Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-50 ... 101-150151-200201-250 ... 1,451-1,492 next last
To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20041127
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

151 posted on 11/27/2004 8:37:21 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 150 | View Replies]

To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Blam's links page, with non-GGG stuff and duplicate links removed:
152 posted on 11/28/2004 11:14:46 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; blam

"Blam's links page, with non-GGG stuff and duplicate links removed: "

Great set of links.

I guess I should look at people's home pages... (I usually don't)


153 posted on 11/28/2004 11:47:45 AM PST by FairOpinion
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 152 | View Replies]

To: FairOpinion

I found I missed one that was not GGG-related; found a bunch that were old-style URLs and have no facility for keyword adding (or for posting new replies); and found three or four which had been removed due to copyright complaint. But now, I must eat, shower, dress, and go shopping. Really. I mean it this time.


154 posted on 11/28/2004 11:56:33 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 153 | View Replies]

Here's a early, supplemental digest for this week. It has some older topics (mostly from Blam's link list) which got added to the GGG catalog today, but aren't getting an individual ping.

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Supplemental Digest #19a

Ancient Middle East
The Kurdish People: A Background and History
  Posted by xzins
On News/Activism 04/07/2004 7:54:38 PM PDT · 35 replies · 87+ views


The Kurdish Partnership | Matthew Hand and Mark Brockman
"No Friends but the Mountains" The Kurdish people comprise a large ethnic group of about 25 million that have always lived in the same place, and trace their roots back to the Medes of ancient Persia more than 2,500 years ago. In fact, the Magi, or "wise men" who traveled from the east to deliver their gold, frankincense and myrrh to the newborn Jesus at Bethlehem were most likely Zoroastrian priests, forbears of the modern Kurds. The Kurds are tribal people, many of them lived, until recently, a nomadic lifestyle in the mountainous regions of Turkey, Syria, Iraq and...
 

Zoroastrians Fight Extinction
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 12/23/2003 10:01:12 PM PST · 122 replies · 202+ views


VOANews | 12/23/03 | VOANews
The opening bars of Richard Strauss' composition "Thus Spoke Zarathustra" became famous as the theme for Stanle Kubrick's 1968 movie "2001: A Space Odyssey." But apart from academics and some 300-thosuand believers, few people know much about ancient Iranian prophet Zarathustra and his teaching. "Yet only one thousand years ago, millions, millions espoused Zarathustra's monotheistic percepts in nations which stretched from (the ancient Chinese city of) Sian (western China) to the Eastern China across central Asia, northern India, Iran, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia up Greece in the west and Arabia, north Africa and Ethiopia in the south," says Adi Davar, a...
 

Ancient Seas and Thereunder
Satellite Images 'Show Atlantis'
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/06/2004 10:00:25 AM PDT · 102 replies · 194+ views


BBC | 6-6-2004 | Paul Rincon
Satellite images 'show Atlantis' By Paul Rincon BBC News Online science staff The imagery may show the former locations of major buildings and rings A scientist says he may have found remains of the lost city of Atlantis. Satellite photos of southern Spain reveal features on the ground appearing to match descriptions made by Greek scholar Plato of the fabled utopia. Dr Rainer Kuehne thinks the "island" of Atlantis simply referred to a region of the southern Spanish coast destroyed by a flood between 800 BC and 500 BC. The research has been reported as an ongoing project in the...
 

Something You Didn't Know About Cajuns (Ilenos, Canary Islands)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/06/2002 6:10:13 PM PDT · 39 replies · 404+ views


Intersurf.com | unknown | Gilbert C. Din/Sidney Villere
ISLENOS, CANARY ISLANDS The archipelago of the Canaries consists of seven main islands, having a total area of less than 6 percent of the size of Louisiana, lying about sixty-five miles west of Morocco in Northern Africa. They were formed as a result of volcanic activity. It is a rugged, mountainous terrain, and plains are almost nonexistent. Lack of water is a serious problem. The westernmost islands receive the most rain, while the two islands closest to the Sahara Desert and lower in elevation have some deserts. The higher elevations on some of the western islands have pleasant temperatures, and...
 

A 2nd July 2002 Update of the Undersea City off Cuba! - Involves National Geographic!
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 08/12/2002 7:55:09 PM PDT · 32 replies · 319+ views


The Earth Files | JULY 2002 | Paulina Zelitsky and Paul Weinzweig
† † Update About Cuba Underwater Megalithic Research 2002 by Linda Moulton Howe A half mile down in the waters of Cabo de San Antoniooff the western tip of Cuba's Guanahacabibes marked by red X is a 20-kilometersquare area of clean, white sand punctuated by tall, megalithic stones or structures first reported in May 2001 by Paulina Zelitsky, Ocean Engineer, Havana, Cuba. "They (megalithic stones) are very unique structures. They really are not easy to understand and I do not have any easy explanation for them in a natural geological process." != Manuel Iturralde-Vinent, Ph.D., Geologist, National Museum of...
 

Where Was Atlantis? Sundaland Fits The Bill, Surely!
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/29/2004 5:18:02 PM PDT · 35 replies · 576+ views


Graham Hancock | unknown | Dr Sunil Prasannan
Where was Atlantis? Sundaland fits the bill, surely! by Dr. Sunil Prasannan Dr. Sunil Prasannan takes a brief time-out from his NMR spectroscopic studies to suggest a Southeast Asian location for Atlantis as described in Plato's dialogues Timaeus and Critias. OK, so I'm an orthodox scientist, but don't let that bother you - I'm really an OK guy! As I have already explained on the Mysteries message board, I don't intend this to be an exhaustive essay, but as I have been asked for more detail, I will gladly provide it. Neither do I wish to pretend I am the...
 

Asia
Farming Origins Gain 10,000 Years
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/23/2004 4:42:34 PM PDT · 63 replies · 299+ views


BBC | 6-23-2004
Farming origins gain 10,000 years Wild types of emmer wheat like those found at Ohalo were forerunners of today's varieties Humans made their first tentative steps towards farming 23,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. Stone Age people in Israel collected the seeds of wild grasses some 10,000 years earlier than previously recognised, experts say. These grasses included wild emmer wheat and barley, which were forerunners of the varieties grown today. A US-Israeli team report their findings in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The evidence comes from a collection of 90,000 prehistoric plant remains dug...
 

British Isles
Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · 62 replies · 242+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
see "Star of the East / Star of Bethlehem" heading
 

Origins and Prehistory
Y Chromosomes Sketch New Outline of British History
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 05/27/2003 3:49:55 PM PDT · 28 replies · 103+ views


NY Times | May 27, 2003 | NICHOLAS WADE
History books favor stories of conquest, not of continuity, so it is perhaps not surprising that many Englishmen grow up believing they are a fighting mixture of the Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans who invaded Britain. The defeated Celts, by this reckoning, left their legacy only in the hinterlands of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. A new genetic survey of Y chromosomes throughout the British Isles has revealed a very different story. The Celtic inhabitants of Britain were real survivors. Nowhere were they entirely replaced by the invaders and they survive in high proportions, often 50 percent or more, throughout...
 

Y Chromosomes Rewrite British History
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/24/2003 10:33:30 AM PDT · 78 replies · 406+ views


Nature | 6-19-2003 | Hannah Hoag
Y chromosomes rewrite British historyAnglo-Saxons' genetic stamp weaker than historians suspected 19 June 2003 HANNAH HOAG Some Scottish men's Y's are remarkably similar to those of southern England. © GettyImages A new survey of Y chromosomes in the British Isles suggests that the Anglo-Saxons failed to leave as much of a genetic stamp on the UK as history books imply1. Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans invaded Britain repeatedly between 50 BC and AD 1050. Many historians ascribe much of the British ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons because their written legacy overshadows that of the Celts. But the Y chromosomes of...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old (Wyoming)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · 61 replies · 170+ views


Sunday Gazette Mail | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN -- The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeleton's teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
 

Star of the East / Star of Bethlehem
Early Christians Hid The Origins Of The Bethlehem Star
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/21/2001 5:11:00 AM PST · 150 replies · 392+ views


New Scientist | 12-21-2001 | Marcus Chown
Early Christians hid the origins of the Bethlehem star 13:15 21 December 01 Marcus Chown A US astronomer claims he has found the first mention of the star of Bethlehem outside the Bible. The reference is in a 4th-century manuscript written by a Roman astrologer and Christian convert called Firmicus Maternus. Photo: Bridgeman Art Library Michael Molnar, formerly of Rutgers University in New Jersey, is the originator of the idea that the star of Bethlehem was not a spectacular astronomical event such as a supernova or a comet but an obscure astrological one. The event would nevertheless have been ...
 

Legacy of Bethlehem: Amazing intrigue surrounding birth of Jesus, connections to Islam
  Posted by JohnHuang2
On News/Activism 12/25/2003 7:09:28 AM PST · 11 replies · 30+ views


WorldNetDaily.com | Thursday, Christmas Day, 2003 | Hal Lindsey
Bethlehem's legacy Posted: December 25, 20031:00 a.m. Eastern ©†2003†WorldNetDaily.com Bethlehem is a sacred city to both Jews and Christians. It is sacred to the Jews because its greatest King, David, was born there. It is sacred to Christians because Jesus, the Messiah, was born there, as was predicted some 700 years before: But as for you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, too little to be numbered among the clans of Judah, from you One will go forth for Me to be ruler in Israel. His goings forth are from long ago, from the days of eternity.ñ Micah 5:2, NASB Ironically, the real legacy...
 

Police On Meteor Alert After Huge Balls Of Fire Light Up Spanish Sky
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/05/2004 6:45:55 PM PST · 7 replies · 22+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 1-6-2004 | Giles Tremlett
Police on meteor alert after huge balls of fire light up Spanish sky Giles Tremlett in Madrid Tuesday January 6, 2004 The Guardian (UK) Was it a brightly shining star leading the present-laden three kings to the homes of millions of children at today's Epiphany, Spain's biggest gift-giving day of Christmas? As police scoured a remote mountainous district of the northern LeÛn province yesterday for remnants of a large, brilliant, burning object that fell to earth on Sunday, the most likely explanation was that it was part of a meteor. The search concentrated near Renedo de Valderaduey after neighbours saw...
 

Researcher has theory on the 'Star of Bethlehem' -
  Posted by UnklGene
On News/Activism 12/14/2003 4:14:42 PM PST · 19 replies · 18+ views


San Antonio Express-News | December 13, 2003 | Rachel L. Toalson
Researcher has theory on the 'Star of Bethlehem' - By Rachel L. Toalson San Antonio Express-News 12/13/2003 All she did was ask him to hang a star above the three wise men adorning their lawn that Christmas in 1998. But Marion Larson's request launched her father into a project that, after hours of research, would carry him across the world. "I was tricked into it," said Rick Larson, a former law professor at Texas A&M University in College Station. "I'm not an astronomer, I'm a lawyer. But when you tell a lawyer he has to have a star, he's got...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Doctors link polio to West Nile virus
  Posted by sarcasm
On News/Activism 09/24/2002 2:17:21 AM PDT · 59 replies · 157+ views


Boston Globe | September 24, 2002 | Stephen Smith
<p>In case reports released yesterday, stunned neurologists in Mississippi and Georgia describe the conditions of four patients suffering from the hobbled limbs, impaired breathing, and fevers that are the hallmark of polio, a disease essentially eradicated in the United States.</p>
 

Dumbing down: the proof [a copy of a test for 11-year-olds from 1898]
  Posted by snarks_when_bored
On General/Chat 11/28/2004 5:50:10 AM PST · 27 replies · 212+ views


The Spectator (U.K.) | November 27, 2004 | No author
Dumbing down: the proof As a service to Spectator readers who still have any doubts about the decline in educational standards, we are printing these exam papers taken by 11-year-olds applying for places to King Edward's School in Birmingham in 1898. ENGLISH GRAMMAR1. Write out in your best handwriting: -- ëO Mary, go and call the cattle home,And call the cattle home,And call the cattle home,Across the sands o' Dee.'The western wind was wild and dank with foam,And all alone went she. The western tide crept up along the sand,And o'er and o'er the sand,And round and round the sand,As...
 

end of supplemental digest #19a

155 posted on 11/28/2004 5:09:45 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 151 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the ping list link for a special, supplemental Gods Graves Glyphs digest:
Gods Graves Glyphs Supplemental Digest 19a
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

156 posted on 11/28/2004 5:13:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 155 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for your yeoman service. It must be a big time commitment, but it is appreciated.


157 posted on 11/28/2004 5:23:06 PM PST by Unam Sanctam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 156 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #20

Anatolia
King Midas' Modern Mourners
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 11/28/2004 6:23:26 PM PST · 8 replies · 87+ views


Science News | Nov. 4, 2000; Vol. 158, No. 19 , p. 296 | Jessica Gorman
The modern diners sitting before Sams were about to eat the first reconstruction of that feastóa celebration that had remained undiscovered for decades after archaeologist Rodney S. Young first excavated Midas' tomb in 1957. Ancient Roman, Greek, or even Maya banquets had been re-created previously, but generally from texts and ancient recipes. Not so with the Midas feast. "It's the first time that somebody tried to do it working just from the chemical evidence," says Patrick E. McGovern, the museum's molecular archaeologist who led the analyses. In other words, from the pan scrapings.
 

Troy the Movie
  Posted by JFC
On General/Chat 05/25/2004 7:00:32 AM PDT · 40 replies · 172+ views


Vanity | JFC
I went to see the movie Troy, reluctantly, last night with my husband. We both turned to each other at the end and said... the left who said the Passion was bloody and so harsh for all eyes, just have no leg to stand on. I do think Brad Pitt is trying and will be taking the place of Mel Gibson in these type of roles, since Hollywood has left Mel out to dry. I would not recommend seeing it. Unless your into blood, and lots of naked bodies.
 

Ancient Egypt
Ancient Pyramids Discovered in Italy
  Posted by green team 1999
On News/Activism 05/02/2003 10:57:36 PM PDT · 107 replies · 787+ views


whitley strieber unknowncountry.com | may-2-2003 | whitley strieber unknowncountry
Ancient Pyramids Discovered in Italy 02-May-2003 On the Farshores website, Marco V. of Varese, Italy writes, "You may be interested in a discovery which has been recently made: three pyramids were discovered thanks to satellite and aerial imagery in northern Italy, in the town of MontevecchiaÖ They are the first pyramids ever discovered in Italy and the dimensions are quite impressive; the highest pyramid is [500 feet] tall. They are stone buildings, as recent excavations have proved. However, they are now completely covered by ground and vegetation, so that they now look like hills. "The inclination degree of all the...
 

Dynasty 0 (Egyptian colonies in Canaan)
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 11/27/2004 9:48:47 PM PST · 9 replies · 83+ views


xoomer.virgilio.it | Francesco Raffaele
Most of the occurrences of Narmer's name are on jars and jar fragments; an astonishing number of serekhs has emerged in the last 25 years from excavations in Israel and Palestine (Tel Erani, En Besor, Arad, Halif Terrace/Nahal Tillah, Small Tel Malhata, Tel Maahaz, Tel Lod and some more) signifying an apex of commercial contacts between Egypt and Canaan which lasted all through [Early Bronze I] ...These data and the excavation of many Southern Palestine sites, are proof of a very complex series of interrelations between Egypt and peoples centred beyond North Sinai lasting more than two (or three) centuries....
 

