on British

· 06/24/2012 6:42:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SandRat ·
· 7 replies ·
· Sierra Vista Herald/Review ·
· Bill Hess ·

WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS, NEWBURGH, N.Y. -- On Aug. 7, 1782, General George Washington issued an order for the establishment of The Badge of Military Merit. Part of his order for the badge's creation was it would be in the shape of a heart and made of purple cloth on which the word merit would be embroidered. It was to be worn on the left breast of the recipient. Only three are known to have been awarded by Washington, all in 1783 at his Newburgh headquarters with one on display at the New Windsor Cantonment. All involved bravery. Two were awarded for what...


 Book containing George Washington's copy of Constitution fetches nearly $10M

· 06/23/2012 7:34:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ETL ·
· 24 replies ·
· FoxNews.com ·
· June 22, 2012 ·
· Maegan Vazquez ·

A book owned by George Washington and containing his own annotated copy of the Constitution sold for almost $10 million at Christie's, more than three times what it was expected to draw. A fierce bidding war between two unidentified parties forced the price up, and applause erupted in the venerable auction house when the hammer came down and the 223-year-old book sold for $9,826,500 to the Mount Vernon Ladies Association.The Acts of Congress volume includes a copy of the Constitution, a draft of the Bill of Rights, and acts creating the executive, State and Treasury department. The book was printed...

Early America

 Archaeologists Unearth Rare 17th Century Find at Jamestown Excavations

· 06/26/2012 9:44:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 18 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Thu, Jun 21, 2012 ·
· Anon. ·

The pocket-sized ivory sundial likely belonged to one of the early English gentlemen colonists. It was discovered while archaeologists were carefully digging fill soil above a cellar dated to the early James Fort period (1607-1610) at Jamestown, Virginia, the site of North America's first successful English colony. The artifact was the lower leaf of an ivory pocket sundial known in the 17th century as a diptych dial. It clearly bore the name of its maker, Hans Miller, who was a 17th century craftsman known to have made sundials in Nuremberg, Germany. Like many objects found at the Jamestown excavations, it...

The Civil War

 Sallie, Mascot of the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteers

· 06/23/2012 5:18:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by PaulZe ·
· 21 replies ·
· nycivilwar.us ·

It was during the first month of training in 1861 for the new 11th PA Volunteer Infantry Regiment when a stranger from town brought to the captain a puppy, barely four to five weeks old, and presented it to the regiment. She was a pug-nosed brindle bull terrier that soon won the admiration of all the men in the unit. She was cute, and the men named her after one of the local beauties in West Chester, PA, the site of training. In the weeks and months that followed, Sallie could count on the hundreds of uniformed men to play...

British Isles

 King's Lynn: Bronze Age burial pot find excites experts

· 06/27/2012 3:00:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Lynn News (UK) ·
· Friday, June 22, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

An exciting find of an intact Bronze Age burial urn has been made by a team of archaeological experts working on the site of a new link road under construction at Lynn. The team had already unearthed Iron Age timber posts beside the route of the road which will take traffic from the A149 Queen Elizabeth Way to Scania Way on the Hardwick Industrial Estate, where the new Sainsbury's superstore is being built. Ken Hamilton, Norfolk County Council's senior historic environment officer, said now a collared urn, believed to contain cremated human remains from about 2,500 years ago, had been...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Rome Icon Actually Younger Than the City

· 06/25/2012 7:49:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 10 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Mon Jun 25, 2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

The icon of Rome's foundation, a life-size bronze statue of a she-wolf with two human infants suckling her, is about 1,700 years younger than its city, Rome's officials admitted on Saturday. The official announcement, made at the Capitoline Museums, where the 30 inch-high bronze is the centerpiece of a dedicated room, quashes the belief that the sculpture was adopted by the earliest Romans as a symbol for their city. "The new dating ranges between 1021 e il 1153," said Lucio Calcagnile, who carried radiocarbon tests at the University of Salento's Center for Dating...

The Roman Empire

 The Ivy League of Ancient Roman Gladiator Schools

· 06/27/2012 11:17:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 6 replies ·
· IO9 ·
· Jun 22, 2012 ·
· Keith Veronese ·

The Ivy League of Ancient Roman Gladiator Schools If you got sent back in time 2,000 years to ancient Rome, you probably wouldn't want to choose a career as a gladiator. After all, it was a messy existence, with a fairly low life expectancy. But if you were up to your eyeballs in debt, or wanted a chance at fortune or fame, you could break in at the top, by going to gladiator school. And four different Roman gladiator academies rose above the nearly 100 others, to become the best of the best. At these schools, you'd learn specific fighting...

Faith & Philosophy

 Yeshiva University Team Discovers the Arch of Titus Menorah's Original Golden Color

· 06/25/2012 4:50:54 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 9 replies ·
· Yeshiva University ·
· June 22, 2012. ·

From June 5 to 7, 2012 an international team of scholars led by the Yeshiva University Center for Israel Studies in partnership with the Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma undertook a pilot study of the Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum, the ancient civic center of Rome, Italy. The focus of attention was the Menorah panel and the relief showing the deification of Titus at the apex of the arch. The arch was originally dedicated after the Emperor Titus' death in 81 CE and celebrates his victory in the Jewish War of 66-74 CE, which climaxed...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 DNA clues to Queen of Sheba tale

· 06/23/2012 9:34:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 17 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 21 June 2012 ·
· Helen Briggs ·

Clues to the origins of the Queen of Sheba legend are written in the DNA of some Africans, according to scientists.Genetic research suggests Ethiopians mixed with Egyptian, Israeli or Syrian populations about 3,000 years ago. This is the time the queen, mentioned in great religious works, is said to have ruled the kingdom of Sheba. The research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, also sheds light on human migration out of Africa 60,000 years ago.According to fossil evidence, human history goes back longer in Ethiopia than anywhere else in the world. But little has been known until now...

Egypt

 Egyptian Islamists Target Bikinis, Pyramids

· 09/02/2011 8:57:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bayouranger ·
· 35 replies ·
· investigativeproject.org ·
· Sept 01, 2011 ·
· IPT news ·

With the Egyptian economy already worsening since the revolution began in January, Muslim Brotherhood operatives are demanding stricter regulations on behavior and dress that could damage the country's tourism industry. The Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), which functions as the Brotherhood's political wing, wants to ban alcohol consumption on Egyptian streets and ban bikinis on the beach. "Beach tourism must take the values and norms of our societies into account," FJP Secretary-General Muhammad Saad al-Katatny told Egyptian tourism officials Monday. "We must place regulations on tourists wishing to visit Egypt, which we will announce in advance." For their part, Egyptian...

Religion of Pieces

 Iraq cuts US archaeology cooperation over Jewish archives

· 06/27/2012 3:46:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· Middle East Online ·
· Tuesday, June 26, 2012 ·
· Mohamad Ali Harissi ·

Iraq has cut cooperation with the United States on archaeological exploration because Washington has not returned Iraq's Jewish archives, Tourism and Archaeology Minister Liwaa Smaisim has said. The fate of the archives, which were removed from Iraq following the 2003 US-led invasion, is a long-running point of contention between Washington and Baghdad, which has for years sought their return. Smaisim, a member of powerful anti-US Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's movement, said in an interview with AFP that Iraq will use "all the means" to pursue the return of the archives. "One of the means of pressure that I used against...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 UNESCO designates Church of the Nativity as endangered site (bad news)

· 06/30/2012 12:43:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Olog-hai ·
· 7 replies ·
· AP via Christian Science Monitor ·
· June 29, 2012 ·
· Dalia Nammari & Karin Laub, AP ·

The Palestinians on Friday persuaded the U.N. cultural agency to list the Church of the Nativity -- the place where Christians believe Jesus was born -- as an endangered World Heritage site despite misgivings by churches in charge of the basilica.The Palestinians hailed the nod by UNESCO as a step forward in their quest for global recognition of an independent Palestine in the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem, captured by Israel in 1967. The centuries-old basilica is located in a part of the Israeli-occupied West Bank where the Palestinians have self-rule. UNESCO's decision was seen by them as validation of their rights to...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Syria's stonehenge': Mysterious ruins in desert could be 10,000 years old

· 06/25/2012 12:56:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Fractal Trader ·
· 30 replies ·
· Daily Mail Online ·
· 25 June 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

A mysterious ancient building in Syria, described as a 'landscape for the dead' could be as old as 10,000 years ago - far older than the Great Pyramid. But scientists have been unable to explore the ruins, unearthed in 2009, because of the conflict in the region. The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines, circles, and tombs in a near-lifeless area of desert. The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines,...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 ScienceCasts: The Surprising Power of a Solar Storm

· 06/29/2012 3:14:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by tired&retired ·
· 8 replies ·
· NASA Science ·
· March 22, 2012 ·
· NASA Science ·

A flurry of solar activity in early March dumped enough heat in Earth's upper atmosphere to power every residence in New York City for two years. The heat has since dissipated, but there's more to come as the solar cycle intensifies. At 2:16 minutes into the video it very clearly says that the CO2 is one of the most efficient coolants in the atmosphere and that it reflected 95% of the radiation back into outer space. This entire series of videos is excellent.

Climate

 The Intriguing Problem Of The Younger Dryas -- What Does It Mean And What Caused It?

· 06/21/2012 10:11:38 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 40 replies ·
· watts Up With That? ·
· June 19, 2012 ·
· Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook ·

This is a follow up posting to Younger Dryas --The Rest of the Story!Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University.The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid cooling in the late Pleistocene 12,800 to 11,500 calendar years ago. It followed closely on the heels of a dramatically abrupt warming that brought the last Ice Age to a close (17,500 calendar years ago), lasted for about 1,300 years, then ended as abruptly as it started. The cause of these remarkably sudden climate changes has puzzled geologists and climatologists for decades and despite much effort to find...

Epigraphy & Language

 Creative Individuals Travelled to the South Swedish Inland 9,000 Years Ago

· 06/26/2012 8:11:51 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Monday, June 25, 2012 ·
· U of Gothenburg, via AlphaGalileo ·

Despite its good ecologic status, there were no permanent settlements in the south Swedish inland 9,000 years ago. Yet the area was visited by people who wanted to express their individuality and creativity and thereby gain status... Carl Persson's doctoral thesis in Archaeology is based on archaeological material discovered in connection with the construction of the E4 highway by Markaryd, Sweden. The finds consisted of a few very small pieces of flint that had been left behind in connection with visits to what used to be a small island in the outlet of a long-gone lake. The wear marks on...

Prehistory & Origins

 La Draga Neolithic site in Banyoles yields the oldest Neolithic bow discovered in Europe

· 06/29/2012 2:01:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 17 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· June 29, 2012 ·
· Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona ·

Archaeological research carried out at the Neolithic site of La Draga, near the lake of Banyoles, has yielded the discovery of an item which is unique in the western Mediterranean and Europe. The item is a bow which appeared in a context dating from the period between 5400-5200 BCE, corresponding to the earliest period of settlement. It is a unique item given that it is the first bow to be found in tact at the site. According to its date, it can be considered chronologically the most ancient bow of the Neolithic period found in Europe. The study will permit...


 Complex Thinking Behind the Bow and Arrow

· 06/26/2012 8:18:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 32 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Monday, June 25, 2012 ·
· Universitaet Tubingen, via AlphaGalileo ·

Using archaeological finds and ethnological parallels, the two researchers reconstructed the steps needed to make a bow and arrows. These are complimentary tools -- separate, but developed interdependently. The bow is the controlling element, while the arrows can be used more flexibly and are interchangeable. About 2.5 million years ago, humans first used tools to make other tools then to make tools assembled from different parts to make a unit with particular qualities, such as wooden spears with stone spearheads (ca. 200,000-300,000 years ago.) The bow and arrow and other complementary tool sets made it possible for prehistoric humans to...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Oldest Pearl in Human History Found in UAE -- From a Grave

· 06/28/2012 4:30:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 10 replies ·
· Emirates 24/7 ·
· Thursday, June 28, 2012 ·

Researchers have discovered the world's oldest natural pearl in Umm Al Quwain, UAE, which is believed to be originated between 5547 and 5235 BC, Discovery News said in a report. The report said that the pearl was discovered not from the sea but grave. Researchers said that findings at local necropolis revealed that pearls were often placed on the deceased's face, often above the upper lip. The research was carried out by French researchers. The discovery suggests that pearl oyster fishing first started in Gulf Arab peninsula not in Japan - as previously believed by researchers. In 5,000 BC, half-drilled...

PreColumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis

 Ancient Text Confirms Mayan Calendar End Date

· 06/28/2012 4:34:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Perdogg ·
· 25 replies ·
· yahoo ·

A newly discovered Mayan text reveals the "end date" for the Mayan calendar, becoming only the second known document to do so. But unlike some modern people, ancient Maya did not expect the world to end on that date, researchers said. "This text talks about ancient political history rather than prophecy," Marcello Canuto, the director of Tulane University Middle America Research Institute, said in a statement. "This new evidence suggests that the 13 bak'tun date was an important calendrical event that would have been celebrated by the ancient Maya; however, they make no apocalyptic prophecies whatsoever regarding the date."


 Maya archaeologists unearth new 2012 monument

· 06/29/2012 7:28:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 13 replies ·
· PHYS.ORG ·
· JUNE 28, 2012 ·
· Tulane University ·

Archaeologists working at the site of La Corona in Guatemala have discovered a 1,300 year-old year-old Maya text that provides only the second known reference to the so-called "end date" for the Maya calendar on December 21, 2012. The discovery, one of the most significant hieroglyphic find in decades, was announced today at the National Palace in Guatemala. "This text talks about ancient political history rather than prophecy," says Marcello A. Canuto, Director of Tulane's Middle American Research Institute and co-director of the excavations at the Maya ruins of La Corona. "This new evidence suggests that the 13 Bak'tun date...

China

 Pottery 20,000 years old found in a Chinese cave

· 06/28/2012 4:37:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Dysart ·
· 17 replies ·
· Newsvine.com ·
· 6-27-12 ·

Pottery fragments found in a south China cave have been confirmed to be 20,000 years old, making them the oldest known pottery in the world, archaeologists say. The findings, which will appear in the journal Science on Friday, add to recent efforts that have dated pottery piles in east Asia to more than 15,000 years ago, refuting conventional theories that the invention of pottery correlates to the period about 10,000 years ago when humans moved from being hunter-gathers to farmers. The research by a team of Chinese and American scientists also pushes the emergence of pottery back to the last...

end of digest #415 20120630


1,426 posted on 06/30/2012 12:13:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1424 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #415 · v 8 · n 49
Saturday, June 30, 2012
 
29 topics
2901105 to 2898806
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
I do apologize -- I've been falling asleep at the keyboard, and managed to get mixed up a little and sent the actual Digest, instead of just this pointer message, to the entire list. Ouch! Mea GULPa.

Digest #415, 22 topics, the 4th of July's falling on Wednesday seems like a good reason to take a week off, and if I had to guess, it would be that there will be rain all week. ;') It may be so macabre, I wind up finishing my novel, "The Fall of the Spouse of Usher". Hey, just because it isn't funny now doesn't mean that the rapper by that name won't eventually kill his wife.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Here's a topic (the top one) that TXnMA pinged me to after I'd finished (but not yet posted) the Digest for this week, along with the rest of the Timbuktu keyword. Thanks TXnMA. Remember in November.
  • "If your feelings are hurt because of something you've read on the Internet, it may interest you to know that the reason is, your feelings have $#!+ for brains." -- SunkenCiv
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,427 posted on 06/30/2012 12:26:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1426 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

WOW..maybe I didn’t notice before..but I love this format!! THank you, thank you!


1,428 posted on 06/30/2012 1:29:27 PM PDT by SueRae (See it? Hell, I can TASTE November from my house!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1426 | View Replies]


This week's *38* topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #416
Saturday, July 7, 2012

The Revolution

 July 2, 1776 - Birth of the American Republic Begins:
  New York Abstains, John Dickenson is Absent


· 07/02/2012 6:26:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by maggiesnotebook ·
· 15 replies ·
· Maggie's Notebook ·
· July 2, 1776 ·
· Maggie@MaggiesNotebook ·

On the night of July 1, 1776, after a steamy heat-and-storm-laden day, the Continental Congress took a break from debating declaring independence from Britain. Nine colonies, a majority, voted for independence, but there was a desperate need for a unanimous vote. That night, came the dreadful news of 100 British warships off the shores of New York City. The final vote came the next day, on July 2nd. New York abstained (and we thank them). John Dickinson of the divided Philadelphia delegation was absent. We thank him too. This has been my traditional Independence Day post for several years now. Taken...


 Fleming: What Life Was Like in 1776

· 07/04/2012 5:11:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 33 replies ·
· WSJ ·
· 7-4-12 ·
· Thomas Fleming ·

Almost every American knows the traditional story of July Fourth -- the soaring idealism of the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress's grim pledge to defy the world's most powerful nation with their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But what else about revolutionary America might help us feel closer to those founders in their tricornered hats, fancy waistcoats and tight knee-breeches? Those Americans, it turns out, had the highest per capita income in the civilized world of their time. They also paid the lowest taxes -- and they were determined to keep it that way. By 1776, the 13 American colonies had...

The General

 The Wisdom of Washington

· 07/01/2012 7:33:34 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 23 replies ·
· NY Post ·
· June 30, 2012 ·
· Maureen Callahan ·

His annotated Constitution was worth $9.8 million at auction -- but was priceless to a nation When George Washington's personal, annotated copy of the Constitution sold last week for $9.8 million at auction in New York, it didn't just set a record. It allowed us to see, for the first time, how cautiously our first president assumed the office, his eyes not toward history but the future. "This shows that he let the presidency define him, rather than for him to define the presidency," says Edward Lengel, military historian and author of two books on Washington. "He was a man...

Facts in the Ground

 Archaeology uncovers truths

· 07/09/2012 4:10:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 6 replies ·
· Cleveland Jewish News ·
· July 9, 2012 ·
· Cliff Savren ·

The Arab line following the creation of the state of Israel was that Israel was a colonialist foreign entity plopped down in the Arab Middle East. Nothing exposes the fallacy of such an argument as powerfully as archaeological finds that literally lay bare the Jewish presence here from ancient times. It must have been thrilling for the early Zionists who made their way to Israel in the late 19th century and early 20th to see newly uncovered archaeological finds attesting to Jewish life here 1,500 to 2,000 years earlier. One of my favorite spots is the ancient mosaic synagogue floor...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Mosaic in Israel Shows Biblical Samson

· 07/05/2012 4:40:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 7 replies ·
· CNN ·
· 7/4/12 ·
· Joe Sterling ·

(CNN) -- Archaeologists are reveling in the discovery of an ancient synagogue in northern Israel, a "monumental" structure with a mosaic floor depicting the biblical figure of Samson and a Hebrew inscription. The synagogue -- dating to the fourth and fifth centuries in both the Talmudic and late Roman periods -- is in Huqoq, an ancient Jewish village in the country's Galilee region, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said. Jodi Magness, a professor of early Judaism in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said the building was found in a recent excavation. She...

Exegesis

 Was Ezekiel an epileptic?

· 11/18/2001 6:31:29 PM PST ·
· Posted by Phil V. ·
· 18 replies ·
· 182+ views ·
· The Jerusalem Post ·
· November, 19 2001 ·
· By Judy Siegel ·

Ezekiel's visions may have resulted as much from disease as from divine inspiration, according to a California neuroscientist, who believes the prophet suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy. Dr. Eric Altschuler, of the University of California at San Diego, presented his theory about Ezekiel and epilepsy before last week's meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego and reported in the latest issue of New Scientist. Altschuler said a careful reading of the Book of Ezekiel shows he had "all the classic signs of the ...

Faith & Philosophy

 England's Saints Have Been Written Out of History

· 06/23/2011 11:51:56 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 39 replies ·
· Catholic Herald (UK) ·
· 6/23/11 ·
· Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith ·

Our isle was once a land of saints, but now there is a trend to consign all religious people to the dustbin of historyToday, under the old dispensation, which may yet return, would have been Corpus Christi, and at least in the Cathedral town of Arundel, it still is, and thousands of people will be rushing down to West Sussex to see the magnificent carpet of flowers and to take part in the solemn Mass and procession at 5.30pm. I, sadly, cannot be with them, and for those in that position, I offer some consolation in a reflection of today's...

