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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

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Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #420
Saturday, August 4, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Palm trees 'grew on Antarctica' (in the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago.)

· 08/02/2012 1:05:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NormsRevenge ·
· 23 replies ·
· BBC News ·
· 8/2/12 ·
· Jason Palmer ·

Scientists drilling deep into the edge of modern Antarctica have pulled up proof that palm trees once grew there. Analyses of pollen and spores and the remains of tiny creatures have given a climatic picture of the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago. The study in Nature suggests Antarctic winter temperatures exceeded 10C, while summers may have reached 25C. Better knowledge of past "greenhouse" conditions will enhance guesses about the effects of increasing CO2 today. The early Eocene -- often referred to as the Eocene greenhouse -- has been a subject of increasing interest in recent years as...

Egypt

 Archeologists unearth extraordinary human sculpture in Turkey [ Suppiluliuma ]

· 07/30/2012 8:19:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 60 replies ·
· Eurekalert ·
· Monday, July 30, 2012 ·
· Kim Luke, U of Toronto ·

The head and torso of the human figure, intact to just above its waist, stands approximately 1.5 meters in height, suggesting a total body length of 3.5 to four meters. The figure's face is bearded, with beautifully preserved inlaid eyes made of white and black stone, and its hair has been coiffed in an elaborate series of curls aligned in linear rows. Both arms are extended forward from the elbow, each with two arm bracelets decorated with lion heads. The figure's right hand holds a spear, and in its left is a shaft of wheat. A crescent-shaped pectoral adorns...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Archeologists find 3,300-year-old burnt wheat

· 07/28/2012 7:32:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· Jerusalem Post ·
· Tuesday, July 24, 2012 ·
· Sharon Udasin ·

A team from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority (INPA) uncovered 14 large pithoi-style bulk storage jugs filled with the wheat inside what was a storage room in a monumental, palace-like building from the Canaanite period (2,000-3,000 BCE), the INPA said on Monday. After the jars are fully exposed the researchers will transfer them to conservation and restoration laboratories. Afterwards, the palace will be covered up again until the next excavation season. Archeological excavations at Hatzor have been conducted by Hebrew University in cooperation with the INPA for the past couple of decades. In...

Diet & Cuisine

 Luxury food and pampered pooches in Iron Age Britain

· 08/01/2012 4:00:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 2 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 7/2012 ·
· University of Reading ·

University of Reading archaeologists have found evidence that Iron Age people in Britain were spicing up meals with foods and seasoning imported from around the Mediterranean. Previously it had been assumed that prior to the Roman occupation of Britain, only liquid products such as olive oil and wine were imported from across the Channel. However archaeologists working at Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire have discovered that people of that time were importing Mediterranean seasoning as well as whole olives themselves....


 Silchester Iron Age finds reveal secrets of pre-Roman Britain

· 08/01/2012 4:06:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 3 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 7-31-2012 ·
· Maev Kennedy ·

...The banal seeds are astonishing because many came from a level dating to a century before the Romans. More evidence is emerging every day, and it is clear that from around 50BC the Iron Age Atrebates tribe, whose name survived in the Latin Calleva Atrebatum, the wooded place of the Atrebates, enjoyed a lifestyle that would have been completely familiar to the Romans when they arrived in AD43. Their diet would also be quite familiar to many in 21st-century Britain. The people ate shellfish -- previously thought to have been eaten only in coastal settlements -- as well as cows,...

The Roman Empire

 'Perplexing' find at Alderney Roman dig

· 07/29/2012 4:45:13 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· BBC ·
· Saturday, July 28, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Archaeologists have found something "interesting" and "perplexing" at a Roman dig in Alderney. A team from the island, the UK and Guernsey are excavating land at the fort of the nunnery at Longy Common. The dig is focusing on a gateway and wall but the team said they were "not expecting" the way it was laid out. Dr Jason Monaghan said: "We've found something interesting, but we don't actually know what it is until we take a bit more dirt out." Dr Monaghan, Director of Guernsey Museums, said the team had dug a trench to examine the gateway. "It's a...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Archaeology: Serbia, 31 early Christian tombs discovered

· 07/28/2012 7:53:56 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· ANSA ·
· Friday, July 27, 2012 ·
· ANSAmed ·

The remains of 31 early Christian tombs have been discovered during archaeological excavations in Nis, Serbia's third largest city in the southern part of the country. "These are the most important excavations carried out so far on the site of the early Christian necropolis of Jagodin-mala", said Toni Cerskov, who heads the team of 45 archaeologists, architects, anthropologists, photographers and workers at the site. The tombs are located under the former textile factory Niteks, the Tanjug news agency reports. Cerskov said the tombs are among the most important findings regarding the early Christian period and can be compared to the...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Does this coin found near Jerusalem prove that Samson lived?

· 07/31/2012 9:12:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by the scotsman ·
· 34 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· 31st July 2012 ·
· Leon Watson ·

'A tiny seal has been uncovered that could be the first archaeological evidence of Samson, the Biblical slayer of Philistines. Archaeologists discovered the ancient artifact while excavating the tell of Beit Shemesh in the Judaean Hills near Jerusalem, Israel. It appears to depict the Old Testament story of Samson, whose might was undone by his lust for the temptress Delilah, and his fight with a lion. The seal, which measures less than an inch in diameter, shows a large animal with a feline tail attacking a human figure. The seal was discovered at a level of excavation that dates it...

Ancient Autopsies

 Ancient Burial Box Linked to Priest Who Played Part in Christ's Crucifixion

· 08/03/2012 2:44:21 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 27 replies ·
· Christian Post ·
· August 30, 2012 ·
· Nicola Menzie ·

Yosef bar Caifa Scientists at a university in Israel believe they have discovered an ancient burial box belonging to the family of the high priest who played a part in the crucifixion of Jesus as described in the Bible. The burial box, or ossuary, was recovered from looters three years ago by the Israel Antiquities Authority. On close examination the ossuary was found to have a rare inscription mentioning the names "Miriam," "Yeshua," and "Caiaphus. "Once the inscription was authenticated, archaeologists were astounded by what they had found. According to researchers, the Caiaphus mentioned in the carved-in inscription may very well be the same...

Early America

 500 year old rum? Archaeologists search for the real Captain Morgan

· 07/29/2012 2:13:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 13 replies ·
· FoxNews.com ·
· July 26, 2012 ·
· FoxNews.com ·

To life, love and a legendary privateer's lost fleet. U.S. archaeologists are continuing their search for real-life buccaneer Captain Henry Morgan's lost fleet after the discovery of six cannons, a 17th century wooden shipwreck and even a barrel that may very well contain rum. Yo, ho ho indeed. Aptly backed by the Captain Morgan rum brand, a team of leading archaeologists led by Frederick "Fritz" Hanselmann of Texas State University hope to unlock the myth and mysteries of one of history's most iconic sea captains. "We're interested in telling the true story of Henry Morgan," Hanselmann, who is a director...

Obituaries

 Sir John Keegan -- RIP

· 08/03/2012 5:16:17 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 16 replies ·
· Daily Telegraph ·
· August 2, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

He had been on the teaching staff of the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, for 25 years in 1986 when Max Hastings announced his recruitment to the paper the day he took over the editor's chair. Keegan proved an unrivalled asset as the Soviet empire crumbled and collapsed, the government demanded a "peace dividend" in the form of cutbacks to the Armed Forces and a series of military actions flared up in the Middle East and the Balkans.

Epigraphy & Language

 You write potato, I write ghoughpteighbteau

· 08/21/2008 4:42:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by forkinsocket ·
· 31 replies ·
· The Economist ·
· Aug 14th 2008 ·
· Staff ·

GHOTI and tchoghs may not immediately strike readers as staples of the British diet; and even those most enamoured of written English's idiosyncrasies may wince at this tendentious rendering of "fish and chips". Yet the spelling, easily derived from other words*, highlights the shortcomings of English orthography. This has long bamboozled foreigners and natives alike, and may underlie the national test results released on August 12th which revealed that almost a third of English 14-year-olds cannot read properly. One solution, suggested recently by Ken Smith of the Buckinghamshire New University, is to accept the most common misspellings as variants rather...

Oh So Mysteriouso

 Human cycles: History as science (new wave of violence predicted for US)

· 08/02/2012 5:27:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 25 replies ·
· Nature ·
· 1 Aug 2012 ·
· Laura Spinney ·

Researcher Peter Turchin sees two cycles driving political instability. The secular cycle, lasting two to three centuries, starts with a relatively egalitarian society (supply and demand for labour roughly balance). But over time, population grows, labour supply outstrips demand, elites form and the living standards of the poorest fall. Then the society becomes top-heavy with elites, who start fighting for power. Political instability ensues, leading to collapse, and the cycle begins again. The shorter fathers-and-sons cycle, spanning 50 years or two generations, interacts with the longer cycle. Turchin sees this cycle peaking around 1870 (ethnic strife, class resentment), 1920 (race...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Liberal profs admit they'd discriminate against conservatives in hiring, advancement

· 08/02/2012 2:03:10 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Cincinatus' Wife ·
· 40 replies ·
· The Washington Times ·
· August 1, 2012 ·
· Emily Esfahani Smith ·

Psychologists Yoel Inbar and Joris Lammers, based at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, surveyed a roughly representative sample of academics and scholars in social psychology and found that "In decisions ranging from paper reviews to hiring, many social and personality psychologists admit that they would discriminate against openly conservative colleagues." This finding surprised the researchers. The survey questions "were so blatant that I thought we'd get a much lower rate of agreement," Mr. Inbar said. "Usually you have to be pretty tricky to get people to say they'd discriminate against minorities." One question, according to the researchers, "asked whether, in...

end of digest #420 20120804


1,441 posted on 08/04/2012 7:36:27 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1437 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #420 · v 9 · n 4
Saturday, August 4, 2012
 
39 topics
2914106 to 2911965
815 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
This week GGG took a bit of a breather with a mere 14 topics. Again, some were left on deck, but I was busy with real life and/or stranded on dialup, or worse yet, having to use wintel. A couple of nights I konked out by 10 pm.

Troll activity in all threads has been quite a bit lower.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,442 posted on 08/04/2012 7:52:21 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1441 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Re: dial-ups

We got rid of our dial-up last November.
This November we get rid of something else.

: )


1,443 posted on 08/04/2012 8:12:17 AM PDT by TheConservativeParty (O.M.G. Obummer Must Go / LUV my GOV Scott Walker)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1442 | View Replies]

To: TheConservativeParty

:’D


1,444 posted on 08/04/2012 8:15:35 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1443 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #421
Saturday, August 11, 2012

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 How did the wolf become dog ?

· 08/05/2012 10:18:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by djone ·
· 31 replies ·
· salon.com ·
· Mark Derr ·

Derr acknowledges that the story of the dog's emergence (as distinct from its evolutionary forebear, the wolf) cannot be "neatly distilled." Different estimates place the first appearance of dog-like creatures anywhere from 12,000 to 135,000 years ago. But Derr argues that the dog itself was an "evolutionary inevitability." He suggests that dogs and humans -- similar animals who "simply took to traveling with each other" tens of thousands of years ago, "and never stopped" --

Diet & Cuisine

 Brewing Stone Age beer

· 08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 50 replies ·
· sciencenordic.com ·
· 7-20-2012 ·
· Asle Rønning ·

Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway's Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. "This is fun -- really thrilling. It's hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway," says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Researchers find evidence of ritual use of 'black drink' at Cahokia

· 08/08/2012 5:53:39 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 44 replies ·
· Heritage Daily ·
· 8-7-2012 ·

People living 700 to 900 years ago in Cahokia, a massive settlement near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, ritually used a caffeinated brew made from the leaves of a holly tree that grew hundreds of miles away, researchers report. The discovery -- made by analyzing plant residues in pottery beakers from Cahokia and its surroundings -- is the earliest known use of this "black drink" in North America. It pushes back the date by at least 500 years, and adds to the evidence that a broad cultural and trade network thrived in the Midwest and southeastern U.S....

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 For Indians, ax marked first chapter of disaster

· 08/07/2012 6:48:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· Columbus Dispatch ·
· Sunday July 29, 2012 8:04 AM ·
· Bradley T. Lepper ·

The ax is significant because it predates the documented arrival of European explorers in the region by a century or more. It likely was brought to America by Basque whalers or fishermen who traded it to some coastal-dwelling Indian for animal furs. It then must have been passed from one tribe to another until it was eventually acquired by a resident of the Mantle site. European artifacts also have been found at the late prehistoric Madisonville site in Hamilton County in southwestern Ohio. Although large by Ohio standards, it wouldn't have compared to the Mantle site. Archaeologist Penelope Drooker estimated...

Ancient Autopsies

 What Vikings really looked like

· 08/05/2012 6:28:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 45 replies ·
· ScienceNordic ·
· 7-29-2012 ·
· Irene Berg Sørensen ·

There's no shortage of myths about the appearance of our notorious Viking ancestors. To find out more about these myths, ScienceNordic's Danish partner site, videnskab.dk, asked its Facebook readers to list their favourite myths about what the Vikings looked like. We have picked out five myths from the resulting debate and asked researchers to help us confirm or bust these myths. Armed with this information, our graphic designer then took a shot at drawing some examples of our infamous forefathers, which you can see in our picture gallery...

Epigraphy & Language

 Medieval silver treasure found on Gotland

· 08/05/2012 5:12:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by csvset ·
· 4 replies ·
· The Local ·
· 4 Aug 12 ·
· Clara Guibourg ·

A silver treasure from the 12th century has been found on the Baltic island Gotland, where over 600 pieces of silver coins have been unearthed, according to reports in local media. "This is an amazing find. It's unbelievable that treasures of this scale exist here on Gotland," Marie Louise Hellquist of Gotland's County Administrative Board (Länsstyrelsen) told local newspaper Hela Gotland. The medieval treasure was uncovered last Monday, as the landowner was moving soil. Some 500 pieces of coin were discovered in the field, and following further searches conducted once archaeologists arrived on Wednesday, that figure has swollen considerably. "In...

Epidemics, Pandemics, Plagues, the Sniffles

 Mass grave in London reveals how volcano caused global catastrophe

· 08/05/2012 5:20:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 34 replies ·
· The Guardian (UK) ·
· 8-4-2012 ·
· Dalya Alberge ·

When archaeologists discovered thousands of medieval skeletons in a mass burial pit in east London in the 1990s, they assumed they were 14th-century victims of the Black Death or the Great Famine of 1315-17. Now they have been astonished by a more explosive explanation -- a cataclysmic volcano that had erupted a century earlier, thousands of miles away in the tropics, and wrought havoc on medieval Britons. Scientific evidence -- including radiocarbon dating of the bones and geological data from across the globe -- shows for the first time that mass fatalities in the 13th century were caused by one...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 The Roots of Jewishness

· 08/09/2012 6:34:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 27 replies ·
· ScienceNOW ·
· 6 August 2012 ·
· Gisela Telis ·

Family ties. Most Jewish populations share a genetic connection, but some groups, such as Ethiopian Jews (pictured here, sharing unleavened bread ahead of Passover), stand alone. Credit: Eliana Aponte/Reuters Scholars of all kinds have long debated one seemingly simple question: What is "Jewishness?" Is it defined by genetics, culture, or religion? Recent findings have revealed genetic ties that suggest a biological basis for Jewishness, but this research didn't include data from North African, Ethiopian, or other Jewish communities. Now a new study fills in the genetic mapâ?"and paints a more complex picture of what it means to...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Susita Site Yields Surprises

· 08/07/2012 2:19:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Eleutheria5 ·
· 19 replies ·
· Arutz Sheva ·
· 7/8/12 ·
· Gil Ronen ·

The 13th year of Haifa University's archeological digs at the Susita site just east of the Sea of Galilee (Kinneret) has yielded several surprises, including what experts believe is a portrait of a local man from the 3rd century CE, carved into a basalt gravestone. Susita -- as it is known in the Aramaic version -- was originally known by the Latin name Hippos. Both names refer to horses, although the reason for this name is not known. It was destroyed by the earthquake of 749 CE. Archeologist Dr. Michael Eisenberg explained that the "Susita man" rock was found in...

Longer Perspectives

 First Person: Should Israel Return the Tablets of the Law to Egypt? [ hypothetically ]

· 08/08/2012 6:52:49 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 24 replies ·
· Biblical Archaeology Review ·
· BAR 38:05, Sep/Oct 2012 ·
· Hershel Shanks ·

In 1969, barely two years after the 1967 Six-Day War, a team of Israeli archaeologists made an exploratory excavation at the base of one of the numerous sites in the Sinai Peninsula proposed as Biblical Mt. Sinai. It was not long before a member of the team exposed a piece of rock with a single Hebrew letter on it. This naturally led to more intensive excavation in this area, as a result of which additional, larger pieces of inscribed stones were recovered. They were taken to Israel for further study. When examined by paleographers, experts in dating inscriptions by the...