Pharoahs and Kings - A Test of Time
  Posted by Scythian
On News/Activism 07/31/2002 7:35:06 PM PDT · 9 replies · 107+ views


debate.org.uk | David M. Rohl
A New Chronology Synopsis of David Rohl's book "A Test of Time" by John Fulton The concept of time for us today is taken to be an absolute unchangeable system. We measure time from the fixed point of Christ's birth so that this is the one thousand, nine hundred and ninety-seventh year since he was born. The ancients, however, could not look forward to Christ's birth; instead, they worked on a regnal dating system where events happened in the Nth year of the reign of a particular king. For most of the Old Testament, we can find a good...
 

What Made Alexander So Great?
  Posted by Destro
On General/Chat 12/01/2004 9:12:17 AM PST · 4 replies · 109+ views


slate.msn.com | Monday, Nov. 29, 2004, at 10:30 AM PT | Christopher Hitchens
Recent studies have also raised the question of whether he was a hopeless alcoholic (or perhaps an almost sacrificial votary of a cult devoted to Dionysus, the god of wine) and of whether he was just another bloodthirsty conqueror. But note this first: This man really did exist, and these events really did occur. Our sources may be fragmentary and inconsistent and contradictory, but they involve us in disputes about real people and events. For the next four weeks, you won't be able to go into a supermarket without hearing pseudo-devotional music concerning an episode 2,000 years ago that may...
 

Ancient Greece
Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 02/14/2003 1:30:45 PM PST · 19 replies · 146+ views


www.novinite.com | 2003-02-13 | Novinite editorial Staff
†Subscribe for free at www.novinite.com Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery2003-02-13Bulgarian archaeologists discovered an oval ritual hall fitting the description that ancient historians gave to the Dionysus Temple in the Rhodope range famous for its splendor and mysteriousness in antique times and for the many failed attempts to determine its exact location in modernity. During an expedition in 2002, the team of archeologist Nikolay Ovcharov unearthed the hall inside of an ancient Thracian palace, some 250km southeast of Bulgaria's capital Sofia. The temple-palace is part of the dead city of Perpericon in Bulgaria's Eastern Rhodope Mountain that...
 

The Linear B Tablets and Mycenaean Social, Political, and Economic Organization
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 11/28/2004 7:29:26 PM PST · 4 replies · 43+ views


Dartmouth College | 1996 | faculty
DO-E-RO, DO-E-RA [doeros, doera] -- Such personnel are common at both Pylos and Knossos. Although the later Greek cognates doulos and doule mean "male slave" and "female slave" respectively, the Mycenaean Greek forms may have had a significance closer to "servant, bondsman/bondswoman". Some DO-E-RO are clearly the property of living individuals, while others are described as being "of (= belonging to) a god/goddess". There is some evidence that the children of parents of whom only one was a slave were also slaves, a situation unlike that prevailing in Classical Greece. Slaves of a divinity are the most common form at...
 

Ancient Rome and Italy

Discovering Dante's Damsel In Distress
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat 12/01/2003 1:16:10 PM PST · 4 replies · 25+ views


Discovery.com | 12-1-2003 | Rossella Lorenzi
Discovering Dante's Damsel in Distress Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News A Majolica Jug: Missing Link? Dec. 1, 2003 ó A 14th century jug unearthed in a Tuscan castle might shed new light on one of the most touching and mysterious female figures in Dante's Divine Comedy, according to Italian archaeologists. Legend has always linked Castel di Pietra, a castle near the village of Gavorrano in the Tuscan Maremma, with the sad fate of Pia dei Tolomei, a lady supposedly imprisoned there and then murdered by her jealous husband. "Do thou remember me who am the Pia/ Siena made me, unmade me...
 

Etruscan Ruins Show How Ancients Lived
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat 04/08/2002 5:05:24 AM PDT · 5 replies · 36+ views


IOL | 4-7-2002 | Shasta Darlington
Etruscan ruins show how ancients lived April 07 2002 at 11:34AM By Shasta Darlington Rome - The ruins of an Etruscan mining city abandoned almost 3 000 years ago are giving archaeologists an unprecedented look at one of Italy's first and most mysterious civilisations. Since stumbling across the ruins of a single stone dwelling in the early 1980s, archaeologists have found the region, on the shores of a lake in central Italy, was once the site of an Etruscan city in 700 BC and 600 BC. "It's an extraordinary find because almost all Etruscan ruins are necropoli," said Giovannangelo Camporeale,...
 

USO Canteen FReeper Style ~ Julius Caesar: The Gallic Wars ~ September 16, 2003
  Posted by LaDivaLoca
On News/Activism 09/16/2003 2:53:23 AM PDT · 303 replies · 215+ views


Heraklia.fws1.com | September 16, 2003 | LaDivaLoca
† † For the freedom you enjoyed yesterday... Thank the Veterans who served in The United States Armed Forces. † † Looking forward to tomorrow's freedom? Support The United States Armed Forces Today! † † ANCIENT WARFARE ANCIENT ROMAN MILITARY(continuation) † Julius Caesar: The Gallic Wars "I am bound to suspect, Caesar, that your friendship is a sham and that your army here in Gaul is for no other purpose than to crush me. So if you do not get out of this area and take your army with you, I shall treat you not as a friend but...
 

Gallic war treasure discovered in southern France
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 11/27/2004 9:49:43 PM PST · 58 replies · 1,413+ views


Yahoo News | Nov. 27, 2004 | AFP
BORDEAUX, France (AFP) - French archaeologists said this week they had discovered an exceptional Gallic war treasure in the south of the country, including rare war trumpets and ornate helmets. The some 470 objects, or fragments of objects, were found at the end of September during a dig at Naves, in the department of Correze in southern France, in a ditch hollowed out of a Gallic-Roman temple, they said. "The exceptional character of this discovery lies mainly in the presence of five almost complete carnyx," Christophe Maniquet, an archeologist at Inrap, France's national institute for Archeological studies, said. "They are...
 

Post Your Favorite Latin Quotes
  Posted by Mad Dawgg
On General/Chat 11/03/2003 2:40:42 PM PST · 90 replies · 374+ views


Today of course | All the gang at FR
Hey this is just a little break from the Election madness we will all be a part of tomorrow. Post any Latin quotes you like whether they be serious or funny. If you don't know any just do a google search on Latin Quotes there are some really great ones.
 
Pompeii's Burial Not Its First Disaster
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/02/2004 4:17:13 PM PST · 10 replies · 289+ views


Science News | 11-27-2004 | Sid Perkins
Pompeii's burial not its first disaster Sid Perkins From Denver, at a meeting of the Geological Society of America Recent excavations reveal that the ancient city of Pompeii, famed for its burial by an eruption of Italy's Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79, suffered through several devastating landslides in the centuries preceding its volcanic demise. About three-fourths of Pompeii has been excavated, says Jean-Daniel Stanley of the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. However, most of the digs in the city have extended down only to the ground level of dwellings that were standing in the 1st century. In...
 

Romans went to war on diet of pizza, dig shows.
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 08/26/2002 2:20:42 PM PDT · 72 replies · 520+ views


The Scotsman | Mon 26 Aug 2002 | John Innes
Romans went to war on diet of pizza, dig shows John Innes ROMAN soldiers went to war on egg and pizza according to archaeological analysis of Roman army toilets in Scotland. Scientists also have discovered that the soldiers also appear to have gone to the lavatory in pairs. Further analysis of the 2,000-year old remains of the legionnairesí breakfasts may produce more clues to the diet and eating habits of the troops led by Gnaeus Agricola. They forced their way to the north of Scotland and victory over Caledonian tribesmen at the battle of Mons Graupius in 84 AD. But...
 

Ancient Seas and Thereunder
A 2nd July 2002 Update of the Undersea City off Cuba! - Involves National Geographic!
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 08/12/2002 7:55:09 PM PDT · 32 replies · 343+ views


The Earth Files | JULY 2002 | Paulina Zelitsky and Paul Weinzweig
† † Update About Cuba Underwater Megalithic Research 2002 by Linda Moulton Howe A half mile down in the waters of Cabo de San Antoniooff the western tip of Cuba's Guanahacabibes marked by red X is a 20-kilometersquare area of clean, white sand punctuated by tall, megalithic stones or structures first reported in May 2001 by Paulina Zelitsky, Ocean Engineer, Havana, Cuba. "They (megalithic stones) are very unique structures. They really are not easy to understand and I do not have any easy explanation for them in a natural geological process." != Manuel Iturralde-Vinent, Ph.D., Geologist, National Museum of...
 

Satellite Images 'Show Atlantis'
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/06/2004 10:00:25 AM PDT · 102 replies · 224+ views


BBC | 6-6-2004 | Paul Rincon
Satellite images 'show Atlantis' By Paul Rincon BBC News Online science staff The imagery may show the former locations of major buildings and rings A scientist says he may have found remains of the lost city of Atlantis. Satellite photos of southern Spain reveal features on the ground appearing to match descriptions made by Greek scholar Plato of the fabled utopia. Dr Rainer Kuehne thinks the "island" of Atlantis simply referred to a region of the southern Spanish coast destroyed by a flood between 800 BC and 500 BC. The research has been reported as an ongoing project in the...
 

Something You Didn't Know About Cajuns (Ilenos, Canary Islands)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/06/2002 6:10:13 PM PDT · 39 replies · 422+ views


Intersurf.com | unknown | Gilbert C. Din/Sidney Villere
ISLENOS, CANARY ISLANDS The archipelago of the Canaries consists of seven main islands, having a total area of less than 6 percent of the size of Louisiana, lying about sixty-five miles west of Morocco in Northern Africa. They were formed as a result of volcanic activity. It is a rugged, mountainous terrain, and plains are almost nonexistent. Lack of water is a serious problem. The westernmost islands receive the most rain, while the two islands closest to the Sahara Desert and lower in elevation have some deserts. The higher elevations on some of the western islands have pleasant temperatures, and...
 

Where Was Atlantis? Sundaland Fits The Bill, Surely!
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/29/2004 5:18:02 PM PDT · 35 replies · 586+ views


Graham Hancock | unknown | Dr Sunil Prasannan
Where was Atlantis? Sundaland fits the bill, surely! by Dr. Sunil Prasannan Dr. Sunil Prasannan takes a brief time-out from his NMR spectroscopic studies to suggest a Southeast Asian location for Atlantis as described in Plato's dialogues Timaeus and Critias. OK, so I'm an orthodox scientist, but don't let that bother you - I'm really an OK guy! As I have already explained on the Mysteries message board, I don't intend this to be an exhaustive essay, but as I have been asked for more detail, I will gladly provide it. Neither do I wish to pretend I am the...
 

Asia
Inscribed Bricks Unearthed South Of Iran (1100BC)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 11/29/2004 12:26:38 PM PST · 56 replies · 1,113+ views


Net Iran | 11-23-2004
Date Added:Nov 24 2004Inscribed Bricks Unearthed South of Iran Iran-11/23/2004 In the latest round of archeological excavations at the historical site of Enshan, Fars province, Iranian and American archeologists have unearthed several inscribed bricks and a seal dating back to the mid-Elamite era (1100 BC).Enshan is regarded as one of the capitals of the Elamites and is rich in cultural heritage artifacts ranging from the Elamite to the Achamenid era (3500 BC to 500 AD). Dr. Kamyar Abdi, an instructor of Dartmouth College in the United States told Cultural Heritage News (CHN) agency that in the course of excavations in...
 

1421 (Chinese discovery of America)
  Posted by SteveH
On General/Chat 01/01/2004 4:48:30 PM PST · 16 replies · 104+ views


(vanity concerning the book 1421)
Hello, I am wondering if anyone out there has read "1421" yet. I read it over the holidays and found it about 80% believable. In reading some of the other reviews on Amazon, it seemed that some skeptical readers blew it off due to a small set of fanciful conjectures that appeared relatively early in the book. Any other reviews?
 

Unearthed Painting Fragments Point To Ancient Fire In Nara
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/01/2004 4:26:06 PM PST · 13 replies · 258+ views


Mainichi | 12-01-2004 | Manichi Shimbun
Unearthed painting fragments point to ancient fire in Nara IKARUGA, Nara -- Numerous fragments of burned wall paintings have been unearthed at Nara Prefecture's Horyuji Temple, underscoring descriptions in ancient literature of a fire that broke out in 670. Mainichi ShimbunHoryuji Temple Officials of the Ikaruga Municipal Board of Education said they believed wall-painting fragments found near the famous Minami Daimon gate of Horyuji Temple were those from a hall in the temple, which was built in the early 7th century. Horyuji holds another set of paintings created at the end of the 7th century that are believed to be...
 

British Isles
New Theory On Stonehenge Mystery
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/03/2004 4:00:41 PM PST · 43 replies · 1,181+ views


BBC | 12-3-2004
New theory on Stonehenge mystery Experts believe the stones may have been levered into place A fresh theory on how Stonehenge was built has been tested out by a group of experts and enthusiasts. Gordon Pipes, of the Stonehengineers group of scientists and archaeologists, has suggested that levers may have been used to move the giant stones. They have tested his "stone-rowing" theory which involves a 45-tonne stone being levered on a track of logs. "It's akin to rowing a boat, weights can be picked up with levers using body mass and balance," said Mr Pipes. Mr Pipes, from Derby,...
 

Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · 63 replies · 278+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
 

History Unearthed (Viking Hoard)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/03/2004 3:53:30 PM PST · 64 replies · 920+ views


Chester Chronicle | 12-3-2004
History unearthed Dec 3 2004 Chester Chronicle A HOARD of Viking jewellery has been found by a metal detector enthusiast in the Cheshire countryside. The finder, Steve Reynoldson from Keighley in West Yorkshire, made the discovery near Huxley on Sunday during a metal detecting rally which attracted almost 100 enthusiasts. Archaeologist Dan Garner, who works for Chester Archaeology, went to the site where he confirmed the booty of 20 silver arm bands was likely to date from the Viking period in the 10th century. Mr Garner said: 'Of the treasure-detected finds in the area, it has to be one of...
 

How We Loved The Romans (Scotland Celts)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/27/2002 4:36:00 PM PST · 45 replies · 200+ views


Sunday Herald | 10-28-2002 | Juliette Garside
How we really loved the Romans New research explodes myth that Scots were untameable barbarians By Juliette Garside The enduring myth that the Romans left the 'barbarians' of Scotland untouched during their conquest of the rest of the British Isles has been shattered by a new archaeological find. Not only did they settle in Scotland for around 15 years in the first century AD ... they even got our ancestors to swap their beer and lard for wine and olive oil. For hundreds of years, historians who based their theories on the classical writer Tacitus have always assumed the first...
 

Y Chromosomes Rewrite British History
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/24/2003 10:33:30 AM PDT · 78 replies · 467+ views


Nature | 6-19-2003 | Hannah Hoag
Y chromosomes rewrite British historyAnglo-Saxons' genetic stamp weaker than historians suspected 19 June 2003 HANNAH HOAG Some Scottish men's Y's are remarkably similar to those of southern England. © GettyImages A new survey of Y chromosomes in the British Isles suggests that the Anglo-Saxons failed to leave as much of a genetic stamp on the UK as history books imply1. Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans invaded Britain repeatedly between 50 BC and AD 1050. Many historians ascribe much of the British ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons because their written legacy overshadows that of the Celts. But the Y chromosomes of...
 