Farty Shades of Green

 Saint Patrick [Apostle Of Ireland]

· 03/17/2002 3:36:13 PM PST ·
· Posted by Lady In Blue ·
· 39 replies ·
· 2,398+ views ·
· Catholic Encyclopedia ·
· 00/00/1911 ·
· Patrick Francis CARDINAL Moran ·

A Litany of Saints By Ann Ball. Includes a history of the Litany of the Saints, with profiles of the individual saints mentioned in the litany. More... Visit Catholic Freebies to get free...

No, No, Rudolph, the *Schmidt* House!

 How St. Nicholas Became Santa Claus: One Theory

· 12/20/2005 7:20:30 PM PST ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 36 replies ·
· 863+ views ·
· Zenit News Agency ·
· December 20, 2005 ·

Jeremy Seal on an Epic History BATH, England, DEC. 20, 2005 (Zenit.org).- The modern persona of Santa Claus is a far cry from its origins: St. Nicholas, bishop of Myra. So how did he go from a charitable saint to an icon of Christmas consumerism? Travel writer Jeremy Seal embarked on an international search to answer that question and recorded his findings in "Nicholas: The Epic Journey from Saint to Santa Claus" (Bloomsbury". Seal told ZENIT what he discovered tracking the cult of Santa Claus across the globe and why he thinks St. Nicholas and his charism of charity still...

Religion of Pieces

 Mali: Islamists destroy Timbuktu heritage sites

· 06/30/2012 10:02:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 25 replies ·
· Associated Press ·
· June 30, 2012 ·
· BABA AHMED ·

BAMAKO, Mali (AP) -- Islamist fighters with ties to al-Qaida have destroyed tombs classified as a UNESCO World Heritage site in Mali's historic city of Timbuktu, a resident and U.N. officials said Saturday. Irina Bokova, who heads the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, cited in a statement Saturday reports the centuries-old Muslim mausoleums of Sidi Mahmoud, Sidi, Moctar and Alpha Moya have been destroyed.


 Islamist rebels destroy UNESCO World Heritage sites in historic Mali city of Timbuktu

· 06/30/2012 11:27:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ColdOne ·
· 17 replies ·
· WaPo ·
· 6/30/12 ·
· ap ·

BAMAKO, Mali -- Islamist fighters with ties to al-Qaida have destroyed tombs classified as a UNESCO World Heritage site in Mali's historic city of Timbuktu, a resident and U.N. officials said Saturday. Irina Bokova, who heads the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, cited in a statement Saturday reports the centuries-old Muslim mausoleums of Sidi Mahmoud, Sidi, Moctar and Alpha Moya have been destroyed.

The Vikings

 Legendary Viking town unearthed

· 07/03/2012 7:16:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Engraved-on-His-hands ·
· 38 replies ·
· ScienceNordic ·
· July 2, 2012 ·
· Niels Ebdrup ·

Danish archaeologists believe they have found the remains of the fabled Viking town Sliasthorp by the Schlei bay in northern Germany, near the Danish border. According to texts from the 8th century, the town served as the centre of power for the first Scandinavian kings. But historians have doubted whether Sliasthorp even existed. This doubt is now starting to falter, as archaeologists from Aarhus University are making one amazing discovery after the other in the German soil. "This is huge. Wherever we dig, we find houses -- we reckon there are around 200 of them," says Andres Dobat, a lecturer...

Age of Sail

 500-year-old global map found in Munich (with continent named America)

· 07/04/2012 6:59:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 16 replies ·
· dw ·
· July 3, 2012 ·

History 500-year-old global map found in Munich Munich librarians have found a rare 16th century world map that first gave America its name as a continent. The version by German cartographer Martin Waldseem¸ller survived World War II sandwiched between geometry books. The Munich version is smaller than the 500-year-old global map found in a German monastery in 1901 and handed over by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2007 to the US Library of Congress. Only four smaller versions were previously known to have survived. The word "America" on the larger Library of Congress map Waldseem¸ller (1470-1522) was...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Sky 'Crucifix' in Ancient Text May Be Mystery-Solving Supernova

· 07/01/2012 9:22:00 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 28 replies ·
· Livescience ·
· Friday, June 29, 2012 ·
· Life's Little Mysteries Staff ·

According to an Old English manuscript chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons, a mysterious "red crucifix" appeared in the "heavens" over Britain one evening in A.D. 774. Now astronomers say it may have been the supernova explosion that sprinkled unexplained traces of carbon-14 in tree rings that year, halfway around the world in Japan. Jonathon Allen, an undergraduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz, made the connection this week after listening to a Nature podcast. He heard a team of Japanese scientists discussing new research in which they measured an odd spike in carbon-14 levels in tree rings...

The Phoenicians

 Archaeological report: Razed ruins not Phoenician port

· 07/03/2012 6:26:00 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Daily Star ·
· June 29, 2012 ·
· Justin Salhani ·

Beirut's Minet al-Hosn construction site does not contain the remains of a Phoenician port as maintained by the Directorate General of Antiquities and the former Culture Minister, according to an archaeological report obtained by The Daily Star. The Archaeological Assessment Report on the Venus Towers Site states: "While the site ... is intriguing, it does not fit the known parameters for a port, shipyard, or shipshed facility." The report, written by Dr. Ralph Pederson of Marburg University following an extensive investigation, maintains that there is nothing to connect the site to ships or shipbuilding. "The trenches could not have functioned...

Terracotta in China

 More terracotta warriors unearthed in China

· 06/30/2012 9:41:10 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 31 replies ·
· .upi. ·

Over 8,000 unearthed terracotta warriors stand in formation in a massive underground tomb (Pit 1) built for Emperor Qinshihuang's protection in his afterlife just 100 miles north-west of Xi'an, one of the oldest cities in China and the capital of Shaanxi Province on June 28, 2012. The Museum of the Terracotta Army has been listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Australia & the Pacific

 Polynesian paddle fetches nearly $340,000

· 04/17/2010 5:10:34 PM PDT ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 18 replies ·
· 669+ views ·
· upi ·
· April 17, 2010 ·

ISLE OF WIGHT, England - A 100-year-old wooden paddle used in Polynesian dance ceremonies before becoming a household ornament fetched nearly $340,000 at a British auction. Bidders in London and Brussels quickly upped the price on the paddle after bidding started at just $4,629, The Times of London reported. The ceremonial paddle, known as a rapa, originated on Easter Island in the southeastern Pacific, where performers used the paddles to accentuate movements in dances and ceremonies. Tim Smith of Isle of Wight auctioneers Island Auction Rooms in Shanklin set a guide price of $15,341. "When the money started going up,...

PreColumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis

 Calls made to repatriate Beothuk remains

· 06/30/2012 6:02:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 27 replies ·
· Yahoo Canada ·
· Saturday, June 23, 2012 ·
· CBC ·

Aboriginal groups want bones of the extinct Beothuk people to be removed from museum vaults and brought back to Newfoundland. A woman named Shanawdithit was the last known member of her people, with her 1829 death in St. John's marking the end of the Beothuk. Disease, persecution and the Beothuk's decision to withdraw from coastal communities have been cited as causes of wiping out the Beothuk. The location of Shanawdithit's grave is not known, but the skulls of her aunt and uncle -- a chief -- languish in a museum in Edinburgh, Scotland. The remains of at least 22 Beothuk...

Ancient Autopsies

 "Frankenstein" Bog Mummies Discovered in Scotland

· 07/08/2012 5:46:50 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 27 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· 6-6-2012 ·
· Rachel Kaufman ·

In a "eureka" moment worthy of Dr. Frankenstein, scientists have discovered that two 3,000-year-old Scottish "bog bodies" are actually made from the remains of six people. According to new isotopic dating and DNA experiments, the mummies -- a male and a female -- were assembled from various body parts, although the purpose of the gruesome composites is likely lost to history. The mummies were discovered more than a decade ago below the remnants of 11th-century houses at Cladh Hallan, a prehistoric village on the island of South Uist (map), off the coast of Scotland. The bodies had been buried in the fetal position 300...

British Isles

 Farming in Dark Age Britain

· 07/06/2012 4:50:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 26 replies ·
· Suite 101 ·
· 3-18-2011 ·
· Brenda Lewis ·

In the Dark Ages, the early Anglo-Saxon settlers in Britain led a hard life farming the land, in total contrast to their Romano-British predecessors. When the Romans invaded Britain in 43AD, they found a land of thick forests, heath and swampland. There were no towns, no roads - or nothing that a Roman would have recognized as proper roads - and no bridges. After the Romans However, by the time the Romans abandoned Britain four centuries later, they had turned it into a quite different place. The Anglo-Saxon settlers who began to arrive in large numbers in around 450AD found...

Diet & Cuisine

 Mystical marks in virgin forest explained

· 07/04/2012 6:07:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 48 replies ·
· Science Nordic (?!?) ·
· June 27, 2012 ·
· Nina Kristiansen ·

During a recent mapping of the rare virgin forest in and around the ÿvre Dividalen National Park in Troms, Norway, scientists noticed some scars reappearing on the trees. Many trees had some of their bark cut away on one side, leaving marks that were hard to explain. Arve Elvebakk of the University of Troms (UiT) headed the study. He worked together with Andreas Kirchhefer, an expert in dating old trees by tree-ring analysis. He had already used ancient pines to chart weather and climate conditions. Could the cuts in the bark have been left by settlers who started farms in...

Zymurgy

 Whisky windfall: Man finds rare 100-year-old bottles hidden in the attic

· 07/06/2012 5:38:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by yorkie ·
· 76 replies ·
· NY Daily News ·
· July 6, 2012 ·
· Meghan Neal ·

When a Missouri man decided to install central air-conditioning and central heat in the attic of his historic house, he found much more than he bargained for. Bryan Fite, of St. Joseph, Mo., discovered 13 bottles of century-old whisky under the floorboards in the attic of his 1850s house. He didn't recognize his good fortune right away, thinking the bottles were tubes or oddly shaped installation pipes. But Fite soon discovered he was sitting on a goldmine of antique whisky - the bottles are likely worth several hundred dollars each, and possibly more.

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 World's Oldest Purse Found -- Studded With a Hundred Dog Teeth?

· 06/30/2012 6:07:51 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 35 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· Wednesday, June 27, 2012 ·
· Andrew Curry ·

The world's oldest purse may have been found in Germany -- and its owner apparently had a sharp sense of Stone Age style. Excavators at a site near Leipzig (map) uncovered more than a hundred dog teeth arranged close together in a grave dated to between 2,500 and 2,200 B.C. According to archaeologist Susanne Friederich, the teeth were likely decorations for the outer flap of a handbag... The dog teeth were found during excavations of the 250-acre (100-hectare) Profen (map) site, which is slated to become an open-pit coal mine in 2015. So far the project has uncovered evidence of...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 CSIC recovers part of the genome of 2 hunter-gatherer individuals from 7,000 years ago

· 06/30/2012 5:31:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 17 replies ·
· Eurekalert ·
· Thursday, June 28, 2012 ·
· Spanish National Research Council ·

A team of scientists, led by researcher Carles Lalueza-Fox from CSIC (Spanish National Research Council), has recovered -- for the first time in history -- part of the genome of two individuals living in the Mesolithic Period, 7000 years ago. Remains have been found at La BraÃ’a-Arintero site, located at Valdelugueros (León), Spain. The study results, published in the Current Biology magazine, indicate that current Iberian populations don't come from these groups genetically. The Mesolithic Period, framed between the Paleolithic and Neolithic Periods, is characterized by the advent of agriculture, coming from the Middle East. Therefore, the genome found is...

Climate

 'Britain's Atlantis' found at bottom of North sea
  -- a huge undersea world swallowed by the sea...


· 07/06/2012 10:07:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 33 replies ·
· Daily Mail (UK) ·
· Monday, July 2, 2012 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

Doggerland, a huge area of dry land that stretched from Scotland to Denmark was slowly submerged by water between 18,000 BC and 5,500 BC. Divers from oil companies have found remains of a 'drowned world' with a population of tens of thousands -- which might once have been the 'real heartland' of Europe. A team of climatologists, archaeologists and geophysicists has now mapped the area using new data from oil companies -- and revealed the full extent of a 'lost land' once roamed by mammoths... The research suggests that the populations of these drowned lands could have been tens of...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Caravaggio Discovery: to Find 100 New Works Is Simply Astonishing

· 07/05/2012 6:41:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 13 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 05 Jul 2012 ·
· Mark Hudson ·

Telegraph critic Mark Hudson wonders at the possible discovery of 100 Caravaggio works in Italy and says if confirmed it could throw fresh light on the artist's reputationThe prospect of a hundred newly discovered works by any great artist of the past is little short of astonishing. The entire oeuvres of several of great figures -- Vermeer and Giorgione for example -- barely gets into double figures. When you think that 200 works is a pretty respectable total for the average, world-changing old master, then the prospect of an extra hundred constitutes a massive increase, that is likely to significantly...

Finiculi, Finicula

 Tuscan village on sale on Ebay for 2.5 million euros

· 07/05/2012 3:34:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· Medievalists.net ·
· June 28, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

A medieval village, set in the Tuscan hills of Italy among castles and monasteries, can be yours for €2.5 million. Pratariccia, which is situated about 25 miles east of Florence, has now been put on sale through ebay, the popular online shopping website. The village consists of 25 homes and eight hectares of land. The village has been abandoned for over fifty years, so many of the buildings are in a ruined state and electricity lines would need to be established. Also, no roads exist that lead to the village. Local estate agent Carlo Magni said in an interview, "It's...

Paleontology

 "Beautiful" Squirrel-Tail Dinosaur Fossil Upends Feather Theory

· 07/03/2012 4:40:01 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 63 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· 7-2-2012 ·
· Christine Dell'Amore ·

A newfound squirrel-tailed specimen is the oldest known meat-eating dinosaur with feathers, according to a new study. The late-Jurassic discovery, study authors say, strikes down the image of dinosaurs as "overgrown lizards." Unearthed recently from a Bavarian limestone quarry, the "exquisitely preserved" 150-million-year-old fossil has been dubbed Sciurumimus albersdoerferi -- "Scirius" being the scientific name for tree squirrels. Sciurumimus was likely a young megalosaur, a group of large, two-legged meat-eating dinosaurs. The hatchling had a large skull, short hind limbs, and long, hairlike plumage on its midsection, back, and tail...

Dinosaurs

 Dinosaurs were Warm-blooded Reptiles

· 07/02/2012 5:46:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 22 replies ·
· Scientific Computing ·
· 6/29/12 ·

Reconstruction of a dinosaur from the Catalan pre-Pyrenees, about 70 milion years ago. Courtesy of "scar Sanisidro. A study of extant mammals refutes the hypothesis that dinosaurs were ectotherms. The work was carried out by researchers from ICP and UAB. It has been published in Nature. The study analyzed the lines of arrested growth (LAG) in the bones of around a hundred ruminants, representative of the specific and ecological diversity of that group of mammals. The results show that the presence of these lines is not an indicator of ectothermic physiology (does not generate internal heat), as had previously been...

The Civil War

 Incredible 3D Stereoscopic Civil War Photos

· 07/07/2012 1:11:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 29 replies ·
· Wild Ammo ·
· Eric S ·

Incredible 3D Stereoscopic Civil War Photos Stereoscopic images basically involve taking 2 or more static images, from slightly different angles, to create a 3D effect that tricks the eye into noticing the depth of field, angles and perspective of the image. Thus, it's possible to take a flat image and create 3D depth to it. When applied to older photographs, it's an amazing technique, because it brings life to history. Take for example, these Civil War photographs that use a stereoscopic effect!

World War Eleven

 In South Pacific, search is on for Amelia Earhart's plane

· 07/04/2012 11:17:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Rabin ·
· 10 replies ·
· Stars & Stripes ·
· July 4, 2012 ·
· Laura J. Nelson ·

"I have a feeling that there is just about one more good flight left in my system, and I hope this trip is it," Earhart said before she left. Now, a group of historians, salvage workers and scientists think they know

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Churchill, puffing on cigar and wearing dashing aviator glasses
  while being tailed by the Luftwaffe


· 07/08/2012 6:16:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Dysart ·
· 43 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 7-8-12 ·
· Chris Parsons ·

Flight Officer Ron Buck kept back his own pictures from the trip that was later described as the 'Most Daring Flight of the Whole War.' Churchill had crossed the Atlantic by ship in order to lobby President Roosevelt, but rashly decided to fly home from Bermuda. With some of his most senior colleagues, the Prime Minister embarked on what was to become a perilous 18 hours flight.

Longer Perspectives

 What John Roberts really did for us

· 06/30/2012 11:52:15 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Starman417 ·
· 105 replies ·
· Flopping Aces ·
· 06-30-12 ·
· DrJohn ·

Pyrrhus was king of the Hellenistic kingdom of Epirus whose costly military successes against Macedonia and Rome gave rise to the phrase' Pyrrhic victory'. In 281 BC Tarentum, a Greek colony in southern Italy, asked his assisstance against Rome. Pyrrhus crossed to Italy with 25,000 men and 20 elephants. He won a complete, but costly, victory over a Roman army at Heraclea. In 279 Pyrrhus, again suffering heavy casualties, defeated the Romans at Asculum. His remark 'Another such victory and I shall be ruined' gave name to the term 'Pyrrhic victory' for a victory obtained at to great a...

The Roman Empire

 Superficial similarities between presidents and Roman leaders
  -- kinda cool, ultimately meaningless


· 03/13/2009 12:53:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Jubal Harshaw ·
· 5 replies ·
· 559+ views ·
· class="attrib">having too much time on my hands ·
· now ·
· me ·

I was just going over a list of Roman leaders, and was struck by similarities to our own leadership over the recent decades. I started with Nixon, and this is what I have: Caesar had a history that was superficially like Nixon's: Julius Caesar came to leadership during the Roman "social wars," a time of, well, social warring and unrest. Granted, the nominal issues during the Roman social wars were different than the issues raised during the American internal unrest of the late 1960s and early 1970s, but the widespread civil violence was a point of similarity. Both Caesar and...

Epigraphy & Language

 Metal Detector Hobbyists Find Rare Heap Of Celtic Coins

· 07/01/2012 4:57:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 25 replies ·
· NPR ·
· 6/30/2012 ·

June 30, 2012 For more than 30 years, Richard Miles and Reg Mead scoured the fields of their native Jersey with metal detectors, hoping to one day come across an ancient coin or two. Earlier this week, the detector beeped and they found the world's largest-ever stash of Celtic coins. Host Scott Simon speaks with Reg Mead about their find. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Reg Mead and Richard Miles began to scour a field on their home island of Jersey...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Buried "treasure" in Southeastern Pennsylvania Freeper help needed

· 07/01/2012 6:03:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by OL Hickory ·
· 19 replies ·
· treasureNet ·
· June-2012 ·
· SEPaMAN ·

Family tradition has it that my grandfather buried numerous hoards throughout the township, however we have only one set of clues. Whenever I searched for the hoard I usually swept the area with a metal detector in case any other treasures happened to be near. My father, who I believe was in the know, said that the location of the hoard was a clue to finding other buried caches - one of them in a barrow containing my grandfather!

Common Criminals

 Former church caretaker arrested for the Codex Calixtinus theft -- manuscript recovered

· 07/05/2012 2:58:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 2 replies ·
· Medievalists.net ·
· Wednesday, July 4, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

A former caretaker of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, along with his wife, son, and another women, have been arrested by Spanish police in connection with the theft of the Codex Calixtinus, an important 12th-century manuscript. The manuscript has not yet been recovered, but police believe that they will soon find it. The Director General of Police, Ignacio Cosido, said in an interview, "I think we're in the right direction to solve the case. The investigation is ongoing, but the main objective is to find the Codex." The police have also recovered ?1.2m in cash, eight other copies of...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 U.S. Government: No Evidence of Aquatic Humanoids (i.e., "Mermaids") Has Ever Been Found.

· 07/03/2012 8:51:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 38 replies ·
· NOAA ·
· July 2012 ·
· NOAA ·

No evidence of aquatic humanoids has ever been found. Mermaids -- those half-human, half-fish sirens of the sea -- are legendary sea creatures chronicled in maritime cultures since time immemorial. The ancient Greek epic poet Homer wrote of them in The Odyssey. In the ancient Far East, mermaids were the wives of powerful sea-dragons, and served as trusted messengers between their spouses and the emperors on land. The aboriginal people of Australia call mermaids yawkyawks -- a name that may refer to their mesmerizing songs. The belief in mermaids may have arisen at the very dawn of our species. Magical...

end of digest #416 20120707


1,429 posted on 07/09/2012 5:35:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SueRae

My pleasure, glad you like it!