Climate

 Scafetta's new paper attempts to link climate cycles to planetary motion ( March 2012)

· 08/08/2012 12:52:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 14 replies ·
· March 21, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

Nicola Scafetta sent me this paper yesterday, and I read it with interest, but I have a number of reservations about it, not the least of which is that it is partially based on the work of Landscheidt and the whole barycentric thing which gets certain people into shouting matches. Figure 9 looks to be interesting, but note that it is in generic units, not temperature, so has no predictive value by itself.Fig. 9. Proposed solar harmonic reconstructions based on four beat frequencies. (Top) Average beat envelope function of the model (Eq. (18)) and (Bottom) the version modulated with a...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Ancient records shed light on Italian earthquakes (Aquila area)

· 08/10/2012 4:03:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· Friday, August 3, 2012 ·
· Seismological Society of America ·

The rich recorded history of settlement in the area, along with oral traditions, archaeological excavations, inscriptions and medieval texts, and offer insight into how often the region might expect destructive earthquakes. But according to a new study by Emanuela Guidoboni and colleagues, the historical record on ancient and medieval earthquakes comes with its own shortcomings that must be addressed before the seismic history of L'Aquila can be useful in assessing the current seismic hazard in this area... ...the researchers combed through written records and information from archaeological excavations, covering the period from ancient Roman occupation in the first century A.D....


 Italian 'Super Volcano' May Threaten Millions: Scientists plan to drill deep below Romans'...

· 08/06/2012 7:54:17 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 35 replies ·
· Newser ·
· Monday, August 06, 2012 ·
· Rob Quinn ·

A hidden "super volcano" near Pompeii threatens an eruption that could make Vesuvius look like a picnic, scientists warn. The Phlegraean Fields zone of intense seismic activity -- which the ancient Romans believed was the gateway to hell -- could doom millions of people in the Naples area if it erupts, Reuters reports. Scientists plan to drill more than two miles below its surface to monitor any signs of a pending eruption in the huge chamber of molten rock, but some experts fear that the drilling itself could trigger an earthquake or eruption. Areas like the Phlegraean fields "can give...

The Roman Empire

 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck that is so well preserved even the FOOD is intact

· 08/09/2012 8:38:47 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Kartographer ·
· 38 replies ·
· UK Daily Mail ·
· 8/9/12 ·
· Mark Prigg ·

The ship, a navis oneraria, or merchant vessel, was located at a depth of about 200 feet after a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was used to scour the seabed. A search for the shipwreck was launched after local fisherman revealed they kept finding pieces of pottery in their nets. The divers found the wreck so well preserved even the food, still sealed in over 200 pots, is intact.

Egypt

 Possible Egyptian pyramids found using Google Earth

· 08/10/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· Archaeology News Network ·
· Monday, August 6, 2012 ·
· Posted by TANN ·

One of the complex sites contains a distinct, four-sided, truncated, pyramidal shape that is approximately 140 feet in width. This site contains three smaller mounds in a very clear formation, similar to the diagonal alignment of the Giza Plateau pyramids. The second possible site contains four mounds with a larger, triangular-shaped plateau. The two larger mounds at this site are approximately 250 feet in width, with two smaller mounds approximately 100 feet in width. This site complex is arranged in a very clear formation with the large plateau, or butte, nearby in a triangular shape with a width of approximately...

Early America

 Wreck thought to be famous 19th-century pirate ship that sank with hold full of treasure

· 08/09/2012 9:30:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wildbill ·
· 21 replies ·
· Mailonline ·
· 8/9/2012 ·
· Emma Reynolds ·

A shipwreck discovered in Tonga is thought to be a famous pirate vessel that sank in the 19th century with a hold full of treasure. Legend has it that the Port-au-Prince was attacked by warriors near the South Pacific archipelago in 1806 and most of its British crew massacred on the orders of King Finau 'Ulukalala II. The British had captured the ship from the French and made into a privateer -- meaning it had permission to attack and plunder boats belonging to rivals Spain and France.

The Revolution

 Ceremony held to remember the Battle of Oriskany [235 year anniversary]

· 08/08/2012 7:13:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 18 replies ·
· Rome (NY) Observer ·
· August 07, 2012 ·
· RACHEL MURPHY ·

ORISKANY -- Nearly 200 people gathered Monday to remember the 235th anniversary of one of the bloodiest battles during the Revolutionary War at The Battle of Oriskany. It was a commemorative ceremony held by members of the Oneida Nation and representatives from the National Parks Service at Fort Stanwix. During the ceremony flags were lowered to half-staff, wreaths were placed at the monument, and men wore military costumes while firing off muskets. "There were hundreds of people who lost their lives here in this battle and it's really important to remember those people who gave their lives for our freedom today," said...

Schooled

 Three smart history podcasts

· 08/09/2012 12:57:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by iowamark ·
· 4 replies ·
· Sacramento Bee ·
· August 8, 2012 ·
· Pete Basofin ·

The Internet Age is a golden age for history buffs. Think of the sheer quantity of material -- lectures, conferences, books, articles, photographs, paintings, maps, census records, historic audio and video clips, all kinds of of primary and secondary resources -- available at the click of a mouse. There are also podcasts devoted to history. Podcasts (for the uninitiated) are audio or video series produced by amateurs or professional outlets on every imaginable topic... BackStory with the American History Guys. Hosted by three experts representing the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, BackStory aims to bring a "historical perspective to the...

Olympiads

 The 1904 Olympic Marathon May Have Been the Strangest Ever

· 08/08/2012 10:13:31 AM PDT ·
· Posted by afraidfortherepublic ·
· 35 replies ·
· The Smithsonian ·
· 8-7-12 ·

America's first Olympics may have been its worst, or at least its most bizarre. Held in 1904 in St. Louis, the games were tied to that year's World's Fair, which celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase while advancing, as did all such turn-of-the-century expositions, the notion of American imperialism. Although there were moments of surprising and genuine triumph (gymnast George Eyser earned six medals, including three gold, despite his wooden leg), the games were largely overshadowed by the fair, which offered its own roster of sporting events, including the controversial Anthropology Days, in which a group of "savages" recruited...

The Great War

 Letter to Winston Churchill May Contain First Known Use of 'OMG'

· 08/08/2012 3:55:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TurboZamboni ·
· 17 replies ·
· NY Magazine ·
· 8-7-12 ·
· Brett Smiley ·

Letters of Note curator Shaun Usher has pointed out what might be the first known usage of O.M.G., in a September 1917 missive from British admiral John Arbuthnot "Jacky" Fisher (or Lord Fisher) to Sir Winston Churchill. In a letter to Churchill about some "utterly [upsetting]" World War I-era newspaper headlines, Fisher wrote, "I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis -- O.M.G (Oh! My! God!) -- Shower it on the Admiralty!!" To which we assume Churchill replied, "Oh Dear Fisher! I am laughing heartily out loud!!"

The Only Face of Socialism

 Seventy-Five Years After Stalin's Great "Operation Kulak" Reign of Terror

· 08/05/2012 3:06:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ReformationFan ·
· 18 replies ·
· The New American ·
· August 5, 2012 ·
· Bruce Walker ·

Seventy-five years ago, on August 5, 1937, one of the most horrific -- and most ignored -- episodes in human history began. "Operation Kulak" ("kulak" meaning rich peasants) was the Soviet Union's effort to repress those farmers who had a little more than other farmers (according, at least, to the definitions of the Communist Party), and who resisted collectivization. Soviet dictator Josef Stalin (pictured) had begun the development of "Operation Kulak" the previous month, when he contacted all the regional Party leaders as well as the NKVD (roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Gestapo and SS in Nazi Germany), asking...

Obituaries

 Last Polish soldier of WWII opening battle dies (Westerplatte)

· 08/06/2012 12:40:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by dfwgator ·
· 21 replies ·
· Associated Press ·
· ·

WARSAW, Poland (AP) -- Maj. Ignacy Skowron, the last known survivor of World War II's Battle of Westerplatte, has died. He was 97. Family friend Zofia Nowak said Monday that Skowron died at his grandson's home in Kielce, in southern Poland on Sunday after suffering circulatory, liver and pancreas problems.

World War Eleven

 10 Things You Don't Know About Guadalcanal

· 08/07/2012 3:18:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by PJ-Comix ·
· 90 replies ·
· 10 Things You Don't Know About ·
· August 7, 2012 ·
· PJ-Comix ·

Today marks the 70th anniversary of the first offensive land operation taken by the United States in World War II. On August 7, 1942, the U.S. Marines landed at Guadalcanal. The general outlines of that battle which lasted which lasted 6 months until February 9, 1943 are known by many but here are 19 things about Guadalcanal that you might not know. This is the first of my regular "20 Things You Don't Know" posts that I hope will encourage the History Channel to bring back that series. You can read my full mission statement about this in my...

Pages

 Book review- Bending the Twig: The Revolution in Education and Its Effect on Our Children

· 08/09/2012 6:52:43 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ProgressingAmerica ·
· 16 replies ·
· PGA Weblog ·
· ·

'Tis education forms the common mind Just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined -- Alexander Pope Progressive education.... what is it? Where does it come from? Is America the only place it's ever been tried? I've made my own attempts to dig into progressive education, but I can only use the internet for my queries. This book titled "Bending the twig; the revolution in education and its effect on our children" is a genuine inquiry based on thoughtful research into the topic using sources I'd probably never have access to. The review for this book comes from a...


 The Tragedy Europe Forgot (Expulsions of Germans From East of the Oder)

· 08/10/2012 7:02:19 AM PDT ·
· Posted by C19fan ·
· 9 replies ·
· Wall Street Journal ·
· August 9, 2012 ·
· Andrew Stuttaford ·

By the late spring of 1945, Germany had lost a war, its honor and millions of dead. There was more to come. The Allies had decided that the country's east should be carved up between Poland and the Soviet Union and that its German inhabitants should be moved to the truncated Reich. There they would encounter Sudeten Germans, Czechoslovakia's second largest ethnic group, now also scheduled for deportation. In August 1945, the United Kingdom, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed at Potsdam that these transfers, which had in any case already begun, should be "orderly and humane."

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan was Unavoidable

· 08/05/2012 1:27:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Retain Mike ·
· 46 replies ·
· class="attrib">Self ·
· August 5, 2012 ·
· Self ·

Dropping Atomic Bombs on Japan Unavoidable We now mark the 67th anniversary of dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II. Once again we must listen to the contra-factual analysis of revisionists as they expound on what a needless, tragic and profoundly immoral decision the United States had made. In support of dropping the atomic bombs historians often cite the inevitability of horrifying casualties, if troops had landed on the home islands. They extrapolate from 48,000 American and 230,000 Japanese losses on Okinawa to estimates of 500,000 American and millions of Japanese casualties for mainland invasions. However,...

Palontology

 Dinosaur Boom Linked to Rise of Rocky Mountains

· 08/05/2012 5:26:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 22 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 8-3-2012 ·
· Charles Choi ·

The evolution of new dinosaur species may have surged due to the rise of the Rocky Mountains and the emergence of a prehistoric inner sea in North America, researchers say. Duck-billed and horned dinosaurs flourished in North America, reaching a peak about 75 million years ago, a time known as the Campanian. For instance, one Campanian region known as the Dinosaur Park formation in what is now Canada saw seven different duck-billed dinosaur species and five horned dinosaur species emerge. A comparable region known as the Hell Creek formation in the United States from the Maastrichtian, the time that led...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Has the Loch Ness Monster Finally Been Caught on Camera?

· 08/04/2012 6:49:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 65 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 08/03/2012 ·

A monster hunter who has spent 26 years searching for the Loch Ness Monster claims to have taken the "best picture ever" of the beast, after dedicating 60 hours a week to his quest.Nessie hunter George Edwards waited 26 years for this moment -- and he now believes he has the best picture ever taken of the Loch Ness monster. He spends his life on the loch -- around 60 hours a week -- taking tourists out on his boat Nessie Hunter IV, and has led numerous Nessie hunts over the years. But this image is the one that's convinced...

end of digest #421 20120811


1,445 posted on 08/11/2012 6:40:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #421 · v 9 · n 5
Saturday, August 11, 2012
 
28 topics
2916849 to 2914827
815 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
This week I was a kept man, having to barely lift a finger posting topics, and yet we have 28! Nice job, and many thanks, to all who contributed!

Last week GGG had taken a bit of a breather with a mere 14 topics, but I forgot to update the digest header, which still showed 39 topics. In my defense, out of the 421 digests, I've only messed up someting in like half of them.

Romney-Ryan 2012.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Ya picked a fine time to leave me, loose wheel. [splat!]

Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,446 posted on 08/11/2012 7:14:55 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #422
Saturday, August 18, 2012

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Genetic Study Offers Clues to History of North Africa's Jews

· 08/12/2012 6:05:27 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 9 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· 8/7/12 ·
· Sharon Begley ·

(Reuters) - A new genetic analysis has reconstructed the history of North Africa's Jews, showing that these populations date to biblical-era Israel and are not largely the descendants of natives who converted to Judaism, scientists reported on Monday. The study also shows that these Jews form two distinct groups, one of which is more closely related than the other to their European counterparts, reflecting historical migrations. The findings are the latest in series of genetic studies, which began in the 1990s, indicating that the world's Jews share biological roots, not just cultural and religious ties. In many cases the analyses...

Egypt


Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Severed Hands Discovered in Ancient Egypt Palace

· 08/12/2012 6:57:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 56 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· August 10th, 2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

A team of archaeologists excavating a palace in the ancient city of Avaris, in Egypt, has made a gruesome discovery. The archaeologists have unearthed the skeletons of 16 human hands buried in four pits. Two of the pits, located in front of what is believed to be a throne room, hold one hand each. Two other pits, constructed at a slightly later time in an outer space of the palace, contain the 14 remaining hands. They are all right hands; there are no lefts. "Most of the hands are quite large and some of them are very large," Manfred Bietak,...

Ancient Autopsies

 Siberian Princess reveals her 2,500 year old tattoos

· 08/16/2012 8:42:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 21 replies ·
· Siberian Times ·
· 8-14-2012 ·

The ancient mummy of a mysterious young woman, known as the Ukok Princess, is finally returning home to the Altai Republic this month. She is to be kept in a special mausoleum at the Republican National Museum in capital Gorno-Altaisk, where eventually she will be displayed in a glass sarcophagus to tourists. For the past 19 years, since her discovery, she was kept mainly at a scientific institute in Novosibirsk, apart from a period in Moscow when her remains were treated by the same scientists who preserve the body of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin. To mark the move 'home', The...


 The Ice-Maiden with the Tiger Tattoo

· 08/17/2012 11:09:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 46 replies ·
· WebProNews/Science ·
· 17 Aug 2012 ·
· Amanda Crum ·

The Ice-Maiden is the most famous Pazyryk (Siberian culture probably related to the Scythians) mummy yet found. She died at about the age of 25. Buried clothed in luxurious wild silk, her body was perfectly preserved in perma-frost. But it is the tattoos that set Pazyryk burials apart. "Compared to all tattoos found by archeologists around the world, those on the mummies of the Pazyryk people are the most complicated and the most beautiful," according to the lead researcher, Dr. Natalia Polosmak.

India

 Was Narmada valley the centre of human evolution?

· 08/16/2012 6:41:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Times of India ·
· Thursday, August 14, 2012 ·
· Prashant Rupera, TNN ·

Through the largest exploration exercise ever undertaken, M S University's Department of Archaeology and Ancient History along with United States' Stone Age Institute will unearth evidence of our own ancestors. MSU and Indiana-based Stone Age Institute at Gosport have joined hands for the 'Narmada Basin Paleoanthropology Project (NBPA)' with the target to collect all the paleoanthropological evidence within the last two million years. "This project may throw new light giving credence to the belief that the Narmada Valley could have been the centre of human evolution," says professor K Krishnan, head of MSU's Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. The...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Humans, Neanderthals Did Not Have Babies

· 08/17/2012 9:37:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 112 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Aug 16, 2012 ·
· Anon ·

Recent research strikes a blow to the theory that humans and Neanderthals interbred. THE GIST Studies over the last two years suggest that Neanderthals vanished more than 30,000 years ago. This would mean that early humans and Neanderthals could not have interbred. enlarge Over the last two years, several studies have suggested that Homo sapiens got it on with Neanderthals, an hominid who lived in parts of Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East for up to 300,000 years but vanished more than 30,000 years ago. The evidence for this comes from fossil DNA, which shows that on average Eurasians...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Sex with early mystery species of humans seen in DNA. (Proof of Fallen Angels)

· 08/13/2012 11:50:12 AM PDT ·
· Posted by TaraP ·
· 194 replies ·
· Seattle Times ·
· July 26th, 2012 ·
· Brian Vastag ·

There's only one way the foreign DNA could have made it into modern human populations. "We're talking about sex," said Joshua Akey of the University of Washington, whose lab identified the foreign DNA in three groups of modern Africans. The human family tree just got another -- mysterious -- branch, an African "sister species" to the heavy-browed Neanderthals that once roamed Europe. While no fossilized bones have been found from these enigmatic people, they did leave a calling card in present-day Africans: snippets of foreign DNA. There's only one way that genetic material could have made it into modern human...