Y Chromosomes Sketch New Outline of British History
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 05/27/2003 3:49:55 PM PDT · 67 replies · 552+ views


NY Times | May 27, 2003 | NICHOLAS WADE
History books favor stories of conquest, not of continuity, so it is perhaps not surprising that many Englishmen grow up believing they are a fighting mixture of the Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans who invaded Britain. The defeated Celts, by this reckoning, left their legacy only in the hinterlands of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. A new genetic survey of Y chromosomes throughout the British Isles has revealed a very different story. The Celtic inhabitants of Britain were real survivors. Nowhere were they entirely replaced by the invaders and they survive in high proportions, often 50 percent or more, throughout...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
The Hazard of Near-Earth Asteroid Impacts on Earth
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/02/2004 10:51:16 AM PST · 14 replies · 128+ views


Frontiers | 4 March 2004 | Clark R. Chapman
The actual damage that a NEA impact might cause on Earth was concretely described by Baldwin, a leading advocate for the impact origin of lunar craters. Later, Opik... proposed that NEA impacts might account for mass extinctions in the Earth's paleontological record. Around the same time, Shoemaker firmly established the impact origin of Meteor Crater in Arizona... [I]t was not only a cultural but a scientific shock when Mariner 4's first photographs of the Martian surface revealed it to be covered by craters; a decade later, Mariner 10 found the same on Mercury... In 1979 and 1980, the Voyagers first...
 

Legacy of Bethlehem: Amazing intrigue surrounding birth of Jesus, connections to Islam
  Posted by JohnHuang2
On News/Activism 12/25/2003 7:09:28 AM PST · 11 replies · 45+ views


WorldNetDaily.com | Thursday, Christmas Day, 2003 | Hal Lindsey
Bethlehem's legacy Posted: December 25, 20031:00 a.m. Eastern ©†2003†WorldNetDaily.com Bethlehem is a sacred city to both Jews and Christians. It is sacred to the Jews because its greatest King, David, was born there. It is sacred to Christians because Jesus, the Messiah, was born there, as was predicted some 700 years before: But as for you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, too little to be numbered among the clans of Judah, from you One will go forth for Me to be ruler in Israel. His goings forth are from long ago, from the days of eternity.ñ Micah 5:2, NASB Ironically, the real legacy...
 

Police On Meteor Alert After Huge Balls Of Fire Light Up Spanish Sky
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/05/2004 6:45:55 PM PST · 7 replies · 25+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 1-6-2004 | Giles Tremlett
Police on meteor alert after huge balls of fire light up Spanish sky Giles Tremlett in Madrid Tuesday January 6, 2004 The Guardian (UK) Was it a brightly shining star leading the present-laden three kings to the homes of millions of children at today's Epiphany, Spain's biggest gift-giving day of Christmas? As police scoured a remote mountainous district of the northern LeÛn province yesterday for remnants of a large, brilliant, burning object that fell to earth on Sunday, the most likely explanation was that it was part of a meteor. The search concentrated near Renedo de Valderaduey after neighbours saw...
 

Researcher has theory on the 'Star of Bethlehem' -
  Posted by UnklGene
On News/Activism 12/14/2003 4:14:42 PM PST · 19 replies · 42+ views


San Antonio Express-News | December 13, 2003 | Rachel L. Toalson
Researcher has theory on the 'Star of Bethlehem' - By Rachel L. Toalson San Antonio Express-News 12/13/2003 All she did was ask him to hang a star above the three wise men adorning their lawn that Christmas in 1998. But Marion Larson's request launched her father into a project that, after hours of research, would carry him across the world. "I was tricked into it," said Rick Larson, a former law professor at Texas A&M University in College Station. "I'm not an astronomer, I'm a lawyer. But when you tell a lawyer he has to have a star, he's got...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Doctors link polio to West Nile virus
  Posted by sarcasm
On News/Activism 09/24/2002 2:17:21 AM PDT · 59 replies · 168+ views


Boston Globe | September 24, 2002 | Stephen Smith
<p>In case reports released yesterday, stunned neurologists in Mississippi and Georgia describe the conditions of four patients suffering from the hobbled limbs, impaired breathing, and fevers that are the hallmark of polio, a disease essentially eradicated in the United States.</p>
 

Farming Origins Gain 10,000 Years
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/23/2004 4:42:34 PM PDT · 73 replies · 468+ views


BBC | 6-23-2004
Farming origins gain 10,000 years Wild types of emmer wheat like those found at Ohalo were forerunners of today's varieties Humans made their first tentative steps towards farming 23,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. Stone Age people in Israel collected the seeds of wild grasses some 10,000 years earlier than previously recognised, experts say. These grasses included wild emmer wheat and barley, which were forerunners of the varieties grown today. A US-Israeli team report their findings in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The evidence comes from a collection of 90,000 prehistoric plant remains dug...
 


Let's Have Jerusalem
A.D., B.C. - not P.C.
  Posted by .cnI redruM
On News/Activism 11/18/2004 10:39:06 AM PST · 176 replies · 2,350+ views


The American Thinker | November 18th, 2004 | Selwyn Duke
Our civilization is suffering what could be called a cultural death by a thousand cuts. The open sores are ubiquitous, but what happens to irk me at this moment is that quite some time ago I learned that my birth date is not what my parents always told me it was. Moreover, no one elseís is either. You see, those who are contemptuous of tradition have decided to take it upon themselves to change our calendar and replace B.C. [Before Christ] and A.D. [Anno Domini] with B.C.E. [Before the Common Era] and C.E. [The Common Era]. The latter two designations...
 

Are the Arabs, Arab?
  Posted by SJackson
On News/Activism 02/02/2004 5:07:04 AM PST · 51 replies · 106+ views


Fontpagemagazine | 22-04 | David Yeagley
The people of the Middle East have forgotten their legitimate ethnic heritage. . . and it's not "Arab." Are the Arabs, Arab?By David YeagleyFrontPageMagazine.com | February 2, 2004 People in the Arabic world have forgotten who they are. The people of Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Iraq, and even some "Palestinians," are not Arabs at all. Instead, they are descendents of very ancient peoples, with different cultural and ethnic origins. Militant Arabs invaded these lands in the 7th century A.D. and forced "Arabic" culture on their ancestors. Mohammadís new religion of Islam sought world dominion through coerced unity, crushing cultural diversity. But...
 

Assyrians in Turkey: Disappearance of a Culture? (July, 2000)
  Posted by miltonim
On News/Activism 01/02/2004 1:04:19 PM PST · 2 replies · 67+ views


Assyrian Education Network | Friday, August 25, 2000 at 02:32 PM CT | Dr. Racho Donef
Last year, as some of you may know, a conference entitled "Portraits of Christian Asia Minor" was held at Macquarie University. The Conference was attended by the Turkish Consul who, reportedly, after the conference requested a meeting with Senator John Nimrod, from the U.S., who is also, President of the Assyrian Universal Alliance. The Consul expressed his regret for what had happened in the past, explaining that the Turks are trying to turn a new page with the Assyrians. He advised that he is personally working to establish contact and good relations with the Assyrians.[1] I am reporting this here...
 

Destination Kabul for Turkish forces
  Posted by a_Turk
On News/Activism 06/24/2002 8:05:53 PM PDT · 27 replies · 45+ views


BBC | 6/21/2002 | Jonny Dymond
It was six in the morning local time. The aeroplane's in-flight monitor read "Welcome to Ashkhabad". But something was wrong. Because on either side of the airbus as it had taxied to a halt had been burnt out fighter jets and bombed buildings, the wreckage of a relatively low-level but long-term conflict. If this was Ashkhabad, capital of Turkmenistan, we'd all be missing a big story. Kabul remains a city of destroyed buildings. In fact it was Kabul, the Afghan capital. The brass band of the Turkish Army reached up into overhead lockers, fretting over their creased uniforms. And...
 

Did Israel's Lost Tribes end up in Afghanistan?
  Posted by CommiesOut
On News/Activism 02/02/2002 9:22:59 PM PST · 92 replies · 164+ views


Reuters | 03 FEB 2002 | Tom Heneghan
Did Israel's Lost Tribes end up in Afghanistan? By Tom Heneghan KABUL, Feb 3 (Reuters) - Considering all they shunned and shattered in their quest for pure Islam, Afghanistan's now vanquished Taliban seem to have overlooked the awkward legend that they were descended from the Lost Tribes of Israel. The Pashtun tribes that produced the Taliban, one of the most zealous sects the Muslim world has ever seen, have traditionally traced their roots to the Jews who disappeared after the Babylonian Captivity in the sixth century B.C. The legend, which seems bizarre in light of Jewish-Muslim tensions since the creation ...
 

Early Christians Hid The Origins Of The Bethlehem Star
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/21/2001 5:11:00 AM PST · 155 replies · 568+ views


New Scientist | 12-21-2001 | Marcus Chown
Early Christians hid the origins of the Bethlehem star 13:15 21 December 01 Marcus Chown A US astronomer claims he has found the first mention of the star of Bethlehem outside the Bible. The reference is in a 4th-century manuscript written by a Roman astrologer and Christian convert called Firmicus Maternus. Photo: Bridgeman Art Library Michael Molnar, formerly of Rutgers University in New Jersey, is the originator of the idea that the star of Bethlehem was not a spectacular astronomical event such as a supernova or a comet but an obscure astrological one. The event would nevertheless have been ...
 

The Kurdish People: A Background and History
  Posted by xzins
On News/Activism 04/07/2004 7:54:38 PM PDT · 35 replies · 98+ views


The Kurdish Partnership | Matthew Hand and Mark Brockman
"No Friends but the Mountains" The Kurdish people comprise a large ethnic group of about 25 million that have always lived in the same place, and trace their roots back to the Medes of ancient Persia more than 2,500 years ago. In fact, the Magi, or "wise men" who traveled from the east to deliver their gold, frankincense and myrrh to the newborn Jesus at Bethlehem were most likely Zoroastrian priests, forbears of the modern Kurds. The Kurds are tribal people, many of them lived, until recently, a nomadic lifestyle in the mountainous regions of Turkey, Syria, Iraq and...
 

Zoroastrians Fight Extinction
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 12/23/2003 10:01:12 PM PST · 122 replies · 212+ views


VOANews | 12/23/03 | VOANews
The opening bars of Richard Straussí composition ìThus Spoke Zarathustraî became famous as the theme for Stanle Kubrickís 1968 movie ì2001: A Space Odyssey.î But apart from academics and some 300-thosuand believers, few people know much about ancient Iranian prophet Zarathustra and his teaching. ìYet only one thousand years ago, millions, millions espoused Zarathustraís monotheistic percepts in nations which stretched from (the ancient Chinese city of) Sian (western China) to the Eastern China across central Asia, northern India, Iran, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia up Greece in the west and Arabia, north Africa and Ethiopia in the south,î says Adi Davar, a...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old (Wyoming)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · 61 replies · 196+ views


Sunday Gazette Mail | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN ó The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeletonís teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
 

A Complex Agricultural Society In Uruguay's La Plata Basin, 4,800 - 4,200 Years Ago
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/02/2004 11:26:39 AM PST · 19 replies · 229+ views


Eureka Alert/Smithsonian | 12-2-2004 | Jose Iriarte
Contact: JosÈ Iriarte iriartej@si.edu 202-786-2094 x8350 Smithsonian Institution A complex agricultural society in Uruguay's La Plata basin, 4,800-4,200 years ago A complex farming society developed in Uruguay around 4,800 to 4,200 years ago, much earlier that previously thought, Iriarte and his colleagues report in this week's Nature (December 2). Researchers had assumed that the large rivers system called the La Plata Basin was inhabited by simple groups of hunters and gatherers for much of the pre-Hispanic era. Iriarte and coauthors excavated an extensive mound complex, called Los Ajos, in the wetlands of southeastern Uruguay. They found evidence of a circular...
 

Maize Reveals Traces Of Old Breeding Project
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/02/2004 11:37:33 AM PST · 20 replies · 425+ views


Nature | 12-1-2004 | Emma Harris
Maize reveals traces of old breeding project Emma Marris Gene suggests ancient culture selected patterns in its corn. Teosinte grass (left) compared to "reconstructed" primitive maize, created by crossing teosinte with Argentine pop corn. © The Doebley Lab The people of Mesoamerica are largely responsible for the golden corn we grow today, having domesticated tough teosinte grass thousands of years ago and bred it into modern maize. Researchers have now located the gene responsible for some of the traits that the Mesoamericans were selecting. The discovery should help scientists understand how plants develop, and reveals just how strict the ancient...
 

Headless Bodies Found at Mysterious Mexico Pyramid
  Posted by Betis70
On News/Activism 12/02/2004 5:58:20 PM PST · 112 replies · 1,900+ views


Yahoo Reuters | 12/2/2004 | Brian Winter
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The discovery of a tomb filled with decapitated bodies suggests Mexico's 2,000 year-old "Pyramid of the Moon" may have been the site of horrifically gory sacrifices, archeologists said on Thursday. The tomb at Teotihuacan, the first major city built in the Americas, whose origins are one of history's great mysteries, also held the bound carcasses of eagles, dogs and other animals. "It is hard to believe that the ritual consisted of clean, symbolic performances -- it is most likely that the ceremony created a horrible scene of bloodshed with sacrificed people and animals," said Saburo Sugiyama,...
 

Mexican tomb reveals gruesome human sacrifice
  Posted by snarks_when_bored
On General/Chat 12/03/2004 4:14:00 PM PST · 15 replies · 79+ views


New Scientist | December 4, 2004 | Will Knight
Mexican tomb reveals gruesome human sacrifice 18:46†03†December†04 NewScientist.com news service † Evidence of a grisly human sacrifice and a complex military infrastructure has emerged from an excavation of the ruins of a pyramid in the 2000-year-old city of Teotihuacan in Mexico. A vault containing 12 bodies, ten of which had been decapitated, along with the remains of pumas, wolves and eagles were discovered at the city's central structure, the Pyramid of the Moon. "What we have found in this excavation suggests that a certain kind of mortuary ritual took place inside the tomb before it was filled in," says...
 

A Noble Find Reveals Life In The Past (Ancient China)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/03/2004 3:39:10 PM PST · 4 replies · 228+ views


Xinhuanet/China View | 12-3-2004
A noble find reveals the life in the past www.chinaview.cn 2004-12-03 11:02:53 BEIJING, Dec. 3 (Xinhuanet) -- Chicken fighting, women dancing with long silk sleeves and other colourful mural portrayals of the ancient Chinese captivated archaeologists when they entered an ancient tomb in Shaanxi Province. The hostess and her female guests constitute a part of the murals found in an ancient tomb in Xi'an, capital of Northwest China's Shaanxi Province. [file photo] The murals have been considered a rare find, according to Cheng Linquan, deputy director of the Xi'an Research Institute of Archaeology. They provide visual evidence for the study...
 