1,430 posted on 07/09/2012 5:36:26 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #416 · v 8 · n 52
Saturday, July 7, 2012
 
38 topics
2904653 to 2901356
815 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Well, sure, this is two days late, and the *38* topics are somewhat poached from next week's issue, but hey -- this Digest is the final one of the *eighth* volume, which is a big deal, because I've been doing this more than eight years. Maybe I'll do the dishes to celebrate. By way of full disclosure, I must point out that the issue count is now corrected to #52, last week's said #49 which was incorrect by two. I'm not sure when that error crept in.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
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1,431 posted on 07/09/2012 5:40:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #417
Saturday, July 14, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Solar System Ice: Source of Earth's Water

· 07/14/2012 6:12:51 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· Carnegie Institution ·
· Thursday, July 12, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Scientists have long believed that comets and, or a type of very primitive meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites were the sources of early Earth's volatile elements -- which include hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon -- and possibly organic material, too. Understanding where these volatiles came from is crucial for determining the origins of both water and life on the planet. New research led by Carnegie's Conel Alexander focuses on frozen water that was distributed throughout much of the early Solar System, but probably not in the materials that aggregated to initially form Earth... It has been suggested that both comets and carbonaceous...

Climate

 Climate was HOTTER in Roman, medieval times than now: Study

· 07/10/2012 2:53:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 25 replies ·
· The Register ·
· 10th July 2012 11:44 GMT ·
· Lewis Page ·

Americans sweltering in the recent record-breaking heatwave may not believe it - but it seems that our ancestors suffered through much hotter summers in times gone by, several of them within the last 2,000 years. Phew, what a scorcher, Marcus. Let's get in the frigidarium A new study measuring temperatures over the past two millennia has concluded that in fact the temperatures seen in the last decade are far from being the hottest in history. A large team of scientists making a comprehensive study of data from tree rings say that in fact global temperatures have been on a...

The Roman Empire

 An Army Sacrificed in a Bog [ Alken, Denmark, 2K ago ]

· 07/11/2012 4:45:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Past Horizons Archaeology ·
· July 2012 ·
· Aarhus University ·

The unique discovery at the east end of Lake Mossø of a slaughtered army dating to around two thousand years ago, was revealed by Danish archaeologists in 2009. They had found skeletal material from up to 200 warriors, who may have all come from the same battle. Cuts and slashes on the skeletons showed they had died violently but nothing is as yet known about the identity of the killers, or their victims. In February this year it was announced that the Carlsberg Foundation has granted 1.5 million DKK for further research and excavations in Alken Wetlands. Archaeologists and other...

Age of Sail

 De Soto discovery could change history books

· 07/09/2012 7:05:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Engraved-on-His-hands ·
· 38 replies ·
· Ocala [FL] Star Banner ·
· July 8, 2012 ·
· Fred Hiers ·

Hernando De Soto's route through Florida is as elusive to modern archaeologists as the gold the famed Spanish explorer sought throughout the southeastern United States. Ever since De Soto's 600 men set foot on the shores of Tampa Bay, arriving from Cuba almost 500 years ago, historians have debated the exact direction of his failed treasure-hunting expeditions as far north as Tennessee and North Carolina. But in north Marion County, an archaeologist has found what his contemporaries deem rarer than the gold De Soto was seeking -- physical evidence of the explorer's precise journey through Marion County and enough information...

Religion of Pieces

 Islamists destroy 2 more tombs in Mali's Timbuktu

· 07/10/2012 5:20:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by EBH ·
· 7 replies ·
· ap ·
· 7/10/12 ·
· Baba Ahmed ·

Islamic extremists destroyed another two mausoleums in the northern Malian city of Timbuktu on Tuesday, attacking a graveyard attached to the city's most picturesque mosque, according to a historian specializing in the area's heritage. Salem Ould Elhadj, a researcher at the Ahmed Baba Institute in Timbuktu, said the members of the radical sect set out with picks and shovels to raze the tombs of two of Timbuktu's scholars, Baba Babadje and Mahamane Foulane, both of whom are considered saints. Their mausoleums are in a cemetery attached to the nearly 700-year-old Djingareyber mosque, built in 1325. It's made of mud and...

Egypt

 Calls to Destroy Egypt's Great Pyramids Begin

· 07/10/2012 4:42:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 97 replies ·
· FrontPage Magazine ·
· July 10, 2012 ·
· Raymond Ibrahim ·

According to several reports in the Arabic media, prominent Muslim clerics have begun to call for the demolition of Egypt's Great Pyramids -- or, in the words of Saudi Sheikh Ali bin Said al-Rabi'i, those 'symbols of paganism,' which Egypt's Salafi party has long planned to cover with wax. Most recently, Bahrain's 'Sheikh of Sunni Sheikhs' and President of National Unity, Abd al-Latif al-Mahmoud, called on Egypt's new president, Muhammad Morsi, to 'destroy the Pyramids...


 Calls to Destroy Egypt's Great Pyramids Begin

· 07/10/2012 9:22:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 114 replies ·
· AINA/Front Page Magazine ·
· 7-10-2012 ·
· Raymond Ibrahim ·

According to several reports in the Arabic media, prominent Muslim clerics have begun to call for the demolition of Egypt's Great Pyramids--or, in the words of Saudi Sheikh Ali bin Said al-Rabi'i, those "symbols of paganism," which Egypt's Salafi party has long planned to cover with wax. Most recently, Bahrain's "Sheikh of Sunni Sheikhs" and President of National Unity, Abd al-Latif al-Mahmoud, called on Egypt's new president, Muhammad Morsi, to "destroy the Pyramids and accomplish what the Sahabi Amr bin al-As could not." This is a reference to the Muslim Prophet Muhammad's companion, Amr bin al-As and his Arabian tribesmen,...


 Calls to Destroy Egypt's Great Pyramids Begin

· 07/10/2012 2:54:42 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Dallas59 ·
· 50 replies ·
· AINA ·
· 7/10/2012 ·
· AINA ·

According to several reports in the Arabic media, prominent Muslim clerics have begun to call for the demolition of Egypt's Great Pyramids--or, in the words of Saudi Sheikh Ali bin Said al-Rabi'i, those "symbols of paganism," which Egypt's Salafi party has long planned to cover with wax. Most recently, Bahrain's "Sheikh of Sunni Sheikhs" and President of National Unity, Abd al-Latif al-Mahmoud, called on Egypt's new president, Muhammad Morsi, to "destroy the Pyramids and accomplish what the Sahabi Amr bin al-As could not." This is a reference to the Muslim Prophet Muhammad's companion, Amr bin al-As and his Arabian tribesmen,...


 Egypt's Government Planning to Destroy the Great Pyramids?

· 07/10/2012 5:39:49 PM PDT ·
· Posted by dewawi ·
· 51 replies ·
· Christian Post ·
· ·

An online magazine has offered translations to Arabic news sources that purportedly indicate that Egypt's Salafi party has come forth with plans to demolish Egypt's Great Pyramids in an effort to bring down what it calls "symbols of paganism." Bahrain's "Sheikh of Sunni Sheikhs" and President of National Unity, Abd al-Latif al-Mahmoud, has reportedly urged Egypt's new president, Muhammad Morsi, to "destroy the Pyramids and accomplish what Amr bin al-As could not," according to conservative political publication FrontPage Magazine. Al-Mahmoud's comments relate to Amr bin al-As, a companion of the Islam's founder Muhammad, who invaded Egypt in 641 and began...


 Calls to Destroy Egypt's Great Pyramids Begin

· 07/11/2012 5:47:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Paleo Conservative ·
· 79 replies ·
· FrontPageMagazine.com ·
· July 10, 2012 ·
· Raymond Ibrahim ·

According to several reports in the Arabic media, prominent Muslim clerics have begun to call for the demolition of Egypt's Great Pyramids -- or, in the words of Saudi Sheikh Ali bin Said al-Rabi'i, those "symbols of paganism," which Egypt's Salafi party has long planned to cover with wax. Most recently, Bahrain's "Sheikh of Sunni Sheikhs" and President of National Unity, Abd al-Latif al-Mahmoud, called on Egypt's new president, Muhammad Morsi, to "destroy the Pyramids and accomplish what Amr bin al-As could not." Has the sun finally set for Egypt's Great Pyramids? This is a reference to the Muslim Prophet Muhammad's companion,...

The Crusades

 The Crusaders' last stand: Pot of gold worth £300,000 found in fortress

· 07/11/2012 6:56:15 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 20 replies ·
· The Daily Mail ·
· 7-11-12 ·
· Rob Waugh ·

A pot of gold from the Crusades worth up to $500,000 has been found buried in an ancient Roman fortress in Israel. The coins were buried by Christian soldiers of the order of the Knights Hospitalier as the Crusaders faced an unstoppable attack by a huge Muslim army. The knights were annihilated in April 1265. The coins - worth a fortune even in 1265 when they were thought to have been buried - were deliberately hidden inside a broken jug to prevent them being discovered. The fortress was destroyed in April 1265 by forces of Mamluks who overwhelmed the Crusaders...


 Hoard of gold coins found at Israel Crusades site

· 07/11/2012 2:33:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by shove_it ·
· 18 replies ·
· Yahoo/Reuters ·
· 11 Jul 2012 ·

HERZLIYA, Israel (Reuters) - A 1,000-year-old hoard of gold coins has been unearthed at a famous Crusader battleground where Christian and Muslim forces once fought for control of the Holy Land, Israeli archaeologists said on Wednesday. [Related: Ancient road discovered in Greece] The treasure was dug up from the ruins of a castle in Arsuf, a strategic stronghold during the religious conflict waged in the 12th and 13th centuries. The 108 coins - one of the biggest collections of ancient coins discovered in Israel - were found hidden in a ceramic jug beneath a tile floor at the cliff-top...


 Hoard of Gold Coins Found at Israel Crusades Site

· 07/12/2012 6:41:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 6 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· 7/11/12 ·

(Reuters) - A 1,000-year-old hoard of gold coins has been unearthed at a famous Crusader battleground where Christian and Muslim forces once fought for control of the Holy Land, Israeli archaeologists said on Wednesday. The treasure was dug up from the ruins of a castle in Arsuf, a strategic stronghold during the religious conflict waged in the 12th and 13th centuries. The 108 coins - one of the biggest collections of ancient coins discovered in Israel - were found hidden in a ceramic jug beneath a tile floor at the cliff-top coastal ruins, 15 km (9 miles) from Tel Aviv....

Elam, Persia, Parthia, Iran

 Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Teimareh Petroglyphs and Star Trails

· 07/12/2012 3:09:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· NASA ·
· July 12, 2012 ·
· (see photo credit) ·

Explanation: Engraved in rock, these ancient petroglyphs are abundant in the Teimareh valley, located in the Zagros Mountains of central Iran. They likely tell a tale of hunters and animals found in the middle eastern valley 6,000 years ago or more, etched by artists in a prehistoric age. In the night sky above are star trails etched by the rotation of planet Earth during the long composite exposure made with a modern digital camera. On the left, the center of the star trail arcs is the North Celestial Pole (NCP), the extension of Earth's axis into space, with Polaris, the...

Dinosaurs

 Scientists place 500-million-year-old gene in modern organism (Ruh-Roh!)

· 07/11/2012 1:21:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 92 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· 11 July 2012 ·
· Georgia Inst of Tech ·

It's a project 500 million years in the making. Only this time, instead of playing on a movie screen in Jurassic Park, it's happening in a lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Using a process called paleo-experimental evolution, Georgia Tech researchers have resurrected a 500-million-year-old gene from bacteria and inserted it into modern-day Escherichia coli(E. coli) bacteria. This bacterium has now been growing for more than 1,000 generations, giving the scientists a front row seat to observe evolution in action. "This is as close as we can get to rewinding and replaying the molecular tape of life," said scientist...

Paleontology

 Very round ancient turtle warmed readily in Sun

· 07/13/2012 7:11:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· Thursday, July 12, 2012 ·
· Will Ferguson ·

Why be really, really round? It turns out that the precisely circular carapace of a newly discovered species of fossil turtle may have made the ancient creature too wide to be swallowed by predators - and helped it warm up in the sun. Edwin Cadena at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, and colleagues, uncovered the 1.5 metre long fossil buried at the Cerrejón Coal Mine in north-western Colombia. Puentemys mushaisaensis is thought to have lived 60 million years ago, shortly after the extinction of the dinosaurs. It is the most recent discovery in a string of super large reptiles...

Prehistory & Origins

 Most complete skeleton of ancient relative of man found

· 07/13/2012 5:18:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 41 replies ·
· Telegraph UK ·
· Thursday, July 13, 2012 ·
· AFP ·

The remains of a juvenile hominid skeleton, of the newly identified Australopithecus (southern ape) sediba species, are the "most complete early human ancestor skeleton ever discovered," according to Lee Berger, a paleontologist from the University of Witwatersrand. "We have discovered parts of a jaw and critical aspects of the body including what appear to be a complete femur (thigh bone), ribs, vertebrae and other important limb elements, some never before seen in such completeness in the human fossil record," said Prof Berger. The latest discovery was made in a one-metre-wide rock that lay unnoticed for years in a laboratory until...

Australia & the Pacific

 Bush tucker feeds an ancient mystery

· 07/13/2012 7:38:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· HeritageDaily ·
· Tuesday, July 10, 2012 ·
· Contributing Source: UNSW ·

As sabre tooth tigers and woolly mammoths were wandering around Europe, unique, giant prehistoric animals were living in Australia -- three metre tall kangaroos and wombat-like creatures, the size of a four-wheel drive, were just some of the curious creatures Down Under. Yet mysteriously, sometime during the last 100,000 years, they disappeared forever. The extinction of these giant animals, known as megafauna, has generated great debate. One group advocates "human blitzkrieg" -- those asserting the first Australians hunted these beasts to extinction. Others, myself included, find there is too little evidence to confidently attribute responsibility to any particular factor. Nonetheless,...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Native Americans descended from three Asian groups: study

· 07/11/2012 11:22:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 57 replies ·
· AFP ·
· 11 July 2012 ·
· AFP ·

Native Americans spread out today from Canada to the tip of Chile descended not from one but at least three migrant waves from Siberia between 5,000 and 15,000 years ago, a study said Wednesday. The finding is controversial among geneticists, archaeologists and linguists -- many of whom have maintained that a single Asian ancestral group populated the Americas. But the new study, claiming to be the most comprehensive analysis yet of Native American genetics, claims to have found incontrovertible proof that there were three immigration waves -- a theory first put forward in 1986. Most Native Americans, said the study,...

PreColumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis

 Fossilized human feces hints at long-lost, 13,500-year-old West Coast culture

· 07/12/2012 2:19:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Sopater ·
· 40 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· July 12, 2012 ·
· Gene J. Koprowski ·

Maybe the 1992 movie Brendan Fraser film Encino Man wasn't too far from the mark? Fossilized human feces and other evidence from a West Coast cave demonstrates the existence of a long-lost, 13,500-year-old American culture, scientists said Thursday. The fossilized feces, known to researchers as a coprolite, from the Paisley Caves in Oregon has turned assumptions about the history of the Americas on its ear.


 Oregon cave discovery suggests lost ancient American culture (Pre-Clovis)

· 07/13/2012 5:29:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 13 replies ·
· Christian Science Monitor ·
· 7-12-2012 ·
· Wynne Parry ·

Ancient stone projectile points and fossilized feces suggest a previously unknown culture that existed on the West Coast some 13,000 years ago. Ancient stone projectile points discovered in a Central Oregon cave complex have cast new light on the identity of the first Americans. ~~~snip~~~ These stone points, a type known as Western temmed points, are narrower and lack the distinctive flute, or shallow groove, found on Clovis points. Researchers believe the two types of points represent different technologies, produced by different cultures....


 Native Americans arrived to find natives already there, fossil poo shows

· 07/14/2012 9:58:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 46 replies ·
· The Register ·
· 13th July 2012 11:23 GMT ·
· Lewis Page ·

Ancient darts also found in possible prehistoric pub The ancient people who have long been thought to be the first humans to colonise North America were actually johnny-come-latelies, according to scientists who have comprehesively analysed the ancient fossilised poo of their predecessor Americans. The new revelations come to us courtesy of Copenhagen university, where some of the investigating boffins are based. The scientists say that their results demonstrate conclusively their somewhat controversial thesis: that the "Clovis" culture dating from around 13,000 years ago - which has long been thought to be the earliest human society in the Americas - was...

Peru & the Andes

 Ancient pre-Inca tomb found in northern Peru

· 07/13/2012 4:24:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by csvset ·
· 18 replies ·
· France24 ·
· 14 July 2012 ·

Archeologists said Friday they have discovered a tomb about 1,200 years old, from the pre-Inca Sican era, in northern Peru. Human remains and jewelry were found July 4 along with the tomb, likely that of a member of the aristocracy of the Sican or Lambayeque elite, head researcher Carlos Wester La Torre told AFP. A gold earflap, a silver-plated crown, and some 120 silver and copper ornaments that served as emblems of power, along with 116 pieces of pottery and seashells were found in the tomb. The tomb was located in a burial chamber some six meters (20 feet) deep...

The Revolution

 The "Best Earthly Inheritance" Our Founders Bequeathed

· 07/04/2012 1:52:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Twotone ·
· 1 replies ·
· Oregon Catalyst ·
· July 4, 2012 ·
· Kathryn Hickok ·

Every July much is said by eloquent historians, civic and religious leaders, and -- thanks to blogs and social media -- Americans everywhere, about the Declaration of Independence, the meaning of the American Experiment, and the price of freedom. Independence Day is a moment to be grateful for the blessings of liberty and to remember the gifts many sacrificed so much to leave us. But this year we also mark the 180th anniversary of the death in 1832 of the last surviving signer of the Declaration. Charles Carroll's life spanned nearly a century. By the fiftieth anniversary of July 4, 1776, Carroll had outlived...

The Civil War

 Secret Message in Lincoln's Pocketwatch, 1861

· 07/10/2012 7:18:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 45 replies ·
· Retronaut ·
· Retronaut ·

Secret Message in Lincoln's Pocketwatch, 1861 "In 2009 the Smithsonian found a "secret" message engraved in Abraham Lincoln's watch by a watchmaker who was repairing it in 1861 when news of the attack on Fort Sumter reached Washington, D.C. "In an interview with The New York Times April 30, 1906, 84-year-old Jonathan Dillon recalled he was working for M.W. Galt and Co. on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, where he was repairing Lincoln's watch. The owner of the shop announced that the first shot of the Civil War had been fired. Dillon reported that he unscrewed the dial of the watch,...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Romanovs' Fate Revealed

· 07/11/2012 7:01:18 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 32 replies ·
· Wall Street Journal ·
· July 10, 2012 ·
· Jonathan Earle ·

Nicholas Romanov, the deposed czar of Russia, and his family were awakened in the middle of the night on July 16-17, 1918, and told to get dressed. They were being moved to a safe location, their Bolshevik captors said, away from the White army that was closing in on Yekaterinburg, in the southern Ural Mountains. The soldiers shepherded the family and four servants -- a cook, valet, doctor and maid -- into the basement of the house where they were being held. Nicholas carried his ailing son, Alexei, in his arms. Once all were assembled, a death sentence was read aloud, twice, and the...

Epigraphy & Language

 Long-Lost Language

· 07/08/2012 1:17:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by djone ·
· 46 replies ·
· Field & Stream! ·
· David E. Petzal and Philip Bourjaily ·

"One of the small things I like about hunting is that it takes you into the countryside where people say things you thought no one actually says anymore. Bits of old-fashioned speech hang on outside of town. Hearing them opens a little window into the past.--"Just remembered what the old folks would say if they hadn't seen you in awhile :Man I thought you fell in....'He's so tight, he squeaks when he walks.'..."He couldn't cut his way out of a wet paper bag with two butcher knives".....remembered another I always liked: my old landlord, a German farmer, used "young" for...

end of digest #417 20120714


1,432 posted on 07/15/2012 6:26:44 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #417 · v 9 · n 1
Saturday, July 14, 2012
 
38 topics
2906533 to 2904700
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the first issue of the ninth year of the Gods, Graves, Glyphs digest. I'd planned to do something really special, such as changing the format as I did a year ago, or maybe that has been two years. What I decided on was to post this a day late, IOW a whole day earlier than last week's issue. Pretty special.

Religion of Pieces topics have been the most posted this week:
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,433 posted on 07/15/2012 6:32:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1432 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #417 · v 9 · n 1
Saturday, July 14, 2012
 
38 topics
2906533 to 2904700
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Welcome to the first issue of the ninth year of the Gods, Graves, Glyphs digest. I'd planned to do something really special, such as changing the format as I did a year ago, or maybe that has been two years. What I decided on was to post this a day late, IOW a whole day earlier than last week's issue. Pretty special.