Agriculture & Animal Husbandry

 Noble Savages? The era of the hunter-gatherer was not the social and environmental Eden some suggest

· 01/01/2008 11:54:37 AM PST ·
· Posted by billorites ·
· 24 replies ·
· Economist.com ·
· December 19, 2007 ·

HUMAN beings have spent most of their time on the planet as hunter-gatherers. From at least 85,000 years ago to the birth of agriculture around 73,000 years later, they combined hunted meat with gathered veg. Some people, such as those on North Sentinel Island in the Andaman Sea, still do. The Sentinelese are the only hunter-gatherers who still resist contact with the outside world. Fine-looking specimens -- strong, slim, fit, black and stark naked except for a small plant-fibre belt round the waist -- they are the very model of the noble savage. Genetics suggests that indigenous Andaman islanders have been isolated since the...

Prehistory & Origins

 Stone Age skull-smashers spark a cultural mystery

· 08/17/2012 5:42:09 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· August 16, 2012 ·
· Jessica Hamzelou ·

An unusual cluster of Stone Age skulls with smashed-in faces has been found carefully separated from the rest of their skeletons. They appear to have been dug up several years after being buried with their bodies, separated, then reburied. Collections of detached skulls have been dug up at many Stone Age sites in Europe and the Near East -- but the face-smashing is a new twist that adds further mystery to how these societies related to their dead... No one knows why Neolithic societies buried clusters of skulls -- often near or underneath settlements. Some think it was a sign...

Thrace

 Archaeologists Find Thracian Town on Bulgarian Sea Coast

· 08/14/2012 5:06:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 7 replies ·
· Novinite ·
· Tuesday, August 14, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Bulgarian archaeologists have discovered a Thracian settlement during the first ever excavations in the town of Tsarevo on the southern Black Sea coast. The team is led by Milen Nikolov, an archaeologist from the Regional History Museum in the Black Sea city of Burgas. The settlement is very close in location to the town church "Uspenie Bogorodichno." The find proves that Tsarevo and nearby areas have a history more ancient that what was believed until now. During the excavations, the archaeologists have found remnants showing that as early as the 4th - 5th century BC Thracians have built a town...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Why the Chinchorro suddenly began to mummify their dead

· 08/14/2012 12:38:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 17 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· 8-13-2012 ·

Researchers in Chile, led by Pablo Marqueta, an ecologist with Universidad Cat -- lica de Chile have arrived at a new theory to explain why a culture that existed around seven thousand years ago suddenly began to mummify their dead. The Chinchorro The researchers have been examining the Chinchorro, hunter-gatherers that lived in the desert region of what is now northern Chile and southern Peru, from about 10,000 to 4,000 years ago. The mummies first date to 5050 BCE and continue to be made until about 1800 BCE. The Chinchorro people lived by a combination of fishing, hunting and gathering: the word...

Foster Brooks

 Prehistoric Human Brain Found Pickled in Bog

· 08/17/2012 6:32:07 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 26 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· 04-06-2011 ·
· By Jennifer Viegas ·

A brain in near-perfect condition is found in a skull of a person who was decapitated over 2,600 years ago. A human skull dated to about 2,684 years ago with an "exceptionally preserved" human brain still inside of it was recently discovered in a waterlogged U.K. pit, according to a new Journal of Archaeological Science study. The brain is the oldest known intact human brain from Europe and Asia, according to the authors, who also believe it's one of the best-preserved ancient brains in the world. "The early Iron Age skull belonged to a man, probably in his thirties," lead...

The Roman Empire

 Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?

· 08/13/2012 11:05:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by wtd ·
· 38 replies ·
· The Gates of Vienna ·
· August 13, 2012 ·
· Baron Bodissey ·

The title of this thread "Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?" refers to a recent post at Gates of Vienna Blog written by Baron Bodissey. The Baron reviews the book Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy by Emmet Scott. If you have an interest in the subject of the Greco-Roman legacy and Islam as they relate to the sudden decline of medieval Europe this book will expose the linkage between Islam's destructive forces at that time and have you reconsider the implications of current events related to Islam today. Scott argues that the collapse of Latin-Greek civilization...


 Who Really Killed the Pax Romana?

· 08/14/2012 8:16:21 AM PDT ·
· Posted by ckilmer ·
· 16 replies ·
· Gates Of Vienna ·
· Sunday, August 12, 2012 ·
· Barron Boddissy ·

Mohammed and Charlemagne Revisited: The History of a Controversy by Emmet Scott New English Review Press · 2012 · 270 pages $19.95 · Kindle version $9.95 Mohammed & Charlemagne Revisited by Emmet ScottThroughout the coastal areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, archaeologists have uncovered a layer of subsoil that was deposited over a period of three hundred years beginning in the middle of the seventh century AD. This stratum, named the "Younger Fill" by the geologist Claudio Vita-Finzi, covers the ruins of all the major cities and settlements that were established along the Mediterranean littoral during classical antiquity. It stands as...

The Vikings

 Monastery where Christian saint was martyred is uncovered on Eigg

· 08/14/2012 4:58:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· The Scotsman ·
· Tuesday, August 14, 2012 ·
· Alistair Munro ·

Students and local people have uncovered what are thought to be remains of St Donnan's monastery... St Donnan brought Christianity to many places in the West Highlands in the seventh century before settling on Eigg. According to local folklore, he became a martyr after he was killed by Norsemen, along with 50 monks, while giving Mass on Easter Sunday in the year 617... The dig at Kildonnan Graveyard on the south-east side of the island has now uncovered evidence which experts believe shows it is the exact site... Pictish pottery from the same period was also found in the graveyard....

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 The man who should have been King: Australian forklift driver...

· 08/16/2012 3:38:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Daily Mail ·
· Thursday, August 16, 2012 ·
· Daily Mail Reporter ·

Mike Hastings, 71, was a real-life aristocrat, born the 14th earl of Loudoun, who moved to Australia in 1960 in search of adventure. He made international headlines in 2004 when a Channel Four documentary team conducted extensive research into the monarchy and concluded his ancestors were cheated out of the crown in the 15th century. Hastings, an avowed republican, died on June 30 and was buried today in Jerilderie, about 465 miles southwest of Sydney, the local Wagga Wagga Daily Advertiser reported. He was a descendant of England's House of York, whose dynastic struggle with the House of Lancaster became...

Age of Sail

 World's oldest shipping firm Stephenson Clarke Shipping in liquidation

· 08/09/2012 11:24:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by bruinbirdman ·
· 6 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· 8/9/2012 ·

The world's oldest shipping firm, UK-based Stephenson Clarke Shipping, has gone into liquidation after nearly 300 years of trading. Established in 1730, Stephenson Clarke had tried to sell its ships and cut costs in the face of crashing rates for dry bulk shipping on which it relied - transporting cargoes such as coal, grain and iron ore. High and dry But liquidator Tait Walker was appointed on August 3, the company and liquidator said in a statement. "While previous economic downturns have been weathered, the current market is one of the worst experienced for many years with no upturn forecast...

Early America

 Navy's oldest commissioned warship to sail again

· 08/17/2012 2:51:51 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ConorMacNessa ·
· 56 replies ·
· AP via Tampa Bay Online ·
· Aug 17, 5:26 PM EDT ·
· JAY LINDSAY ·

BOSTON (AP) -- The U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned warship will sail under its own power for just the second time in more than a century to commemorate the battle that won it the nickname "Old Ironsides." The USS Constitution, which was first launched in 1797, will be tugged from its berth in Boston Harbor on Sunday to the main deepwater pathway into the harbor. It will then set out to open seas for a 10-minute cruise. The short trip marks the day two centuries ago when the Constitution bested the British frigate HMS Guerriere in a fierce battle during the...

Not-Too-Ancient Autopsies

 Earhart expedition team says video possibly shows plane debris

· 08/17/2012 10:48:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 16 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· August. 18, 2012 ·
· Malia Mattoch McManus ·

(Reuters) - A team of researchers trying to solve the mystery of aviator Amelia Earhart's 1937 disappearance said on Friday that underwater video from a Pacific island has revealed a field of man-made debris that could be remnants of her plane. The footage was collected in July by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) during a $2.2 million expedition to Nikumaroro in the Republic of Kiribati. Unsolved questions about Earhart's fate have long heightened her legendary status as a pioneering aviator, and TIGHAR's voyage to seek clues in her disappearance gained interest far beyond the shores of the...

World War Eleven

 Closure, World War II sub found under the sea (Final Resting Place for 85)

· 08/12/2005 11:31:24 AM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 29 replies ·
· The Charlotte Observer ·
· Thu, Aug. 11, 2005 ·
· KELLY KENNEDY ·

In the ghostly blue lights of a video camera, sea snakes, squids and schools of blue and yellow fish swirl past five-inch battle guns of a World War II submarine 200 feet beneath the South China Sea. "With all the fish and the coral covering the Lagarto, it's almost like someone put flowers on a grave," said Elizabeth Kenney-Augustine, whose grandfather, Bill Mabin of La Grange, Ill., was on the sub. For decades, no human knew where to put flowers for the 86 men who disappeared with the U.S.S. Lagarto somewhere between Thailand and Australia shortly before World War II...

Longer Perspectives

 World War II Deconstructed

· 08/16/2012 7:43:49 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Academiadotorg ·
· 74 replies ·
· Accuracy in Academia ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Malcolm A. Kline ·

Herbert Hoover's Secret History of the Second World War and its Aftermath. As it turns out, Hoover stated what would be his central thesis in a conversation at a 1951 Manhattan dinner to a New York public relations man in language that history buffs who associate the former president with the high starch collars he wore would never guess that he would use. "When Roosevelt put America in to help Russia as Hitler invaded in June, 1941," Hoover said. "We should have let those two bastards annihilate themselves." George H. Nash, no mean historian himself, supplied the above anecdote in...

Climate

 Salvage firm finds the ship that took Scott on his ill-fated Antarctic expedition

· 08/17/2012 10:33:34 PM PDT ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 10 replies ·
· dailymail.co.uk ·
· 17 Aug 2012 ·
· Mark Prigg ·

The SS Terra Nova, the ship that carried Captain Robert Scott on his doomed expedition to the Antarctic a century ago, has been discovered off Greenland. It was discovered by a team from a US research company using a hi-tech underwater vehicle after they spotted an unusual object while testing their sonar equipment. Scott and his party set off from Cardiff aboard the Terra Nova in 1910 with the aim of becoming the first expedition to reach the South Pole. A crew from the Schmidt Ocean Institute discovered the Terra Nova whilst testing echo-sounding equipment aboard its flagship vessel --...

Greeks & Armenians

 More Turk Bias Against Greeks, Armenians

· 08/13/2012 8:44:48 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bayouranger ·
· 6 replies ·
· commentarymagazine.com ·
· 12AUG12 ·
· Michael Rubin ·

The White House continues to talk about Turkey not only as a regional ally but also as a model for reform in the Middle East. It has been several years, however, since Turkish reforms contributed to democracy. The latest case in point is Turkish real estate reform. The Turkish government has announced new regulations. Here is the rub: While the government has removed onerous rules and regulations that made navigating Turkish real estate a nightmare, the government has in effect legislated its traditional hatreds. Armenians, for example, need not apply. They are by law unable to own housing or businesses...

end of digest #422 20120818


1,447 posted on 08/18/2012 9:02:45 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #422 · v 9 · n 6
Saturday, August 18, 2012
 
23 topics
2919995 to 2917534
817 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Twenty-three topics. Troll activity up a tick this week. Summer has flown by, it seems to me.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,448 posted on 08/18/2012 9:06:03 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1447 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #423
Saturday, August 25, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Climate and Drought Lessons from Ancient Egypt

· 08/18/2012 11:29:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 22 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· Thursday, August 16, 2012 ·
· United States Geological Survey et al ·

Ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt's Nile Delta document the region's ancient droughts and fires, including a huge drought 4,200 years ago associated with the demise of Egypt's Old Kingdom, the era known as the pyramid-building time... said Christopher Bernhardt, a researcher with the U.S. Geological Survey... "Even the mighty builders of the ancient pyramids more than 4,000 years ago fell victim when they were unable to respond to a changing climate," said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. "This study illustrates that water availability was the climate-change Achilles Heel then for Egypt, as it may well...

Climate

 Ice core shows Antarctic Peninsula warming is nothing unusual
 --Press release flatly contradicts what boffins said

· 08/23/2012 12:47:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 16 replies ·
· The Register ·
· 23rd August 2012 10:16 GMT ·
· Lewis Page ·

New ice core data from the Antarctic Peninsula has revealed that temperatures in the region during the past 10,000 years have often been higher than they are today, and that warming of the sort seen there recently has also occurred in the pre-industrial past. The new data are derived from a massive new 364m-long core extracted from the ice sheet lying on top of James Ross Island towards the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula in the freezing Weddell Sea. The core was extracted by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey, assisted by...


 Temperatures were warmer than today for most of the past 10,000 years

· 08/23/2012 4:16:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by gorush ·
· 10 replies ·
· http://iceagenow.info ·
· 25 May 10 ·
· Robert W. Felix ·

25 May 10 -- The revamped cap-and-trade (control-and-tax) bill that Senators Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and John Kerry (D-Mass.) are trying to foist on the American public is predicated on a flat-out lie. The control-and-tax proponents would have you believe that our planet has been enduring unprecedented global warming (now coyly referred to as "climate change"), but the facts do not bear that out. Facts. Oh, those damnable facts... ...You'll see that today's benign climate is not even close to being the warmest on record. Not even close. Temperatures have been warmer than today for almost all of the past 10,000...


 Antarctic peninsula was 1.3°C warmer than today 11,000 years ago

· 08/23/2012 5:47:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 18 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· August 23, 2012 ·
· British Antarctic Survey ·

New climate history adds to understanding of recent Antarctic Peninsula warmingResults published this week by a team of polar scientists from Britain, Australia and France adds a new dimension to our understanding of Antarctic Peninsula climate change and the likely causes of the break-up of its ice shelves.The first comprehensive reconstruction of a 15,000 year climate history from an ice core collected from James Ross Island in the Antarctic Peninsula region is reported this week in the journal...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 The Puzzle Of The 13 Solar Towers of Chankillo

· 08/23/2012 4:38:23 AM PDT ·
· Posted by rjbemsha ·
· 22 replies ·
· The Physics arXiv Blog ·
· 21 Aug 2012 ·
· Anonymous ·

Chankillo, a Peruvian "Stonehenge", has 13 towers in a straight line. No-one knows why. Now, Amelia Sparavigna at the Politecnico di Torino in Italy ... show[s] that the first tower lines up with sunrise on 21 June and the last tower lines up with the sunrise on 21 December ...[and] the shadows point north for half the year and south for the other half. What's more, when there are no shadows the sun is at its zenith.... [T]his would have been important information for a farming community, which would need to know when to plant seasonal crops.... However, many questions...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Scottish people's DNA study could 'rewrite nation's history'

· 08/22/2012 7:05:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 131 replies ·
· The Guardian (UK) ·
· 8-14-2012 ·
· Charlotte Higgins ·

Evidence of African, Arabian, south-east Asian and Siberian ancestry in Scotland, says author of book tracing genetic journey A large scale study of Scottish people's DNA is threatening to "rewrite the nation's history", according to author Alistair Moffat. Scotland, he told the Edinburgh international book festival, despite a long-held belief that its ethnic make-up was largely Scots, Celtic, Viking and Irish, was in fact "one of the most diverse nations on earth". "The explanation is simple. We are a people on the edge of beyond; on the end of a massive continent. Peoples were migrating northwest; and they couldn't get...