Sacrificial Burial Deepens Mystery At Teotihuacan, But Confirms The City's Militarism (More)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/03/2004 3:31:14 PM PST · 9 replies · 268+ views


Innovations Report | 12-3-2004
Sacrificial burial deepens mystery at Teotihuacan, but confirms the cityís militarism Partially uncovered figurine, carved in jade, found in connection with three unbound, seated bodies and other objects at the top of the pyramidís fifth stage (the offering was presumably made in the construction of the sixth stage), circa 350 AD. This object is notable in that it is carved from jade that originated in Guatemala, and appears to be Mayan in style. Other jade objects on top of the figurine are beads and earspools. A spectacular new discovery from an ongoing excavation at the Teotihuacanís Pyramid of the Moon...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany

Church's taxation enrages Italians [bishop reinstates medieval church property tax]
  Posted by Polycarp
On News/Activism 01/13/2003 12:26:46 PM PST · 20 replies · 40+ views


LONDON SUNDAY TELEGRAPH | Bruce Johnston
Church's taxation enrages Italians By Bruce Johnston LONDON SUNDAY TELEGRAPH ROME - The people and politicians of a Tuscan village are in revolt against their bishop after he reinstated a medieval church property tax at heavy new levels. In protest, many devout Roman Catholics are boycotting Mass and withholding collection payments. The bills began arriving over Christmas at the homes of hundreds of property owners in Terricciola, a picturesque village of 4,000 people that sits in rolling, vine-covered hills near Pisa. Many are for large sums, some as high as $2,000. The diocese of Volterra insists that the money is...
 

Dumbing down: the proof [a copy of a test for 11-year-olds from 1898]
  Posted by snarks_when_bored
On General/Chat 11/28/2004 5:50:10 AM PST · 30 replies · 341+ views


The Spectator (U.K.) | November 27, 2004 | No author
Dumbing down: the proof As a service to Spectator readers who still have any doubts about the decline in educational standards, we are printing these exam papers taken by 11-year-olds applying for places to King Edwardís School in Birmingham in 1898. ENGLISH GRAMMAR1. Write out in your best handwriting:ó ëO Mary, go and call the cattle home,And call the cattle home,And call the cattle home,Across the sands oí Dee.íThe western wind was wild and dank with foam,And all alone went she. The western tide crept up along the sand,And oíer and oíer the sand,And round and round the sand,As...
 

Study: Scurvy Hit Early N. American French Colony
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 11/30/2004 7:08:36 PM PST · 20 replies · 298+ views


Reuters/Yahoo | 11-29-2004
Study: Scurvy Hit Early N. American French Colony Mon Nov 29,12:40 PM ET Science - Reuters CHICAGO (Reuters) - Scurvy wiped out nearly half of the colonists who established one of the first French settlements in North America 400 years ago, scientists confirmed on Monday. Picture Perfect How to choose the right digital camera, plus the best printers and online photo services. The colony existed in 1604 and 1605 on St. Croix Island off present-day Calais, Maine, and St. Stephen, New Brunswick. Nearly half of the 79 settlers died during the harsh winter, prompting survivors to move to what is...
 

The History and Meaning of "Palestine" and "Palestinians" - The Israel Report July 2001
  Posted by doug from upland
On News/Activism 03/30/2002 2:40:34 PM PST · 23 replies · 213+ views


The Israel Report | July 2001 | various authors
July 2001††††††††† The History and Meaning of "Palestine" and "Palestinians" "There is no such thing as a Palestinian Arab nation . . . Palestine is a name the Romans gave to Eretz Yisrael with the express purpose of infuriating the Jews . . . . Why should we use the spiteful name meant to humiliate us? "The British chose to call the land they mandated Palestine, and the Arabs picked it up as their nation's supposed ancient name, though they couldn't even pronounce it correctly and turned it into Falastin a fictional entity." ---- Golda Meir quoted by Sarah...
 

Not Just Anti-Semitic Lies!-The essence of the message no possibility of peace with the Jews
  Posted by SJackson
On News/Activism 12/06/2002 1:35:58 PM PST · 3 replies · 13+ views


Jerusalem Report | 12-05-02 | Ehud Ya'ari
The essence of the message is that there is no possibility of making peace with the Jews "Horseman without a horse," the Egyptian TV hit series being broadcast by 14 Arab TV networks, is not the only anti-Semitic production to be galloping across the screens each evening this Ramadan. For viewers looking for more than the "Protocols of the Elders of Zion" can offer, thereís no shortage of alternatives. Anti-Semitism has become the last word in the Arab entertainment industry. Al-Manar, the Hizballah TV station broadcast from Lebanon, features Dr. Ghazi Hussein, a veteran salaried PLO lackey and a...
 

Safed: Chief rabbi questioned for incitement
  Posted by Alouette
On News/Activism 11/28/2004 12:38:54 PM PST · 10 replies · 169+ views


Jerusalem Post | Nov. 28, 2004 | David Rudge
Safed Chief Rabbi Shmuel Eliyahu was questioned by Galilee district police on Sunday apparently over comments made in August in which he reportedly called on Jews not to rent or sell homes to Arabs. The Mosawa advocacy center for Arab citizens of Israel at the time submitted a complaint to Attorney-General Menny Mazuz and called on him to initiate a criminal investigation against Eliyahu on the grounds that his reported comments constituted incitement to racism. No further details about the questioning of Eliyahu were available from police on Sunday evening.
 

The Last Crusade Of The Templars
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 11/29/2004 2:57:11 PM PST · 150 replies · 2,840+ views


Times Of London | 11-29-2004 | Ruth Gledhill
The last crusade of the Templars By Ruth Gledhill The knights want a Papal apology nearly 700 years after they were disbanded and hounded into exile THE VATICAN is giving ìserious considerationî to apologising for the persecution that led to the suppression of the Knights Templar. The suppression, which began on Friday , October 13, 1307, gave Friday the Thirteenth its superstitious legacy.A Templar Order in Britain that claims to be descended from the original Knights Templar has asked that the Pope should make the apology. The Templars, based in Hertford, are hoping for an apology by 2007, the 700th...
 

end of digest #20 20041204

158 posted on 12/03/2004 10:58:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 155 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link. This week's has a very large number (56) of topics, some of which were also seen in the 19a supplement (which I hope will be the last "extra"):
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20041204
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

159 posted on 12/03/2004 11:00:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 158 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #21

Ancient Egypt
Excavators Discover 20 Mummies in Egypt
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 12/08/2004 10:46:36 PM PST · 21 replies · 467+ views


Yahoo News ^ | Dec. 7, 2004 | AP
CAIRO, Egypt - Excavators discovered 20 gilded mummies in the Bahariya oasis in western Egypt, the government's council of antiquities said Tuesday. The find brings the total number of gilded mummies recovered in the 2,000-year-old cemetery to 234. The site, known as the Valley of the Golden Mummies, was discovered in 1996. Zahi Hawass, head of antiquities council, said excavators also discovered the tomb of Badiherkhib, the grandson of former Bahariya Gov. Jed-Khunsu. Jed-Khunsu's tomb already has been found. Fifty bronze coins were found with the mummies, the statement said. Survivors were believed to leave the money for the deceased...
 

King Tut Exhibit Could Prove to Be Gold Mine
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/03/2004 11:09:30 PM PST · 33 replies · 168+ views


Reuters ^ | Fri, Dec 03, 2004 | Jill Serjeant
The exhibit is twice the size of the late-1970s King Tut global tour which launched an era of "blockbuster" museum exhibitions. This year's version will charge up to $30 per ticket and give corporate backers a share in the profits, heralding a new trend in partnerships between private companies, museums and the antiquities' home countries.
 

King Tut, Part 2
  Posted by Tumbleweed_Connection
On News/Activism 12/06/2004 7:26:13 PM PST · 10 replies · 230+ views


NY Times ^ | Dec 7, 2004
Do you remember the first time around? Tutankhamun and his hoard came to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1978 and forever changed the way museums did business, not necessarily for the better. There had been major special exhibitions before, but the frenzy over Tut was something extraordinary. Sold-out tickets, long lines, overcrowded galleries - if the objects on display had been any less luminous, any less golden, than they were, they would have been invisible. For the Met, Tutankhamun meant new demographics, new revenues and, in some sense, a new idea of itself. Suddenly it seemed possible to capture...
 

The Lake's Progress (Greeks, Roman, Persians And Arabs)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/10/2004 1:34:11 PM PST · 6 replies · 147+ views


Al-Ahram ^ | 12-10-2004
The lake's progress In ancient times Lake Mareotis was a pleasure resort and watering spot surrounded by market gardens. Jenny Jobbins considers the fertile past of an area that is now desert Western Alexandria was once heavily populated in the Greek and Roman eras. Leucaspis, a residential seaport, is among the few surviving remains. Note Lake Mareotis in the background. When the Greek colonisers and Roman cohorts -- and, later, the Persians and Arabs -- marched to and from Cyrenaica along Egypt's northern coast they all had one aim in mind -- to hold and control North Africa. The...
 

Ancient Greece
Cretan Excavation Sheds New Light On Dark Ages Of Greek History
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/07/2004 1:44:53 PM PST · 8 replies · 471+ views


Kathimerini (English Edition) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Nicholas Paphitis
Cretan excavation sheds light on Dark Ages of Greek historyFinds from ancient Eleutherna at Cycladic Museum A marble statue of Aphrodite, from a second- to first-century-BC bathhouse in Eleutherna. By Nicholas Paphitis - Kathimerini English Edition On a narrow spur under the shadow of Mount Ida in central Crete, archaeologists for the past 20 years have been excavating a town that flourished from the Dark Ages of Greece's early history until Medieval times. The Eleutherna project, a systematic dig carried out by a three-pronged team of top archaeologists from the University of Crete, is in itself unusual in a country...
 

'Cyclops' - Like Remains Found On Crete
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/01/2003 4:13:57 PM PST · 5 replies · 83+ views


CNN.Com ^ | 2-1-2003
<p>Skull of an elephant. The animal's European ancestors had similar anatomies.</p> <p>IRAKLIO, Greece (AP) -- Researchers on the southern Greek island of Crete have unearthed the fossilized tusk, teeth and bones of a Deinotherium Gigantisimum, a fearsome elephant-like creature that might have given rise to ancient legends of one-eyed cyclops monsters.</p>
 

Cyclops Myth Spurred by One-Eyed Fossils?
  Posted by TigerLikesRooster
On News/Activism 02/08/2003 8:01:23 PM PST · 16 replies · 98+ views


National Geographic NEWS ^ | 02/05/03 | Hillary Mayell
Cyclops Myth Spurred by One-Eyed Fossils? Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News February 5, 2003 Ever wonder where our worst nightmares come from? For the ancient Greeks, it may have been the fossils of giant prehistoric animals. The tusk, several teeth, and some bones of a Deinotherium giganteum, which, loosely translated means really huge terrible beast, have been found on the Greek island Crete. A distant relative to today's elephants, the giant mammal stood 15 feet (4.6 meters) tall at the shoulder, and had tusks that were 4.5 feet (1.3 meters) long. It was one of the largest mammals ever...
 

Greek Farmer Finds 2,000-Year-Old Monument
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/11/2004 10:21:21 PM PST · 2 replies · 104+ views


Associated Press ^ | 9 December 2004 | Derek Gatopoulos
"Sulla's forces of 15,000 -- I think it is not an exaggeration -- faced the massive armies of the King of Pontus Mithridates, whose forces exceeded 100,000," Aravantinos said. "It's one of these rare times when the ancient texts meet archaeology. For Rome, this battle meant salvation, and for Greece the effect was great because Sulla brutally punished the Greek towns that sided with his enemy."
 

Ancient Rome and Italy
Cat's gravestone fetches £200,000 at Sotheby's
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 12/12/2004 1:33:43 PM PST · 28 replies · 567+ views


UK Telegraph ^ | 12/12/04 | Will Bennett
A stone marking a pet cat's grave fetched more than £200,000 at Sotheby's yesterday after experts said it was a 1,100-year-old Anglo-Saxon carving. The relief depicting St Peter was found in a salvage yard 20 years ago by a stonemason, Johnny Beeston, who took it back to his home in Dowlish Wake, Somerset, where he and his wife Ruth decided it would make a headstone for their cat Winkle. After Chris Brewchorne, an amateur archaeologist from the town, realised its significance as he walked past, experts identified it as probably part of a Christian cross from 900AD. Yesterday an anonymous...
 

What Is a Dead Language Doing in the 21st Century?
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 12/05/2004 7:12:01 PM PST · 207 replies · 3,232+ views


e3mil.com ^ | 12/04/2004 | Sue Reilly
Across the nation, schools are re-introducing Latin into their curricula. While Latin's visibility is highest in private and homeschool settings, it is mounting a comeback in the public school system as well. This remarkable phenomenon brings to mind our often-ignored connection to the Roman and Greek civilizations of the ancient world. What Is Old Is New Again Latin's stability makes it unique among languages still in use. Although centuries ago its grammar and vocabulary became essentially frozen (thus earning the designation 'dead'), this language of the Roman Empire did not disappear ó thanks largely to its status as the Roman...
 

Ancient Warfare
Bees, snakes, germs - any weapon in a pinch
  Posted by TrebleRebel
On News/Activism 11/30/2003 7:12:18 AM PST · 22 replies · 56+ views


The Vancouver Sun | 11/29/2003 | Jay Currie
If you are under Roman siege in the middle of a desert, a scorpion bomb seems like a very good idea. Collect a bunch of lethal scorpions and, very carefully, seal them in clay pots. Hurl the pots at the attackers as needed. That's exactly what the defenders of Hatra, just south of Mosul in today's Iraq, did in 198 AD. The siege was lifted in 20 days. As Adrienne Mayor writes in her intriguing book Greek Fire, Poison Arrows and Scorpion Bombs, scorpions weren't the only stinging animals pressed into service in the ancient world. A clay pot full...
 

Bio Warfare Rears Its Head- The Ancient world USED IT!!!(MUST READ!)
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 01/30/2004 7:18:50 AM PST · 20 replies · 70+ views


Newsday ^ | January 13, 2004 | By Bryn Nelson
The following ARE exerpts... "...From Hercules' poisoned arrows to early germ warfare and attacks with scorpion bombs and red-hot sand, she contends, cultures around the world have grappled with the revulsion and justification of using these unconventional weapons ever since they began creating their own myths and recording their histories. Mayor has compiled a slew of examples in her new book, "Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs: Biological and Chemical Warfare in the Ancient World" (Overlook Press)..." "...The early dilemmas posed in mythic form would be recorded eventually in the annals of historians as combatants put their growing knowledge...
 

Asia
China Was Drinking Wine 9,000 Years Ago
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/06/2004 5:20:45 PM PST · 46 replies · 565+ views


The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Roger Highfield
China was drinking wine 9,000 years ago By Roger Highfield, Science Editor (Filed: 07/12/2004) A mixed fermented wine of rice, honey and fruit was being drunk in northern China 9,000 years ago, more than a thousand years before the previously oldest known fermented drinks, brewed in the Middle East. In the past scientists relied on the stylistic similarities of early pottery and bronze vessels to argue for the existence of a prehistoric fermented beverage in China. Today's findings provide the first direct chemical evidence from ancient China for such beverages, which were of cultural, religious, and medical significance. Dr Patrick...
 