There has been a slight rise in troll activity, and IMHO we can anticipate that to continue to rise up through the Pubbie nominating convention.

Religion of Pieces topics have been the most posted this week:
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,434 posted on 07/15/2012 6:36:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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This week's 24 topics, order added, newest to oldest:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #418
Saturday, July 21, 2012

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Neanderthal Arm Morphology Caused by Scraping, Not Spear Thrusting

· 07/21/2012 6:55:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Wednesday, July 18, 2012 ·
· PLoS ONE ·

It was scraping hide, not thrusting spears, that caused dominant strength on their right sides. Unique arm morphology in Neandertals was likely caused by scraping activities such as hide preparation, not spear thrusting as previously theorized, according to research published July 18 in the open access journal PLoS ONE*. The researchers, led by Colin Shaw of the University of Cambridge, took muscle measurements of modern men performing three different spear thrusting tasks and four different scraping tasks. They found that muscle activity was significantly higher on the left side of the body for spear thrusting tasks relative to the right...

PreHistory, & Origins

 300 000 year old flint tools found in Northern France

· 07/17/2012 8:15:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· Monday, July 16, 2012 ·
· Source: INRAP ·

The deposits at Etricourt Manancourt in the Picardie region of France documents the history of early European settlements, revealing at least five prehistoric levels, ranging between 300,000 and 80,000 years old... Archaeologists from Inrap looked at 17 hectares in 2010, which revealed a Palaeolithic level and more evidence was found in 2012, when 3,200 square metres were excavated over 4 month period. The most recent occupation comes from the Middle Paleolithic (80,000 years old) and belongs to the Neanderthals. Twenty sites of this period are already known in northern France. The next two levels are also Neanderthal and belong to...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Neanderthals Had Knowledge Of Plant Healing Qualities

· 07/19/2012 9:56:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports ·
· Thursday, July 19, 2012 ·
· Naturwissenschaften ·

A team of researchers has provided the first molecular evidence that Neanderthals not only ate a range of cooked plant foods, but also understood their nutritional and medicinal qualities... The researchers, led by the Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona and the University of York, combined pyrolysis gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry with morphological analysis of plant microfossils to identify material trapped in dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) from five Neanderthals from the north Spanish site of El Sidrón. Their results provide another twist to the story -- the first molecular evidence for medicinal plants being used by a Neanderthal individual. According to a prepared...

Diet & Cuisine

 An olive stone from 150BC links pre-Roman Britain to today's pizzeria

· 07/21/2012 7:25:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 36 replies ·
· guardian.co.uk ·
· Thursday 19 July 2012 ·
· Maev Kennedy ·

Iron Age Britons were importing olives from the Mediterranean a century before the Romans arrived with their exotic tastes in food, say archaeologists who have discovered a single olive stone from an excavation of an Iron Age well at at Silchester in Hampshire. The stone came from a layer securely dated to the first century BC, making it the earliest ever found in Britain -- but since nobody ever went to the trouble of importing one olive, there must be more, rotted beyond recognition or still buried. The stone, combined with earlier finds of seasoning herbs such as coriander, dill...

Climate

 Little Ice Age (Solar Influence)

· 12/20/2002 3:38:20 PM PST ·
· Posted by PeaceBeWithYou ·
· 41 replies ·
· 744+ views ·
· CO2 Science Magazine ·
· December 18, 2002 ·
· Staff Summary ·

How much of an influence the sun has exerted on earth's climate during the 20th Century is a topic of heated discussion in the area of global climate change. The primary reason for differing opinions on the subject derives from the fact that although numerous studies have demonstrated significant correlations between certain measures of solar activity and various climatic phenomena (Reid, 1991, 1997, 1999, 2000), the magnitude of the variable solar radiative forcing reported in these studies is generally so small it is difficult to see how it could possibly produce climatic effects of the magnitude observed (Broecker, 1999). Supporters...

Central Asia

 Wet climate may have fueled Mongol invasion

· 07/20/2012 6:55:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 38 replies ·
· NBC News ·
· July 20, 2012 ·
· Stephanie Pappas ·

Consistent rain and warm temperatures may have given the Mongols the energy source they needed to conquer Eurasia: grass for their horses (huge amount of grass needed to feed the 10 horses for each Mongol warrior).

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 How Big is the Entire Universe?

· 07/21/2012 12:57:15 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 43 replies ·
· Starts with a Bang ·
· 7/18/12 ·
· Ethan Siegel ·

(25) Millenium simulation from Volker Springel et al., from the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge." --Stephen Hawking. The Universe is a vast, seemingly unending marvel of existence. Over the past century, we've learned that the Universe stretches out beyond the billions of stars in our Milky Way, out across billions of light years, containing close to a trillion galaxies all told.Image credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team. And yet, that's just the observable Universe! There are good reasons to believe that the...

Age of Sail

 Ships' logs give clues to Earth's magnetic decline

· 05/13/2006 9:51:41 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Crazieman ·
· 59 replies ·
· 1,699+ views ·
· New Scientist ·
· May 11, 2006 ·
· Patrick Berry ·

The voyages of Captain Cook have just yielded a new discovery: the gradual weakening of Earth's magnetic field is a relatively recent phenomenon. The discovery has led experts to question whether the Earth is on track towards a polarity reversal. By sifting through ships' logs recorded by Cook and other mariners dating back to 1590, researchers have greatly extended the period over which the behaviour of the magnetic field can be studied. The data show that the current decline in Earth's magnetism was...

Religion of Pieces

 Ancient Map Shows Egg-Shaped England

· 06/06/2004 5:45:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 54 replies ·
· 281+ views ·
· The Guardian (UK) ·
· 6-6-2004 ·
· Vanessa Thorpe ·

It is known as a catalogue of 'marvel for the eyes' and tomorrow the public will be able to judge for themselves at last. A previously unknown medieval Arabic map with the earliest representation of an identified 'England' -- a tiny, egg-shaped lump -- is to go on public display in Oxford. The unique and, until now, unseen map is part of a manuscript called the Book of Curiosities of the Sciences and Marvels, which was originally put together, probably in the Nile...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Gold coins from the Crusades found in Israel

· 07/17/2012 5:13:53 AM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 14 replies ·
· cna ·
· July 16, 2012 ·

Tel Aviv, Israel, Jul 16, 2012 / 04:08 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Israeli archeologists have found more than one hundred gold coins from the time of the Crusades, when conflict arose between Muslims and Christians over control of the Holy Land. "It is an unusual find. We don't have much gold from the time of the Crusades," said Oren Tal, a professor at the University of Tel Aviv who led the investigation. The treasure was found in the ruins of a castle in Arsuf, a strategic bastion during the Crusades of the 12th and 13th centuries. The 108 coins...

No, No, Rudolph, the *Schmidt* House!

 How Ancient Greeks Named Their Puppies

· 07/16/2012 10:00:55 PM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 45 replies ·
· The Smithsonian ·
· 7-9-12 ·

Dogs played a special role in ancient Greek society and mythology; Cerberus guarded the gates of Hades, the goddess Artemis used dogs in her hunt, and Greek citizens employed dogs for hunting and protection. To the ancient Greeks, picking your new pup was an important decision, just as it is today. But, according to Stanford University researcher Adrienne Mayor, writing for Wonders & Marvels, the process could have been just a little bit different. Like moderns, the ancients looked for an adventurous and friendly nature, but one test for selecting the pick of the litter seems rather heartless today. Let...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Younger Dryas --The Rest of the Story!

· 06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 8 replies ·
· watts Up With That? ·
· June 16, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·
· Rodney Chilton ·

WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact. The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I've added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event.

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago

· 07/14/2012 6:00:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 11 replies ·
· PNAS ·
· 10 July 2012 ·
· Ted Bunch et al. ·

This paper supports the proposal that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago.


 Comet May Have Collided With Earth 13,000 Years Ago(MEXICO)

· 07/15/2012 5:03:34 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ForGod'sSake ·
· 49 replies ·
· Spacedotcom ·
· March 6, 2012 ·
· Clara Moskowitz ·

Central Mexico's Lake Cuitzeo contains melted rock formations and nanodiamonds that suggest a comet impacted Earth around 12,900 years ago, scientists say. CREDIT: Israde et al. (2012) New evidence supports the idea that a huge space rock collided with our planet about 13,000 years ago and broke up in Earth's atmosphere, a new study suggests. This impact would have been powerful enough to melt the ground, and could have killed off many large mammals and humans. It may even have set off a period of unusual cold called the Younger Dryas that began at that time, researchers say. The...

PreColumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis

 Small Dig, Big Discovery: Chumash Jaw Bone Found Under Vets Center

· 07/21/2012 6:13:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Santa Barbara Independent ·
· Thursday, July 19, 2012 ·
· Nick Welsh ·

The past and future recently collided in the dirt five feet beneath Santa Barbara's Veterans Memorial Building on Cabrillo Boulevard ...could well knock out of consideration long-simmering plans to erect a three-story museum in the courtyard behind the vets building honoring Santa Barbara's servicemen and women who fought in all foreign wars since World War I. The archeological work took place this June... along the waterfront was once the site of Syuxtun, a major Chumash community for about 1,000 years with about 500 people in its prime, so UCSB archeologist and anthropology professor Lynn Gamble... overseeing a team of UCSB...

Mayans

 Mayans used reservoir, sand-filtered water to support urban population at Tikal

· 07/16/2012 5:47:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 10 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 16 July 2012 ·
· Vernon Scarborough et al. ·

Around 700 AD, Tikal had the largest dam built by the ancient Maya of Central America, used sand filtration to cleanse water entering reservoirs, a "switching station" that accommodated seasonal filling and release of water, and the deepest, rock-cut canal segment in the Maya lowlands. All this to support a population at Tikal of perhaps 60,000 to 80,000 inhabitants and an estimated population of five million in the overall Maya lowlands.

Paleontology

 Where Have the Hawk-Sized Insects Gone?

· 07/17/2012 2:44:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 60 replies ·
· ScienceNOW ·
· June 4, 2012 ·
· Sid Perkins ·

Around 300 million years ago, dragonflies with the wingspans of hawks flitted above coal-producing swamps. Such giants don't exist today, partly because oxygen levels in the atmosphere are much lower. But another reason is that the evolution of birds and their increasing agility in the air forced flying insects to shrink, according to a new study. Like all multicellular animals, insects fuel their metabolism by taking in oxygen. Unlike creatures with lungs, however, insects draw in air through holes in their shell-like exoskeletons. The oxygen diffuses from those holes to the creatures' tissues through a dense network of tubes. Because...

Beat Rick's Nuts -- Wait, What?

 (Vavavooom!) 600-year-old bra and underwear discovered in an Austrian castle

· 07/20/2012 10:24:09 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 52 replies ·
· IO9 ·
· Jul 18, 2012 ·
· Annalee Newitz ·

600-year-old bra and underwear discovered in an Austrian castle Contemporary bras are more comfortable, modified versions of corsets -- or so it was believed, until a 2007 discovery changed the way we see women's underwear. Working with a team of her colleagues, archaeologist Beatrix Nutz recently publicized her discovery of several linen bras and some underwear in a medieval castle. Nutz has presented academic papers about her discovery, and even analyzed the underwear for DNA (see picture). But the public didn't hear about the medieval bras until a BBC history program showed pictures of them. Nutz and colleagues also found...

Middle Ages & Renaissance

 Cash-strapped Berlin stalked by 450-year-old trillion-Euro debt

· 07/19/2012 8:41:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by JerseyanExile ·
· 7 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· July 19, 2012 ·
· Reuters ·

The sleepy hamlet of Mittenwalde in eastern Germany could become one of the richest towns in the world if Berlin were to repay it an outstanding debt that dates back to 1562. A certificate of debt, found in a regional archive, attests that Mittenwalde lent Berlin 400 guilders on May 28 1562, to be repaid with six percent interest per year. According to Radio Berlin Brandenburg RBB.L, the debt would amount to 11,200 guilders today, which is roughly equivalent to 112 million euros. Adjusting for compound interest and inflation, the total debt now lies in the trillions, by RBB's estimates....

Longer Perspectives

 History Repeating Itself: The Vendee Genocide

· 07/20/2012 1:11:30 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Perseverando ·
· 7 replies ·
· Barnhardt ·
· July 18, AD 2012 10:20 AM MST ·
· Ann Barnhardt ·

Here's my latest video recorded by the good folks at FreedomTalkNetcast.com down in Pueblo, Colorado. This presentation covers the almost unknown war and genocide against the people of the Vendee region of France during the proto-Marxist French Revolution. This genocide by the atheist, godless, totalitarian French Revolutionaries against the Church killed 450,000 people, and has served as a the tactical template for Marxist governments who have fomented statist schisms and then entered into open war against the Church over the last century, including the Soviets and Mexicans in the early 20th century, and the Red Chinese and Vietnamese, and Marxist...


 6 Factors in the Decline of the Roman Empire (and perhaps America)

· 06/25/2009 11:16:21 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Osnome ·
· 84 replies ·
· 4,150+ views ·
· Osnome ·
· 6-25-09 ·
· Osnome ·

Six Most Important Factors that destroyed Roman Civilization: 1)Overtaxation 2)Opression of the Provences by the Central Government 3)Government topheavy with bureaucracy 4)Military power overextended across the world(their world at the time) 5)The Populace diverted by degenerate mass entertainment 6) The Borders poorly defended against increasing foreign migration(in their case, Barbarians)

World War Eleven

 Search for Earhart's Wrecked Plane Continues

· 07/19/2012 3:18:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by P.O.E. ·
· 9 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· 07-16-2012 ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

After some technical problems, the search for the wreckage of Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra has begun near the reef slope off the west end of Nikumaroro, a tiny uninhabited island between Hawaii and Australia where the legendary aviator may have landed and died as a castaway 75 years ago. The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) is carrying on the the hunt, which relies on a torpedo-shaped Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) called Bluefin-21 and a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV).

Common Criminals

 Did Yugoslav dictator Tito poison Stalin?

· 07/18/2012 7:09:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 20 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· July 18, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

When Russian leader Josef Stalin died, on March 5 in 1953, a letter was found in his office that had been written by Yugoslavian leader Josip Broz Tito. The two leaders were bitter enemies, after Tito had used World War II as an opportunity to spark a revolution and lead Yugoslavia to independence from Soviet influence. A combination of pride, fear and jealousy had spurred Stalin to attempt to have Tito killed -- and no less than 22 assassination attempts had been made in the years after the war.

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 5 men withstand 1.7 kiloton nuclear explosion

· 07/19/2012 7:42:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by moonshot925 ·
· 37 replies ·
· Youtube ·
· 3 November 2011 ·
· atomcentral ·

On July 19, 1957, five men stood at Ground Zero of an atomic test that was being conducted at the Nevada Test Site. This was the test of a 2KT (kiloton) MB-1 nuclear air-to-air rocket launched from an F-89 Scorpion interceptor. The nuclear missile detonated 10,000 ft above their heads. A reel-to-reel tape recorder was present to record their experience. You can see and hear the men react to the shock wave moments after the detonation. The placard reading "Ground Zero; Population Five" was made by Colonel Arthur B. "Barney" Oldfield, the Public Information Officer for the Continental Air Defense Command in Colorado Spring who arranged for the volunteers to participate. The five volunteers were: Colonel Sidney Bruce, Lt. Colonel Frank P. Ball (technical advisor to the Steve Canyon tv show), Major Norman "Bodie" Bodinger, Major John Hughes, Don Lutrel, and George Yoshitake, the cameraman (who wasn't a volunteer). See George discuss his work photographing atomic and nuclear explosions in "Atomic Filmmakers."

end of digest #418 20120721


1,435 posted on 07/21/2012 2:59:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #418 · v 9 · n 2
Saturday, July 21, 2012
 
24 topics
1148795 to 2906848
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
There ain't nothin' in ramblin', either run around...

I'm going to plaster this all over your internet, pull on some street clothes, and get the wicked afterlife out of here.

The Digest has a certain lilt to it, moreso than usual, it was easy to segué from topic to topic. Nice selection too. Some were dragged kicking and squealing from the depths of the FRchives.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: "My party was founded in 1854 and has won 23 presidential elections. How many presidential elections has your party won?" -- moonshot925, #46 of For Romney's GOP, is Constitution a losing issue?, Friday, July 20, 2012
 
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1,436 posted on 07/21/2012 3:03:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1435 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #419
Saturday, July 28, 2012

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Polar bears' ancient roots pushed way back

· 07/25/2012 6:22:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 28 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Monday, July 23rd, 2012 ·
· Devin Powell ·

...A new analysis of its DNA suggests that Ursus maritimus split from the brown bear between 4 million and 5 million years ago -- around the same time when, some scientists believe, the Arctic's thick sea ice first formed. With such old origins, the creature must have weathered extreme shifts in climate, researchers report online July 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Simulations of how the DNA changed over time suggest that polar bear populations rose and fell with the temperature. After thriving during cooler times between 800,000 and 600,000 years ago, the bears seem to...

Paleontology

 Little animals spread sperm for smelly mosses

· 07/25/2012 4:05:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Science News ·
· Friday, July 20th, 2012 ·
· Susan Milius ·

Male moss plants don't make pollen, but instead send sperm off to try to swim through dew to find a female moss. Earlier research in dry lab containers showed that the sperm can hitchhike on mites and little arthropods called springtails... Now, lab tests with two moss species show that in more natural, dewy conditions, springtails increased moss fertilization. With water alone, sperm found female moss in roughly a third of moss test clumps, but water plus springtails raised the number to almost half, Eppley and her colleagues report online July 18 in Nature. The new paper improves the case...

PreColumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis

 Utah dig unearths large Fremont Indian structure

· 07/25/2012 1:04:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ApplegateRanch ·
· 12 replies ·
· AP via Indian Country News ·
· July, 2012 ·
· unlisted ·

Source is AP story, so only able to post a short excerpt; much more at the link.Archaeologists have struck gold at a dig near the town of Goshen about 35 miles south of Provo: the largest Fremont Indian structure ever found. Jim Allison, anthropology professor at Brigham Young University, said the 850-square-foot structure is unique because it served as a communal area that brought the entire village together. It's several times larger than typical Fremont structures, which average between 80 and 90 square feet.

Ancient Autopsies

 Prehistoric human remains found along Hwy 99 (Harris County in Texas)

· 07/26/2012 4:53:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by a fool in paradise ·
· 24 replies ·
· ABC News KTRK Channel 13 Houston ·
· July 26, 2012 ·
· Deborah Wrigley ·

Work crews clearing the land for the Grand Parkway expansion have made a surprising discovery -- human remains which are being described as 'prehistoric.' The remains were found in the stretch of land known as Grand Parkway segment E. The Grand Parkway segment between I-10 and Highway 290 has been under construction for nearly a year. Last month, in advance of bulldozers moving in, a state archeologist working on the project found something not unexpected for those who seek out the past -- a handful of bones dating back to prehistory. "I know it's a rare find, but knowing this...

Hills in Them Thar Gold

 Stylized Figure Pendant, 5th-7th century Panama; International Style Gold

· 07/25/2012 10:18:23 AM PDT ·
· Posted by muawiyah ·
· 15 replies ·
· metropolitan museum of art ·
· 1977 ·
· Alice K. Bache ·

Cast in gold over a core, this stylized anthropomorphic figure fluidly integrates human and animal traits. A realistic human face capped by a sweeping headdress extends forward from the abstract body. The generalized depictions of crouching legs, outspread wings, and notched fishtail may connote earth, sky, and sea. The pendant is part of a group of ornaments of uniform style and technology. Both the puzzling combination of elements from different creatures and the superbly finished surfaces set the pendants in the group apart from other Central American goldwork. The group is widely distributed -- they are known from Colombia in the south...