Prehistory & Origins

 Lao skull earliest example of modern human fossil in Southeast Asia

· 08/22/2012 5:41:52 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· Monday, August 20, 2012 ·
· U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ·

An ancient skull recovered from a cave in the Annamite Mountains in northern Laos is the oldest modern human fossil found in Southeast Asia, researchers report. The discovery pushes back the clock on modern human migration through the region by as much as 20,000 years and indicates that ancient wanderers out of Africa left the coast and inhabited diverse habitats much earlier than previously appreciated. The team described its finding in a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The scientists, who found the skull in 2009, were likely the first to dig for ancient bones in Laos...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Neanderthal and Human Matings Get a Date

· 08/21/2012 3:03:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 32 replies ·
· Smithsonian 'blogs ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Erin Wayman ·

Two years ago the analysis of the Neanderthal genome revealed modern humans carry Neanderthal DNA, implying our ancestors mated with Neanderthals at some point in the past. Scientists only found genetic traces of Neanderthals in non-African people, leading to the conclusion that Neanderthal-human matings must have occurred as modern humans left Africa and populated the rest of the world. A new paper (PDF) posted on arXiv.org puts a date on those matings: 47,000 to 65,000 years ago... To determine what really happened, Sankararaman's team looked at rates of genetic change to estimate when Neanderthals and humans last exchanged genes. If...

Religion of Pieces

 Syrian Conflict Imperils Historical Treasures

· 08/18/2012 11:04:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 15 replies ·
· New York Times ·
· August 15, 2012 ·
· Patricia Cohen ·

Preservationists and archaeologists are warning that fighting in Syria's commercial capital, Aleppo -- considered the world's oldest continuously inhabited human settlement -- threatens to damage irreparably the stunning architectural and cultural legacy left by 5,000 years of civilizations. Already the massive iron doors to the city's immense medieval Citadel have been blown up in a missile attack, said Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, an organization that works to preserve cultural heritage sites... President Bashar al-Assad's forces have been shelling the city, and in recent days his army has taken up positions inside the Citadel, trading fire with...

Longer Perspectives

 Are we willing to die to save the past?

· 08/16/2012 7:00:18 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bayouranger ·
· 5 replies ·
· meforum.org ·
· 15AUG12 ·
· by Alexander H. Joffe ·

Archaeologist Alex Joffe on how Western empowerment of Islamists threatens precious antiquities. Preserving the past has costs. Much of the world shares the belief that the past has intrinsic value, which is encoded into laws and regulations that imperfectly protect, preserve and study historical and archaeological remains. Contributions, admission fees and taxes pay for the upkeep of monuments from the Parthenon to the Liberty Bell. When highways are constructed they are diverted around historical landmarks, or the landmarks are moved. Archaeological excavations slow construction everywhere. But are we willing to kill or die for the past? The question is not...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Two Leonardos found in 'Last Supper'

· 08/19/2012 6:32:32 AM PDT ·
· Posted by JoeProBono ·
· 53 replies ·
· upi ·
· Aug. 18, 2012 ·

ROME, -- A British art expert says two of the figures in Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "The Last Supper" are actually self-portraits of the artist. Ross King said this week that while not a lot is known about Da Vinci's physical appearance at the time he painted "The Last Supper," he is confident the noses on two of the apostles are a giveaway. King has concluded the long hair, beards and Greek noses on the two matched up with a portrait of the Italian master drawn years later. Greek noses and prominent hair, King said, were "rarities for an Italian...

Doh!

 Elderly woman destroys 19th-century fresco with DIY restoration

· 08/22/2012 9:48:26 AM PDT ·
· Posted by beaversmom ·
· 85 replies ·
· The Telegraph ·
· August 22, 2012 ·
· Amy Willis ·

Three separate photographs of "Ecce Homo" by painter Elias Garcia Martinez show extensive damage caused by an elderly woman who decided the masterpiece needed a little refurbishment. But in a time of austerity, rather than calling in a professional to complete the job, the unnamed woman attempted to restore the mural herself -- at a devastating cost.


 Spanish fresco restoration botched by amateur

· 08/22/2012 1:49:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by NYer ·
· 41 replies ·
· BBC ·
· August 22, 2012 ·

Elias Garcia Martinez's Ecce Homo (left) and the "restoration" An elderly parishioner has stunned Spanish cultural officials with an alarming and unauthorised attempt to restore a prized Jesus Christ fresco. Ecce Homo (Behold the Man) by Elias Garcia Martinez has held pride of place in the Sanctuary of Mercy Church near Zaragoza for more than 100 years.The woman took her brush to it after years of deterioration due to moisture.Cultural officials said she had the best intentions and hoped it could be properly restored. The woman, in her 80s, was reportedly upset at the way the fresco had deteriorated and took...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Tracking pages of ancient Hebrew Bible

· 09/28/2008 6:21:58 AM PDT ·
· Posted by PRePublic ·
· 3 replies ·
· SF Chronicle ·
· Sept. 28, 2008 ·

Tracking pages of ancient Hebrew Bible Crusaders held it for ransom, fire almost destroyed it and it was reputedly smuggled across borders in the Middle East hidden in a washing machine. But in 1958, when it finally reached Israel, 196 pages were missing -- about 40 percent of the total -- and for some Old Testament scholars they have become a kind of holy grail. Researchers representing the manuscript's custodian in Jerusalem now say they have leads on some of the missing pages and are nearer their goal of making the manuscript whole again. The Crown, known in English...

Underwater Archaeology

 'Whale ribs, meteorites and chairs' [ Robert Ballard off Cyprus ]

· 08/20/2012 6:07:39 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 20 replies ·
· Cyprus Mail ·
· August 19, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Famed explorer Robert Ballard's expedition over the Eratosthenes Seamount is currently collecting images during sweeps of the area using the latest technology to explore the sea floor some 70 miles off the island. After two days of exploring, the team's underwater robots, operating at 800 to 1,000 metres, yesterday reached the summit of the Eratosthenes, going over terrain from a previous sweep and then turned west to head to unexplored territory to the west. On Friday night they came across what appeared to be fossilised rib bones commentators suggested might have come from a whale, perhaps even 40,000 years old......

Age of Sail

 Stephen Harper renews hunt for Franklin ships long lost to the Arctic depths

· 08/24/2012 3:43:20 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Loyalist ·
· 17 replies ·
· National Post ·
· August 24, 2012 ·
· Jordan Press and Randy Boswell ·

CAMBRIDGE BAY, Nunavut -- The search for the remnants of an ill-fated British expedition that failed to cross the Northwest Passage -- and a seminal moment in Canada's history on Arctic sovereignty -- will start anew. In the coming weeks, a group of researchers will scour Canada's Arctic waters to find Sir John Franklin's two ships, Erebus and the Terror, led by a ship named for an Arctic researcher who perished in a plane crash last year. The renewal of Parks Canada's search for the lost Franklin vessels, anticipated last week by Postmedia News, follows three recent federal expeditions that...

War of 1812

 Washington Burning: The 200th Anniversary of The War of 1812

· 08/24/2012 7:21:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by kiryandil ·
· 18 replies ·
· Washingtonian ·
· August 2012 ·
· Adam Goodheart ·

August 24, 1814. "During the War of 1812, British troops burned much of Washington DC. And to think we never had the decency to thank them." ~Larry J Must-watch Youtube video:War of 1812 -- Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie


 Old Ironsides sails again: USS Constitution goes to sea

· 08/20/2012 3:57:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by mdittmar ·
· 51 replies ·
· Mail Online ·
· 8/19/12 ·
· Associated Press ·

The U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned warship sailed under its own power for just the second time in more than a century to commemorate the battle that won it the nickname 'Old Ironsides.' The USS Constitution, which was first launched in 1797, was tugged from its berth in Boston Harbor on Sunday to the main deepwater pathway into the harbor. It then set out to open seas for a 10-minute cruise. The short trip marked the day two centuries ago when the Constitution bested the British frigate HMS Guerriere in a fierce battle during the War of 1812. It follows a...

World War Eleven

 Spies, Enigma machine and James Bond's creator

· 08/19/2012 8:15:22 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Squawk 8888 ·
· 21 replies ·
· Edmonton Journal ·
· August 18, 2012 ·
· Kathryn Greenaway ·

Date: Aug. 19, 1942 Time: 5 a.m. Location: A stone beach on the northern coast of France. Operation: More than 6,000 Allied forces infantrymen attempt to penetrate a German stronghold. Outcome: Unmitigated disaster. Less than six hours later, 60 per cent of the infantrymen were dead, injured and/or captured; 907 Canadians died. Why the Allied forces allowed the poorly planned Dieppe Raid to move forward has been a mystery for decades -- until now. Montreal historian David O'Keefe has solved the mystery and, in the process, has rewritten a defining moment in military history. O'Keefe, a military historian by profession,...

Epigraphy & Language

 A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

· 08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 33 replies ·
· Nature.com ·
· 8-23-2012 ·
· Alyssa Joyce ·

Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia -- now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Archaeological Dig Reveals Causes -- and Possible Cures -- for Diabetes Epidemic

· 08/24/2012 11:29:54 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 16 replies ·
· Indian Country Today Media Network ·
· 8-23-2012 ·
· Eisa Ulen Richardson ·

The future health of Natives may lie in the scatological remains of the past -- a vanguard study of ancient excrement has offered fresh new ways of thinking about the prevalence of diabetes among Native people of the American Southwest. Karl Reinhard, a professor of forensic science and environmental archaeology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has studied the fossilized feces, or coprolites, of ancestral Pueblo people and documented typical Pueblo diets prior to European contact. He has determined that the overwhelming prevalence of diabetes among Pueblo descendants may stem from their radical departure from the healthy diets of their progenitors. According to...

end of digest #423 20120825


1,449 posted on 08/24/2012 10:00:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv; 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #423 · v 9 · n 7
Saturday, August 25, 2012
 
21 topics
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Twenty-one topics, and I'm on dialup now, and it's after midnight.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Remember in November.
 
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1,450 posted on 08/24/2012 10:02:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #424
Saturday, September 1, 2012

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Asperger's Man- The Search for Multi-Regional Human Speciation

· 08/30/2012 10:45:34 AM PDT ·
· Posted by EveningStar ·
· 10 replies ·
· The Freehold ·
· August 29-30, 2012 ·
· Jonathan David Baird ·

My first love will always be archaeology and the study of what makes us human.This article is speculation. This is my personal musing on the development of certain psychological and physiological human traits. This is not to be taken as anything but my personal opinion. I have no evidence that there was an Asperger's man. This article was also written several years ago and since then more evidence for the possibility of interbreeding with other hominids has come to light in Russia and in Africa that may support my original idea... Part 1·Part 2

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Most Neanderthals Were Right-Handed Like Us

· 08/26/2012 9:13:15 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 54 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 8-24-2012 ·
· Megan Gannon ·

Right-handed humans vastly outnumber lefties by a ratio of about nine to one, and the same may have been true for Neanderthals. Researchers say right-hand dominance in the extinct species suggests that, like humans, they also had the capacity for language. A new analysis of the skeleton of a 20-something Neanderthal man confirms that he was a righty like most of his European caveman cousins whose remains have been studied by scientists (16 of 18 specimens). Dubbed "Regourdou," the skeleton was discovered in 1957 in France, not far from the famous network of caves at Lascaux....

Prehistory & Origins

 Neolithic Man: The First Lumberjack?

· 08/27/2012 3:38:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Terra Daily ·
· Wednesday, August 15, 2012 ·
· Staff Writers ·

The use of functional tools in relation to woodworking over the course of the Neolithic period has not been studied in detail until now. Through their work at the archaeological site of Motza, a neighbourhood in the Judean Hills, Dr. Barkai and his fellow researchers, Prof. Rick Yerkes of Ohio State University and Dr. Hamudi Khalaily of the Israel Antiquity Authority, have unearthed evidence that increasing sophistication in terms of carpentry tools corresponds with increased agriculture and permanent settlements. The early part of the Neolithic age is divided into two distinct eras - Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and Pre-Pottery Neolithic...

Climate

 Greenhouse theory smashed by biggest stone

· 03/30/2006 4:58:23 PM PST ·
· Posted by haole ·
· 57 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· 14 March 2006 ·
· Vladimir Shaidurov ·

A new theory to explain global warming was revealed at a meeting at the University of Leicester (UK) and is being considered for publication in the journal "Science First Hand". The controversial theory has nothing to do with burning fossil fuels and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. According to Vladimir Shaidurov of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the apparent rise in average global temperature recorded by scientists over the last hundred years or so could be due to atmospheric changes that are not connected to human emissions of carbon dioxide from the burning of natural gas and oil. Shaidurov explained how...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 New paper finds deep Arctic Ocean from 50,000 to 11,000 years ago was 1-2°C warmer ......

· 08/31/2012 2:10:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· 20 replies ·
· Watts Up With That? ·
· August 29, 2012 ·
· Anthony Watts ·

Reposted from the Hockey SchtickA new paper published in Nature Geoscience finds "From about 50,000 to 11,000 years ago, the central Arctic Basin from 1,000 to 2,500 meters deep was 1-2°C warmer than modern Arctic Intermediate Water." This finding is particularly surprising because it occurred during the last major ice age. Horizontal axis is thousands of years ago with modern temperatures at the left and 50,000 years ago at the right. Temperature proxy of the Intermediate Water Layer of the Arctic Ocean is shown in top graph with degrees C anomaly noted at the upper right vertical axis. Note...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Ancient Town Found Near Stonehenge

· 01/30/2007 10:28:33 AM PST ·
· Posted by Froufrou ·
· 15 replies ·
· woai.com ·
· 01/30/07 ·
· Unknown ·

Evidence of a large settlement full of houses dating back to 2,600 BC has been discovered near the ancient stone monument of Stonehenge in southwest England, scientists said on Tuesday. They suspect inhabitants of the houses, forming the largest Neolithic village ever found in Britain, built the stone circle at Stonehenge -- generally thought to have been a temple, burial ground or an astronomy site -- between 3,000 and 1,600 BC. "We found the remains of eight houses," Mike Parker Pearson, a professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, said in a teleconference to announce the discovery. "We think they are...

Orkney

 Third 5,000-year-old figurine found at Orkney dig

· 08/31/2012 6:15:12 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· BBC ·
· August 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

A third 5,000-year-old hand-carved figurine has been discovered during excavations on Orkney. Archaeologists had previously unearthed two ancient figurines in 2009 and 2010 at the dig at Links of Noltland in Westray. All three will go on display at the Westray Heritage Centre. Alasdair McVicar, chair of the Westray Heritage Trust, said: "The discovery of these figurines has really put Westray and the heritage centre on the map." Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop said: "There was understandable excitement when the first figurine, believed to be the earliest artistic representation of the human form ever found in the UK, was found in...

Scotland Yet

 Roman Gask Project archaeologists look to uncover Stracathro site's secrets

· 08/31/2012 6:27:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Courier UK ·
· August 28, 2012 ·
· Graeme Bletcher ·

A team of archaeologists has arrived in Angus to survey the world's most northerly Roman fort. Directors of The Roman Gask Project, Dr David Woolliscroft and Dr Birgitta Hoffmann, are at the ancient site near Stracathro, which was part of a line of Scottish watchtowers believed to be the oldest Roman frontier. Despite being discovered from the air almost 50 years ago, little is known about the structure of the fort near Brechin, which makes up part of the Gask Ridge frontier system. Assisted by volunteers from Liverpool University, the experts will use non-invasive survey techniques such as magnetometry and...

Roman Empire

 Emperor Caligula Gold Coin Found Underwater Near Cyprus

· 08/27/2012 7:05:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Greek Reporter (Source: onair24) ·
· August 21, 2012 ·
· Marianna Tsatsou ·

A significant archaeological finding, a gold coin, has been reported discovered underwater in the area between Limassol and Larnaca by a local amateur fisherman. According to Cypriot authorities, the coin is of great value. Cypriot media reported that it dates back to the first century A.D. and depicts the third Roman emperor called Caligula, well-known for his fierce and brutal policy during his reign. On this coin, Caligula is sacrificing an animal before the Temple of Augustus, which is constituted by six pillars. Many coins of the same age have been found over the course of time, but this one...

Epigraphy & Language

 Ancient poem deifies wife of brutal Roman emperor Nero

· 08/26/2012 8:21:11 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 21 replies ·
· MSNBC ·
· 8/23/2012 ·
· Owen Jarus ·

A just-deciphered ancient Greek poem discovered in Egypt deifies Poppaea Sabina, the wife of the infamous Roman emperor Nero, showing her ascending to the stars. Based on the lettering styles and other factors, scholars think the poem was written nearly 200 years after Nero died (about 1,800 years ago), leaving them puzzled as to why someone so far away from Rome would bother composing or copying it at such a late date. In the poem, Poppaea ascends to heaven and becomes a goddess. The ancient goddess Aphrodite says to Poppaea, "my child, stop crying and hurry up: with all their...