Find Stirs Sleeping Buddha Talk
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/04/2004 11:41:00 AM PST · 12 replies · 286+ views


Washington Times ^ | 12-4-2004 | Maseeh Rahman
Find stirs Sleeping Buddha talk By Maseeh Rahman THE WASHINGTON TIMES BAMIYAN, Afghanistan ó French archeologists searching for the colossal Sleeping Buddha in Bamiyan province have uncovered what could be the long-missing statue's foot, raising hopes of a major new discovery from Afghanistan's ancient Buddhist past. Ever since the fundamentalist Taliban destroyed Bamiyan's 1,500-year-old Standing Buddhas in 2001 because they were "un-Islamic," attention has been focused on the hunt for the much larger Sleeping Buddha, described in the travel diary of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuan Zang and depicted in cave paintings at the historic site in the Hindu Kush...
 

History Haunts The Plain Of Jars
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/09/2004 3:10:21 PM PST · 20 replies · 451+ views


The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 12-9-2004 | Sebastien Berger
History haunts the Plain of Jars By Sebastien Berger in Laos (Filed: 09/12/2004) Deep in the mountains of northern Laos is one of the most dangerous archaeological sites ever. The last remnants of an ancient civilisation are next to 30-year-old craters and unexploded US ordnance left by the greatest aerial bombardment of all time. Little is known of the people who carved the huge sandstone containers that give the Plain of Jars its name. The purpose of the artefacts is not known though they are believed to be connected to burial rituals. Archaeologists are mystified by the ancient stoneware containers...
 

British Isles
Saxon Find Brings Clues To History
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/11/2004 4:17:08 PM PST · 10 replies · 471+ views


Evening Star ^ | 12-11-2004
Saxon find brings clues to history December 11, 2004 00:01 A NUMBER of ancient artefacts discovered by a metal detecting enthusiast have given vital clues to Suffolk's history. Six gold and silver fragments discovered in a Witnesham field have given historians the chance to confirm details about life in Suffolk around 1,500 years ago. At a treasure trove inquest on Wednesday, Great Suffolk Coronor Dr Peter Dean confirmed the artefacts met the criteria for treasure. A treasure trove inquest is held when an object of at least 300 years old containing a substantial amount of silver or gold is found...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
British archaeologist discovers 'John the Baptist' cave near Jerusalem
  Posted by F15Eagle
On News/Activism 12/06/2004 8:37:42 AM PST · 72 replies · 1,954+ views


Yahoo! News Science - AFP ^ | Mon, Dec 06, 2004 | AFP
KIBBUTZ TSUBA, Israel (AFP) - A British archaeologist has uncovered a cave in the mountains near Jerusalem which he believes conclusively proves that the Biblical figure of John the Baptist existed. "The first concrete evidence of the existence of John the Baptist has been found on site," 46-year-old Shimon Gibson told AFP. Gibson, who holds a degree from University College London and has written several works on Biblical archaeology, believes the discovery to be "the first archaeological proof of the historical veracity of the Gospels". Other archaeologists, however, believe Gibson's conclusions go too far, and that the discovery of an...
 

FOLLOWING THE WISE MEN
  Posted by presidio9
On News/Activism 12/24/2003 7:16:30 AM PST · 2 replies · 21+ views


NY Post ^ | December 23, 2003 | JOHN J. MILLER
<p>FOR a few minutes on Christmas, children may set down their new toys from the man in the red suit and listen to transmissions from a machine on the red planet. On Thursday, the European Space Agency is scheduled to guide a British probe called the Beagle II onto the surface of Mars in what should become the first successful landing there since NASA's Mars Pathfinder in 1997. But while Mars grabs all the extraterrestrial attention this holiday ("The Beagle has landed!"), normally Christmas is the season of Jupiter, because there's a very good chance that the biggest planet in our solar system was the Star of Bethlehem.</p>
 

The Mother Of All Palestinian Modern-Day Curses (Archaeology)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/12/2004 11:45:13 AM PST · 29 replies · 757+ views


Haaretz ^ | 12-12-2004 | Yoav Stern
The mother of all Palestinian modern-day curses By Yoav SternThe parchment on which the curse was written and the package in which it was found." During a Dead Sea-area dig in 2002, Prof. Yizhar Hirschfeld discovered two small packages wrapped in cloth. The contents of one of them, just recently made public, was a scathing curse aimed at Israeli leaders. "Oh God almighty, I beg you God to destroy Ariel Sharon, son of Devorah, son of Eve." Thus opens a unique text, written in eloquent Arabic, on parchment found more than two years ago at the bottom of the Dead...
 

Persia, Elam, etc
Bones Suggest Women Went to War in Ancient Iran
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 12/04/2004 10:57:12 AM PST · 21 replies · 418+ views


ABC ^ | 12/04/04 | ABC
Dec 4, 2004 ó TEHRAN (Reuters) - These days Iranian women are not even allowed to watch men compete on the football field, but 2,000 years ago they could have been carving the boys to pieces on the battlefield. DNA tests on the 2,000-year-old bones of a sword-wielding Iranian warrior have revealed the broad-framed skeleton belonged to woman, an archaeologist working in the northwestern city of Tabriz said on Saturday. "Despite earlier comments that the warrior was a man because of the metal sword, DNA tests showed the skeleton inside the tomb belonged to a female warrior," Alireza Hojabri-Nobari told...
 

Jewelry From 3rd Millennium BC Discovered In Southwest Iran
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/06/2004 4:37:16 PM PST · 20 replies · 404+ views


Tehran Times ^ | 12-6-2004
Jewelry from 3rd millennium B.C. discovered in southwest Iran Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) ñ- Ancient Iranians were fond of jewelry almost 4300 years ago and were highly skilled in producing jewelry and ornaments, Iranian archaeologists have concluded based on discoveries they made during their recent excavations at the ancient site of Shahdad in Kerman Province. According to the head of the archaeological team, Mir-Abedin Kaboli, archaeologists discovered the ruins of a developed city with industrial and residential areas and a graveyard after fourteen stages of excavations. 'Many artifacts including rare stones, jewelry, engraved stones, and jeweler's tools were...
 

Phoenicians
Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · 6 replies · 62+ views


Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebasti·n Celestino and Carolina LÛpez-Ruiz
When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Ancient Gold Mask to Be Returned to Peru
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 12/11/2004 10:12:06 PM PST · 17 replies · 369+ views


Reuters ^ | Dec. 10, 2004 | Reuters
LIMA, Peru (Reuters) - A gold mask dating back more than 1,000 years to a pre-Inca civilization in northern Peru will be returned home next year after being turned in to police by a collector in Italy, a museum official said on Friday. The well-preserved mask, measuring 14 inches (35 cm) long by 8.7 inches (22 cm) wide, represents the sea god Naylamp from the Sican culture, Carlos Elera, director of the National Sican Museum in Peru told Reuters by telephone. "It's authentic. It's classic Sican, gold with deep red mercury sulfide which had religious importance in the beliefs of...
 

Following The Trail Of Ancient Louisianians
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/10/2004 1:00:11 PM PST · 12 replies · 388+ views


Archaeology Magazine ^ | 12-9-2004 | Amelie A Walker
Following the Trail of Ancient Louisianians December 9, 2004 by Amelie A. Walker A mound at Marksville, one of the state-owned sites on the Louisiana Ancient Mounds Trail. (Mark J. Sindler/LA Office of Tourism) Known for Mardi Gras, jazz, and Cajun culture, Louisiana also has a wealth of Native American sites dating to as early as 4000 B.C. The most obvious remains of ancient peoples are the many mounds that can be seen throughout the state, in cotton and soybean fields, hidden in woods, or even under houses. In all, there are more than 700 mound complexes or individual mounds...
 

Science Is Eating His Dust(Adventurer exploring Chachapoya civilization of Peru)
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 12/08/2004 10:31:09 PM PST · 33 replies · 506+ views


LA Times via Yahoo News ^ | Dec. 7, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh
Gene Savoy plunged into the Peruvian jungle half a century ago in search of the fabled El Dorado, a lost Incan city so wealthy that its king reputedly walked coated in gold dust. Now semiretired, Savoy never found El Dorado. But along the way, he became the world's foremost chronicler of a forgotten civilization known as the Chachapoya ó and a blight to traditional archeologists. Savoy, 79, is among the last of a dying breed ó the swashbuckling adventurer whose expeditions plow through the world's rain forests in search of lost history. The tension between Savoy and the archeological establishment...
 

Threads of old
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/09/2004 7:11:09 AM PST · 9 replies · 136+ views


San Diego Union-Tribune ^ | Thursday, Dec. 9, 2004 | Leigh Fenly
Fabric remains are exceedingly rare in archaeological sites, but here was a young woman beautifully preserved in finely sewn clothes. The ice maiden's thigh-high riding boots were still supple. Her dress, woven 2,400 years ago of sheep's wool and camel hair, was held at the waist by a braided cord banded in colors and hung with tassels. She wore a 3-foot black felt headdress adorned with griffins and birds.
 

Origins and Prehistory
Human ancestors started eating meat, evolution served up a healthy bonus.< eata this Peta >
  Posted by Helms
On News/Activism 12/09/2004 10:44:58 AM PST · 83 replies · 1,269+ views


Medical News Today ^ | 03-22-2004, 07:40 PM | By Gilien Silsby and Gia Scafidi
- 03-22-2004, 07:40 PM By Gilien Silsby and Gia Scafidi When our human ancestors started eating meat, evolution served up a healthy bonus - the development of genes that offset high cholesterol and chronic diseases associated with a meat-rich diet, according to a new USC study. Those ancestors also started living longer than ever before - an unexpected evolutionary twist. The research by USC professors Caleb Finch and Craig Stanford appeared in the Quarterly Review of Biology. "At some point - probably about 2 1/2 million years ago - meat eating became important to humans," said Stanford, chair of the...
 

Ice-Age Ivory Flute Found in German Cave (35K years old]
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 12/10/2004 12:57:32 PM PST · 55 replies · 1,234+ views


Reuters Science ^ | Dec. 10, 2004 | Anon EuroWeenie
BERLIN (Reuters) - A 35,000-year-old flute made from a woolly mammoth's ivory tusk has been unearthed in a German cave by archaeologists, the University of Tuebingen said on Friday. The flute, one of the oldest musical instruments discovered, was pieced together from 31 fragments found in a cave in the Swabian mountains in southwestern Germany, the university said. The mountains have yielded rich pickings in recent years, including ivory figurines, ornaments and other musical instruments. Archaeologists believe humans camped in the area in winter and spring. Mammoths, now extinct, were large elephant-like creatures with hairy coats and long, upcurved tusks....
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
American troops launch 'Exorcist' tour at ancient temple
  Posted by Pokey78
On News/Activism 01/03/2004 3:12:38 PM PST · 8 replies · 57+ views


The Sunday Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 01/04/04 | Colin Freeman
For a country recently purged of its chief tormentor, it is perhaps a grimly appropriate theme for its first new tourist attraction. American troops in Iraq have launched what has been dubbed "The Exorcist Experience", after discovering that the ancient ruins they were guarding provided the location for the 1973 horror classic's opening sequence. They now plan to help locals put the 2,000-year-old city of Hatra back on the international tourist map by marketing it as a future holiday destination to fans of the cult film. Using a modest $5,000 (£2,800) grant, the soldiers have recruited local guides and guards...
 

The Peoples Of The Red Book (Anthropology)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/12/2004 4:45:07 PM PST · 2 replies · 94+ views


Internet ^ | 9-30-1993 | Ants Viires Ph.D
INTRODUCTION In the cliche-ridden propaganda of the Soviet era tsarist Russia was frequently dubbed the 'prison of nations'. When the Soviets came into power this 'prison', by virtue of new national policies, transformed into a family of friendly and brotherly nations in whose bosom all the national cultures flourished. To boast of the achievements under the Communist Party leadership, grandiose cultural festivals were arranged in the Soviet republics, folkloristic dance, song and instrumental groups were established and the revival of old peasant culture was encouraged. The slogan 'socialist in content, nationalist in form' came to be applied to the new...
 

The Real Esselen (Archaeology)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/09/2004 1:59:11 PM PST · 13 replies · 241+ views


Monterrey County Weekly ^ | 12-9-2004 | Ryan Masters
The Real EsselenA new book delivers the overlooked story of Big Sur's early inhabitants. Dec 09, 2004 By Ryan Masters Life Work: Gary Breshchini and Trudy Haversat correct errors and misconceptions as they shed new light on the Esselen Nation. Four different expedition logs from the late 18th century recount an Esselen 'hunting technique' involving the hunters' custom of donning deer hides, heads and antlers to sneak up on their prey. Only the fourth log, that of English captain George Vancouver, points out that this was actually more of a 'floor show' to entertain the padre and his guests after dinner...
 

end of digest #21 20041211

160 posted on 12/12/2004 6:41:16 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 158 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20041211
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

161 posted on 12/12/2004 6:48:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 160 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs -- Weekly Digest #22

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Mystery Of 'Chirping' Pyramid Decoded
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/17/2004 2:43:44 PM PST · 74 replies · 1,426+ views


Nature | 12-14-2004 | Philip Ball
Mystery of 'chirping' pyramid decoded Philip BallAcoustic analysis shows how temple transforms echoes into sounds of nature El Castillo's strange echoes have fascinated visitors for generations © Punchstock A theory that the ancient Mayans built their pyramids to act as giant resonators to produce strange and evocative echoes has been supported by a team of Belgian scientists. Nico Declercq of Ghent University and his colleagues have shown how sound waves ricocheting around the tiered steps of the El Castillo pyramid, at the Mayan ruin of Chichen Itza near Cancun in Mexico, create sounds that mimic the chirp of a bird...
 

The Roman Head From Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review Of The Evidence
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/18/2004 4:26:41 PM PST · 14 replies · 494+ views


University Of New Mexico | 4-18/22-2001 | Romeo H. Hristov/Santiago Genoves T.
The Roman Head from Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review of the evidence Paper prepared for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in New Orleans, Louisiana (April 18-22, 2001). Romeo H. Hristov (b) and Santiago Genoves T. (b) (a) Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 8713 1, U.S.A. (b) Instituto de Investigaciones Antropologicas-UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria 04510, Mexico, D.F., MEXICO Abstract: Since the publication of the complementary research on the apparently Roman head found in Central Mexico (Hristov, Romeo and Santiago Genoves 1999 "Mesoamerican Evidence of Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Contacts, Ancient Mesoamerica. 10 (2): 207-213) this find...
 

Ancient Egypt
British, Egyptian Archaeologists Map Out Regions Beneath Pyramids
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 09/29/2003 9:35:13 AM PDT · 19 replies · 216+ views


Zawya | 9-29-2003
British, Egyptian archaeologists map out regions beneath Pyramids CAIRO, Sept 28 (KUNA) -- A team of British and Egyptian archaeologists are excavating beneath the three Pyramids of Giza to find more about the mystery of the Pyramids and their builders. "The British team, which hails from the University of Birmingham, is using the latest and most up-to-date equipment to seek the mystery of the Pyramids," said Zahi Hawwas, Secretary General of the Higher Council for Antiquities in Egypt. The team is employing a special radar that would help create an archaelogical map of the subterranean region beneath the three Pyramids...
 

Drought That Destroyed A Civilisation
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 11/16/2003 11:05:23 AM PST · 36 replies · 154+ views


The Herald (UK) | 11-11-2003 | Martin Willians
Drought that destroyed a civilisation MARTIN WILLIAMS November 11 2003 IT is one of history's biggest mysteries and has confounded experts for hundreds of years. But a team of scientists believe they have discovered why the world's first great civilisation, established in Egypt nearly 5000 years ago, crumbled and plunged into a dark age that lasted for more than 1000 years. The researchers, including one academic from St Andrews University, have produced new evidence linking the demise of the Egyptian Old Kingdom with decades of drought after a study of layers of sediment at the source of the Blue Nile...
 