The Mayans

 "Dramatic" New Maya Temple Found, Covered With Giant Faces [ El Zotz ]

· 07/22/2012 8:12:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 81 replies ·
· National Geographic News ·
· Friday, July 20, 2012 ·
· Ker Than ·

Some 1,600 years ago, the Temple of the Night Sun was a blood-red beacon visible for miles and adorned with giant masks of the Maya sun god as a shark, blood drinker, and jaguar. Long since lost to the Guatemalan jungle, the temple is finally showing its faces to archaeologists, and revealing new clues about the rivalrous kingdoms of the Maya. Unlike the relatively centralized Aztec and Inca empires, the Maya civilization -- which spanned much of what are now Guatemala, Belize, and Mexico's Yucatan region (Maya map) -- was a loose aggregation of city-states. "This has been a growing...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 Ancient Poop Gives Clues to Modern Diabetes Epidemic

· 07/25/2012 9:13:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 35 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 7-24-2012 ·
· Stephanie Pappas ·

The ancient Native Americans of the desert Southwest subsisted on a fiber-filled diet of prickly pear, yucca and flour ground from plant seeds, finds a new analysis of fossilized feces that may explain why modern Native Americans are so susceptible to Type II diabetes. Thousands of years of incredibly fibrous foods, 20 to 30 times more fibrous than today's typical diet, with low impact on the blood sugar likely left this group vulnerable to the illness when richer Anglo foods made their way to North America, said study researcher Karl Reinhard, a professor of forensic sciences at the University of...

Climate

 Greenland Ice Melt every 150 years is "right on time'

· 07/24/2012 7:44:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Rocky ·
· 14 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· July 24, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

"Ice cores from Summit show that melting events of this type occur about once every 150 years on average. With the last one happening in 1889, this event is right on time," says Lora Koenig, a Goddard glaciologist and a member of the research team analyzing the satellite data. I covered this over the weekend when Bill McKibben started wailing about the albedo going off the charts. I thought it might be soot related. The PR below and quote above is from NASA Goddard. I had to laugh at the title of their press release, where they cite "Unprecedented...

The Roman Empire

 Tree-rings prove climate was WARMER in Roman and Medieval times than it is now

· 07/21/2012 8:40:01 PM PDT ·
· Posted by dennisw ·
· 30 replies ·
· dailymail. ·
· 11 July 2012 ·
· Science Reporter ·

How did the Romans grow grapes in northern England? Perhaps because it was warmer than we thought. A study suggests the Britain of 2,000 years ago experienced a lengthy period of hotter summers than today. German researchers used data from tree rings -- a key indicator of past climate -- to claim the world has been on a "long-term cooling trend' for two millennia until the global warming of the twentieth century. This cooling was punctuated by a couple of warm spells. These are the Medieval Warm Period, which is well known, but also a period during the toga-wearing Roman...

Vesuvius, 79 AD

 House of the Telephus Relief: raising the roof on Roman real estate

· 07/27/2012 7:47:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Guardian UK ·
· Monday 23 July 2012 ·
· John Hooper in Ercolano ·

With several dozen rooms, the House of the Telephus Relief was "top-level Roman real estate", said Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, the director of the Herculaneum Conservation Project (HCP). It was more of a palace or mansion, thought to have been built for Marcus Nonius Balbus, the Roman governor of Crete and part of modern-day Libya, whose ostentatious tomb was found nearby. The most lavishly decorated part of the immense residence was a three-storey tower. On the top floor was a nine-metre high dining room with a coloured marble floor and walls, a suspended ceiling and a wrap-around terrace... ...the wind changed direction...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 10 Civilizations That Disappeared Under Mysterious Circumstances

· 07/24/2012 7:54:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Sir Napsalot ·
· 51 replies ·
· io9 ·
· 7-23-2012 ·
· Annalee Newitz ·

For almost as long as we've had civilization, we've lost it. There are records going back hundreds of years of explorers discovering huge temples encrusted with jungle, or giant pits full of treasure that were once grand palaces. Why did people abandon these once-thriving cities, agricultural centers, and trade routes? Often, the answer is unknown. Here are ten great civilizations whose demise remains a mystery. 1. The Maya The Maya are perhaps the classic example of a civilization that was completely lost, its great monuments, cities and roads swallowed up by the central American jungles, and its peoples scattered to...


 Were The Dark Ages Really Dark?

· 12/10/2002 11:12:37 AM PST ·
· Posted by Mike Darancette ·
· 18 replies ·
· tripod ·
· September, 1999 ·
· Greg Bryant ·

.... snip ... Physical Aspects Of The Dark Ages Let's first look at the onset of "the" Dark Ages in the sixth century AD. The Roman Empire was finished, nothing was happening in the sciences, and worse was happening in nature. The Italian historian Flavius Cassiodorus wrote about conditions that he experienced during the year AD 536 : "The Sun...seems to have lost its wonted light, and appears of a bluish colour. We marvel to see no shadows of our bodies at noon, to feel the mighty vigour of the Sun's heat wasted into feebleness, and the phenomena which accompany...

Epigraphy & Language

 Discovery of early medieval royal stronghold in southwest Scotland [ the Picts ]

· 07/27/2012 9:55:32 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· Thursday, July 26, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Trusty's Hill, near Gatehouse of Fleet in Dumfries and Galloway, is best known for the Pictish Symbols carved into a natural rock outcrop at the fort's entrance. However, in recent years, many historians have begun to doubt whether these carvings were genuine, some even suggesting that the carvings are forgeries... As well as an abundance of domestic waste, including animal bones, stone and metal tools and a spindle whorl, from 'dark soil' occupation deposits sealed by the collapsed ramparts of the fort, the excavators recovered numerous crucible and clay mould fragments, metalworking debris and a variety of iron pins and...

Farty Shades of Green

 Kerry island structure may be due to tsunami waves in medieval times

· 07/26/2012 8:31:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Irish Central ·
· Thursday, July 26, 2012 ·
· Patrick Counihan ·

Alan E Hayden, the director of more than 200 medieval excavations in Ireland, believes the grouping of islands off the Kerry coast suggests earthquake and tsunami wave style damage... The Times report adds: "A folk tale collected by a teacher in the early part of the last century offers an explanation for local place names connected to a road that ran from Dolus Head through the islands to Skellig. "The road, a pre-medieval structure, is called Bothar na Scairte, or road of the cataclysm, and it is traceable for some distance on Valentia. In the folk tale the road and...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Mona Lisa's Skeleton Found?

· 07/22/2012 1:11:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by BenLurkin ·
· 20 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Wed Jul 18, 2012 01:01 PM ET ·
· Rossella Lorenzi ·

Archaeologists say they have found a complete skeleton buried beneath the floor of an abandoned nunnery in Florence, Italy, which might belong to Lisa Gherardini, the woman believed to have inspired Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. The bones were found beneath the remains of an altar in the church of the now derelict Convent of St. Orsola. "That altar was certainly in use at Lisa Gherardini's time," said Valeria D'Aquino, an archaeologist at the Tuscan Superintendency

Prehistory & Origins

 Archaeologists uncover Palaeolithic ceramic art

· 07/27/2012 5:43:10 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· Wednesday, July 25, 2012 ·
· U of Cambridge ·

Evidence of a community of prehistoric artists and craftspeople who "invented" ceramics during the last Ice Age -- thousands of years before pottery became commonplace -- has been found in modern-day Croatia. The finds consist of 36 fragments, most of them apparently the broken-off remnants of modelled animals, and come from a site called Vela Spila on the Adriatic coast. Archaeologists believe that they were the products of an artistic culture which sprang up in the region about 17,500 years ago. Their ceramic art flourished for about 2,500 years, but then disappeared... Most histories of the technology begin with the...

Diet & Cuisine

 6,500 year old hunting trophy found in eastern Croatia

· 07/27/2012 7:52:49 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 19 replies ·
· Croatian Times ·
· Wednesday, July 25, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Archaeologists in Bapska, eastern Croatia have stumbled across 6,500 year old deer antlers. The hunting trophy was found hanging on the wall of prehistoric house along with valuable items of jewellery, writes website dalje.com. "We have the oldest deer hunting trophy in Croatia," said Marcel Buric, the head researcher at the Department of Prehistoric Archaeology of the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. According to Buric, local hunters from Bapska have estimated that the deer, where the antlers trophy has come from, would have weighed between 220 and 250 kilograms and would have been extremely strong due to its 12 antlers....

Egypt

 First Dynasty funerary boat discovered at Egypt's Abu Rawash

· 07/27/2012 7:34:39 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· Ahram Online ·
· Wednesday, July 25, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

During routine excavation works at the Archaic period cemetery located at Abu Rawash area northeast of the Giza Plateau, a French archaeological mission from the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology in Cairo (IFAO) stumbled on what is believed to be a funerary boat of the First Dynasty King Den (dating from around 3000BC). The funerary boat was buried with royalty, as ancient Egyptians believed it would transfer the king's soul to the afterlife for eternity. Unearthed in the northern area of Mastaba number six (a flat-roofed burial structure) at the archaeological site, boat consists of 11 large wooden planks reaching...


 Pharaoh's playground revealed by missing fractals

· 07/27/2012 7:37:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· Friday, July 20, 2012 ·
· Colin Barras ·

The Dahshur royal necropolis in Egypt was once a dazzling sight. Some 30 kilometres south of Cairo, it provided King Sneferu with a playground to hone his pyramid-building skills -- expertise that helped his son, Khufu, build the Great Pyramid of Giza. But most signs of what went on around Dahshur have been wiped away by 4500 years of neglect and decay. To help work out what has been lost, archaeologists have turned to fractals. All around the world, river networks carve fractal patterns in the land that persist long after the rivers have moved on (see picture). "You can...

Alexander the Great

 Alexander the not so Great: History through Persian eyes

· 07/25/2012 9:39:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 31 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 7-14-2012 ·
· Ali Ansari ·

Alexander the Great is portrayed as a legendary conqueror and military leader in Greek-influenced Western history books but his legacy looks very different from a Persian perspective. Any visitor to the spectacular ruins of Persepolis -- the site of the ceremonial capital of the ancient Persian Achaemenid empire, will be told three facts: it was built by Darius the Great, embellished by his son Xerxes, and destroyed by that man, Alexander. ~~~snip~~~ He razed Persepolis to the ground following a night of drunken excess at the goading of a Greek courtesan, ostensibly in revenge for the burning of the Acropolis...

The Trojan War

 'Myths' Are More Plausible than Fiction

· 07/24/2012 8:31:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 16 replies ·
· Daily Telegraph via Europhysics Letters ·
· 25 July 2012 ·
· Nick Collins ·

[Research] "findings support historians' belief that ancient myths ... may be based, at least in part, on real communities and people." Researchers from Coventry University analysed the texts of three ancient stories and compared the complex web of characters' relationships with the type of "social networks" that occur in real life. The results showed that the societies depicted in the stories strongly mirrored real social networks that had been mapped out by others. But modern fiction differed from the ancient myths, as well as from real social networks, in telltale ways.

Early America

 Ohio's Mysteries: The Old Stone Fort

· 07/24/2012 5:51:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 90 replies ·
· nbc4i.com ·
· July 23, 2012 ·
· Anon ·

It's believed to be the oldest building in Ohio, and possibly the Midwest. But the mystery remains: who built it and why? COSHOCTON, Ohio -- It's believed to be the oldest building in Ohio, and possibly the Midwest -- built nearly a century before the American Revolution. But the mystery remains: who built the Old Stone Fort and why? On an ordinary plot of farm land on County Road 254 in eastern Coshocton County sits what is arguably one of the most important buildings in Ohio history. It is believed that the Old Stone Fort was built sometime around...

The Revolution

 Did any Hessian troops imprisoned in Reading [PA]
  stay in America after the Revolutionary War?

· 07/26/2012 5:42:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 31 replies ·
· Reading Eagle ·
· 7-26-12 ·
· Ron Devlin ·

Ask Ron Devlin: Country they fought against became home Reading Eagle: Tim Leedy The state historical marker for Hessian Camp on Mineral Spring Road. Dorothy Johnston, who grew up near Hessian Camp in Reading, wondered what happened to the German mercenaries imprisoned in Reading during the Revolutionary War. First, some background. Faced with open revolt in its American Colonies, Britain arranged with the Prince of Hesse-Cassel, the Duke of Brunswick and other German nobles to send troops to the Colonies. By some estimates, 30,000 German mercenaries, including those called Hessians, were sent to help the British squelch the rebellion. After...


 Princeton: Battlefield group appeals Planning Board finding

· 07/25/2012 9:38:25 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 12 replies ·
· Princeton Packet ·
· July 24, 2012 ·
· Jennifer Bradley ·

The Princeton Battlefield Society has filed an appeal of the Princeton Regional Planning Board's decision to allow the Institute for Advanced Study to build faculty housing on a part of the battlefield known as Maxwell's Field on Friday, and is also seeking funds to support the society's fight. According to the society, the proposed development area of the battlefield is believed to be the site of a winning counterattack lead by George Washington during the Battle of Princeton. The appeal includes 12 counts that challenge the Planning Board's decision. "The Planning Board failed numerous times to properly support its decision...

Underwater Archaeology

 Button is clue to sunken ship's history

· 07/24/2012 6:03:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 2 replies ·
· The St. Augustine Record ·
· July 23, 2012 ·
· Marcia Lane ·

A ship's bell from a wreck found off St. Augustine has yielded another clue to the possible identify of the ship that may date from the American Revolution. The clue: a button found in the concretion still attached to the bronze bell that was discovered in 2010 by archaeologists with the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program. "It's in rough shape," Sam Turner, director of archaeology at the St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum, said of the button. Even so, the top part of a crown can be seen on the button and similar crowns are found on Royal Provincial buttons plus the...

The Civil War

 Remarkable photos capture life in besieged Washington during the Civil War

· 07/26/2012 6:07:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 15 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· July 26, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

These are the striking black-and-white images which capture America on the cusp of monumental change during the Civil War. But instead of portraying dramatic events such as the bloody Battle of Antietam or Abraham Lincoln's historic address at Gettysburg, the images reveal day-to-day life for those caught during wartime in Washington DC. Defending the nation's capital, which was ripe for invasion by Confederate forces that had set their sights on the city, became a top priority for the U.S. government.

Before the Airplane

 America steams ahead: Incredible black-and-white pictures
  capture how railroads and steamboats helped
  forge its future at the turn of the 20th century

· 07/20/2012 6:29:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 23 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· July 19, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

They are images of a nation in motion -- of a country building its future with expanding railroads and industrial opportunities. These glorious black-and-white photographs, which have been released by the Library of Congress, reveal America reveling in its new-found productivity, at a time when steam engines and steamboats were forging the nation ahead. The images, taken between 1870 and 1920, capture the determination with which America tackled the new century -- and how the country also began enjoying the fruits of the 19th century's industrial labour, in what was termed the Gilded Age.

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Latest Amelia Earhart search falls short

· 07/23/2012 11:52:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by iowamark ·
· 16 replies ·
· CBS News ·
· July 24, 2012 ·
· AP ·

A $2.2 million expedition that hoped to find wreckage from famed aviator Amelia Earhart's final flight is on its way back to Hawaii without the dramatic, conclusive plane images searchers were hoping to attain. But the group leading the search, The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, still believes Earhart and her navigator crashed onto a reef off a remote island in the Pacific Ocean 75 years ago this month, its president told The Associated Press on Monday. "This is just sort of the way things are in this world," TIGHAR president Pat Thrasher said. "It's not like an Indiana...

Two Submarines

 Search team returning to Churchill River after release
  of sonar images showing suspected Nazi submarine

· 07/27/2012 6:48:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Squawk 8888 ·
· 10 replies ·
· National Post ·
· July 26, 2012 ·
· Jake Edmiston ·

Until this week, proof of a sunken Nazi submarine in Labrador was confined to old rumours of dark shadows in the Churchill River. The stories go back decades, suggesting that German U-boats had snaked along the river bottom and deep into Labrador. Now newly released sonar images depicting a mysterious submerged shape near Happy Valley-Goose Bay have generated excitement among those who believe the old tales and skepticism among those who don't.


 German U-boat Found 100 Kilometers Inland in Labrador

· 07/27/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JerseyanExile ·
· 36 replies ·
· Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ·
· July 25, 2012 ·
· CBC News ·

An important piece of history from the Second World War may be sitting in a river in Labrador. Searchers believe they've found a German U-boat buried in the sand on the bottom of the Churchill River. The discovery has yet to be authenticated. Two years ago, searchers scoured the bottom of the Churchill River with side-scanning sonar. They were looking for three men lost over Muskrat Falls. When they reviewed the footage from that search, they made an unexpected discovery. "We were looking for something completely different, not a submarine, not a U-boat -- I mean, no one would ever...


 Explorers find downed German U-Boat off Mass.

· 07/27/2012 4:03:08 PM PDT ·
· Posted by robowombat ·
· 39 replies ·
· Associated Press ·
· Jul 27, 5:22 PM EDT ·
· Jay Lindsay ·

BOSTON (AP) -- Divers have discovered a World War II-era German submarine nearly 70 years after it sank under withering U.S. attack in waters off Nantucket. The U-550 was found Monday by a privately funded group organized by New Jersey lawyer Joe Mazraani. It was the second trip in two years to the site by the team, some of whom had been searching for the lost U-boat for two decades. Using side-scan sonar, the seven-man team located the wreck listing to its side in deep water about 70 miles south of Nantucket. Sonar operator Garry Kozak said he spotted the...

World War Eleven

 Doolittle Raiders share memories of their exploits at EAA

· 07/25/2012 2:30:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by GOP_Party_Animal ·
· 15 replies ·
· Milwaukee Journal Sentinal ·
· 7-25-2012 ·
· Meg Jones ·

Oshkosh -- As they flew over Tokyo, Richard Cole and David Thatcher realized with relief that Japanese anti-aircraft gunners had never before fired at enemy planes. As the first Americans to strike Japan's home islands during World War II, Cole and Thatcher found that the ack-ack-ack of the flak guns did little damage to the 16 B-25B Mitchell medium bombers that achieved fame as the Doolittle Raiders. It was only four months after the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, and Japanese military commanders had promised their nation that it was invulnerable. The American crews lost all their planes and their...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Fundamentally Freund: Jewish unity and Joseph's Tomb

· 07/25/2012 7:41:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Former Fetus ·
· 5 replies ·
· The Jerusalem Post ·
· 7/25/2012 ·
· MICHAEL FREUND ·

Last week, in the most unlikely of places, I came face to face with the power of Jewish unity. It was well after midnight when the convoy of heavily-guarded Israeli cars and buses began the short drive through the deserted streets of Shechem (Nablus). Posted along the way were young men in IDF uniforms, keeping a watchful eye on the hundreds of Jews who were braving the late hour and our hostile neighbors to visit an ancient Jewish holy site in the heart of Palestinian-controlled territory. For years, I had wanted to visit Joseph's Tomb, the burial place of one...

Bytes of Reality

 Researchers Produce First Complete Computer Model of an Organism

· 07/21/2012 9:27:35 AM PDT ·
· Posted by onedoug ·
· 22 replies ·
· Science Daily ·
· 21 JULY 2012 ·
· Max McClure, Stanford University ·

In a breakthrough effort for computational biology, the world's first complete computer model of an organism has been completed, Stanford researchers reported last week in the journal Cell. A team led by Markus Covert, assistant professor of bioengineering, used data from more than 900 scientific papers to account for every molecular interaction that takes place in the life cycle of Mycoplasma genitalium, the world's smallest free-living bacterium. ....

Panspermia

  SETI and Intelligent Design

· 12/02/2005 8:35:59 AM PST ·
· Posted by ckilmer ·
· 213 replies ·
· space.com ·
· posted: 01 December 2005 ·
· Seth Shostak ·

SETI and Intelligent Design By Seth ShostakSETI Instituteposted: 01 December 200506:37 am ET If you're an inveterate tube-o-phile, you may remember the episode of "Cheers" in which Cliff, the postman who's stayed by neither snow, nor rain, nor gloom of night from his appointed rounds of beer, exclaims to Norm that he's found a potato that looks like Richard Nixon's head.This could be an astonishing attempt by taters to express their political views, but Norm is unimpressed. Finding evidence of complexity (the Nixon physiognomy) in a natural setting (the spud), and inferring some deliberate, magical mechanism behind it all,...

Didn't Get the Memo? Fiction Has To Make Sense

 1987 Time Capsule of Predictions on 2012 by Sci-Fi Authors

· 07/25/2012 10:09:45 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JerseyanExile ·
· 61 replies ·
· Writers of the Future ·

ISAAC ASIMOVAssuming we haven't destroyed ourselves in a nuclear war, there will be 8-10 billion of us on this planet -- and widespread hunger. These troubles can be traced back to President Ronald Reagan who smiled and waved too much. GREGORY BENFORD YOUR FUTURE AND WELCOME TO IT -- 25 years from now. World population stands at nearly 8 billion. The Dow-Jones Industrial Average stands at 8,400, but the dollar is worth a third of today's. Oil is running out, but shale-extracted oil is getting cheaper. The real shortage in much of the world is water. Most Americans are barely literate, think in...