Byzantium

 Bulgarian archaeologist discover necropolis of ancient Apollonia in Sozopol

· 08/31/2012 6:22:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· FOCUS News Agency ·
· 29 August 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Bulgarian archaeologists discovered a necropolis of ancient Apollonia in the coastal town of Sozopol, Director of the Museum of History in Sozopol Dimitar Nedev announced for FOCUS News Agency. In Nedev's words, the burial was found in the northern part of the narthex of the three-naved basilica under the levels of the two churches. "The situation is the following: two churches -- one from VI and another from the VII century, with equal period of construction, and another one of the X century, existing until XVII century. In the outlines of the northern part of the narthex, we found the...

Greece

 The Greek Crisis: Palaeoanthropology and Archaeology

· 08/31/2012 6:42:42 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 5 replies ·
· Heritage Daily.com ·
· August 29, 2012 ·
· Charles t. g. Clarke ·

Greece has been in the grip of a financial crisis for the last few years now and Greek heritage sites are hit the worst. There is however, an unseen, less well known crisis and it involves Greek palaeoanthropology -- the study of hominin evolution. It is not so much a crisis as a metaphorical drought of artefacts and fossil evidence, which remains the best way to understand human evolution in Greece. An understanding of tectonic activity and the ever changing relationship between the Aegean Sea and mainland Greece are crucial to understanding why so little Lower Palaeolithic Hominin material has...

Paleontology

 Prehistoric tiny bugs found trapped in amber

· 08/28/2012 8:29:13 AM PDT ·
· Posted by null and void ·
· 26 replies ·
· WTOP ·
· 8/28/12 ·
· Seth Borenstein ·

This undated handout photo provided by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the University of Göttingen shows photomicrographs of the two new species of ancient gall mites in 230-million-year-old amber droplets from northeastern Italy. The gall mites were named: Triasacarus fedelei, left, and Ampezzoa triassica. (AP Photo/A. Schmidt, University of Göttingen, Proceedings of the National Academy) -- WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists have found three well preserved ancient insects frozen in amber -- and time -- in what is Earth's oldest bug trap. The discoveries of amber-encased insects in Italy may sound like something out of "Jurassic Park"...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Shakespeare's Richard III Buried in a UK Parking Lot?

· 08/26/2012 5:30:48 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 21 replies ·
· The Times of India ·
· Aug 27, 2012 ·

Archaeologists may have solved the puzzle of where the English king Richard III, immortalized by Shakespeare in his play is buried as they have started digging a car park in Leicester for his lost remains. The University of Leicester, Leicester City Council and the Richard III Society have joined forces to search for the grave of Richard III, thought to be under a parking lot for city council offices. The team will use ground-penetrating radar to search for the ideal spots to dig. "This archaeological work offers a golden opportunity to learn more about medieval Leicester as well as about...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Pictures: Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

· 08/31/2012 6:18:21 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 21 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· August 2012 ·
· A.R. Williams ·

Sixteen feet (five meters) below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of 1,789 bones from children, teenagers, and adults along with the complete skeleton of a young woman. The burial, dating to the 1480s, lies at the foot of the main temple in the sacred ceremonial precinct of the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, founded by the Aztecs in 1325. The Aztecs dominated central Mexico until falling to Spanish conquistadores in 1521. Although several burials with multiple remains have been uncovered previously in this precinct, this is the first that includes human bones from such a wide span...

The Revolution

 Seeking Brooklyn's Lost Mass Grave

· 08/25/2012 7:23:53 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 45 replies ·
· The New York Times ·
· August 25, 2012 ·
· Justin Burke ·

Confident Bob Furman suspects that up to 256 Revolutionary soldiers lie under this lot in Gowanus.Dave Sanders for The New York Times NOTHING is visible at the intersection of Third Avenue and Eighth Street in the Gowanus section of Brooklyn to indicate that anything extraordinary is there. The artisanal-pie place on one corner and the auto body shops across the way suggest it is merely another spot in the city where grit is giving way to gentrification. But if a small group of history enthusiasts are right, this particular corner of Kings County is hallowed ground. HEROIC Kim Maier,...

Age of Sail

 USS Constitution Sails For First Time Since 1997

· 08/20/2012 11:21:06 AM PDT ·
· Posted by moonshot925 ·
· 25 replies ·
· NAVY ·
· 19 August 2012 ·
· Kathryn E. Macdonald ·

CHARLESTOWN, Mass. (NNS) -- USS Constitution departed her berth from Charlestown, Mass. Aug. 19, to set sail for the first time since 1997, during an underway demonstration commemorating Guerriere Day. The underway honored the 200th anniversary of Constitution's decisive victory over the HMS Guerriere during the War of 1812, marking the first time a United States frigate defeated a Royal Navy frigate at or nearly equal size. It's also the battle in which Constitution earned her famous nickname "Old Ironsides." The ship got underway at 9:57 a.m. with tugs attached to her sides and 285 people on board, including special...

The Civil War

 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Antietam

· 08/26/2012 6:52:09 PM PDT ·
· Posted by PaulZe ·
· 37 replies ·
· 150thAntietamReenactment.com ·

The 150th Antietam-Sharpsburg Reenactment is pleased to announce we will be hosting a Remembrance Illumination scheduled for Saturday evening, September 15th at 7PM. The Antietam Illumination Committee in conjunction with Michael Wicklein will be placing 3654 (Union KIA 2108, Confederate KIA 1546) candles on the reenactment battlefield in remembrance of the number killed in action on September 17, 1862 at the Battle of Antietam. Lasting approximately one hour, the program will include an artillery salute.

Back to the Future

 Sci-Fi writers of the past predict life in 2012

· 08/28/2012 12:09:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by EveningStar ·
· 16 replies ·
· Gizmag ·
· August 5, 2012 ·
· David Szondy ·

As part of the L, Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future award in 1987, a group of science fiction luminaries put together a text "time capsule" of their predictions about life in the far off year of 2012. Including such names as Orson Scott Card, Robert Silverberg, Jack Williamson, Algis Budrys and Frederik Pohl, it gives us an interesting glimpse into how those living in the age before smartphones, tablets, Wi-Fi and on-demand streaming episodes of Community thought the future might turn out.

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Mythical Dragon Gate Protects Home

· 08/26/2012 1:29:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by EveningStar ·
· 11 replies ·
· My Modern Metropolis ·
· November 9, 2011 ·
· Pinar ·

In Dublin, Ireland, stands an estate reminiscent of old folklore, complete with its own dragon! Of course, dragons are mythical creatures, so this home only has a dragon made of steel which acts as its gatekeeper. The property, known at Harlech House, was originally built in 1798 by a Welsh immigrant. (The estate is actually named after a town in Wales called Harlech and the national flag has a dragon on it.) Harlech House sits on less than an acre of land but is full of enchantment. It features religious iconography and fairy-tale motifs throughout the seven-bedroom home, but it's...

World War Eleven

 The Amazing Saga Of Two-Gun Cohen

· 08/29/2012 2:50:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Zionist Conspirator ·
· 11 replies ·
· The Jewish Press ·
· 8/29/'12 ·
· Steven Plaut ·

In November 1947, the United Nations was considering the creation of a Jewish state in parts of Western Palestine and a new Arab state in the other parts. The hopes of the Jews rested in large part on China. The five-member Security Council had to approve putting the resolution before the General Assembly, but China, one of the five, was threatening to veto it. The head of the Chinese delegation was approached by a hero of the Chinese campaign against the Japanese during World War II, a man who had been a general and senior adviser to President Sun Yat-sen....

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Israeli Archaeologist Excavates Sobibor Death Camp To Reveal The Nazis' Buried Secrets

· 08/28/2012 7:11:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 45 replies ·
· Haretz ·
· August 21, 2012 ·
· Associated Press ·

Israeli archaeologist digs into Sobibor death camp in search of Nazi killing machines Yoram Haimi's biggest breakthrough yet: mapping of what the Germans called the Himmelfahrsstrasse, or the 'Road to Heaven,' a path upon which the inmates were marched naked into the gas chambers. When Israeli archaeologist Yoram Haimi decided to investigate his family's unknown Holocaust history, he turned to the skill he knew best: He began to dig. After learning that two of his uncles were murdered in the infamous Sobibor death camp, he embarked on a landmark excavation project that is shining new light on the workings of...

Longer Perspectives

 While digging a highway, Israeli archeologists find two figurines from the New Stone Age

· 08/31/2012 6:33:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Art Daily ·
· Saturday, September 1, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

Two figurines from the New Stone Age (Pre-Pottery Neolithic B) were discovered in excavations the Israel Antiquities Authority is currently conducting at the Tel Moza archaeological site, prior to work being carried out on the new Highway 1 from Sha'ar HaGai to Jerusalem by the National Roads Company. According to Anna Eirikh and Dr. Hamoudi Khalaily, directors of the excavation at the site on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "The figurines, which are 9,000-9,500 years old, were found near a large round building whose foundations were built of fieldstones and upper parts of the walls were apparently made of...

Religion of Pieces

 Turkey Lobbies Museums Around World to Return Artifacts

· 08/31/2012 7:11:20 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· Voice of America ·
· Friday, August 31, 2012 ·
· Dorian Jones ·

Turkey is following an increasingly aggressive policy of getting top museums around the world to return its heritage. Minister of Culture and Tourism Ertugrul Gunay says that in the last decade, more than 4,000 artifacts had been brought back to Turkey from world museums and collections... Gunay says when you visit the world's big museums in the US, England, France, Germany, you see that most of the precious artifacts came from Turkey, Italy, Egypt and Greece. Some of these, he says, were looted, and he is fighting to get back historical artifacts that went to the big museums of the...


 '1001 Muslim Inventions' Fantasy Comes to DC: The Presentation of Legend as History

· 08/26/2012 4:59:28 PM PDT ·
· Posted by YankeeReb ·
· 114 replies ·
· vinienco.com ·
· 8/26/2012 ·
· J. Christian Adams ·

National Geographic Explorer's Hall in Washington D.C. has hosted some of the most prestigious exhibits in America. Previous exhibits have included the Chinese terracotta warriors, as well as the James Caird, the lifeboat Sir Ernest Shackleton miraculously sailed from Antarctica to South Georgia Island in 1916. Currently it is hosting a curious exhibit through February 2013 entitled "1001 Inventions: Discover the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization." This high tech, slickly produced exhibit explicitly seeks to debunk the "myth" that the dark ages were dark. The exhibit purports to provide examples of innovations from Muslim civilization, and some of the...

end of digest #424 20120901


1,451 posted on 09/01/2012 7:54:56 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #424 · v 9 · n 8
Saturday, September 1, 2012
 
25 topics
2925256 to 2922732
816 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Twenty-five topics, most of them posted by someone beside me, and I'm very grateful for the help!

Oh, great, I messed up the links on every last one of the topics in the Digest. Gotta fix that program (again). Sorry for the inconvenience, but you're all clever enough to figure out the workaround.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Romney / Ryan in November.
Zero has to go, because it's quite literally him or us. And "him or us" isn't "lesser of two evils".

-- 'Civ, in this topic (and in his FR profile shortly thereafter)
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,452 posted on 09/01/2012 8:08:34 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1451 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #425
Saturday, September 8, 2012

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Staggering Number of Bones of Extinct Ice Age Animals Found in Mexico

· 09/06/2012 8:24:18 PM PDT ·
· Posted by ForGod'sSake ·
· 110 replies ·
· International Business Times ·
· September 4, 2012 ·
· Sanskrity Sinha ·

Apparently, archaeologists have also found a few human skeletal remains at the excavation site -- More than hundred bones of animals, now extinct, that thrived over 10,000 years ago (the late Pleistocene period), have been discovered in the state of Hidalgo, in central-eastern Mexico. Remains of megafauna that lived more than 10,000 years ago in what is now the Valley of Mexico. (Photo: INAH) The discovery was made at a construction site of a wastewater treatment plant near the river El Salto in the city of Atotonilco de Tula,...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 Human Genome Is Much More Than Just Genes

· 09/06/2012 10:04:50 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 13 replies ·
· ScienceNOW ·
· 5 September 2012 ·
· Elizabeth Pennisi ·

This diagram illustrates a chromosome in ever-greater detail, as the ENCODE project drilled down to DNA to study the functional elements of the genome. Credit: ENCODE project · The human genome -- the sum total of hereditary information in a person -- contains a lot more than the protein-coding genes teenagers learn about in school, a massive international project has found. When researchers decided to sequence the human genome in the late 1990s, they were focused on finding those traditional genes so as to identify all the proteins necessary for life. Each gene was thought to be a discrete piece...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 How our DNA differs from that of Denisovans, our extinct cousins

· 09/01/2012 5:42:46 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 45 replies ·
· LA Times ·
· 9-1-12 ·
· Rosie Mestel ·

Scientists are beginning to analyze the DNA differences between modern humans and our extinct archaic relatives, the Denisovans. (National Human Genome Research Institute) Genome of ancient Denisovans may help clarify human evolution Scientists recently reported they had pieced together a high-quality sequence of an archaic human relative, the Denisovans. Among other things, the researchers took a close look at the ways in which we differ from these people, who were named after the place where their traces were discovered: Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains of Siberia....snip It's "fascinating" to see the DNA changes that spread to most or all...

Age of Sail

 A brief history of Iceland - Vanity

· 12/08/2006 11:24:32 AM PST ·
· Posted by Leifur ·
· 128 replies · 2,467+ views ·
· 8.12.2006 ·
· Leifur ·

Here are the basics of the history of Iceland. With a special emphasis of US - Icelandic connections and the US military presence here and its end in this year, and the disillusionment of many Icelanders, specially on the right, because of this towards the US wich they have supported for long time. 874: Scandinavian/british isles vikings and their celtic slaves began settling the country. 930: Mostly settled, the Icelandic Free State was established, a governing system without a king or any executive branch whatsoever. A very individualistic system of governance, that ensured peace and prosperity here for 300 years....

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Two Iron Age Sites Discovered in Finland

· 09/03/2012 6:21:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· Thursday, September 6, 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

In the autumn of 2010, local amateur archaeologists discovered a large harbor, dating from around 1000-1200 AD, in Ahvenkoski village, at the mouth of western branch of the Kymijoki River in Finland. The findings included a smithy, a iron smelting furnace, forceps, as well as hundreds of iron objects such as boat rivets, similar to those found at Viking settlements in different parts of the Baltic, Scandinavia, Scotland and Iceland. More recently, in August of 2012 and in the same area, a 2 x 3 meter wide late Viking Age or Crusade period cremation grave was uncovered. Artifacts included a...

Epigraphy & Language

 [Indo-Euro]Language family may have Anatolian origins

· 09/01/2012 6:51:05 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 14 replies ·
· Science News ·
· August 23rd, 2012 ·
· Bruce Bower ·

Indo-European tongues traced back more than 8,000 years to present-day Turkey ANCIENT SPREADThe map shows the timing and geographic expansion of Indo-European languages proposed in a new statistical analysis. The red area in what's now Turkey is a possible birthplace of the Indo-European language family more than 8,000 years ago.Remco Bouckaert et al. Indo-European languages range throughout Europe and South Asia and even into Iran, yet the roots of this widespread family of tongues have long been controversial. A new study adds support to the proposal that the language family expanded out of Anatolia -- what's now Turkey -- between...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Archaeologists unearth ruins of 1,500-year-old Jewish town in southern Israel

· 09/03/2012 6:06:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Times of Israel ·
· Sunday, September 2, 2012 ·
· Matti Friedman ·

The remains of two Jewish ritual baths and two public buildings were uncovered in a salvage dig ahead of the paving of a new section of Israel's Highway 6, a north-south toll road eventually slated to run much of the length of the country. Both of the public buildings feature raised platforms along the walls facing Jerusalem, archaeologists say -- a trademark feature of Jewish houses of prayer... The existence of the town was known to scholars from archaeological surveys, but the findings show it was more substantial than had been previously thought, Nir Shimshon-Paran, the dig director, told The...

Roman Empire

 Late Roman Shipwreck on Spanish Chapel

· 09/03/2012 7:54:05 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Bodrum Museum of
 Underwater Archeology ·
· by 2009 ·
· Tony Marciniec ·

Just off the west coast of the Bodrum peninsula, southwest of an island called Yassiada, there is a submerged reef appropriately referred to by some as The Ship Trap. About A.D. 626, in the reign of Emperor Heraclius, when the Persians and the Avars were laying siege to Constantinople, the capital of the East Roman Empire, the reef claimed another victim, a small ship bearing in its hold a cargo of nearly a thousand wine amphorae. For more than thirteen centuries the shipwreck lay on the seabed until it was discovered by Kemal Aras, a Turkish diver, who then showed...