Egypt Announces Discovery Of 30,000 Year-Old Skeleton
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 05/08/2002 3:46:59 PM PDT · 50 replies · 264+ views


ABC News Online | 5-8-2002
Egypt announces discovery of 30,000 year-old skeleton Wednesday, 8 May 2002 The skeleton of a human being who lived more than 30,000 years ago has been discovered in southern Egypt by Belgian archaeologists, an Egyptian official announced. "Anthropologists have set his, or her, age to be between 30,000 and 33,000 years ago," Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said. It was the oldest skeleton ever found in northern Africa, Mr Hawass said. A team from the University of Leuven found the skeleton buried in a seated position facing east, with the head turned upward, the director of...
 

I Have Solved The Riddle Of The Sphinx, Says Frenchman
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/13/2004 5:36:33 PM PST · 66 replies · 2,493+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 12-14-2004 | Nic Fleming
I have solved riddle of the Sphinx, says Frenchman By Nic Fleming, Science Correspondent (Filed: 14/12/2004) Archaeologists, who are able to tell us who built the pyramids of Ancient Egypt, have puzzled over the riddle of the Sphinx for generations. The identity of the ruler who ordered the building of the 65ft high, 260ft long limestone half-human statue that has guarded the Giza Plateau for 4,500 years has been lost in the sands of time. Workers on the Sphinx in a television reconstruction Now, following a 20-year re-examination of historical records and uncovering new evidence, Vassil Dobrev, a French Egyptologist,...
 

King Tut Exhibit Could Prove to Be Gold Mine (Coming to the USA in 2005 for 27 month/4 city tour)
  Posted by NormsRevenge
On News/Activism 12/03/2004 7:41:03 PM PST · 59 replies · 1,127+ views


Reuters on Yahoo | 12/3/04 | Jill Serjeant - Reuters
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The gilded treasures of King Tutankhamun are on their way back to the United States in what could prove a gold rush for Egypt and big business. "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" starts a 27-month tour of the United States in June 2005 that will mark the first return here in more than two decades of the precious artifacts buried with the mysterious boy king. The exhibit is twice the size of the late-1970s King Tut global tour which launched an era of "blockbuster" museum exhibitions. This year's version will charge up to...
 

Ancient India
A Civilisation Parallel To Harappa? Experts Wonder
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/13/2004 12:05:39 PM PST · 6 replies · 288+ views


Express India | 12-13-2004 | Abhishek Kapoor
A civilisation parallel to Harappa? Experts wonder Abhishek Kapoor Vadodara, December 11: Was Gujarat the cradle of an independent civilisation, contemporary of the classical Harappan civilisation around the Indus Valley? This view is gaining academic credence in the community of archaeologists specialising on the subject across the country. The Sorath (present Saurashtra) region civilisation, dating back to 3700 BC at some places, was distinct from the classical Harappan as it developed in the Indus Valley, say researchers in the field. ëëIt maintained its separate identity in many ways even as a cultural, economic and technological exchange took place between the...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Death at Halmyris: Two Christian Martyrs at a Roman Outpost on the Danube
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/15/2004 10:07:57 AM PST · 8 replies · 124+ views


Archaeology Odyssey | Nov/Dec 2004 | Mihail Zahariade and Myrna K. Phelps
In 2001 our team, which had been excavating Halmyris for 20 years, made an extraordinary discovery: a fourth-century C.E. basilica containing the bones of two Christian martyrs previously known only from literary sources. If Halmyris had long been recognized for its role in Roman military history, now it had instant appeal to students of Christianity as well.
 

Palestinian Genes Show Arab, Jewish, European and Black-African Ancestry
  Posted by quidnunc
On News/Activism 12/17/2004 3:05:57 PM PST · 56 replies · 929+ views


Global Politician | December 16, 2004 | David Storobin, Esq.
A study by the University of Chicago found that Arab populations, including Palestinians, Jordanians, Syrians, Iraqis, and Bedouin, have at least some sub-Saharan African genes. Non-Arabs from the region, including Turks, Kurds, Armenians, Azeris, Georgians, and Jews did not have any African roots. [1] A possible explanation is the proximity of the Arabian peninsula to the Black African nations. This conclusion is favored by the fact that Yemenite Arabs have 35% Black African genes in their mtDNA (which passes through the mother), while others have less. Yemen, of course, is very close geographically to several Black African nations. Other Arabs,...
 

Western Wall Hill - Out; Temple Period Finds - In
  Posted by Alouette
On News/Activism 12/13/2004 3:49:45 PM PST · 6 replies · 376+ views


Israel National News (Arutz 7) | Dec. 13, 2004
Jerusalem city engineers will take down the hill jutting out from the Western Wall, replacing it with a bridge. Archaeologists expect to find treasures, such as a tall gate from the Second Temple. The Jerusalem Municipality has decided to take down the hill that leads up from the Western Wall (Kotel) entrance to the Temple Mount, for fear that it might otherwise collapse. The walkway up the hill leads to the Mughrabim Gate, which is currently the only entrance for Jews to the Temple Mount. The city plans to replace the hill with a bridge that will lead into the...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Archaeologists Excited By 500,000-Year-Old Axe Find In Quarry
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/17/2004 11:37:14 AM PST · 140 replies · 2,375+ views


24hourmuseum.org.uk | 12-16-2004 | David Prudames
ARCHAEOLOGISTS EXCITED BY 500,000-YEAR-OLD AXE FIND IN QUARRY By David Prudames 16/12/2004 This image shows the axe head from different angles. Photo: Graham Norrie, University of Birmingham Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity. A Stone Age hand axe dating back 500,000 years has been discovered at a quarry in Warwickshire. The tool was found at the Smiths Concrete Bubbenhall Quarry at Waverley Wood Farm, near Coventry, which has already produced evidence of some of the earliest known human occupants of the UK. It was uncovered in gravel by quarry manager John Green who took it to be identified by archaeologists at...
 

Old graves found at school site were possibly pioneers'
  Posted by Excuse_My_Bellicosity
On News/Activism 12/18/2004 7:34:16 AM PST · 39 replies · 763+ views


Salt Lake Tribune | 12/18/2004 | Matt Canham
Five pine coffins discovered on the future site of North Summit Middle School had some students concerned ghosts would haunt their hallways, while others just wondered what would happen to the old bones. The coffins, containing the remains of one man and four children, were found while construction crews finished the footings on the new building. The workers found the first grave on Dec. 10 and the last - the coffin of a 1- to 2-year-old child - was exhumed Friday. "We knew there used to be an old cemetery here," said North Summit Middle School Principal Lloyd Marchant. "But...
 

Settled Life Speeds Social And Religious Evolution
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/16/2004 3:32:52 PM PST · 3 replies · 94+ views


New Scientist | 12-13-2004 | Emma Young
Settled life speeds social and religious evolution 13 December 2004 Emma Young The shift from nomadic life to settled village life can lead to a rapid development of religious and social complexity and hierarchy, according to a detailed chronology of the Valley of Oaxaca in Mexico. Only about 1300 years separate its oldest ritual buildings - simple ëmenís hutsí - and the first standardised temples of the Zapotec state, an archaeological study suggests. ìThis is the first study to show how the co-evolution of social and religious complexity occurred, and what steps were involved,î says Joyce Marcus at the University...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Catastrophic Flooding From Ancient Lake May Have Triggered Cold Period
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/18/2004 11:51:06 AM PST · 27 replies · 671+ views


Newswise | 12-18-2004 | Jeff Donnelly
Catastrophic Flooding from Ancient Lake May Have Triggered Cold Period CLIMATE CHANGE, WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION, JEFF DONNELLY, ABRUPT CLIMATE CHANGE Newswise ó Imagine a lake three times the size of the present-day Lake Ontario breaking through a dam and flooding down the Hudson River Valley past New York City and into the North Atlantic. The results would be catastrophic if it happened today, but it did happen some 13,400 years ago during the retreat of glaciers over North America and may have triggered a brief cooling known as the Intra-Allerod Cold Period. Assistant Scientist Jeffrey Donnelly of the Woods...
 

Experts Seek Trail to Mark Ice Age Floods (National Park Service Study)
  Posted by NormsRevenge
On News/Activism 11/10/2003 7:55:28 PM PST · 14 replies · 32+ views


Yahoo News | 11/10/03 | Joseph B. Frazier - AP
THE DALLES, Ore. - The National Park Service has proposed a marked trail to commemorate Ice Age floods through four Western states that left canyons, valleys, lakes and ridges that still dominate the terrain today ó some so dramatic they can be seen from outer space. Picture an ice dam 30 miles wide, forming a lake 2,000 feet deep and 200 miles long, stretching from the Idaho panhandle into western Montana, containing more water than Lake Erie and Lake Ontario combined. Now picture that dam giving way, the water thundering out in 48 hours, through four states, across Washington and...
 

Major Climate Change Occurred 5,200 Years Ago: Evidence Suggests That History Could Repeat Itself
  Posted by snarks_when_bored
On General/Chat 12/17/2004 10:57:17 PM PST · 44 replies · 307+ views


Space and Earth Science News | December 16, 2004
† Major Climate Change Occurred 5,200 Years Ago: Evidence Suggests That History Could Repeat Itself December 16, 2004 Glaciologist Lonnie Thompson worries that he may have found clues that show history repeating itself, and if he is right, the result could have important implications to modern society. Thompson has spent his career trekking to the far corners of the world to find remote ice fields and then bring back cores drilled from their centers. Within those cores are the records of ancient climate from across the globe. From the mountains of data drawn by analyzing countless ice cores, and...
 

Sky-High Icebergs Carried Boulders From The Rockies To In South-Central Washington
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 11/05/2003 6:29:54 AM PST · 11 replies · 28+ views


Science Daily | 11-4-2003 | Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Source: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Date: 2003-11-04 Sky-high Icebergs Carried Boulders From The Rockies To In South-central Washington Seattle -- Geologists have uncovered a scene in the Pasco Basin west of the Columbia River in Washington state that shows how boulders piggybacked icebergs from what is now Montana and came to rest at elevations as high as 1,200 feet. Although glacial deposits of rocks and boulders are common, especially in the upper Midwest, "There probably isn't anyplace else in the world where there are so many rocks that rafted in on icebergs," said Bruce Bjornstad, a geologist at the Department...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Aircraft litter seafloor off S. Oahu
  Posted by Chuckster
On News/Activism 12/16/2004 5:30:57 PM PST · 26 replies · 861+ views


Honolulu Advertiser | 12-15-04 | Jan Tenbruggencate
Aircraft litter seafloor off S. O'ahu Tenbruggencate Jan Staff Advertiser Final Post-WWI biplanes, flying boats among last week's finds BY JAN TENBRUGGENCATE, Advertiser Science Writer An undersea aircraft museum lies on the ocean floor off South O'ahu, and it includes representatives of virtually the entire era of the flying boats - from early post-World War I biplanes to World War II PBY Catalinas and a postwar behemoth that sank in 1950, the Martin Marshall Mars. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration yesterday announced a series of discoveries made last week and said agencies are mapping the seafloor to document the...
 

(Ten) Egypt Archaeologists Face Smuggling Trial
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/14/2004 3:44:30 PM PST · 4 replies · 105+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 12-13-2004
Egypt Archaeologists Face Smuggling Trial Monday December 13, 2004 8:16 PM CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - Ten Egyptians, including three top archaeologists, will stand trial on charges of stealing and smuggling tens of thousands of antiquities, the nation's chief prosecutor said Monday. Prosecutor-General Maher Abdel Wahid also decided to send the chief of Pharaonic antiquities, Sabri Abdel Aziz, to a disciplinary tribunal on charges of negligence of duty, Egypt's Middle East News Agency reported. The officials were part of a gang that the government accuses of stealing 57,000 artifacts from antiquity warehouses and smuggling thousands of them abroad. The Egyptian officials,...
 

end of digest #22 20041218

162 posted on 12/19/2004 5:48:56 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 160 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link, issue #22.
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20041218
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

163 posted on 12/19/2004 5:53:19 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 162 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs -- Weekly Digest #23

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
2,300-year-old mummy found in Mexico
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 12/19/2004 1:36:05 AM PST · 15 replies · 499+ views


Billings Gazette | DEc. 19, 2004 | AP
MEXICO CITY - Mexican archeologists reported Thursday the discovery of a 2,300-year-old mummy of a female child along with some fabric, hair, feathers and plant remains in a dry, cold, high-altitude cave in the central state of Queretaro. Archeologists received a tip about some human remains in the cave in a mountainous area known as the Sierra Gorda. They searched the cave, located about 9,570 feet above sea level, and found the girl's mummified remains, which lacked one arm. "This is one of the oldest mummies to have been found in Mexico," according to a press release from the Templo...
 

Ancient Peru Site Older, Much Larger
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/23/2004 9:49:50 AM PST · 67 replies · 975+ views


Seattle Times | 12-23-2004 | Thomas H. Maugh
Thursday, December 23, 2004 - Page updated at 12:03 A.M. Ancient Peru site older, much larger By Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times A Peruvian site previously reported as the oldest city in the Americas actually is a much larger complex of as many as 20 cities with huge pyramids and sunken plazas sprawled over three river valleys, researchers report. Construction started about 5,000 years ago ó nearly 400 years before the first pyramid was built in Egypt ó at a time when most people around the world were simple hunters and gatherers, a team from Northern Illinois University...
 

Archaeologists push back beginning of civilization in Americas 400 years
  Posted by bruinbirdman
On News/Activism 12/22/2004 6:09:11 PM PST · 40 replies · 660+ views



Archaeologists have unearthed evidence that the oldest civilisation in the Americas dates back 400 years earlier than previously thought, according to research published today. New radiocarbon dating of 95 samples taken from pyramid mounds and houses suggest that by 3100 BC there were complex societies and communal building of religious monuments across three valleys in Peru. This emerging civilisation was the first in the Americas to develop centralised decision-making, formalised religion, social hierarchies and a mixed economy based on agriculture and fishing. The newly uncovered sites in the Fortaleza and Pativilca valleys, along with the nearby previously reported sites in...
 

Explorers Rediscover Incan City Near Machu Picchu
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/23/2004 10:15:16 PM PST · 3 replies · 74+ views


Reuters | Nov 6 2003 | staff
Using infrared aerial photography to penetrate the forest canopy, the team led by Briton Hugh Thomson and American Gary Zeigler located the ruins at Llactapata 50 miles northwest of the ancient Incan capital, Cusco... The site was first mentioned by explorer Hiram Bingham, the discoverer of Machu Picchu, in 1912. But he was very vague about its location, and the ruins have lain undisturbed ever since. After locating the city from the air, the expedition used machetes to hack through the jungle to reach it, 9,000 feet up the side of a mountain. They found stone buildings including a solar...
 

Inca wall falls for 'Archaeologist' hotel
  Posted by bedolido
On General/Chat 09/15/2003 1:57:59 PM PDT · 4 replies · 17+ views


ABC News | 09/15/03 | Staff Writer
A Frenchman has torn down part of an ancient Inca wall to build a hotel that he ironically wanted to call 'The Archaeologist', in the Peruvian city of Cusco, capital of the Inca empire. The El Comercio newspaper said Joel Raymund was planning to slap up a concrete wall in place of the large, finely cut bricks that had been there since before the 16th century Spanish conquest. Peruvian authorities have halted construction of the hotel. The newspaper reported Mr Raymund has apologised but it is not clear what sanctions he could face. The Inca dynasty ruled over a swathe...
 