Africa

 Massive Underground Water Supply Found In Desert African Country
  (Supply could last 400 years)

· 07/21/2012 12:25:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 51 replies ·
· Business Insider ·
· 07/21/2012 ·
· Michael Kelley ·

A newly discovered water source could supply half of Africa's driest sub-Saharan country with 400 years of water, reports Matt McGrath of BBC. The new aquifer -- called Ohangwena II -- flows under the border between Angola and Namibia, covering an area of about 43 miles by 25 miles on Namibia's side. The water is up to 10,000 years old and cleaner to drink than many modern sources. Project manager Martin Quinger told BBC that the stored water could last 400 years based on current rates of consumption. Currently the 800,000 people living in the northern part of the country...

Primatology

 Gorillas filmed performing amazing feat of intellectual ability

· 07/24/2012 7:44:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Engraved-on-His-hands ·
· 28 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· July 23, 2012 ·
· Bob Yirka ·

Researchers working in Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda have filmed gorillas dismantling snares set by poachers to catch smaller game. Previously, anecdotal evidence had suggested that silverback gorillas had been seen dismantling snares. In this instance it was two young blackback, mountain gorillas that were involved. The team, part of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund's Karisoke Research Center, filmed first a silverback motioning towards the snare. Next, two young male blackbacks arrived on the scene, surveyed the situation, then proceeded to take apart the snare, avoiding being caught in it in the process.

Faith & Philosophy

 Buddha tree alive and healthy at age 2,500

· 07/22/2012 6:21:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TigerLikesRooster ·
· 33 replies ·
· UPI ·
· 07/20/12 ·

Published: July 20, 2012 at 5:54 PM BODH GAYA, India, July 20 (UPI) -- The 2,500-year-old tree under which Gautama Buddha is believed to have attained enlightenment is alive and healthy, Indian scientists said Thursday. The Bodhi tree, a large Sacred Fig (Ficus religiosa,) is in Bodh Gaya in India's eastern state of Bihar, about 60 miles from the state capital of Patna. "The Bodhi tree is fully healthy," Subhash Nautiyal of the Forest Research Institute in India's northern state of Uttarakhand said. Nautiyal and colleagues examined the tree after removing the cement slabs around its base, China's Xinhua News...

end of digest #419 20120728


1,437 posted on 07/28/2012 9:23:55 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #419 · v 9 · n 3
Saturday, July 28, 2012
 
39 topics
2911689 to 2909076
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
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 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
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 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
39 topics?!? Clearly, you've all been working too hard this week. Keep it up! And many thanks from me and on behalf of all.

Troll activity in all threads has been a little lower, but it continues. At this point it's merely an annoyance, and I hardly dumped a Back to the Future load of manure on anyone this week.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
  • "Unlike our Recumbent Resident, these early hominids actually have a bit of documentation." -- [Kenny Bunk right here]
 
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1,438 posted on 07/28/2012 9:29:02 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

LOL
Loved the Back to the Future reference.

cheers


1,439 posted on 07/28/2012 11:14:01 AM PDT by TheConservativeParty (O.M.G. Obummer Must Go)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1438 | View Replies]

To: TheConservativeParty

:’) Thanks.


1,440 posted on 07/28/2012 1:03:01 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #420
Saturday, August 4, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Palm trees 'grew on Antarctica' (in the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago.)

· 08/02/2012 1:05:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NormsRevenge ·
· 23 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· 8/2/12 ·
· Jason Palmer ·

Scientists drilling deep into the edge of modern Antarctica have pulled up proof that palm trees once grew there. Analyses of pollen and spores and the remains of tiny creatures have given a climatic picture of the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago. The study in Nature suggests Antarctic winter temperatures exceeded 10C, while summers may have reached 25C. Better knowledge of past "greenhouse" conditions will enhance guesses about the effects of increasing CO2 today. The early Eocene -- often referred to as the Eocene greenhouse -- has been a subject of increasing interest in recent years as...

Egypt

 Archeologists unearth extraordinary human sculpture in Turkey [ Suppiluliuma ]

· 07/30/2012 8:19:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 60 replies ·
· Eurekalert ·
· Monday, July 30, 2012 ·
· Kim Luke, U of Toronto ·

The head and torso of the human figure, intact to just above its waist, stands approximately 1.5 meters in height, suggesting a total body length of 3.5 to four meters. The figure's face is bearded, with beautifully preserved inlaid eyes made of white and black stone, and its hair has been coiffed in an elaborate series of curls aligned in linear rows. Both arms are extended forward from the elbow, each with two arm bracelets decorated with lion heads. The figure's right hand holds a spear, and in its left is a shaft of wheat. A crescent-shaped pectoral adorns...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Archeologists find 3,300-year-old burnt wheat

· 07/28/2012 7:32:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· Jerusalem Post ·
· Tuesday, July 24, 2012 ·
· Sharon Udasin ·

A team from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority (INPA) uncovered 14 large pithoi-style bulk storage jugs filled with the wheat inside what was a storage room in a monumental, palace-like building from the Canaanite period (2,000-3,000 BCE), the INPA said on Monday. After the jars are fully exposed the researchers will transfer them to conservation and restoration laboratories. Afterwards, the palace will be covered up again until the next excavation season. Archeological excavations at Hatzor have been conducted by Hebrew University in cooperation with the INPA for the past couple of decades. In...

Diet & Cuisine

 Luxury food and pampered pooches in Iron Age Britain

· 08/01/2012 4:00:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 2 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 7/2012 ·
· University of Reading ·

University of Reading archaeologists have found evidence that Iron Age people in Britain were spicing up meals with foods and seasoning imported from around the Mediterranean. Previously it had been assumed that prior to the Roman occupation of Britain, only liquid products such as olive oil and wine were imported from across the Channel. However archaeologists working at Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire have discovered that people of that time were importing Mediterranean seasoning as well as whole olives themselves....


 Silchester Iron Age finds reveal secrets of pre-Roman Britain

· 08/01/2012 4:06:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 3 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 7-31-2012 ·
· Maev Kennedy ·

...The banal seeds are astonishing because many came from a level dating to a century before the Romans. More evidence is emerging every day, and it is clear that from around 50BC the Iron Age Atrebates tribe, whose name survived in the Latin Calleva Atrebatum, the wooded place of the Atrebates, enjoyed a lifestyle that would have been completely familiar to the Romans when they arrived in AD43. Their diet would also be quite familiar to many in 21st-century Britain. The people ate shellfish -- previously thought to have been eaten only in coastal settlements -- as well as cows,...

The Roman Empire

 'Perplexing' find at Alderney Roman dig

· 07/29/2012 4:45:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· BBC ·
· Saturday, July 28, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Archaeologists have found something "interesting" and "perplexing" at a Roman dig in Alderney. A team from the island, the UK and Guernsey are excavating land at the fort of the nunnery at Longy Common. The dig is focusing on a gateway and wall but the team said they were "not expecting" the way it was laid out. Dr Jason Monaghan said: "We've found something interesting, but we don't actually know what it is until we take a bit more dirt out." Dr Monaghan, Director of Guernsey Museums, said the team had dug a trench to examine the gateway. "It's a...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Archaeology: Serbia, 31 early Christian tombs discovered

· 07/28/2012 7:53:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· ANSA ·
· Friday, July 27, 2012 ·
· ANSAmed ·

The remains of 31 early Christian tombs have been discovered during archaeological excavations in Nis, Serbia's third largest city in the southern part of the country. "These are the most important excavations carried out so far on the site of the early Christian necropolis of Jagodin-mala", said Toni Cerskov, who heads the team of 45 archaeologists, architects, anthropologists, photographers and workers at the site. The tombs are located under the former textile factory Niteks, the Tanjug news agency reports. Cerskov said the tombs are among the most important findings regarding the early Christian period and can be compared to the...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Does this coin found near Jerusalem prove that Samson lived?

· 07/31/2012 9:12:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by the scotsman ·
· 34 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 31st July 2012 ·
· Leon Watson ·

'A tiny seal has been uncovered that could be the first archaeological evidence of Samson, the Biblical slayer of Philistines. Archaeologists discovered the ancient artifact while excavating the tell of Beit Shemesh in the Judaean Hills near Jerusalem, Israel. It appears to depict the Old Testament story of Samson, whose might was undone by his lust for the temptress Delilah, and his fight with a lion. The seal, which measures less than an inch in diameter, shows a large animal with a feline tail attacking a human figure. The seal was discovered at a level of excavation that dates it...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ancient Burial Box Linked to Priest Who Played Part in Christ's Crucifixion

· 08/03/2012 2:44:21 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 27 replies ·
· Christian Post ·
· August 30, 2012 ·
· Nicola Menzie ·

Yosef bar Caifa Scientists at a university in Israel believe they have discovered an ancient burial box belonging to the family of the high priest who played a part in the crucifixion of Jesus as described in the Bible. The burial box, or ossuary, was recovered from looters three years ago by the Israel Antiquities Authority. On close examination the ossuary was found to have a rare inscription mentioning the names "Miriam," "Yeshua," and "Caiaphus. "Once the inscription was authenticated, archaeologists were astounded by what they had found. According to researchers, the Caiaphus mentioned in the carved-in inscription may very well be the same...

Early America

 500 year old rum? Archaeologists search for the real Captain Morgan

· 07/29/2012 2:13:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 13 replies ·
· FoxNews.com ·
· July 26, 2012 ·
· FoxNews.com ·

To life, love and a legendary privateer's lost fleet. U.S. archaeologists are continuing their search for real-life buccaneer Captain Henry Morgan's lost fleet after the discovery of six cannons, a 17th century wooden shipwreck and even a barrel that may very well contain rum. Yo, ho ho indeed. Aptly backed by the Captain Morgan rum brand, a team of leading archaeologists led by Frederick "Fritz" Hanselmann of Texas State University hope to unlock the myth and mysteries of one of history's most iconic sea captains. "We're interested in telling the true story of Henry Morgan," Hanselmann, who is a director...

Obituaries

 Sir John Keegan -- RIP

· 08/03/2012 5:16:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 16 replies ·
· Daily Telegraph ·
· August 2, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

He had been on the teaching staff of the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, for 25 years in 1986 when Max Hastings announced his recruitment to the paper the day he took over the editor's chair. Keegan proved an unrivalled asset as the Soviet empire crumbled and collapsed, the government demanded a "peace dividend" in the form of cutbacks to the Armed Forces and a series of military actions flared up in the Middle East and the Balkans.

Epigraphy & Language

 You write potato, I write ghoughpteighbteau

· 08/21/2008 4:42:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by forkinsocket ·
· 31 replies ·
· The Economist ·
· Aug 14th 2008 ·
· Staff ·

GHOTI and tchoghs may not immediately strike readers as staples of the British diet; and even those most enamoured of written English's idiosyncrasies may wince at this tendentious rendering of "fish and chips". Yet the spelling, easily derived from other words*, highlights the shortcomings of English orthography. This has long bamboozled foreigners and natives alike, and may underlie the national test results released on August 12th which revealed that almost a third of English 14-year-olds cannot read properly. One solution, suggested recently by Ken Smith of the Buckinghamshire New University, is to accept the most common misspellings as variants rather...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Human cycles: History as science (new wave of violence predicted for US)

· 08/02/2012 5:27:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 25 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 1 Aug 2012 ·
· Laura Spinney ·

Researcher Peter Turchin sees two cycles driving political instability. The secular cycle, lasting two to three centuries, starts with a relatively egalitarian society (supply and demand for labour roughly balance). But over time, population grows, labour supply outstrips demand, elites form and the living standards of the poorest fall. Then the society becomes top-heavy with elites, who start fighting for power. Political instability ensues, leading to collapse, and the cycle begins again. The shorter fathers-and-sons cycle, spanning 50 years or two generations, interacts with the longer cycle. Turchin sees this cycle peaking around 1870 (ethnic strife, class resentment), 1920 (race...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Liberal profs admit they'd discriminate against conservatives in hiring, advancement

· 08/02/2012 2:03:10 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Cincinatus' Wife ·
· 40 replies ·
· The Washington Times ·
· August 1, 2012 ·
· Emily Esfahani Smith ·

Psychologists Yoel Inbar and Joris Lammers, based at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, surveyed a roughly representative sample of academics and scholars in social psychology and found that "In decisions ranging from paper reviews to hiring, many social and personality psychologists admit that they would discriminate against openly conservative colleagues." This finding surprised the researchers. The survey questions "were so blatant that I thought we'd get a much lower rate of agreement," Mr. Inbar said. "Usually you have to be pretty tricky to get people to say they'd discriminate against minorities." One question, according to the researchers, "asked whether, in...

end of digest #420 20120804


1,441 posted on 08/04/2012 7:36:27 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #420 · v 9 · n 4
Saturday, August 4, 2012
 
39 topics
2914106 to 2911965
815 members
view this issue

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 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
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 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
This week GGG took a bit of a breather with a mere 14 topics. Again, some were left on deck, but I was busy with real life and/or stranded on dialup, or worse yet, having to use wintel. A couple of nights I konked out by 10 pm.

Troll activity in all threads has been quite a bit lower.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
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1,442 posted on 08/04/2012 7:52:21 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1441 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Re: dial-ups

We got rid of our dial-up last November.
This November we get rid of something else.

: )


1,443 posted on 08/04/2012 8:12:17 AM PDT by TheConservativeParty (O.M.G. Obummer Must Go / LUV my GOV Scott Walker)
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To: TheConservativeParty

:’D


1,444 posted on 08/04/2012 8:15:35 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1443 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #421
Saturday, August 11, 2012

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 How did the wolf become dog ?

· 08/05/2012 10:18:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by djone ·
· 31 replies ·
· salon.com ·
· Mark Derr ·

Derr acknowledges that the story of the dog's emergence (as distinct from its evolutionary forebear, the wolf) cannot be "neatly distilled." Different estimates place the first appearance of dog-like creatures anywhere from 12,000 to 135,000 years ago. But Derr argues that the dog itself was an "evolutionary inevitability." He suggests that dogs and humans -- similar animals who "simply took to traveling with each other" tens of thousands of years ago, "and never stopped" --

Diet & Cuisine

 Brewing Stone Age beer

· 08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 50 replies ·
· sciencenordic.com ·
· 7-20-2012 ·
· Asle Rønning ·

Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway's Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. "This is fun -- really thrilling. It's hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway," says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Researchers find evidence of ritual use of 'black drink' at Cahokia

· 08/08/2012 5:53:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 44 replies ·
· Heritage Daily ·
· 8-7-2012 ·

People living 700 to 900 years ago in Cahokia, a massive settlement near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, ritually used a caffeinated brew made from the leaves of a holly tree that grew hundreds of miles away, researchers report. The discovery -- made by analyzing plant residues in pottery beakers from Cahokia and its surroundings -- is the earliest known use of this "black drink" in North America. It pushes back the date by at least 500 years, and adds to the evidence that a broad cultural and trade network thrived in the Midwest and southeastern U.S....

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 For Indians, ax marked first chapter of disaster

· 08/07/2012 6:48:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· Columbus Dispatch ·
· Sunday July 29, 2012 8:04 AM ·
· Bradley T. Lepper ·

The ax is significant because it predates the documented arrival of European explorers in the region by a century or more. It likely was brought to America by Basque whalers or fishermen who traded it to some coastal-dwelling Indian for animal furs. It then must have been passed from one tribe to another until it was eventually acquired by a resident of the Mantle site. European artifacts also have been found at the late prehistoric Madisonville site in Hamilton County in southwestern Ohio. Although large by Ohio standards, it wouldn't have compared to the Mantle site. Archaeologist Penelope Drooker estimated...

Ancient Autopsies

 What Vikings really looked like

· 08/05/2012 6:28:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 45 replies ·
· ScienceNordic ·
· 7-29-2012 ·
· Irene Berg Sørensen ·

There's no shortage of myths about the appearance of our notorious Viking ancestors. To find out more about these myths, ScienceNordic's Danish partner site, videnskab.dk, asked its Facebook readers to list their favourite myths about what the Vikings looked like. We have picked out five myths from the resulting debate and asked researchers to help us confirm or bust these myths. Armed with this information, our graphic designer then took a shot at drawing some examples of our infamous forefathers, which you can see in our picture gallery...

Epigraphy & Language

 Medieval silver treasure found on Gotland

· 08/05/2012 5:12:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by csvset ·
· 4 replies ·
· The Local ·
· 4 Aug 12 ·
· Clara Guibourg ·

A silver treasure from the 12th century has been found on the Baltic island Gotland, where over 600 pieces of silver coins have been unearthed, according to reports in local media. "This is an amazing find. It's unbelievable that treasures of this scale exist here on Gotland," Marie Louise Hellquist of Gotland's County Administrative Board (Länsstyrelsen) told local newspaper Hela Gotland. The medieval treasure was uncovered last Monday, as the landowner was moving soil. Some 500 pieces of coin were discovered in the field, and following further searches conducted once archaeologists arrived on Wednesday, that figure has swollen considerably. "In...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 Mass grave in London reveals how volcano caused global catastrophe

· 08/05/2012 5:20:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 34 replies ·
· The Guardian (UK) ·
· 8-4-2012 ·
· Dalya Alberge ·

When archaeologists discovered thousands of medieval skeletons in a mass burial pit in east London in the 1990s, they assumed they were 14th-century victims of the Black Death or the Great Famine of 1315-17. Now they have been astonished by a more explosive explanation -- a cataclysmic volcano that had erupted a century earlier, thousands of miles away in the tropics, and wrought havoc on medieval Britons. Scientific evidence -- including radiocarbon dating of the bones and geological data from across the globe -- shows for the first time that mass fatalities in the 13th century were caused by one...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 The Roots of Jewishness

· 08/09/2012 6:34:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 27 replies ·
· ScienceNOW ·
· 6 August 2012 ·
· Gisela Telis ·

Family ties. Most Jewish populations share a genetic connection, but some groups, such as Ethiopian Jews (pictured here, sharing unleavened bread ahead of Passover), stand alone. Credit: Eliana Aponte/Reuters Scholars of all kinds have long debated one seemingly simple question: What is "Jewishness?" Is it defined by genetics, culture, or religion? Recent findings have revealed genetic ties that suggest a biological basis for Jewishness, but this research didn't include data from North African, Ethiopian, or other Jewish communities. Now a new study fills in the genetic mapâ?"and paints a more complex picture of what it means to...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Susita Site Yields Surprises

· 08/07/2012 2:19:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Eleutheria5 ·
· 19 replies ·
· Arutz Sheva ·
· 7/8/12 ·
· Gil Ronen ·

The 13th year of Haifa University's archeological digs at the Susita site just east of the Sea of Galilee (Kinneret) has yielded several surprises, including what experts believe is a portrait of a local man from the 3rd century CE, carved into a basalt gravestone. Susita -- as it is known in the Aramaic version -- was originally known by the Latin name Hippos. Both names refer to horses, although the reason for this name is not known. It was destroyed by the earthquake of 749 CE. Archeologist Dr. Michael Eisenberg explained that the "Susita man" rock was found in...

Longer Perspectives

 First Person: Should Israel Return the Tablets of the Law to Egypt? [ hypothetically ]

· 08/08/2012 6:52:49 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· BAR 38:05, Sep/Oct 2012 ·
· Hershel Shanks ·

In 1969, barely two years after the 1967 Six-Day War, a team of Israeli archaeologists made an exploratory excavation at the base of one of the numerous sites in the Sinai Peninsula proposed as Biblical Mt. Sinai. It was not long before a member of the team exposed a piece of rock with a single Hebrew letter on it. This naturally led to more intensive excavation in this area, as a result of which additional, larger pieces of inscribed stones were recovered. They were taken to Israel for further study. When examined by paleographers, experts in dating inscriptions by the...

Climate

 Scafetta's new paper attempts to link climate cycles to planetary motion ( March 2012)

· 08/08/2012 12:52:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 14 replies ·
· March 21, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

Nicola Scafetta sent me this paper yesterday, and I read it with interest, but I have a number of reservations about it, not the least of which is that it is partially based on the work of Landscheidt and the whole barycentric thing which gets certain people into shouting matches. Figure 9 looks to be interesting, but note that it is in generic units, not temperature, so has no predictive value by itself.Fig. 9. Proposed solar harmonic reconstructions based on four beat frequencies. (Top) Average beat envelope function of the model (Eq. (18)) and (Bottom) the version modulated with a...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Ancient records shed light on Italian earthquakes (Aquila area)

· 08/10/2012 4:03:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Friday, August 3, 2012 ·
· Seismological Society of America ·

The rich recorded history of settlement in the area, along with oral traditions, archaeological excavations, inscriptions and medieval texts, and offer insight into how often the region might expect destructive earthquakes. But according to a new study by Emanuela Guidoboni and colleagues, the historical record on ancient and medieval earthquakes comes with its own shortcomings that must be addressed before the seismic history of L'Aquila can be useful in assessing the current seismic hazard in this area... ...the researchers combed through written records and information from archaeological excavations, covering the period from ancient Roman occupation in the first century A.D....