Anatolia

 Headless statues unearthed in Aphrodisias excavations

· 09/03/2012 7:00:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Hurriyet Daily News ·
· Anatolia News Agency ·

The two big headless statues have been found at the ancient city of Aphrodisias. The ongoing excavation works at one of Turkey's most important archaeological sites, the Karacasu Aphrodisias Ancient City, have revealed two headless statues. According to information provided by the Culture and Tourism Ministry, one of the statues is in 1.76 meters in height and the other is 1.68 meters. One of the statues holds a roll in its left hand and its right hand is on its chest. There is a pack of documents behind its left foot, but the fingers and head are broken. The second...

Byzantium

 Turkish Archaeologists Reveal 6th Century Baptistery Abroad [in Kosovo]

· 09/07/2012 11:14:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 6 replies ·
· Hurriyet Daily News ·
· 9/7/12 ·
· Dogan News Agency ·

A historic baptistery structure has been unearthed at one of the most important ancient sites in Kosovo by Turkish archaeologists. It is the first such excavation to be carried out by Turkish archaeologists in Europe Since the beginning of excavations in July in Kosovo's ancient city of Ulpiana, a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period have been unearthed by Turkish archaeologists of the Mimar Sinan University. At an excavation site in Kosovo's ancient city of Ulpiana, a team of Turkish archaeologists have discovered a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period. The archaeological team, consisting of archaeology students from Istanbul's Mimar...

Faith & Philosophy

 Crosses appear inside the Hagia Sophia

· 09/01/2012 11:49:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by annalex ·
· 29 replies ·
· Orthodoxy and Hellenism ·
· September 30, 2011 ·

Strange and inexplicable event comes after the last appearance of winged angels. A paradox for those of us who do not possess the art of iconography is that the mosaics were covered with a thick layer of lime (about two fingers), as seen in this picture, in order to hide the Christian symbols. It is onto the lime cover that these crosses appeared. And rightfully should the visitors wonder, since they are not painted later. Somehow they "seeped" from the wall up to the outer surface of plaster? And why should only the crosses...

The Revolution

 Ask Ron column: Did Route 222 [PA] play an important role in the American Revolution?

· 09/06/2012 7:45:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 11 replies ·
· NY Daily News ·
· September 6th 2012 ·
· Ron ·

The road from Reading to Easton, now Route 222, was called King's Highway in 1776. It was a critical artery for the movement of troops and supplies during the American Revolution. Indeed, there's strong evidence that Gen. George Washington himself traversed the road on his way to upstate New York in 1782, stopping off in the Moravian town of Bethlehem. Revolution, however, was not on the minds of most colonists when the Reading-to-Easton road was proposed by Conrad Weiser, William Parsons and other leaders in 1753; Indians were. There had been massacres of settlers pushing north from Philadelphia to settle...

The Great War

 WWI era ammunition frozen in a glacier for nearly a century has been found in N. Italy

· 09/02/2012 7:17:19 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 28 replies ·
· Daily Mail (U.K.) ·
· September 2, 2012 ·
· Alex Gore ·

First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts WWI ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry. The once-perennial glacier began partially melted during a recent heat wave, allowing the Finance Police Alpine rescue...

World War Eleven

 B-17 - Fantastic Story of Survival

· 09/02/2012 8:54:46 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Windflier ·
· 84 replies ·
· Email ·
· Unknown ·
· Unknown Patriot ·

WWII B-17 Survival Story · B-17 "All American" (414th Squadron, 97BG) · Crew Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr. · Copilot- G. Boyd Jr. · Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle · Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge · Engineer- Joe C. James · Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway · Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda · Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk · Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus · Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland · B-17 in 1943 · A mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area, became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of World War II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went...

The Holocaust

 Volunteer For Auschwitz Among Polish War Heroes
  Buried In Mass Grave By Poland's Communist Regime

· 08/30/2012 8:34:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by DogByte6RER ·
· 13 replies ·
· leaderpost.com ·

Man who volunteered for Auschwitz among war heroes Poland searching for in mass grave WARSAW, Poland - It could hardly have been a riskier mission: infiltrate Auschwitz to chronicle Nazi atrocities. Witold Pilecki survived nearly three years as an inmate in the death camp, managing to smuggle out word of executions before making a daring escape. But the Polish resistance hero was crushed by the post-war communist regime -- tried on trumped-up charges and executed. Six decades on, Poland hopes Pilecki's remains will be identified among the entangled skeletons and shattered skulls of resistance fighters being excavated from a mass...

Egypt

 Berlin marks 100 years of discovering Nefertiti

· 09/03/2012 7:30:22 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 11 replies ·
· Hurriyet Daily News ·
· August 30, 2012 ·
· Agence France-Presse ·

Berlin's Egyptian Museum has said that it will celebrate the centenary of the discovery of the 3,400-year-old fabled bust of Egypt's Queen Nefertiti amid an ongoing feud with Cairo over its ownership. The museum said it would open an exhibition on Dec. 6 honoring the famous sculpture and other jewels of the Amarna period in its collection on the German capital's Museum Island. On the same day in 1912, the bust was unearthed by German archaeologist Ludwig Borchardt. "The exhibition focuses on never-before-seen discoveries from the collections of the Berlin museum, supplemented by loans from other museums abroad," it said,...

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Janet Suzman 'Mad as a Snake' Over Rylance and Shakespeare 'Myths'

· 09/04/2012 12:39:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 21 replies ·
· Guardian ·
· Dalya Alberge ·

Janet Suzman 'mad as a snake' over Rylance and Shakespeare 'myths'

Longer Perspectives

 Must Read: Zombies: How the Left Captured Academia, the Media, and Other Organizations

· 09/05/2012 2:07:10 PM PDT ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 23 replies ·
· PJMedia ·
· September 5 , 2012 ·
· Vik Rubenfeld ·

Alinsky-style behavior in the workplace itself may have been the key Recent studies have confirmed that American universities have become bigoted and biased against the expression of conservative views. One new study documents bias against the expression of conservative views among social and personality psychologists, including those at universities: We find that respondents significantly underestimate the proportion of conservatives among their colleagues. ... that conservatives fear negative consequences of revealing their political beliefs to their colleagues. Finally, we find that conservatives are right to do so. In decisions ranging from...

end of digest #425 20120908


1,453 posted on 09/08/2012 4:49:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1451 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #425 · v 9 · n 9
Saturday, September 8, 2012
 
18 topics
2925256 to 2922732
814 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
Sorry, my GGG activity fell off this week. Nevertheless, troll activity has taken a big uptick in recent weeks.

· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Romney / Ryan in November.
Zero has to go, because it's quite literally him or us. And "him or us" isn't "lesser of two evils".

-- 'Civ, in this topic (and in his FR profile shortly thereafter)
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,454 posted on 09/08/2012 5:22:25 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1453 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #426
Saturday, September 15, 2012

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Early Cannibalism Tied to Territorial Defense?

· 09/10/2012 6:08:37 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 34 replies ·
· Smithsonian 'blogs ·
· Wednesday, September 5, 2012 ·
· Erin Wayman ·

The earliest known instance of cannibalism among hominids occurred roughly 800,000 years ago. The victims, mainly children, may have been eaten as part of a strategy to defend territories against neighbors, researchers report online in the Journal of Human Evolution. The new study shows how anthropologists use the behavior of modern humans and primates to make inferences about what hominids did in the past -- and demonstrates the limitations of such comparisons. The cannibalism in question was discovered in the Gran Dolina cave site of Spain's Atapuerca Mountains. Eudald Carbonell of the University of Rovira and Virgili in Spain and...

Prehistory & Origins

 Prehistoric Animated Cave Drawings Discovered In France

· 09/12/2012 5:47:16 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 21 replies ·
· Web Pro News ·
· 6-14-2012 ·
· Amanda Crum ·

News out of France concerning Prehistoric cave drawings that were animated by torch-light is taking the art history world by storm, and has overwhelmed this artist to the point of awe. The cave drawings were found by archaeologist Marc Azema and French artist Florent Rivere, who suggest that Paleolithic artists who lived as long as 30,000 years ago used animation effects on cave walls, which explains the multiple heads and limbs on animals in the drawings. The images look superimposed until flickering torch-light is passed over them, giving them movement and creating a brief animation. "Lascaux is the cave with...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Biblical-Type Floods Are Real, and They're Absolutely Enormous

· 09/04/2012 8:31:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Theoria ·
· 29 replies ·
· Discover Magazine ·
· 29 Aug 2012 ·
· David R. Montgomery ·

Geologists long rejected the notion that cataclysmic flood had ever occurred -- until one of them found proof of a Noah-like catastrophe in the wildly eroded river valleys of Washington State. After teaching geology at the University of Washington for a decade, I had become embarrassed that I hadn't yet seen the deep canyons where tremendous Ice Age floods scoured down into solid rock to sculpt the scablands. So I decided to help lead a field trip for students to see the giant erosion scars on the local landforms.We drove across the Columbia River and continued eastward, dropping into Moses Coulee, a...

Climate

 Coral links ice to ancient 'mega flood'

· 03/30/2012 12:44:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 28 replies ·
· www.physorg.com ·
· 03-30-2012 ·
· Provided by Oxford University ·

Coral off Tahiti has linked the collapse of massive ice sheets 14,600 years ago to a dramatic and rapid rise in global sea-levels of around 14 metres. Previous research could not accurately date the sea-level rise but now an Aix-Marseille University-led team, including Oxford University scientists Alex Thomas and Gideon Henderson, has confirmed that the event occurred 14,650-14,310 years ago at the same time as a period of rapid climate change known as the Bölling warming. The finding will help scientists currently modelling future climate change scenarios to factor in the dynamic behaviour of major ice sheets. A report of...

Anatolia

 Human Impact Felt On Black Sea Long Before Industrial Era

· 09/08/2012 6:13:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 13 replies ·
· ScienceDaily ·
· September 4, 2012 ·
· Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst ·

In the delta's early stages of development, the river deposited its sediment within a protected bay. As the delta expanded onto the Black Sea shelf in the late Holocene and was exposed to greater waves and currents, rather than seeing the decline in sediment storage that he expected, Giosan found the opposite. The delta continued to grow. In fact, it has tripled its storage rate. If an increase in river runoff was responsible for the unusual rapid build up of sediment in the delta, says Giosan, the question is, "Was this extraordinary event in the Danube delta felt in the...

Black Sea Flood

 The great flood legends -- ancient misreadings of the fossil record?

· 06/21/2004 7:49:48 AM PDT ·
· Posted by aculeus ·
· 64 replies · 1,338+ views ·
· Antiquity ·
· June 2004 ·
· Richard K. Jeck ·

Over the past two decades there have been renewed attempts to search for remains of Noah's ark and to discover evidence of the biblical Flood itself. In the early 1980s, several expeditions led by an American astronaut and others ascended Mt. Ararat, the legendary resting place of Noah's ark in northern Turkey, in an unsuccessful search for remains of the ark. More recently, evidence has been reported that the Black Sea may have formed suddenly about 7500 years ago by break-through flooding from the Mediterranean Sea (Ryan & Pitman 1998; Ballard 2001). These authors speculate that this natural disaster (for...

Underwater Archaeology

 Shipwreck in 'exceptional' condition discovered by archaeologists in France

· 09/08/2012 9:36:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 4 replies ·
· Le Monde via Guardian Weekly ·
· Tuesday 4 September 2012 ·
· Stéphane Foucart ·

It looks like the rib cage of a large marine mammal, whose bones turned black as it was fossilised. The wreck was discovered in May during a dig in Antibes, on the French Riviera, prior to construction of a car park on the site of the Roman port of Antipolis. Archaeologists have gradually uncovered a 15-metre length of hull and structural timbers, in "exceptional" condition, according to Giulia Boetto, a specialist in ship design at Aix-Marseille University who is involved in the dig. Saw and adze marks are still visible on the wood. Luckily the ground in which it was...

Roman Empire

 Buried but found: First images of a lost Roman town

· 09/10/2012 6:02:01 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· Wednesday, September 5, 2012 ·
· U of Cambridge ·

Originally founded as a Roman colony in the 4th century BCE, the site of Interamna Lirenas lies in the Liri Valley in Southern Lazio, about 50 miles south of Rome itself. After it was abandoned around the year 500 CE, it was scavenged for building materials and, over time, its remains were completely lost from view. Today, the site is an uninterrupted stretch of farmland, with no recognisable archaeological features. Now, researchers have successfully produced the first images of the ancient site, using geophysical methods that allowed them to look beneath the surface of the earth and map the layout...

Faith & Philosophy

 Reservoir from time of King Solomon found in Jerusalem

· 09/10/2012 4:39:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by little jeremiah ·
· 12 replies ·
· Fox News ·
· September 10, 2012 ·

Archaeologists have found an ancient water reservoir in Jerusalem that may have been used by pilgrims coming to the Temple Mount, the Israeli Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced. The IAA said the cistern could have held 66,000 gallons (250 cubic meters) of water; it likely dates back to the era of the First Temple, which, according to the Hebrew Bible, was constructed by King Solomon in the 10th century B.C. and then destroyed 400 years later. Israeli archaeologists believe the reservoir served the general public in the ancient city, but say its location hints at...

Ancient Autopsies

 Tutankhamun's death and the birth of monotheism

· 09/10/2012 6:16:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 26 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· 5 September 2012 ·
· Jessica Hamzelou ·

...says Hutan Ashrafian, a surgeon with an interest in medical history at Imperial College London. Tutankhamun died young with a feminised physique, and so did his immediate predecessors. Paintings and sculptures show that Smenkhkare, an enigmatic pharaoh who may have been Tutankhamun's uncle or older brother, and Akhenaten, thought to have been the boy king's father, both had feminised figures, with unusually large breasts and wide hips. Two pharaohs that came before Akhenaten -- Amenhotep III and Tuthmosis IV -- seem to have had similar physiques. All of these kings died young and mysteriously, says Ashrafian. "There are so many...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Land near Petra was a green oasis in the past

· 09/08/2012 9:30:00 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 21 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· September 2012 ·
· unattributed ·

About 15 km to the east of the ancient city of Petra, archaeologists from the University of Leiden have discovered an impressive network of ancient water conservation measures and irrigated field systems... In Antiquity, an ingenious system of underground canals, hacked out of the limestone bedrock, in addition to specially built aqueducts and reservoirs with capacities of millions of litres of water, transformed this marginal region into a complex man-made landscape. This is a fantastic example of ancient water-management technology, constructed to irrigate the surrounding terraced field systems... It is possible that parts of this agricultural system -- which was...

Epigraphy & Language

 US opposes penalty for Russia over historic books

· 09/11/2012 3:41:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SJackson ·
· 14 replies ·
· Seattle Times ·
· 9-11-12 ·
· Frederic J. Frommer ·

The Obama administration is opposing a Jewish group's bid to have civil fines levied against Russia for failing to obey a court order to return its historic books and documents -- a dispute that has halted the loan of Russian art works for exhibit in the United States. WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration is opposing a Jewish group's bid to have civil fines levied against Russia for failing to obey a court order to return its historic books and documents -- a dispute that has halted the loan of Russian art works for exhibit in the United States. In a...

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Mammoth tooth found at Transbay dig

· 09/13/2012 1:22:15 AM PDT ·
· Posted by thecodont ·
· 11 replies ·
· San Francisco Chronicle / SFGate.com ·
· Wednesday, September 12, 2012 ·
· Updated 10:55 p.m. ·
· Michael Cabanatuan ·

A seemingly ordinary day at the Transbay Transit Center construction site became a mammoth day of discovery Monday when a mild-mannered crane operator reached deep into the earth and pulled out a tooth. This was no ordinary tooth. The 10-inch-long brown, black and beige chomper, broken in two and missing a chunk, once belonged to a woolly mammoth, an elephantine creature that roamed the grassy valley that's now San Francisco Bay 10 million to 15 million years ago in the Pleistocene epoch. Other woolly mammoth fossils have been found in the Bay Area, including in San Francisco about 2 miles...

Mammoth Told Me...

 Mammoth fragments raise cloning hopes

· 09/15/2012 11:44:55 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 9 replies ·
· Telegraph (UK) ·
· Tuesday, September 11, 2012 ·
· AP ·

Well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments have been discovered deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organiser has said. Russia's North-Eastern Federal University said an international team of researchers had discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow some 328 feet (100 meters) underground during a summer expedition in the northeastern province of Yakutia. Expedition chief Semyon Grigoryev said Korean scientists with the team had set a goal of finding living cells in the hope of cloning a mammoth. Scientists have previously found bones and fragments...