Machete-Wielding Team Discover Inca Fastness Lost For Four Centuries
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/05/2002 5:26:53 PM PDT · 21 replies · 87+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 6-6-2002 | Roger Highfield
Machete-wielding team discover Inca fastness lost for four centuries By Roger Highfield, Science Editor (Filed: 06/06/2002) One of the last Inca strongholds against the conquering Spanish has been uncovered in cloud-forest by a British and American expedition investigating a rumour of lost ruins, the Royal Geographical Society will announce today. Called Cota Coca, after the coca grown there, the site is more than 6,000ft up in a valley near the junction of the Yanama and Blanco rivers in Vilcabamba, one of the least understood and most significant areas in the history of the Incas, rulers of the last great empire...
 

Machu Picchu Rubbish Dump Found
  Posted by vannrox
On General/Chat 06/12/2002 4:10:51 PM PDT · 6 replies · 42+ views


Discovery News | June 12, 2002 | Editorial Staff
Archaeologists, while clearing away weeds from Peru's Machu Picchu, uncovered more of the ancient site, including a rubbish dump. Machu Picchu Rubbish Dump Found June 10 ó Archeologists doing maintenance at the famous Inca citadel of Machu Picchu have found new stone terraces, water channels, a rubbish dump and a wall dividing the site's urban sector from its temples, an official said on Friday. "We were clearing away weeds when we were surprised to discover new stone structures, including a wall 6.8 meters (22 feet) high with fine masonry which separates the urban from the sacred zone," Fernando Astete, administrator...
 

Road to Machu Picchu runs through L.A.(Inca exhibit in LA Natural History Museum)
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 06/30/2003 8:04:23 PM PDT · 11 replies · 103+ views


San Bernardino Sun | June 27, 2003 | Steven Rosen
Machu Picchu Comes to L.A. Largest U.S. Exhibition of Inca Treasures Makes Only West Coast Stop at Natural History Museum (http://www.nhm.org/) . June 22 to September 7, 2003. This is the first stop on the exhibitionís national tour, after its debut at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Following the Los Angeles presentation, the exhibit will travel to Pittsburgh, Denver, Houston and Chicago. The enduring allure of Machu Picchu, the 15th-century Incan ruins nestled into Peru's Andes Mountains, is its mystery. Why and how did the Incas build such an impressive estate -- a five-acre city, really, with 150...
 

Stained Teapot Reveals An Ancient Love Of Chocolate
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 07/18/2002 8:26:07 AM PDT · 10 replies · 67+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 7-18-2002 | Roger Highfield
Stained teapot reveals an ancient love of chocolate By Roger Highfield, Science Editor (Filed: 18/07/2002) A teapot has provided evidence that our love affair with chocolate began 1,000 years earlier than previously thought. Archaeologists have shown that cocoa was cultivated in the land between the Americas - including what today is Guatemala, Mexico, and Belize - for thousands of years. Now a study of brown stains on 2,600-year-old Mayan pottery from Belize has identified cocoa residues thought to have been left by ancient drinking chocolate. The discovery, reported today in Nature, pushes back the earliest chemical evidence of cocoa use...
 

Ancient Greece
Khirokitia
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/25/2004 7:20:25 PM PST · 2 replies · 49+ views


Cyprus at a Glance | June 26, 2001 | staff
The Neolithic preceramic period is represented by the settlement of Khirokitia and about 20 other similar settlements, spread throughout Cyprus... This, the earliest known culture in Cyprus, consisted of a well-organised, developed society mainly engaged in farming, hunting and herding. Farming was mainly of cereal crops. They also picked the fruit of trees growing wild in the surrounding area such as pistachio nuts, figs, olives and prunes. The four main species of animals whose remains were found on the site were deer, sheep, goats and pigs... The village of Khirokitia was suddenly abandoned for reasons unknown at around 6000 BC...
 

Kourion: The Monuments Of The City
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 12/25/2004 7:32:09 PM PST · 4 replies · 48+ views


Cytop Net | 1998 | staff
This private house is viewable while mounting the hill of Kourion at the left turn towards the Theatre. According to the excavators it was constructed in the late 1st or in the early 2nd century. It was remodeled in the mid 4th century and demolished definitely by the big earthquake, which occurred after the mid 4th century A.D. (365 A.C.). The ruins of this house reflect life in the city of Kourion at the moment of the demolition and all the finds are exposed at the local Museum situated in the village of Episkopi.
 

The Warriors Of Paros
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/19/2004 11:52:54 AM PST · 8 replies · 226+ views


Hellenic News | 12-19-2004 | Foteini Zafeiropoulou/Anagnostis Agelarakis
The Warriors of ParosEarliest Polyandria (Soldiers' burials) found in Greece offer clues to the rise of Classical Greek City-States and Phalangeal War Tactics. by Foteini Zafeiropoulou and Anagnostis Agelarakis Soldiers' bones in urns-evidence of a forgotten battle fought around 730 BC. Did these men perish on their island home of Paros, at the center of the Aegean Sea, or in some distant land? The loss of so many, at least 120 men, was certainly a catastrophe for the community, but their families and compatriots honored them, putting the cremated remains into large vases two of which were decorated with scenes...
 

Ancient Europe
Archaeologists Strike Gold In Secret Spot (Norway)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/21/2004 4:19:03 PM PST · 24 replies · 762+ views


Aftenposten | 12-20-2004
Archaeologists strike gold in secret spot Eleven small, golden reliefs have been unearthed at an archaeological dig somewhere in eastern Norway. Officials won't say where, because they think more of the 1,400-year-old gold objects will be found at the site. Professor Heid Gj¯stein Resi with one of the small gold reliefs found in eastern Norway. PHOTO: ARASH A. NEJAD The most intact object found in October depicts a couple, maybe the mythological figures Fr¯y and Gerd.PHOTO: ARASH A. NEJAD "This is a tremendously unique and exciting discovery, the kind an archaeologist makes only once in a lifetime," professor Heid Gj¯stein...
 

Earliest Depiction Of A Rainbow Found
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/22/2004 10:12:25 AM PST · 48 replies · 862+ views


Discovery News | 12-21-2004 | Jennifer Viegas
Earliest Depiction of a Rainbow Found? By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Dec. 21, 2004 ó An ancient bronze disc that looks a bit like a freckled smiley face may show the world's earliest known depiction of a rainbow, according to a report published in the new issue of British Archaeology magazine. If the rainbow interpretation proves to be correct, the rare image also would be the only known representation of a rainbow from prehistoric Europe. The round bronze object, called the Sky Disc, was excavated in 1999 at Nebra in central Germany. It was said to have been found at...
 

Out Of The Flames, A Work Of Art From 4,000 Years Ago
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/20/2004 5:45:54 PM PST · 13 replies · 510+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 12-21-2004 | Paul Stokes
Out of the flames, a work of art from 4,000 years ago By Paul Stokes (Filed: 21/12/2004) Archaeologists believe a 4,000-year-old stone carving found among the remnants of a devastating moorland blaze could be the world's earliest work of landscape art. Inscriptions on the yard-wide sandstone panel are thought to depict fields and a house with a mountain or seascape in the background. The sandstone panel is thought to depict fields and a house It was discovered last summer after a four-day peat fire exposed a huge chunk of subsoil on Fylingdales Moor, North Yorks. The area of the North...
 

Women Warriors From Amazon Fought For Britain's Roman Army
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/22/2004 10:29:18 AM PST · 63 replies · 1,661+ views


The Times (UK) | 12-22-2004 | Lewis Smith
December 22, 2004 Women warriors from Amazon fought for Britain's Roman army By Lewis Smith THE remains of two Amazon warriors serving with the Roman army in Britain have been discovered in a cemetery that has astonished archaeologists. Women soldiers were previously unknown in the Roman army in Britain and the find at Brougham in Cumbria will force a reappraisal of their role in 3rd-century society. The women are thought to have come from the Danube region of Eastern Europe, which was where the Ancient Greeks said the fearsome Amazon warriors could be found. The women, believed to have died...
 

Ancient Near East
5,000 Years Ago, Women Held Power In Burnt City, Iran
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/24/2004 11:47:31 AM PST · 14 replies · 376+ views


Iranian WS | 12-23-2004
5000 Years Ago, Women Held Power In Burnt City, Iran Dec 23, 2004, 11:34 CHN According to the research by an archeological team in the burnt city, women comprised the most powerful group in this 5000-year-old city. The archeological team has found a great number of seals in the women's graves. In ancient societies, holding a seal was a sign of power, and was of 2 kinds: personal and governmental. The burnt city ancient site located in Sistan-Baluchistan province, southeastern Iran, dates back to between 2000 and 3000 BC. "In the ancient world, there were tools used as a means...
 

Archaeologists Believe They Have Discovered Part Of Throne Of Darius
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/21/2004 3:19:40 PM PST · 20 replies · 569+ views


Tehran Times | 12-21-2004
Archaeologists believe they have discovered part of throne of Darius Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) -- Iranian archaeologists believe they have found a part of one leg of the throne of Darius the Great during their excavations at Persepolis, the ancient capital of the Achaemenid dynasty, the director of the team of archaeologists announced Sunday. ìFour archaeologists of the team found a piece of lapis lazuli during their excavations in water canals passing under the treasury in southeastern Persepolis last year,î said Alireza Askari, adding, ìThe studies on the piece of stone over the past year led the archaeologists...
 

New Studies Show Jiroft Was An International Trade Center 5,000 Years Ago
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/23/2004 9:39:27 AM PST · 2 replies · 94+ views


Tehran Times | 12-23-2004
New studies show Jiroft was an international trade center 5000 years ago Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) ñ- Studies by foreign archaeologists and experts on seals recently discovered in the Jiroft area prove that Jiroft was an international trade center 5000 years ago. The head of the excavation team in the region, Yusef Majidzadeh, said on Wednesday that several ancient seals in various shapes were discovered during the most recent excavation at the site. ìThe twenty-five discovered seals show that the regional people made use of seals in their business. They used to put products inside jars, covered the...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Israeli Archaeologists Believe They Have Found Site of Jesus' First Miracle
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 12/21/2004 1:20:03 PM PST · 118 replies · 1,793+ views


AP | Dec 21, 2004 | Laurie Copans
CANA, Israel (AP) - Among the roots of ancient olive trees, archaeologists have found pieces of large stone jars of the type the Gospel says Jesus used when he turned water into wine at a Jewish wedding in the Galilee village of Cana. They believe these could have been the same kind of vessels the Bible says Jesus used in his first miracle, and that the site where they were found could be the location of biblical Cana. But Bible scholars caution it'll be hard to obtain conclusive proof - especially since experts disagree on exactly where Cana was located....
 

AP: Historical Christian Site Said to Be Found [Jesus's First Miracle]
  Posted by West Coast Conservative
On News/Activism 12/21/2004 1:50:05 PM PST · 28 replies · 1,095+ views


AP | Dec. 21, 2004 | LAURIE COPANS
Among the roots of ancient olive trees, archaeologists have found pieces of large stone jars of the type the Gospel says Jesus used when he turned water into wine at a Jewish wedding in the Galilee village of Cana. They believe these could have been the same kind of vessels the Bible says Jesus used in his first miracle, and that the site where they were found could be the location of biblical Cana. But Bible scholars caution it'll be hard to obtain conclusive proof ó especially since experts disagree on exactly where Cana was located. Christian theologians attach great...
 

Archaeologists Identify Remains of Site Where Bible Says Jesus Restored Blind Man's Sight
  Posted by Sub-Driver
On News/Activism 12/23/2004 11:51:22 AM PST · 30 replies · 716+ views


TBO.COM
Archaeologists Identify Remains of Site Where Bible Says Jesus Restored Blind Man's Sight By Ramit Plushnick-Masti Associated Press Writer JERUSALEM (AP) - Archaeologists in Jerusalem have identified the remains of the Siloam Pool, where the Bible says Jesus miraculously cured a man's blindness, researchers said Thursday - underlining a stirring link between the works of Jesus and ancient Jewish rituals. The archaeologists are slowly digging out the pool, where water still runs, tucked away in what is now the Arab neighborhood of Silwan. It was used by Jews for ritual immersions for about 120 years until the year 70, when...
 

Israel finds Jesus miracle sites
  Posted by kattracks
On News/Activism 12/24/2004 1:25:35 AM PST · 21 replies · 504+ views


NY Daily News | 12/24/04 | MATTHEW KALMAN
JERUSALEM - Just in time for Christmas, Israeli archeologists unveiled ancient sites where Jesus is believed to have performed two of his most celebrated miracles. In Jerusalem, the pool where Jesus is said to have cured a man's blindness has been found under several yards of dirt. According to John's Gospel, Chapter 9, verses 1-12, Jesus performed this miracle at the Siloam Pool in the City of David just south of the Temple Mount. Archeologists revealed yesterday they found an impressively paved assembly area and water channel that brought rainwater to the Siloam Pool in the Second Temple period when...
 

Burial box of Jesus's brother is hoax, say experts (Hoaxster charged with fraud)
  Posted by AAABEST
On Religion 12/24/2004 8:06:54 AM PST · 20 replies · 249+ views


The UK Times | December 24, 2004 | Ian MacKinnon
AN ISRAELI collector of antiquities who stunned the world with a find that he said was the burial container of Jesusí ìbrotherî, James, is to be charged with forgery. Justice Ministry officials said last night that Oded Golan would be indicted next week on a range of charges that would include forgery over an inscription on the stone container that carried the script in Aramaic reading: ìJames, son of Joseph, brother of Jesusî. Six others are also to be charged. The discovery of the ossuary in October 2002 was hailed as one of the great archaeological discoveries of the age...
 

Asia
Black & White Ceramics from 10th-14th Century China
  Posted by maui_hawaii
On News/Activism 12/21/2004 9:30:48 PM PST · 18 replies · 224+ views


artdaily
WASHINGTON, D.C.-From the 10th through the 14th centuries, Chinese potters significantly expanded the ceramic repertoire by perfecting a clay body of pristine whiteness and developing a luscious black glaze, leading to the production of innovative, visually striking vessels, dishes, boxes and tomb ceramics. This exhibition presents examples of the most acclaimed ìblack and whiteî ceramics of the period. The range of glaze colors on view includes ìblacksî that shade to brown, and silvery tones and ìwhitesî that range from ivory to pale blue. Objects from diverse kilns demonstrate the inaccuracy of a longstanding assumption that the major kilns of this...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Dinosaur Swallows Human
  Posted by BenLurkin
On General/Chat 12/24/2004 7:37:06 AM PST · 74 replies · 630+ views


biblelandstudios.com | 12-24-04 | "Bibleland"
Dear Friends, Thank you for your patience and without further delay Bibleland Studios presents The Photos as promised of what appears to be a fossil of a Dinosaur Swallowing a Human. Do these photos provide the necessary evidence that dinosaurs and humans coexisted in our recent ancient past? From our latest poll many of you believe humans and dinosaurs did coexist. But just because we believe it does that make it so? Bibleland Studios is interested in objective; naked, pure unadulterated truth no matter where it leads. Do you believe as I do that the desire to know where we...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Magnificent Seven That Keep Mere Mortals Wondering
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 04/02/2004 5:20:20 PM PST · 18 replies · 47+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 4-3-2004 | Christopher Howse
Magnificent seven that keep mere mortals wondering By Christopher Howse (Filed: 03/04/2004) Only one person out of more than 600 polled could name all Seven Wonders of the World, according to a survey published today. That person's identity is unknown, since the survey was done scientifically by ICM, guaranteeing anonymity. Perhaps it was you. If not, and you want to try getting all seven, look away from this page now. How did you score? If you could name three, you were doing well. Only one person in 10 managed that. Four or more Wonders were named by only a tiny...
 