 Italian 'Super Volcano' May Threaten Millions: Scientists plan to drill deep below Romans'...

· 08/06/2012 7:54:17 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 35 replies ·
· Newser ·
· Monday, August 06, 2012 ·
· Rob Quinn ·

A hidden "super volcano" near Pompeii threatens an eruption that could make Vesuvius look like a picnic, scientists warn. The Phlegraean Fields zone of intense seismic activity -- which the ancient Romans believed was the gateway to hell -- could doom millions of people in the Naples area if it erupts, Reuters reports. Scientists plan to drill more than two miles below its surface to monitor any signs of a pending eruption in the huge chamber of molten rock, but some experts fear that the drilling itself could trigger an earthquake or eruption. Areas like the Phlegraean fields "can give...

The Roman Empire

 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck that is so well preserved even the FOOD is intact

· 08/09/2012 8:38:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Kartographer ·
· 38 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· 8/9/12 ·
· Mark Prigg ·

The ship, a navis oneraria, or merchant vessel, was located at a depth of about 200 feet after a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was used to scour the seabed. A search for the shipwreck was launched after local fisherman revealed they kept finding pieces of pottery in their nets. The divers found the wreck so well preserved even the food, still sealed in over 200 pots, is intact.

Egypt

 Possible Egyptian pyramids found using Google Earth

· 08/10/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· Archaeology News Network ·
· Monday, August 6, 2012 ·
· Posted by TANN ·

One of the complex sites contains a distinct, four-sided, truncated, pyramidal shape that is approximately 140 feet in width. This site contains three smaller mounds in a very clear formation, similar to the diagonal alignment of the Giza Plateau pyramids. The second possible site contains four mounds with a larger, triangular-shaped plateau. The two larger mounds at this site are approximately 250 feet in width, with two smaller mounds approximately 100 feet in width. This site complex is arranged in a very clear formation with the large plateau, or butte, nearby in a triangular shape with a width of approximately...

Early America

 Wreck thought to be famous 19th-century pirate ship that sank with hold full of treasure

· 08/09/2012 9:30:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wildbill ·
· 21 replies ·
· Mailonline ·
· 8/9/2012 ·
· Emma Reynolds ·

A shipwreck discovered in Tonga is thought to be a famous pirate vessel that sank in the 19th century with a hold full of treasure. Legend has it that the Port-au-Prince was attacked by warriors near the South Pacific archipelago in 1806 and most of its British crew massacred on the orders of King Finau 'Ulukalala II. The British had captured the ship from the French and made into a privateer -- meaning it had permission to attack and plunder boats belonging to rivals Spain and France.

The Revolution

 Ceremony held to remember the Battle of Oriskany [235 year anniversary]

· 08/08/2012 7:13:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 18 replies ·
· Rome (NY) Observer ·
· August 07, 2012 ·
· RACHEL MURPHY ·

ORISKANY -- Nearly 200 people gathered Monday to remember the 235th anniversary of one of the bloodiest battles during the Revolutionary War at The Battle of Oriskany. It was a commemorative ceremony held by members of the Oneida Nation and representatives from the National Parks Service at Fort Stanwix. During the ceremony flags were lowered to half-staff, wreaths were placed at the monument, and men wore military costumes while firing off muskets. "There were hundreds of people who lost their lives here in this battle and it's really important to remember those people who gave their lives for our freedom today," said...

Schooled

 Three smart history podcasts

· 08/09/2012 12:57:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by iowamark ·
· 4 replies ·
· Sacramento Bee ·
· August 8, 2012 ·
· Pete Basofin ·

The Internet Age is a golden age for history buffs. Think of the sheer quantity of material -- lectures, conferences, books, articles, photographs, paintings, maps, census records, historic audio and video clips, all kinds of of primary and secondary resources -- available at the click of a mouse. There are also podcasts devoted to history. Podcasts (for the uninitiated) are audio or video series produced by amateurs or professional outlets on every imaginable topic... BackStory with the American History Guys. Hosted by three experts representing the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, BackStory aims to bring a "historical perspective to the...

Olympiads

 The 1904 Olympic Marathon May Have Been the Strangest Ever

· 08/08/2012 10:13:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 35 replies ·
· The Smithsonian ·
· 8-7-12 ·

America's first Olympics may have been its worst, or at least its most bizarre. Held in 1904 in St. Louis, the games were tied to that year's World's Fair, which celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase while advancing, as did all such turn-of-the-century expositions, the notion of American imperialism. Although there were moments of surprising and genuine triumph (gymnast George Eyser earned six medals, including three gold, despite his wooden leg), the games were largely overshadowed by the fair, which offered its own roster of sporting events, including the controversial Anthropology Days, in which a group of "savages" recruited...

The Great War

 Letter to Winston Churchill May Contain First Known Use of 'OMG'

· 08/08/2012 3:55:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TurboZamboni ·
· 17 replies ·
· NY Magazine ·
· 8-7-12 ·
· Brett Smiley ·

Letters of Note curator Shaun Usher has pointed out what might be the first known usage of O.M.G., in a September 1917 missive from British admiral John Arbuthnot "Jacky" Fisher (or Lord Fisher) to Sir Winston Churchill. In a letter to Churchill about some "utterly [upsetting]" World War I-era newspaper headlines, Fisher wrote, "I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis -- O.M.G (Oh! My! God!) -- Shower it on the Admiralty!!" To which we assume Churchill replied, "Oh Dear Fisher! I am laughing heartily out loud!!"

The Only Face of Socialism

 Seventy-Five Years After Stalin's Great "Operation Kulak" Reign of Terror

· 08/05/2012 3:06:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ReformationFan ·
· 18 replies ·
· The New American ·
· August 5, 2012 ·
· Bruce Walker ·

Seventy-five years ago, on August 5, 1937, one of the most horrific -- and most ignored -- episodes in human history began. "Operation Kulak" ("kulak" meaning rich peasants) was the Soviet Union's effort to repress those farmers who had a little more than other farmers (according, at least, to the definitions of the Communist Party), and who resisted collectivization. Soviet dictator Josef Stalin (pictured) had begun the development of "Operation Kulak" the previous month, when he contacted all the regional Party leaders as well as the NKVD (roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Gestapo and SS in Nazi Germany), asking...

Obituaries

 Last Polish soldier of WWII opening battle dies (Westerplatte)

· 08/06/2012 12:40:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by dfwgator ·
· 21 replies ·
· Associated Press ·
· ·

WARSAW, Poland (AP) -- Maj. Ignacy Skowron, the last known survivor of World War II's Battle of Westerplatte, has died. He was 97. Family friend Zofia Nowak said Monday that Skowron died at his grandson's home in Kielce, in southern Poland on Sunday after suffering circulatory, liver and pancreas problems.

World War Eleven

 10 Things You Don't Know About Guadalcanal

· 08/07/2012 3:18:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by PJ-Comix ·
· 90 replies ·
· 10 Things You Don't Know About ·
· August 7, 2012 ·
· PJ-Comix ·

Today marks the 70th anniversary of the first offensive land operation taken by the United States in World War II. On August 7, 1942, the U.S. Marines landed at Guadalcanal. The general outlines of that battle which lasted which lasted 6 months until February 9, 1943 are known by many but here are 19 things about Guadalcanal that you might not know. This is the first of my regular "20 Things You Don't Know" posts that I hope will encourage the History Channel to bring back that series. You can read my full mission statement about this in my...

Pages

 Book review- Bending the Twig: The Revolution in Education and Its Effect on Our Children

· 08/09/2012 6:52:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ProgressingAmerica ·
· 16 replies ·
· PGA Weblog ·
· ·

'Tis education forms the common mind Just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined -- Alexander Pope Progressive education.... what is it? Where does it come from? Is America the only place it's ever been tried? I've made my own attempts to dig into progressive education, but I can only use the internet for my queries. This book titled "Bending the twig; the revolution in education and its effect on our children" is a genuine inquiry based on thoughtful research into the topic using sources I'd probably never have access to. The review for this book comes from a...


 The Tragedy Europe Forgot (Expulsions of Germans From East of the Oder)

· 08/10/2012 7:02:19 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 9 replies ·
· Wall Street Journal ·
· August 9, 2012 ·
· Andrew Stuttaford ·

By the late spring of 1945, Germany had lost a war, its honor and millions of dead. There was more to come. The Allies had decided that the country's east should be carved up between Poland and the Soviet Union and that its German inhabitants should be moved to the truncated Reich. There they would encounter Sudeten Germans, Czechoslovakia's second largest ethnic group, now also scheduled for deportation. In August 1945, the United Kingdom, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed at Potsdam that these transfers, which had in any case already begun, should be "orderly and humane."

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan was Unavoidable

· 08/05/2012 1:27:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Retain Mike ·
· 46 replies ·
· class="attrib">Self ·
· August 5, 2012 ·
· Self ·

Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Unavoidable We now mark the 67th anniversary of dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. Once again we must listen to the contra-factual analysis of revisionists as they expound on what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. In support of dropping the atomic bombs historians often cite the inevitability of horrifying casualties, if troops had landed on the home islands. They extrapolate from 48,000 American and 230,000 Japanese losses on Okinawa to estimates of 500,000 American and millions of Japanese casualties for mainland invasions. However,...

Palontology

 Dinosaur Boom Linked to Rise of Rocky Mountains

· 08/05/2012 5:26:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 22 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 8-3-2012 ·
· Charles Choi ·

The evolution of new dinosaur species may have surged due to the rise of the Rocky Mountains and the emergence of a prehistoric inner sea in North America, researchers say. Duck-billed and horned dinosaurs flourished in North America, reaching a peak about 75 million years ago, a time known as the Campanian. For instance, one Campanian region known as the Dinosaur Park formation in what is now Canada saw seven different duck-billed dinosaur species and five horned dinosaur species emerge. A comparable region known as the Hell Creek formation in the United States from the Maastrichtian, the time that led...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Has the Loch Ness Monster Finally Been Caught on Camera?

· 08/04/2012 6:49:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 65 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 08/03/2012 ·

A monster hunter who has spent 26 years searching for the Loch Ness Monster claims to have taken the "best picture ever" of the beast, after dedicating 60 hours a week to his quest.Nessie hunter George Edwards waited 26 years for this moment -- and he now believes he has the best picture ever taken of the Loch Ness monster. He spends his life on the loch -- around 60 hours a week -- taking tourists out on his boat Nessie Hunter IV, and has led numerous Nessie hunts over the years. But this image is the one that's convinced...

end of digest #421 20120811


1,445 posted on 08/11/2012 6:40:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1441 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #421 · v 9 · n 5
Saturday, August 11, 2012
 
28 topics
2916849 to 2914827
815 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
This week I was a kept man, having to barely lift a finger posting topics, and yet we have 28! Nice job, and many thanks, to all who contributed!

Last week GGG had taken a bit of a breather with a mere 14 topics, but I forgot to update the digest header, which still showed 39 topics. In my defense, out of the 421 digests, I've only messed up someting in like half of them.

Romney-Ryan 2012.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Ya picked a fine time to leave me, loose wheel. [splat!]

Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,446 posted on 08/11/2012 7:14:55 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1445 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #422
Saturday, August 18, 2012

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Genetic Study Offers Clues to History of North Africa's Jews

· 08/12/2012 6:05:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 9 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· 8/7/12 ·
· Sharon Begley ·

(Reuters) - A new genetic analysis has reconstructed the history of North Africa's Jews, showing that these populations date to biblical-era Israel and are not largely the descendants of natives who converted to Judaism, scientists reported on Monday. The study also shows that these Jews form two distinct groups, one of which is more closely related than the other to their European counterparts, reflecting historical migrations. The findings are the latest in series of genetic studies, which began in the 1990s, indicating that the world's Jews share biological roots, not just cultural and religious ties. In many cases the analyses...

Egypt


Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Severed Hands Discovered in Ancient Egypt Palace

· 08/12/2012 6:57:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 56 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· August 10th, 2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

A team of archaeologists excavating a palace in the ancient city of Avaris, in Egypt, has made a gruesome discovery. The archaeologists have unearthed the skeletons of 16 human hands buried in four pits. Two of the pits, located in front of what is believed to be a throne room, hold one hand each. Two other pits, constructed at a slightly later time in an outer space of the palace, contain the 14 remaining hands. They are all right hands; there are no lefts. "Most of the hands are quite large and some of them are very large," Manfred Bietak,...

Ancient Autopsies

 Siberian Princess reveals her 2,500 year old tattoos

· 08/16/2012 8:42:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 21 replies ·
· Siberian Times ·
· 8-14-2012 ·

The ancient mummy of a mysterious young woman, known as the Ukok Princess, is finally returning home to the Altai Republic this month. She is to be kept in a special mausoleum at the Republican National Museum in capital Gorno-Altaisk, where eventually she will be displayed in a glass sarcophagus to tourists. For the past 19 years, since her discovery, she was kept mainly at a scientific institute in Novosibirsk, apart from a period in Moscow when her remains were treated by the same scientists who preserve the body of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin. To mark the move 'home', The...


 The Ice-Maiden with the Tiger Tattoo

· 08/17/2012 11:09:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 46 replies ·
· WebProNews/Science ·
· 17 Aug 2012 ·
· Amanda Crum ·

The Ice-Maiden is the most famous Pazyryk (Siberian culture probably related to the Scythians) mummy yet found. She died at about the age of 25. Buried clothed in luxurious wild silk, her body was perfectly preserved in perma-frost. But it is the tattoos that set Pazyryk burials apart. "Compared to all tattoos found by archeologists around the world, those on the mummies of the Pazyryk people are the most complicated and the most beautiful," according to the lead researcher, Dr. Natalia Polosmak.

India

 Was Narmada valley the centre of human evolution?

· 08/16/2012 6:41:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Times of India ·
· Thursday, August 14, 2012 ·
· Prashant Rupera, TNN ·

Through the largest exploration exercise ever undertaken, M S University's Department of Archaeology and Ancient History along with United States' Stone Age Institute will unearth evidence of our own ancestors. MSU and Indiana-based Stone Age Institute at Gosport have joined hands for the 'Narmada Basin Paleoanthropology Project (NBPA)' with the target to collect all the paleoanthropological evidence within the last two million years. "This project may throw new light giving credence to the belief that the Narmada Valley could have been the centre of human evolution," says professor K Krishnan, head of MSU's Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. The...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Humans, Neanderthals Did Not Have Babies

· 08/17/2012 9:37:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 112 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Aug 16, 2012 ·
· Anon ·

Recent research strikes a blow to the theory that humans and Neanderthals interbred. THE GIST Studies over the last two years suggest that Neanderthals vanished more than 30,000 years ago. This would mean that early humans and Neanderthals could not have interbred. enlarge Over the last two years, several studies have suggested that Homo sapiens got it on with Neanderthals, an hominid who lived in parts of Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East for up to 300,000 years but vanished more than 30,000 years ago. The evidence for this comes from fossil DNA, which shows that on average Eurasians...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Sex with early mystery species of humans seen in DNA. (Proof of Fallen Angels)

· 08/13/2012 11:50:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by TaraP ·
· 194 replies ·
· Seattle Times ·
· July 26th, 2012 ·
· Brian Vastag ·

There's only one way the foreign DNA could have made it into modern human populations. "We're talking about sex," said Joshua Akey of the University of Washington, whose lab identified the foreign DNA in three groups of modern Africans. The human family tree just got another -- mysterious -- branch, an African "sister species" to the heavy-browed Neanderthals that once roamed Europe. While no fossilized bones have been found from these enigmatic people, they did leave a calling card in present-day Africans: snippets of foreign DNA. There's only one way that genetic material could have made it into modern human...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Noble Savages? The era of the hunter-gatherer was not the social and environmental Eden some suggest

· 01/01/2008 11:54:37 AM PST ·
· Posted by billorites ·
· 24 replies ·
· Economist.com ·
· December 19, 2007 ·

HUMAN beings have spent most of their time on the planet as hunter-gatherers. From at least 85,000 years ago to the birth of agriculture around 73,000 years later, they combined hunted meat with gathered veg. Some people, such as those on North Sentinel Island in the Andaman Sea, still do. The Sentinelese are the only hunter-gatherers who still resist contact with the outside world. Fine-looking specimens -- strong, slim, fit, black and stark naked except for a small plant-fibre belt round the waist -- they are the very model of the noble savage. Genetics suggests that indigenous Andaman islanders have been isolated since the...

Prehistory & Origins

 Stone Age skull-smashers spark a cultural mystery

· 08/17/2012 5:42:09 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· August 16, 2012 ·
· Jessica Hamzelou ·

An unusual cluster of Stone Age skulls with smashed-in faces has been found carefully separated from the rest of their skeletons. They appear to have been dug up several years after being buried with their bodies, separated, then reburied. Collections of detached skulls have been dug up at many Stone Age sites in Europe and the Near East -- but the face-smashing is a new twist that adds further mystery to how these societies related to their dead... No one knows why Neolithic societies buried clusters of skulls -- often near or underneath settlements. Some think it was a sign...

Thrace

 Archaeologists Find Thracian Town on Bulgarian Sea Coast

· 08/14/2012 5:06:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Novinite ·
· Tuesday, August 14, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Bulgarian archaeologists have discovered a Thracian settlement during the first ever excavations in the town of Tsarevo on the southern Black Sea coast. The team is led by Milen Nikolov, an archaeologist from the Regional History Museum in the Black Sea city of Burgas. The settlement is very close in location to the town church "Uspenie Bogorodichno." The find proves that Tsarevo and nearby areas have a history more ancient that what was believed until now. During the excavations, the archaeologists have found remnants showing that as early as the 4th - 5th century BC Thracians have built a town...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Why the Chinchorro suddenly began to mummify their dead

· 08/14/2012 12:38:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 17 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 8-13-2012 ·

Researchers in Chile, led by Pablo Marqueta, an ecologist with Universidad Cat -- lica de Chile have arrived at a new theory to explain why a culture that existed around seven thousand years ago suddenly began to mummify their dead. The Chinchorro The researchers have been examining the Chinchorro, hunter-gatherers that lived in the desert region of what is now northern Chile and southern Peru, from about 10,000 to 4,000 years ago. The mummies first date to 5050 BCE and continue to be made until about 1800 BCE. The Chinchorro people lived by a combination of fishing, hunting and gathering: the word...

Foster Brooks

 Prehistoric Human Brain Found Pickled in Bog

· 08/17/2012 6:32:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 26 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· 04-06-2011 ·
· By Jennifer Viegas ·

A brain in near-perfect condition is found in a skull of a person who was decapitated over 2,600 years ago. A human skull dated to about 2,684 years ago with an "exceptionally preserved" human brain still inside of it was recently discovered in a waterlogged U.K. pit, according to a new Journal of Archaeological Science study. The brain is the oldest known intact human brain from Europe and Asia, according to the authors, who also believe it's one of the best-preserved ancient brains in the world. "The early Iron Age skull belonged to a man, probably in his thirties," lead...

The Roman Empire

 Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?

· 08/13/2012 11:05:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wtd ·
· 38 replies ·
· The Gates of Vienna ·
· August 13, 2012 ·
· Baron Bodissey ·

The title of this thread "Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?" refers to a recent post at Gates of Vienna Blog written by Baron Bodissey. The Baron reviews the book Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy by Emmet Scott. If you have an interest in the subject of the Greco-Roman legacy and Islam as they relate to the sudden decline of medieval Europe this book will expose the linkage between Islam's destructive forces at that time and have you reconsider the implications of current events related to Islam today. Scott argues that the collapse of Latin-Greek civilization...


 Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?

· 08/14/2012 8:16:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ckilmer ·
· 16 replies ·
· Gates Of Vienna ·
· Sunday, August 12, 2012 ·
· Barron Boddissy ·

Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy by Emmet Scott New English Review Press · 2012 · 270 pages $19.95 · Kindle version $9.95 Mohammed & Charlemagne Revisited by Emmet ScottThroughout the coastal areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, archaeologists have uncovered a layer of subsoil that was deposited over a period of three hundred years beginning in the middle of the seventh century AD. This stratum, named the "Younger Fill" by the geologist Claudio Vita-Finzi, covers the ruins of all the major cities and settlements that were established along the Mediterranean littoral during classical antiquity. It stands as...