Helix, Make Mine a Double

 'Junk DNA' Debunked

· 09/14/2012 8:48:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Olog-hai ·
· 11 replies ·
· Wall Street Journal ·
· September 5, 2012, 2:01 p.m. ET ·
· Gautam Naik and Robert Lee Hotz ·

The deepest look into the human genome so far shows it to be a richer, messier and more intriguing place than was believed just a decade ago, scientists said Wednesday. While the findings underscore the challenges of tackling complex diseases, they also offer scientists new terrain to unearth better treatments. Encode succeeded the Human Genome Project, which identified the 20,000 genes that underpin the blueprint of human biology. But scientists discovered that those 20,000 genes constituted less than 2% of the human genome. The task of Encode was to explore the remaining 98% -- the so-called junk DNA -- that lies between those...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Have UK archaeologists found Richard III's skeleton?

· 09/12/2012 12:14:15 PM PDT ·
· Posted by TnGOP ·
· 24 replies ·
· Reuters ·
· 09/12/2012 ·
· Michael Holden ·

(Reuters) -- Archaeologists searching for the body of England's King Richard III under a city centre parking lot said on Wednesday they had found remains which could be those of the monarch depicted by Shakespeare as an evil, deformed, child-murdering monster.


 Skeleton found in Leicester could be Richard III

· 09/12/2012 9:09:02 PM PDT ·
· Posted by MrsEmmaPeel ·
· 35 replies ·
· CBC News ·
· Sept 12, 2012 ·
· CBC News ·

Archeologists at the University of Leicester in central England say they have discovered a human skeleton with battle wounds and a curved spine that could be the remains of King Richard III.

The Civil War

 Civil War "Blockade Runner" Warship Washes Up On Alabama Beach

· 09/04/2012 10:13:29 AM PDT ·
· Posted by trailhkr1 ·
· 21 replies ·
· The Daily Mail ·
· 9-4-12 ·
· The Daily Mail ·

Gulf Coast residents are getting a history lesson after a mysterious ship popped up on the beach after Hurricane Isaac. The wreckage of a presumed Civil War warship washed up in Fort Meyer, Alabama, near Mobile, after the Category 1 storm barreled down on the Gulf Cost.

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Colour film of 1901, judged world's earliest ever, found at media museum

· 09/14/2012 6:49:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by lowbridge ·
· 26 replies ·
· guardian ·
· september 12, 2012 ·
· mark brown ·

There is not much of a plot -- goldfish in bowl -- but the scene and others from the same rolls of film were revealed on Wednesday as the earliest colour moving images ever made in a discovery that does nothing less than "rewrite film history". The National Media Museum in Bradford said it had found what it contends are truly historic films from 1901/02, pre-dating what had been thought to be the first successful colour process -- Kinemacolor -- by eight years. "We believe this will literally rewrite film history," said the museum's head of collections, Paul Goodman. "I don't think it is...

Longer Perspectives

 Are Democrats Really the "Pro-Science" Party?

· 09/10/2012 2:29:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 84 replies ·
· realclearpolitics.com ·
· September 10, 2012 ·
· Alex Berezow and Hank Campbell ·

A narrative has developed over the past several years that the Republican Party is anti-science. Recently, thanks to the ignorant remarks about rape made by Rep. Todd Akin, the Democrats have seized the opportunity to remind us that they are the true champions of science in America. But is it really true? No. As we thoroughly detail in our new book, "Science Left Behind," Democrats are willing to throw science under the bus for any number of pet ideological causes -- including anything from genetic modification to vaccines. Consider California's Proposition 37, which would require genetically modified food to carry...

end of digest #426 20120915


1,455 posted on 09/15/2012 5:31:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1453 | View Replies]

To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #426 · v 9 · n 10
Saturday, September 15, 2012
 
10 topics
2931349 to 2926499
818 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
This Digest issue is loaded up with ships, underwater archaeology, and subterranean and submerged civs.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Everything you needed to know about Barry Soetero, you learned on September 11, 2012.
Barack Hussein Obama -- "I will stand with the Muslims should the political winds shift in an ugly direction."
They have, and you are.

Romney / Ryan in November.
Zero has to go, because it's quite literally him or us. And "him or us" isn't "lesser of two evils".

-- 'Civ, in this topic (and in his FR profile shortly thereafter)
 
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·


1,456 posted on 09/15/2012 5:55:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1455 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Wouldn’t it be neat if post #1492 is made on October 8?


1,457 posted on 09/15/2012 6:10:15 PM PDT by Ken H
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1456 | View Replies]

To: Ken H

If I remember, that could probably be arranged...


1,458 posted on 09/15/2012 8:03:39 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1457 | View Replies]


Here are this week's topics, links only, by order of addition to the list:

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #427
Saturday, September 23, 2012

Roman Games

 Romans return to Caerleon

· 09/17/2012 4:06:58 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· South Wales Argus ·
· Sunday 19th August 2012 ·
· Chris Wood ·

THE Romans returned to Caerleon this weekend, with thousands of people marvelling at the battle skills which were hallmarks of their empire-building. Ars Dimicandi draws actors from all over Italy and they travel to all parts of the former Roman Empire demonstrating gladiator-style fighting, different types of duels and battle re-enactments. The group was formed by Dario Battaglia 20 years ago and he said: "The main things we show is different types of fights, armours and how a military person is different from a gladiator." It was Mr Battaglia's third time in Caerleon and the group were there as part...

Roman Britain

 Some catch! The local who wed an emperor's daughter

· 09/17/2012 3:43:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 19 replies ·
· This Is Kent ·
· Thursday, August 30, 2012 ·
· Dover Express ·

In about AD50 there was a rebellion against Rome throughout parts of Britannia but Arviragus did not join in. In fact, he did the dirty on his fellow Britons by allying his tribesmen with the Roman legions to put down the rebellion. After that he helped the Romans to make further inroads into Britannia. History records that the Roman emperor Claudius Caesar, the first emperor to be born outside Italy, was so delighted with the support his troops received from king Arviragus that he gave his daughter Gennissa to him in marriage. No doubt this was to strengthen the alliance...

Roman Africa

 Archaeological research into funeral rituals at Baelo Claudia

· 09/15/2012 7:13:38 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· September 2012 ·
· Asociacion RUVID ·

Set in the current municipality of Tarifa (Cadiz) and opposite the Moroccan coast, Baelo Claudia is one of the best preserved Roman cities in Spain. Declared a National Historic Monument in 1925, the once prosperous city was founded in the late 2nd century BC... The archaeological work conducted at the site since the early twentieth century has uncovered what is probably the best preserved city from the high imperial Roman period of the Iberian Peninsula, though many elements link it to the Mauritanian-Punic African world, especially visible in certain architectural and structural features of the forum and the temple area....

Roman Rhineland

 Excavations at the Place du Chateau in Strasbourg

· 09/16/2012 10:06:35 AM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· Past Horizons Archaeology ·
· September 2012 ·
· Source: INRAP ·

This excavation... presents a unique opportunity to explore the ancient origins of the city, to discover the Roman camp of the Legio VIII Augusta, and to uncover remains associated with the construction of the cathedral. The origins of Strasbourg coincide with the installation of the Roman army. The Legio VIII Augusta was established in the ancient city of Argentorate in the 90's AD. Its 6000 men built a permanent camp covering nearly 20 hectares, which would later become the core of the Episcopal city during the Middle Ages, now the current centre of the city. In the context of several...

Roman Gaul

 Roman military camp dating back to the conquest of Gaul
  throws light on a part of world history


· 09/15/2012 7:36:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 25 replies ·
· Institute of Pre- and Protohistory ·
· Friday, September 14, 2012 ·
· Dr. Sabine Hornung ·

In the vicinity of Hermeskeil, a small town some 30 kilometers southeast of the city of Trier in the Hunsrueck region in the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate, archaeologists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have confirmed the location of the oldest Roman military fortification known in Germany to date. These findings shed new light on the Roman conquest of Gaul. The camp was presumably built during Julius Caesars' Gallic War in the late 50s B.C. Nearby lies a late Celtic settlement with monumental fortifications known as the "Hunnenring" or "Circle of the Huns," which functioned as one of the...

Roman Greece

 Painted Roman tomb found in Corinth

· 09/15/2012 7:49:35 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 17 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· September 2012 ·
· Central Archaeological Council ·

A Roman period tomb containing vivid murals was found in January 2012 during excavation work on the new highway between Corinth-Patras in Greece, according to a report in To BHMA newspaper... The underground chamber tomb has been dated stylistically to the 3rd century CE and measures 2.40 x 2.30 metres internally. The roof, which has been partially damaged is barrel vaulted. There are two decorated sarcophagi, one of which is not well preserved, but the other contains a picture of a beautiful young woman lying on a bed. Within the sarcophagus were two urns, one of which contained a female...

Roman Anatolia

 Enormous Roman Mosaic Found Under Farmer's Field

· 09/18/2012 4:02:49 PM PDT ·
· Posted by mojito ·
· 65 replies ·
· Yahoo ·
· 9/17/2012 ·
· Stephanie Pappas ·

A giant poolside mosaic featuring intricate geometric patterns has been unearthed in southern Turkey, revealing the far-reaching influence of the Roman Empire at its peak. The mosaic, which once decorated the floor of a bath complex, abuts a 25-foot (7-meter)-long pool, which would have been open to the air, said Michael Hoff, a University of Nebraska, Lincoln art historian and director of the mosaic excavation. The find likely dates to the third or fourth century, Hoff said. The mosaic itself is an astonishing 1,600 square feet (149 square meters) -- the size of a modest family home. [....] So far,...

Faith & Philosophy

 Suggestion of a married Jesus --
  Ancient papyrus shows that some early Christians believed he wed


· 09/18/2012 11:20:37 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 102 replies ·
· Harvard Gazette ·
· 09-18-2012 ·
· contr. by Alvin Powell ·

Four words on a previously unknown papyrus fragment provide the first evidence that some early Christians believed Jesus had been married, Harvard Professor Karen King told the 10th International Congress of Coptic Studies today. King, the Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School, announced the existence of the ancient text at the congress' meeting, held every four years and hosted this year by the Vatican's Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum in Rome. The four words that appear on the fragment translate to "Jesus said to them, my wife." The words, written in Coptic, a language of Egyptian Christians, are on a...


 A Faded Piece of Papyrus Refers to Jesus' Wife

· 09/18/2012 2:35:59 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Altariel ·
· 84 replies ·
· NY Times ·
· September 18, 2012 ·
· Laurie Goodstein ·

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- A historian of early Christianity at Harvard Divinity School has identified a scrap of papyrus that she says was written in Coptic in the fourth century and contains a phrase never seen in any piece of Scripture: "Jesus said to them, "My wife ...' " The faded papyrus fragment is smaller than a business card, with eight lines on one side, in black ink legible under a magnifying glass. Just below the line about Jesus having a wife, the papyrus includes a second provocative clause that purportedly says, "she will be able to be my disciple." The...


 A Faded Piece of Papyrus Refers to Jesus' Wife (Written in Coptic in the fourth century)

· 09/18/2012 5:05:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SeekAndFind ·
· 99 replies ·
· New York Times ·
· 09/18/2012 ·
· Laurie Goodstein ·

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- A historian of early Christianity at Harvard Divinity School has identified a scrap of papyrus that she says was written in Coptic in the fourth century and contains a phrase never seen in any piece of Scripture: "Jesus said to them, "My wife ...' " The faded papyrus fragment is smaller than a business card, with eight lines on one side, in black ink legible under a magnifying glass. Just below the line about Jesus having a wife, the papyrus includes a second provocative clause that purportedly says, "she will be able to be my disciple." The...


 The Inside Story of a Controversial New Text About Jesus (Married!)

· 09/19/2012 6:49:40 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 80 replies ·
· Smithsonian Magazine ·
· 9-18-2012 ·
· Ariel Sabar ·

Harvard researcher Karen King today unveiled an ancient papyrus fragment with the phrase, "Jesus said to them, "My wife.'" The text also mentions "Mary," arguably a reference to Mary Magdalene. The announcement at an academic conference in Rome is sure to send shock waves through the Christian world. The Smithsonian Channel will premiere a special documentary about the discovery on September 30 at 8 p.m. ET. And Smithsonian magazine reporter Ariel Sabar has been covering the story behind the scenes for weeks, tracing King's steps from when a suspicious e-mail hit her in-box to the nerve-racking moment when she thought...


 Five big questions about the 'Jesus' wife' papyrus

· 09/20/2012 6:02:24 PM PDT ·
· Posted by count-your-change ·
· 83 replies ·
· Houston Chronicale ·
· Thursday, September 20, 2012 ·
· Alessandro Speciale ·

In a surprise announcement that seemed scripted by novelist Dan Brown, a Harvard professor revealed an ancient scrap of papyrus on Tuesday that refers to Jesus' wife. The so-called "Gospel of Jesus' Wife" presents a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples, said Karen King, a respected historian of early Christianity at Harvard Divinity School.

Africa

 The Mystery of Ethiopian Iconography

· 09/18/2012 12:38:25 PM PDT ·
· Posted by marshmallow ·
· 11 replies ·
· Orthodox Arts Journal ·
· 8/10/12 ·
· Jonathan Pageau ·

Ethiopian Christianity presents many mysteries to us, their unique use of Old Testament typology, their concentric churches, their claim of having the Ark of the Covenent and its use in liturgy -- these all create an obscure but fascinating question. I went to Ethiopia in 2009 to discover more about their liturgical arts. I would like to share some of my findings with you. This is just to give you a taste since of course one could easily write a book on the subject. I will focus on the Lake Tana churches and mostly one church : Kidana Mhiret on...

Let's Have Jerusalem

 Heavenly Egyptian Charm Found in Israeli City

· 09/16/2012 7:49:43 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 16 replies ·
· LiveScience ·
· Monday, September 10, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

A rare scarab amulet newly unearthed in Tel Aviv reveals the ancient Egyptian presence in this modern Israeli city. Archaeologists excavating the ancient city of Jaffa, now part of Tel Aviv, have long uncovered evidence of Egyptian influence. Now, researchers have learned that a gateway belonging to an Egyptian fortification in Jaffa was destroyed and rebuilt at least four times. They have also found the scarab, which bears the cartouche of the Egyptian Pharaoh Amenhotep III... Scarabs were common charms in ancient Egypt, representing the journey of the sun across the sky and the cycle of life. Jaffa was the...

Ancient Autopsies

 Mystery of King Tut's death solved?

· 09/18/2012 1:40:31 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 34 replies ·
· ABC News (Via Yahoo) ·
· 9-14-2012 ·
· Matthew Rosenbaum ·

The mystery of King Tut's death might finally be solved, according to one scientist who argues that the secret to the young pharaoh's demise is hidden in plain sight. Dr. Hutan Ashrafian, a lecturer and surgeon at the Imperial College London, says the key to the mystery lies in the art from the period, which depicted King Tut with highly feminine features, including enlarged breasts. The enlarged breasts, he argues, are indicative of a condition known as gynecomastia, which, when added to a host of historical and familial evidence, indicates that Tutankhamun might have suffered and eventually died from temporal...

The Phoenicians

 Ancient Baby Graveyard Not for Child Sacrifice, Scientists Say

· 09/20/2012 1:09:45 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 24 replies ·
· Live Science ·
· 9-19-2012 ·
· Tia Ghose ·

A Carthaginian burial site was not for child sacrifice but was instead a graveyard for babies and fetuses, researchers now say. A new study of the ancient North African site offers the latest volley in a debate over the primary purpose of the graveyard, long thought to be a place of sacred sacrifice. "It's all very great, cinematic stuff, but whether that was a constant daily activity ― I think our analysis contradicts that," said study co-author Jeffrey Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh....

PreColumbian, Clovis & PreClovis

 Mexican Experts Explore Tomb of Presumed 5th-Century Mayan Leader

· 09/15/2012 7:18:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 10 replies ·
· foxnewslatino ·
· Friday, September 14, 2012 ·
· EFE ·

Mexican experts entered for the first time a 1,500-year-old funerary chamber in Palenque believed to contain the remains of one of the first rulers of this Mayan city... K'uk Bahlam I, who came to power in 431 A.D. and founded the dynasty to which the famed Mayan ruler Pakal belonged. The royal tomb, discovered 13 years ago inside Temple 20 of this archaeological zone in the southern state of Chiapas, is at least two centuries older than the tomb of Pakal, discovered 50 years ago at the same site... "As for dates, we're looking at the birth of the Palenque...

The Vikings

 The English inspired Vikings to build cities

· 09/19/2012 4:57:29 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 11 replies ·
· ScienceNordic.com ·
· 9-16-2012 ·
· Anne Ringgaard ·

When Danish Vikings sailed across the North Sea and conquered England, they left their mark on the English language and place names. That's common knowledge, at least to historians. What's perhaps less known is that the influence cut both ways. Although England was under Danish rule in the Viking Age, the English were culturally and politically more sophisticated than their neighbours to the east. Historian Marie B¯nl¯kke Spejlborg was one of the more than 300 Norse mythology researchers who attended the 15th International Saga Conference held recently in Aarhus, Denmark. She is currently writing her PhD thesis about how the...

Middle Ages & the Renaissance

 Body of Richard III found (possibly)

· 09/16/2012 10:58:10 PM PDT ·
· Posted by 2ndDivisionVet ·
· 7 replies ·
· Persicope Post ·
· September 13, 2012 ·

The background Archeologists from Leicester University have uncovered an intact skeleton which they believe is that of Richard III, the king whose reputation as a ruthless hunchback comes from William Shakespeare's play. The skeleton has a deformed spine, and is at the site of Grey Friars church, where Richard was thought to have been buried after the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, where he was defeated by Henry Tudor. His grave is now underneath a council car park in Leicester. DNA tests will reveal whether he's really the king or not -- it's an adult male, with spinal abnormalities that...

Biology & Cryptobiology

 Old fish, new fish, red fish, blue fish
  cichlid fish appear to be splitting into two species


· 10/01/2008 7:22:16 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Soliton ·
· 24 replies · 731+ views ·
· Science Daily ·
· October 1st, 2008 ·

Some cichlid fish see red better while others only have eyes for blue. This difference in vision, observed in fish in an African lake, could be pushing red-bodied cichlids to branch off from their blue-bodied brethren and to form a new species. If so, it would be the first time that scientists have caught evolution in the act of creating a new species because of changes in sense organs. For one species to diverge into two, some barrier must prevent two groups of individuals from interbreeding. Physical separation of two groups and changes to reproductive organs are two of the...

Megaliths & Archaeoastronomy

 Ancient henge discovered in North Downs [ near Hollingbourne ]

· 09/16/2012 7:41:07 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 6 replies ·
· Kent Online ·
· Saturday, September 8, 2012 ·
· Chris Hunter ·

An ancient ceremonial site the size of Stonehenge has been discovered on the North Downs. The exact purpose of the site -- a neolithic "henge" near Hollingbourne -- remains shrouded in mystery, but a large amount of burnt bone and pottery uncovered suggest it was used in a ritual capacity for almost 2000 years, as far back as 2500BC, the end of the Stone Age. Dr Paul Wilkinson (pictured below) of the Kent Archaeological Field School, which led the investigation, said the first tantalising clue had come in the form of a circular mark spotted in satellite images of a...

Epigraphy & Language

 Theory: Music underlies language acquisition

· 09/19/2012 5:02:40 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Pharmboy ·
· 43 replies ·
· Rice University ·
· September 18, 2012 ·
· B.J. Almond ·

HOUSTON -- (Sept. 18, 2012) -- Contrary to the prevailing theories that music and language are cognitively separate or that music is a byproduct of language, theorists at Rice University's Shepherd School of Music and the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) advocate that music underlies the ability to acquire language. "Spoken language is a special type of music," said Anthony Brandt, co-author of a theory paper published online this month in the journal Frontiers in Cognitive Auditory Neuroscience. "Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence, and music is often treated as being dependent on or derived from...

Rock Art

 Uncovered: Secrets of Ilkley Moor's rock art

· 09/16/2012 7:38:06 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 12 replies ·
· Yorkshire Post ·
· Friday, September 14, 2012 ·
· Andrew Robinson ·

It is a 4,000-year-old mystery just waiting to be solved... Are they way markers, religious symbols, star charts or just 'doodles' done by early farmers with a bit of time on their hands? ...There are more than 400 known rock carvings, known as 'cup and ring' stones, on Rombalds Moor, which includes Ilkley Moor, and they are thought to date back to before the Pyramids were built. Members of Friends of Ilkley Moor are busy mapping the exact locations of the stones, noting down their co-ordinates and taking photographs for posterity. And now the Friends have launched a Cup and...

Prehistory & Origins

 Skilled hunters 300,000 years ago

· 09/18/2012 3:12:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 18 replies ·
· Past Horizons ·
· September 2012 ·
· University of Tubingen ·

Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen in Germany have found eight extremely well-preserved spears -- an astonishing 300,000 years old, making them the oldest known weapons anywhere. The spears and other artefacts as well as animal remains found at the site demonstrate that their users were highly skilled craftsmen and hunters, well adapted to their environment -- with a capacity for abstract thought and complex planning comparable to our own. It is likely that they were members of the species Homo heidelbergensis, although no human remains have yet been found at the site... excavation in an open-cast brown coal mine...

Neandertal / Neanderthal

 Neanderthals used feathers as 'personal ornaments'

· 09/18/2012 12:26:03 PM PDT ·
· Posted by BenLurkin ·
· 31 replies ·
· bbc ·
· 17 September 2012 ·
· Paul Rincon ·

Clive Finlayson and Kimberly Brown from the Gibraltar Museum, along with colleagues from Spain, Canada and Belgium, examined a database of 1,699 ancient sites across Eurasia, comparing data on birds at locations used by humans with those that were not. They found a clear association between raptor and corvid remains and sites that had been occupied by humans. They then looked more closely at bird bones found at Neanderthal sites in Gibraltar, including Gorham's and Vanguard cave, near the base of the rock: "The Neanderthals had cut through and marked the bones. But what were they cutting? We realised a...

Glaciation / The Ice Ages

 Did a Pacific Ocean meteor trigger the Ice Age?

· 09/20/2012 5:02:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 33 replies ·
· PhysOrg ·
· 9-19-2012 ·

(Phys.org) -- When a huge meteor collided with Earth about 2.5 million years ago in the southern Pacific Ocean it not only likely generated a massive tsunami but also may have plunged the world into the Ice Ages, a new study suggests. A team of Australian researchers says that because the Eltanin meteor -- which was up to two kilometres across -- crashed into deep water, most scientists have not adequately considered either its potential for immediate catastrophic impacts on coastlines around the Pacific rim or its capacity to destabilise the entire planet's climate system. "This is the only known deep-ocean impact...

Catastrophism & Astronomy

 Challengers to Clovis-age impact theory missed key protocols, new study finds

· 09/20/2012 7:18:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 46 replies ·
· Eurekalert! ·
· September 17, 2012 ·
· Jim Barlow, U of Oregon ·

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from seven U.S. institutions says a disregard of three critical protocols, including sorting samples by size, explains why a group challenging the theory of a North American meteor-impact event some 12,900 years ago failed to find iron- and silica-rich magnetic particles in the sites they investigated. Not separating samples of the materials into like-sized groupings made for an avoidable layer of difficulty, said co-author Edward K. Vogel, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. The new independent analysis -- published this week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National...


 Asteroid Impact Played Pivotal Role in Rapid Proliferation of Life

· 05/20/2003 11:01:28 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Mike Darancette ·
· 67 replies · 374+ views ·
· Australian Centre for Astrobiology ·
· May 2003 ·
· Australian Centre for Astrobiology ·

Scientists studying rocks near an ancient asteroid impact structure in South Australian have uncovered evidence that could change current theories explaining how life on Earth rapidly diversified about 580 million years ago. Dr Kath Grey of the Western Australian Department of Industry and Resources' Geological survey and an ACA associate researcher, Prof Malcolm Walter, Director of the ACA and Dr Clive Calver of the Tasmanian Department of Mineral Resources challenge the idea that 'Snowball Earth' -- an intense period of glaciation about 600 million years ago, triggered the evolution of simple life forms into more complex and familiar species. In...


 Evidence For Cosmic Impact In Early Mass Extinction Found

· 06/17/2003 7:56:11 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Mike Darancette ·
· 8 replies · 200+ views ·
· Lousiana State University ·
· 11 June 2003 ·
· Ronald Brown ·

It's the stuff of science fiction movies. Bruce Willis, by a mighty effort, saving the world from extinction by a huge meteor. But Bruce Willis won't do it, and in our current state of readiness, neither will anyone else (sic!). That is why LSU geophysicist Brooks Ellwood is plumbing the geologic record, trying to correlate known mass extinctions to meteor strikes. "When we think about the human race and life in general, what do we worry about? We worry about nuclear holocaust and major glaciation. Then we worry about the giant chunks of rock that fly past Earth all the...

The Minoans

 Will Ancient Akrotiri Face Another Massive Eruption?

· 09/21/2012 5:50:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 21 replies ·
· Popular Archaeology ·
· September 2012 ·

The ancient Minoan city of Akrotiri was destroyed by a massive eruption over 3,000 years ago. Will it happen again soon to the excavated remains and the modern town? Scientists uncover some possible signs..... Now, a new survey suggests that a chamber of molten rock beneath Santorini's volcano has expanded 10-20 million cubic metres -- up to 15 times the size of London's Olympic Stadium -- between January 2011 and April 2012. The growth of this 'balloon' of magma has seen the surface of the island rise 8-14 centimetres during this period, a team led by Oxford University scientists has...

The Greeks

 How the Greeks Gave Form to the West

· 01/17/2004 10:59:32 AM PST ·
· Posted by quidnunc ·
· 9 replies · 253+ views ·
· Rocky Mountain News ·
· January 15, 2004 ·
· Vincent Carroll with Thomas Cahill ·

Thomas Cahill's "How the Irish Saved Civilization" was a surprise best-seller in the mid-1990s. Since then he has released three other highly regarded books in a planned seven-part work he calls the "Hinges of History" that chronicle the origins of the modern world. "They are The Gifts of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels" (1998); "Desire of the Everlasting Hills: the World Before and After Jesus" (1999); and most recently "Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter" (2003) all published by Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. Cahill was recently in Denver and...

Black Sea Flood


 From Ancient Deforestation, a Delta Is Born

· 09/17/2012 11:43:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by Renfield ·
· 8 replies ·
· Green Blog -- N.Y. Times ·
· 9-14-2012 ·
· Rachel Nuwer ·

Humans were tampering with nature long before the Industrial Revolution's steam and internal combustion engines arrived on the scene. The invention of agriculture around 8,000 years ago, some argue, significantly changed ecosystems as it spread around the globe. Although scientists are only just beginning to understand how these ancient alterations shaped our world today, a new study in Scientific Reports suggests that millennium-old development along the Danube River in Eastern Europe significantly changed the Black Sea ecosystem and helped create the lush Danube Delta in Romania and Ukraine. "My team had a big surprise," said Liviu Giosan, a geologist at...

Paleontology

 Guinea-zilla? World's largest rodent sibling to guinea pigs -- Roughly the size of a buffalo

· 09/18/2003 11:33:19 AM PDT ·
· Posted by bedolido ·
· 13 replies · 1,248+ views ·
· Eurekalert ·
· 09/18/03 ·
· Ginger Pinholster/Christina Smith ·

Roughly the size of a buffalo, a giant rodent that roamed the banks of an ancient Venezuelan river some 8 million years ago, dining on sea grass and dodging crocodiles, was an evolutionary sibling to modern-day guinea pigs. The largest rodent that ever lived, Phoberomys pattersoni, weighed about 1,545 pounds (700 kilograms) -- more than 10 times the size of today's rodent heavyweight, the 110-pound (50 kilograms) capybara. "Imagine a weird guinea pig, but huge, with a long tail for balancing on its hind legs and continuously growing teeth," said Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra of Germany's University of Tübingen. "It was...

Climate

 [Rut Roe] Another Global Warming Theory Discredited

· 02/08/2004 5:58:26 PM PST ·
· Posted by The Raven ·
· 15 replies · 872+ views ·
· Cntr for the Study of CO2 & Global Change ·
· Feb 8, 2004 ·
· Sherwood, Keith and Craig Idso ·

Low-Frequency Signals in Long Tree-Ring Chronologies Reveal the Existence of Multi-Centennial-Scale Temperature Trends of the Past Millennium* Volume 7, Number 5: 4 February 2004 If the Medieval Warm Period of a thousand years ago was truly warmer than, or merely as warm as, the Modern Warm Period in which we currently live, there is simply no basis for claiming that any of the warming that brought us out of the Little Ice Age was caused by the concomitant historical rise in the air's CO2 content (Idso, 1988). This is the reason why proponents of legislation to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions...

Australia & the Pacific

 Tomb Raiders Spoil Philippine Archaeological Find

· 09/22/2012 12:30:01 AM PDT ·
· Posted by lbryce ·
· 4 replies ·
· Phys.org ·
· September 22, 2012 ·
· Staff ·

Philippine archaeologists said Friday they had discovered a thousand-year old cemetery of rock coffins in a rainforest, but that tomb-raiders had found it decades earlier and stolen precious artefacts. The coffins are rectangular holes carved into a limestone hill, a burial method documented only in two other areas of eastern Asia, the leader of the National Museum's archaeological dig, Eusebio Dizon, told AFP. Dizon said local officials informed the museum last year about the site, in a forest about 200 kilometres (125 miles) southeast of Manila. "(But) treasure hunters had been there before, in the 1960s and the 1970s, and...

Central Asia

 2012 Issyk Kul Expedition: Search for a Sunken Palace

· 09/21/2012 6:17:33 PM PDT ·
· Posted by SunkenCiv ·
· 8 replies ·
· National Geographic ·
· September 6, 2012 ·
· Kristin Romey ·

Early on, Issyk Kul also drew attention from researchers for the remains that lie beneath its stunning cobalt waters. It's an endorheic lake (meaning that it has no outlet) with abundant underwater springs, and the water level has fluctuated dramatically over the centuries, submerging settlements, buildings and even entire cities that had been established on earlier shorelines. Issyk Kul was one of the earliest sites for underwater archaeological research in Central Asia, with divers exploring its depths as long ago as the 1860s. In the Middle Ages, the region around the lake was hotly contested by two divergent lines of...

Dhimmitude

 The Louvre's New Islamic Galleries Bring Riches to Light

· 09/19/2012 3:26:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by EveningStar ·
· 5 replies ·
· New York Times ·
· September 19, 2012 ·
· Carol Vogel ·

PARIS -- When I. M. Pei's glass pyramid opened at the Louvre more than 20 years ago, many argued that this 70-foot-tall structure had destroyed the classical beauty of one of the world's great museums. But today, as crowds wait on long lines outside the pyramid, which serves as the Louvre's main entrance, what once seemed audacious has become as accepted a part of the city's visual landscape as the Eiffel Tower or the Arc de Triomphe. Now the museum is again risking the public's wrath as it introduces the most radical architectural intervention since the pyramid in 1989. Designed...

Early America

 Hidden Treasure in an Old Log Cabin

· 09/18/2012 4:39:03 AM PDT ·
· Posted by djone ·
· 26 replies ·
· myruraltv.com ·

"After nearly four decades of tearing down and restoring old log structures a Virginia man has seen a lot of history. When it came time for him and his new bride to restore one for themselves they had no idea just how much history they would uncover." ...In and and around an old cabin were Spanish coins, minnie balls, a spanish crossbow arrowhead and indian artifacts...(2 minute video)

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

 Legendary Outlaw Butch Cassidy's "Amnesty" Colt .45 To Be Auctioned This Month

· 09/20/2012 7:35:29 PM PDT ·
· Posted by smokingfrog ·
· 20 replies ·
· Sacbee.com ·
· 19 September 2012 ·
· RMK Svc ·

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 19, 2012 -- /PRNewswire/ -- On Sunday, September 30, 2012, California Auctioneers in Ventura, California, will auction off the Colt .45 SAA (Serial Number 158402) that belonged to Robert LeRoy Parker, better known as Butch Cassidy, the legendary bank thief, train robber, and leader of the Wild Bunch Gang -- the notorious Wyoming-based bandits that stalked the American West throughout the 1890s. His legacy as an icon of the American Old West was immortalized in the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Known as the "Amnesty Colt," this is the most documented of Cassidy's guns. Hunted by...

end of digest #427 20120923


1,459 posted on 09/22/2012 8:32:57 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #427 · v 9 · n 11
Saturday, September 23, 2012
 
39 topics
2931349 to 2926499
818 members
view this issue

Freeper Profiles


 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
39 topics?!? This Digest issue is loaded up with asteroid impacts and the Roman Empire. IOW, it's about the second-best week I've ever had with the GGG.

There are *lots* of articles plucked from the FRchives, which is a source which never, ever seems to run out. Just when I think I've found 99% of what there is to find, a whole pile emerge from yet another group of search engine hits.
· view this issue ·
Stuff that doesn't necessarily make it to GGG here on FR sometimes gets shared here, that's my story and I'm sticking with it: Lotta trolls are operating on FR, but mostly not related to GGG topics -- obviously the election is growing near, and Zero is behind *and* everyone knows it.

Everything you needed to know about Barry Soetero, you learned on September 11, 2012.
Zero has to go, because it's quite literally him or us. And "him or us" isn't "lesser of two evils".

-- 'Civ, in this topic (and in his FR profile shortly thereafter)
Romney / Ryan in November.
 
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1,460 posted on 09/22/2012 8:37:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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