The Vikings

 Monastery where Christian saint was martyred is uncovered on Eigg

· 08/14/2012 4:58:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· The Scotsman ·
· Tuesday, August 14, 2012 ·
· Alistair Munro ·

Students and local people have uncovered what are thought to be remains of St Donnan's monastery... St Donnan brought Christianity to many places in the West Highlands in the seventh century before settling on Eigg. According to local folklore, he became a martyr after he was killed by Norsemen, along with 50 monks, while giving Mass on Easter Sunday in the year 617... The dig at Kildonnan Graveyard on the south-east side of the island has now uncovered evidence which experts believe shows it is the exact site... Pictish pottery from the same period was also found in the graveyard....

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 The man who should have been King: Australian forklift driver...

· 08/16/2012 3:38:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· Thursday, August 16, 2012 ·
· Daily Mail Reporter ·

Mike Hastings, 71, was a real-life aristocrat, born the 14th earl of Loudoun, who moved to Australia in 1960 in search of adventure. He made international headlines in 2004 when a Channel Four documentary team conducted extensive research into the monarchy and concluded his ancestors were cheated out of the crown in the 15th century. Hastings, an avowed republican, died on June 30 and was buried today in Jerilderie, about 465 miles southwest of Sydney, the local Wagga Wagga Daily Advertiser reported. He was a descendant of England's House of York, whose dynastic struggle with the House of Lancaster became...

Age of Sail

 World's oldest shipping firm Stephenson Clarke Shipping in liquidation

· 08/09/2012 11:24:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by bruinbirdman ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 8/9/2012 ·

The world's oldest shipping firm, UK-based Stephenson Clarke Shipping, has gone into liquidation after nearly 300 years of trading. Established in 1730, Stephenson Clarke had tried to sell its ships and cut costs in the face of crashing rates for dry bulk shipping on which it relied - transporting cargoes such as coal, grain and iron ore. High and dry But liquidator Tait Walker was appointed on August 3, the company and liquidator said in a statement. "While previous economic downturns have been weathered, the current market is one of the worst experienced for many years with no upturn forecast...

Early America

 Navy's oldest commissioned warship to sail again

· 08/17/2012 2:51:51 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ConorMacNessa ·
· 56 replies ·
· AP via Tampa Bay Online ·
· Aug 17, 5:26 PM EDT ·
· JAY LINDSAY ·

BOSTON (AP) -- The U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned warship will sail under its own power for just the second time in more than a century to commemorate the battle that won it the nickname "Old Ironsides." The USS Constitution, which was first launched in 1797, will be tugged from its berth in Boston Harbor on Sunday to the main deepwater pathway into the harbor. It will then set out to open seas for a 10-minute cruise. The short trip marks the day two centuries ago when the Constitution bested the British frigate HMS Guerriere in a fierce battle during the...

Not-Too-Ancient Autopsies

 Earhart expedition team says video possibly shows plane debris

· 08/17/2012 10:48:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 16 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· August. 18, 2012 ·
· Malia Mattoch McManus ·

(Reuters) - A team of researchers trying to solve the mystery of aviator Amelia Earhart's 1937 disappearance said on Friday that underwater video from a Pacific island has revealed a field of man-made debris that could be remnants of her plane. The footage was collected in July by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) during a $2.2 million expedition to Nikumaroro in the Republic of Kiribati. Unsolved questions about Earhart's fate have long heightened her legendary status as a pioneering aviator, and TIGHAR's voyage to seek clues in her disappearance gained interest far beyond the shores of the...

World War Eleven

 Closure, World War II sub found under the sea (Final Resting Place for 85)

· 08/12/2005 11:31:24 AM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 29 replies ·
· The Charlotte Observer ·
· Thu, Aug. 11, 2005 ·
· KELLY KENNEDY ·

In the ghostly blue lights of a video camera, sea snakes, squids and schools of blue and yellow fish swirl past five-inch battle guns of a World War II submarine 200 feet beneath the South China Sea. "With all the fish and the coral covering the Lagarto, it's almost like someone put flowers on a grave," said Elizabeth Kenney-Augustine, whose grandfather, Bill Mabin of La Grange, Ill., was on the sub. For decades, no human knew where to put flowers for the 86 men who disappeared with the U.S.S. Lagarto somewhere between Thailand and Australia shortly before World War II...

Longer Perspectives

 World War II Deconstructed

· 08/16/2012 7:43:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Academiadotorg ·
· 74 replies ·
· Accuracy in Academia ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Malcolm A. Kline ·

Herbert Hoover's Secret History of the Second World War and its Aftermath. As it turns out, Hoover stated what would be his central thesis in a conversation at a 1951 Manhattan dinner to a New York public relations man in language that history buffs who associate the former president with the high starch collars he wore would never guess that he would use. "When Roosevelt put America in to help Russia as Hitler invaded in June, 1941," Hoover said. "We should have let those two bastards annihilate themselves." George H. Nash, no mean historian himself, supplied the above anecdote in...

Climate

 Salvage firm finds the ship that took Scott on his ill-fated Antarctic expedition

· 08/17/2012 10:33:34 PM PDT ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 10 replies ·
· dailymail.co.uk ·
· 17 Aug 2012 ·
· Mark Prigg ·

The SS Terra Nova, the ship that carried Captain Robert Scott on his doomed expedition to the Antarctic a century ago, has been discovered off Greenland. It was discovered by a team from a US research company using a hi-tech underwater vehicle after they spotted an unusual object while testing their sonar equipment. Scott and his party set off from Cardiff aboard the Terra Nova in 1910 with the aim of becoming the first expedition to reach the South Pole. A crew from the Schmidt Ocean Institute discovered the Terra Nova whilst testing echo-sounding equipment aboard its flagship vessel --...

Greeks & Armenians

 More Turk Bias Against Greeks, Armenians

· 08/13/2012 8:44:48 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bayouranger ·
· 6 replies ·
· commentarymagazine.com ·
· 12AUG12 ·
· Michael Rubin ·

The White House continues to talk about Turkey not only as a regional ally but also as a model for reform in the Middle East. It has been several years, however, since Turkish reforms contributed to democracy. The latest case in point is Turkish real estate reform. The Turkish government has announced new regulations. Here is the rub: While the government has removed onerous rules and regulations that made navigating Turkish real estate a nightmare, the government has in effect legislated its traditional hatreds. Armenians, for example, need not apply. They are by law unable to own housing or businesses...

end of digest #422 20120818


1,447 posted on 08/18/2012 9:02:45 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #422 · v 9 · n 6
Saturday, August 18, 2012
 
23 topics
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817 members
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Freeper Profiles


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 Archaeology
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 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
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 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
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 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Twenty-three topics. Troll activity up a tick this week. Summer has flown by, it seems to me.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
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1,448 posted on 08/18/2012 9:06:03 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1447 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #423
Saturday, August 25, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Climate and Drought Lessons from Ancient Egypt

· 08/18/2012 11:29:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Thursday, August 16, 2012 ·
· United States Geological Survey et al ·

Ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt's Nile Delta document the region's ancient droughts and fires, including a huge drought 4,200 years ago associated with the demise of Egypt's Old Kingdom, the era known as the pyramid-building time... said Christopher Bernhardt, a researcher with the U.S. Geological Survey... "Even the mighty builders of the ancient pyramids more than 4,000 years ago fell victim when they were unable to respond to a changing climate," said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. "This study illustrates that water availability was the climate-change Achilles Heel then for Egypt, as it may well...

Climate

 Ice core shows Antarctic Peninsula warming is nothing unusual
 --Press release flatly contradicts what boffins said

· 08/23/2012 12:47:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 16 replies ·
· The Register ·
· 23rd August 2012 10:16 GMT ·
· Lewis Page ·

New ice core data from the Antarctic Peninsula has revealed that temperatures in the region during the past 10,000 years have often been higher than they are today, and that warming of the sort seen there recently has also occurred in the pre-industrial past. The new data are derived from a massive new 364m-long core extracted from the ice sheet lying on top of James Ross Island towards the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula in the freezing Weddell Sea. The core was extracted by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey, assisted by...


 Temperatures were warmer than today for most of the past 10,000 years

· 08/23/2012 4:16:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by gorush ·
· 10 replies ·
· http://iceagenow.info ·
· 25 May 10 ·
· Robert W. Felix ·

25 May 10 -- The revamped cap-and-trade (control-and-tax) bill that Senators Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and John Kerry (D-Mass.) are trying to foist on the American public is predicated on a flat-out lie. The control-and-tax proponents would have you believe that our planet has been enduring unprecedented global warming (now coyly referred to as "climate change"), but the facts do not bear that out. Facts. Oh, those damnable facts... ...You'll see that today's benign climate is not even close to being the warmest on record. Not even close. Temperatures have been warmer than today for almost all of the past 10,000...


 Antarctic peninsula was 1.3°C warmer than today 11,000 years ago

· 08/23/2012 5:47:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 18 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· August 23, 2012 ·
· British Antarctic Survey ·

New climate history adds to understanding of recent Antarctic Peninsula warmingResults published this week by a team of polar scientists from Britain, Australia and France adds a new dimension to our understanding of Antarctic Peninsula climate change and the likely causes of the break-up of its ice shelves.The first comprehensive reconstruction of a 15,000 year climate history from an ice core collected from James Ross Island in the Antarctic Peninsula region is reported this week in the journal...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 The Puzzle Of The 13 Solar Towers of Chankillo

· 08/23/2012 4:38:23 AM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 22 replies ·
· The Physics arXiv Blog ·
· 21 Aug 2012 ·
· Anonymous ·

Chankillo, a Peruvian "Stonehenge", has 13 towers in a straight line. No-one knows why. Now, Amelia Sparavigna at the Politecnico di Torino in Italy ... show[s] that the first tower lines up with sunrise on 21 June and the last tower lines up with the sunrise on 21 December ...[and] the shadows point north for half the year and south for the other half. What's more, when there are no shadows the sun is at its zenith.... [T]his would have been important information for a farming community, which would need to know when to plant seasonal crops.... However, many questions...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Scottish people's DNA study could 'rewrite nation's history'

· 08/22/2012 7:05:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 131 replies ·
· The Guardian (UK) ·
· 8-14-2012 ·
· Charlotte Higgins ·

Evidence of African, Arabian, south-east Asian and Siberian ancestry in Scotland, says author of book tracing genetic journey A large scale study of Scottish people's DNA is threatening to "rewrite the nation's history", according to author Alistair Moffat. Scotland, he told the Edinburgh international book festival, despite a long-held belief that its ethnic make-up was largely Scots, Celtic, Viking and Irish, was in fact "one of the most diverse nations on earth". "The explanation is simple. We are a people on the edge of beyond; on the end of a massive continent. Peoples were migrating northwest; and they couldn't get...

Prehistory & Origins

 Lao skull earliest example of modern human fossil in Southeast Asia

· 08/22/2012 5:41:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· Monday, August 20, 2012 ·
· U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ·

An ancient skull recovered from a cave in the Annamite Mountains in northern Laos is the oldest modern human fossil found in Southeast Asia, researchers report. The discovery pushes back the clock on modern human migration through the region by as much as 20,000 years and indicates that ancient wanderers out of Africa left the coast and inhabited diverse habitats much earlier than previously appreciated. The team described its finding in a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The scientists, who found the skull in 2009, were likely the first to dig for ancient bones in Laos...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Neanderthal and Human Matings Get a Date

· 08/21/2012 3:03:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 32 replies ·
· Smithsonian 'blogs ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Erin Wayman ·

Two years ago the analysis of the Neanderthal genome revealed modern humans carry Neanderthal DNA, implying our ancestors mated with Neanderthals at some point in the past. Scientists only found genetic traces of Neanderthals in non-African people, leading to the conclusion that Neanderthal-human matings must have occurred as modern humans left Africa and populated the rest of the world. A new paper (PDF) posted on arXiv.org puts a date on those matings: 47,000 to 65,000 years ago... To determine what really happened, Sankararaman's team looked at rates of genetic change to estimate when Neanderthals and humans last exchanged genes. If...

Religion of Pieces

 Syrian Conflict Imperils Historical Treasures

· 08/18/2012 11:04:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· New York Times ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Patricia Cohen ·

Preservationists and archaeologists are warning that fighting in Syria's commercial capital, Aleppo -- considered the world's oldest continuously inhabited human settlement -- threatens to damage irreparably the stunning architectural and cultural legacy left by 5,000 years of civilizations. Already the massive iron doors to the city's immense medieval Citadel have been blown up in a missile attack, said Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, an organization that works to preserve cultural heritage sites... President Bashar al-Assad's forces have been shelling the city, and in recent days his army has taken up positions inside the Citadel, trading fire with...

Longer Perspectives

 Are we willing to die to save the past?

· 08/16/2012 7:00:18 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bayouranger ·
· 5 replies ·
· meforum.org ·
· 15AUG12 ·
· by Alexander H. Joffe ·

Archaeologist Alex Joffe on how Western empowerment of Islamists threatens precious antiquities. Preserving the past has costs. Much of the world shares the belief that the past has intrinsic value, which is encoded into laws and regulations that imperfectly protect, preserve and study historical and archaeological remains. Contributions, admission fees and taxes pay for the upkeep of monuments from the Parthenon to the Liberty Bell. When highways are constructed they are diverted around historical landmarks, or the landmarks are moved. Archaeological excavations slow construction everywhere. But are we willing to kill or die for the past? The question is not...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Two Leonardos found in 'Last Supper'

· 08/19/2012 6:32:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 53 replies ·
· upi ·
· Aug. 18, 2012 ·

ROME, -- A British art expert says two of the figures in Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "The Last Supper" are actually self-portraits of the artist. Ross King said this week that while not a lot is known about Da Vinci's physical appearance at the time he painted "The Last Supper," he is confident the noses on two of the apostles are a giveaway. King has concluded the long hair, beards and Greek noses on the two matched up with a portrait of the Italian master drawn years later. Greek noses and prominent hair, King said, were "rarities for an Italian...

Doh!

 Elderly woman destroys 19th-century fresco with DIY restoration

· 08/22/2012 9:48:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by beaversmom ·
· 85 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· August 22, 2012 ·
· Amy Willis ·

Three separate photographs of "Ecce Homo" by painter Elias Garcia Martinez show extensive damage caused by an elderly woman who decided the masterpiece needed a little refurbishment. But in a time of austerity, rather than calling in a professional to complete the job, the unnamed woman attempted to restore the mural herself -- at a devastating cost.


 Spanish fresco restoration botched by amateur

· 08/22/2012 1:49:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 41 replies ·
· BBC ·
· August 22, 2012 ·

Elias Garcia Martinez's Ecce Homo (left) and the "restoration" An elderly parishioner has stunned Spanish cultural officials with an alarming and unauthorised attempt to restore a prized Jesus Christ fresco. Ecce Homo (Behold the Man) by Elias Garcia Martinez has held pride of place in the Sanctuary of Mercy Church near Zaragoza for more than 100 years.The woman took her brush to it after years of deterioration due to moisture.Cultural officials said she had the best intentions and hoped it could be properly restored. The woman, in her 80s, was reportedly upset at the way the fresco had deteriorated and took...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Tracking pages of ancient Hebrew Bible

· 09/28/2008 6:21:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by PRePublic ·
· 3 replies ·
· SF Chronicle ·
· Sept. 28, 2008 ·

Tracking pages of ancient Hebrew Bible Crusaders held it for ransom, fire almost destroyed it and it was reputedly smuggled across borders in the Middle East hidden in a washing machine. But in 1958, when it finally reached Israel, 196 pages were missing -- about 40 percent of the total -- and for some Old Testament scholars they have become a kind of holy grail. Researchers representing the manuscript's custodian in Jerusalem now say they have leads on some of the missing pages and are nearer their goal of making the manuscript whole again. The Crown, known in English...

Underwater Archaeology

 'Whale ribs, meteorites and chairs' [ Robert Ballard off Cyprus ]

· 08/20/2012 6:07:39 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Cyprus Mail ·
· August 19, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Famed explorer Robert Ballard's expedition over the Eratosthenes Seamount is currently collecting images during sweeps of the area using the latest technology to explore the sea floor some 70 miles off the island. After two days of exploring, the team's underwater robots, operating at 800 to 1,000 metres, yesterday reached the summit of the Eratosthenes, going over terrain from a previous sweep and then turned west to head to unexplored territory to the west. On Friday night they came across what appeared to be fossilised rib bones commentators suggested might have come from a whale, perhaps even 40,000 years old......

Age of Sail

 Stephen Harper renews hunt for Franklin ships long lost to the Arctic depths

· 08/24/2012 3:43:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Loyalist ·
· 17 replies ·
· National Post ·
· August 24, 2012 ·
· Jordan Press and Randy Boswell ·

CAMBRIDGE BAY, Nunavut -- The search for the remnants of an ill-fated British expedition that failed to cross the Northwest Passage -- and a seminal moment in Canada's history on Arctic sovereignty -- will start anew. In the coming weeks, a group of researchers will scour Canada's Arctic waters to find Sir John Franklin's two ships, Erebus and the Terror, led by a ship named for an Arctic researcher who perished in a plane crash last year. The renewal of Parks Canada's search for the lost Franklin vessels, anticipated last week by Postmedia News, follows three recent federal expeditions that...

War of 1812

 Washington Burning: The 200th Anniversary of The War of 1812

· 08/24/2012 7:21:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by kiryandil ·
· 18 replies ·
· Washingtonian ·
· August 2012 ·
· Adam Goodheart ·

August 24, 1814. "During the War of 1812, British troops burned much of Washington DC. And to think we never had the decency to thank them." ~Larry J Must-watch Youtube video:War of 1812 -- Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie


 Old Ironsides sails again: USS Constitution goes to sea

· 08/20/2012 3:57:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by mdittmar ·
· 51 replies ·
· Mail Online ·
· 8/19/12 ·
· Associated Press ·

The U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned warship sailed under its own power for just the second time in more than a century to commemorate the battle that won it the nickname 'Old Ironsides.' The USS Constitution, which was first launched in 1797, was tugged from its berth in Boston Harbor on Sunday to the main deepwater pathway into the harbor. It then set out to open seas for a 10-minute cruise. The short trip marked the day two centuries ago when the Constitution bested the British frigate HMS Guerriere in a fierce battle during the War of 1812. It follows a...

World War Eleven

 Spies, Enigma machine and James Bond's creator

· 08/19/2012 8:15:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Squawk 8888 ·
· 21 replies ·
· Edmonton Journal ·
· August 18, 2012 ·
· Kathryn Greenaway ·

Date: Aug. 19, 1942 Time: 5 a.m. Location: A stone beach on the northern coast of France. Operation: More than 6,000 Allied forces infantrymen attempt to penetrate a German stronghold. Outcome: Unmitigated disaster. Less than six hours later, 60 per cent of the infantrymen were dead, injured and/or captured; 907 Canadians died. Why the Allied forces allowed the poorly planned Dieppe Raid to move forward has been a mystery for decades -- until now. Montreal historian David O'Keefe has solved the mystery and, in the process, has rewritten a defining moment in military history. O'Keefe, a military historian by profession,...

Epigraphy & Language

 A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

· 08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 33 replies ·
· Nature.com ·
· 8-23-2012 ·
· Alyssa Joyce ·

Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia -- now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Archaeological Dig Reveals Causes -- and Possible Cures -- for Diabetes Epidemic

· 08/24/2012 11:29:54 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 16 replies ·
· Indian Country Today Media Network ·
· 8-23-2012 ·
· Eisa Ulen Richardson ·

The future health of Natives may lie in the scatological remains of the past -- a vanguard study of ancient excrement has offered fresh new ways of thinking about the prevalence of diabetes among Native people of the American Southwest. Karl Reinhard, a professor of forensic science and environmental archaeology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has studied the fossilized feces, or coprolites, of ancestral Pueblo people and documented typical Pueblo diets prior to European contact. He has determined that the overwhelming prevalence of diabetes among Pueblo descendants may stem from their radical departure from the healthy diets of their progenitors. According to...

end of digest #423 20120825


1,449 posted on 08/24/2012 10:00:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv; 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #423 · v 9 · n 7
Saturday, August 25, 2012
 
21 topics
2922616 to 2919240
817 members
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Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
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1,450 posted on 08/24/2012 10:02:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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