Michigan Man May Have Tapped Secrets Of The Ancients
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 03/24/2004 4:56:10 PM PST · 62 replies · 237+ views


The Flint Journal (w o r l d w i d e a n o m a l o u s p h e n o m e n a r e s o u r c e) | 3-20-2004 | Kim Crawford
But then, the blocks that Wallace T. Wallington moves around near his home in a rural Flint area have weighed up to nearly 10 tons. And by himself, he moves these behemoth playthings, not with cranes and cables, but with wooden levers. "It's more technique than it is technology," Wallington says. "I think the ancient Egyptians and Britons knew this." Last October, a production crew from Discovery Channel in Canada came to Wallington's home to record him as he raised a 16-foot, rectangular, concrete block that weighed 19,200 pounds and set it into a hole. That taping was made into...
 

end of digest #23 20041225

164 posted on 12/26/2004 10:26:20 AM PST by SunkenCiv (There's nothing new under the Sun. That accounts for the many quotes used as taglines.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 162 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link, issue #23. Only one day late this week, nice job 'Civ.
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20041225
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

165 posted on 12/26/2004 10:28:05 AM PST by SunkenCiv (There's nothing new under the Sun. That accounts for the many quotes used as taglines.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 164 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #24
January 1st, 2005


Ancient Navigation
Of Lasting Genes And Lost Cities Of Tamil Nadu
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/05/2003 4:15:36 PM PST · 21 replies · 103+ views


Hindustan Times | 1-5-2003 | Papri Sri Raman
Of lasting genes and lost cities of Tamil Nadu Papri Sri Raman (Indo-Asian News Service) Chennai, January 5 India's East Coast, especially along Tamil Nadu, is increasingly drawing the attention of archaeologists and anthropologists from across the world for its evolutionary and historical secrets. The focus has sharpened after genetic scientist Spencer Wells found strains of genes in some communities of Tamil Nadu that were present in the early man of Africa. In the "Journey of Man" aired by the National Geographic channel, Wells says the first wave of migration of early man from Africa took place 60,000 years ago...
 

The Periplus of the Red Sea, edition Megalommatis, a Book Review.
  Posted by Muhammad Shams Megalommatis
On Bloggers & Personal 06/16/2004 7:33:33 AM PDT · 3 replies · 219+ views


The Books | 15/6/04 | Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis
The Periplus of the Red Sea (O Periplous tes Erythras Thalasses) Edition Megalommatis. A Book Review. Published in Greek, in 1994 (STOHASTIS Publishing House, Athens - Greece), 272 p., the book consists in a theoretical approach and analytical presentation of a major historical phenomenon that shaped to a very large extent the World History: the development of the trade between East and West. The text of the Periplus of the Red Sea is by definition the central text in the study of the East - West Trade, an interdisciplinary field where more than two dozens of historical branches have been...
 

Scientists Discover Ancient Sea Wharf (Marine Silk Road)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/30/2004 11:46:01 AM PST · 12 replies · 428+ views


East Day.Com | 12-30-2004
Scientists discover ancient sea wharf 30/12/2004 7:32 Archeologists say that they have found the country's oldest wharf and it is believed to be the starting point of an ancient sea route to Central and West Asia. The discovery has reaffirmed the widespread belief that the ancient trade route started in Hepu County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, archeologists said at yesterday's symposium on the nation's marine silk road. After three years of excavation, archeologists have unearthed a wharf that is at least 2,000 years old in Guchengtou Village, according to Xiong Zhaoming, head of the archeological team. At the same site,...
 

Ancient Egypt
8 Prehistoric Granaries Found In Egypt (9,000 Years Old)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/29/2004 8:37:42 AM PST · 20 replies · 542+ views


The Ledger | 12-28-2004
Published Tuesday, December 28, 2004 8 Prehistoric Granaries Found in Egypt The Associated Press CAIRO, Egypt An American excavation mission has unearthed eight granaries that are relics from agricultural life in the Neolithic era, the Egyptian culture minister said in a statement Tuesday. The granaries were discovered last week in Fayoum, an oasis some 50 miles southwest of Cairo, Farouk Hosni said in the statement. The statement said the granaries date back to the Neolithic era that began around 9,000 B.C., known as a transition point from roaming and hunting societies to an agricultural one. Hosni added that "those granaries...
 

Egypt demands return of Rosetta Stone!
  Posted by UnklGene
On News/Activism 07/20/2003 10:18:03 AM PDT · 228 replies · 929+ views


The Sunday Telegraph - UK | July 20, 2003 | Charlotte Edwardes and Catherine Milner
Egypt demands return of the Rosetta Stone By Charlotte Edwardes and Catherine Milner (Filed: 20/07/2003) Egypt is demanding that the Rosetta Stone, a 2,000-year-old relic and one of the British Museum's most important exhibits, should be returned to Cairo. The stone, which became the key to deciphering ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, was found by Napoleon's army in 1799 in the Nile delta, but has been in Britain for the past 200 years. It forms the centrepiece of the British Museum's Egyptology collection and is seen by millions of visitors each year. Now, in an echo of the campaign by Athens for...
 

Egypt demands return of Rosetta Stone- threatens to pursue its claim "aggressively"
  Posted by yankeedame
On News/Activism 07/20/2003 5:58:03 PM PDT · 25 replies · 66+ views


The Sydney Morning Herald | July 21, 2003 | staff writer
Egypt demands return of ancient Rosetta StoneJuly 21 2003Egypt is demanding that the 2000-year-old Rosetta Stone be returned to Cairo and has threatened to pursue its claim "aggressively" if the British Museum does not agree to give it back. The stone, which became the key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics, was found by Napoleon's army in 1799 in the Nile delta, but has been in Britain for 200 years. "If the British want to be remembered, if they want to restore their reputation, they should volunteer to return the Rosetta Stone because it is the icon of our Egyptian identity," said...
 

A lost city has been descovered in Egypt (The Scots and the lost city of Egypt).
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 02/12/2003 1:56:18 PM PST · 26 replies · 380+ views


The Scotsman | 2-12-03 | JIM MCBETH
A SCOTTISH archaeological expedition, operating on a shoestring budget, has uncovered an ancient Egyptian city, buried by the sands of time. The expedition, which scrapes together £10,000 a year to maintain its dig near Memphis, the ancient Pharaonic capital, has written a new page of Egyptís history. For the newly-discovered town, situated near the necropolis of Saqqara, 15 miles from Cairo, is almost certainly where the workmen who built the pyramids lived with their families. The presence of large temples, some nearly 200ft square, a number of tombs and the mix of large and small dwellings indicate a place...
 

The missing sun temples! (Where are they?)
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 01/03/2003 3:59:47 PM PST · 35 replies · 275+ views


Al-Ahram Weekly (Egypt) | 2 - 8 January 2003 | Jill Kamil
The missing sun temples Six Pharaohs of the Fifth Dynasty built massive sun temples at Abu Sir in addition to their pyramids, but only two have so far been found.Jill Kamil talks to the head of the Czech archaeological mission In a presentation on Abu Sir given at the American University in Cairo last week head of the Czech mission Miroslav Verner told the audience that his team had recently been focusing on the "vast and remarkable monuments", the sun temples raised by the Pharaohs of the Fifth Dynasty who ruled from 2494 to 2345 BC. "Their plan (main...
 

Pharaoh at bat? History throws a curve (Prof claims baseball invented in ancient Egypt)
  Posted by mhking
On News/Activism 03/16/2003 4:29:13 AM PST · 20 replies · 191+ views


Albany Times-Union | 3.15.03 | BRUCE WEBER
Pharaoh at bat? History throws a curve Professor claims earliest bat-and-ball games were played in ancient EgyptBy BRUCE WEBER, New York Times First published: Saturday, March 15, 2003 No disrespect meant to Abner Doubleday or Alexander Cartwright or anybody else who might claim responsibility for the game we call baseball, but Thutmose III had them beat by three millennia or so. Thutmose ruled Egypt during the 15th century B.C., and is the first known pharaoh to have depicted himself in a ritual known as seker-hemat, which Egyptologist Peter A. Piccione has loosely translated as "batting the ball." "The word...
 

Ancient Egypt -- Amarna
Akhenaten: An Early Egyptian Monotheist
  Posted by restornu
On Religion 04/05/2004 8:52:20 PM PDT · 27 replies · 73+ views


M E R I D I A N M A G A Z I N E | By Daniel C. Peterson and William J. Hamblin
Although monotheism is usually associated with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, there have, in fact, been a number of other monotheistic religions in world history. Iran, in particular, was a center for monotheistic thought, being home to both Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism. At first glance, ancient Egypt, with its hundreds of exotic gods, would seem the last place for a monotheistic revelation. Yet one of the earliest monotheists known to history was Akhenaten, pharaoh of Egypt from 1352-1336 BC, who perhaps lived in the generation before Moses. Akhenaten was born of royal parents, raised and trained in the religious traditions of Egypt...
 

Found: Queen Nefertiti's Mummy
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/08/2003 10:05:51 AM PDT · 72 replies · 719+ views


The Sunday Times (UK) | 6-8-2003 | Jack Grinston
June 08, 2003 Found: Queen Nefertitiís mummy Jack Grimston BRITISH archeologists believe they may have identified the body of one of the most legendary beauties of the ancient world. They are confident a tattered mummy found in a tomb in the Valley of the Kings is probably Queen Nefertiti, stepmother of the boy king Tutankhamun and one of the most powerful women in ancient Egypt. The conclusion has been made after 12 years of research, using clues such as fragments of a wig and the piercing of the mummyís ears. The breakthrough came after the Egyptian authorities allowed the 3,500-year-old...
 

Ancient Egypt -- Mummies
Ancient Mummy, Probably Pharaoh, Returns to Egypt
  Posted by presidio9
On News/Activism 10/28/2003 8:11:40 AM PST · 18 replies · 102+ views


Reuters | Tue, Oct 28, 2003
A Egyptian mummy, which is probably pharaoh Ramses I who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago, returned home from a U.S. museum after a journey that began with a 19th century grave robbery. The body, which like that of other ancient Egyptian rulers would originally have been laid in a decorated tomb, was flown into Cairo airport carefully packed in a plain wooden crate. Witnesses said the box was taken off the plane Saturday draped in an Egyptian flag. Zahi Hawass, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council for Antiquities, accompanied the mummy on the flight. The Michael C. Carlos Museum...
 

Atlanta Sends Mummy Home
  Posted by Chipata
On News/Activism 04/30/2003 1:59:07 PM PDT · 10 replies · 95+ views


National Geographic | April 30, 2003 | Hillary Mayell
U.S. Museum to Return Ramses I Mummy to Egypt Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News April 30, 2003 A 3,000-year-old mummy that many scholars believe is ancient Egypt's King Ramses I is the star attraction of an exhibit at the Michael C. Carlos Museum in Atlanta that will run from April 26 to September 14. How the mummy came to reside in North America for 140 years, and wound up in Atlanta, is a tale that includes the collapse of law and order in ancient Egypt, grave robbers, stolen antiquities, a two-headed calf and a five-legged pig, the wonders of...
 

Curses! Mummy Tale Not True
  Posted by NormsRevenge
On News/Activism 12/20/2002 6:39:28 PM PST · 11 replies · 99+ views


Yahoo! News | 12/20/02 | Amanda Gardner - HealthScoutNews
Curses! Mummy Tale Not True Fri Dec 20, 2:53 PM ET By Amanda GardnerHealthScoutNews Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthScoutNews) -- Tut tut to those who believe in the mummy's curse. Reuters Photo According to a study reported in the Christmas issue of the British Medical Journal, there is no mummy's curse associated with the opening of the tomb of Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen in Egypt. The study confirms what other experts have long suspected. "I've never had any weird experience with a mummy, and I've worked with them for 30 years," says Bob Brier, an Egyptologist at Long Island University's...
 

Egyptian Busted for Trying to Sell Mummy
  Posted by JohnHuang2
On News/Activism 10/31/2003 12:18:16 PM PST · 25 replies · 50+ views


Associated Press | Friday, October 31, 2003
Egyptian Busted for Trying to Sell Mummy .c The Associated Press CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - A senior Egyptian official and six other government employees have been arrested for trying to sell a mummy to an undercover officer, police said Friday. The seven, all employed at the Agriculture Ministry, were arrested Thursday while negotiating with an officer posing as an antiquities dealer. They are believed to have excavated the mummy recently in an illegal dig in Beni Suef, 60 miles south of Cairo, and had hidden it in a government-owned truck, police said. Most sales of Egyptian antiquities are illegal under...
 

Egypt's 'Ramses' mummy returned (Ramses I)
  Posted by Sabertooth
On News/Activism 10/26/2003 8:58:18 AM PST · 16 replies · 422+ views


BBC | October 26th, 2003
Egypt's 'Ramses' mummy returned The mummy is believed to be that of the Pharaoh Ramses I An ancient Egyptian mummy thought to be that of Pharaoh Ramses I has returned home after more than 140 years in North American museums. The body was carried off the plane in Cairo in a box draped in Egypt's flag. The Michael Carlos Museum gave it back after tests showed it was probably that of the man who ruled 3,000 years ago. The US institution acquired it three years ago from a Canadian museum, which in turn is thought to have bought it...
 

Ancient Greece
On this Day In History, The Battle of Salamis, 480 B.C.
  Posted by Valin
On News/Activism 09/20/2003 2:29:05 PM PDT · 23 replies · 114+ views


Hellas net.
After the first Persian wars an exceptional rich vein was discovered in the Attic silver mines of Laurium. This gave new opportunities for Athens. One group led by Aristides wanted the profits to be spread out over the population, as it was normal in those days, others who were led by Themistocles wanted something different. He was the only one who had correctly understood the message of the oracle of Delphi that Athens should be protected by a wooden wall: he debated that Athens should built a fleet of 200 triremes. He pointed out to the Athenians that a strong...
 

(huge # of graphics) USO Canteen FReeper Style ~ Ancient Greek Warfare Part III - Ancient Greek Navy ~ NOV 25 2003
  Posted by 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub
On News/Activism 11/24/2003 9:57:30 PM PST · 368 replies · 257+ views


Warfare in Hellas | LaDivaLoca
† † For the freedom you enjoyed yesterday... Thank the Veterans who served in The United States Armed Forces. † † Looking forward to tomorrow's freedom? Support The United States Armed Forces Today! † † † † ANCIENT WARFAREPart III: Ancient Greek Military: †Lfikrates' Hoplite Greek Navy Ifikrates' hoplite. Ifikrates was an Athenian general during the hegemony of Thebes, but most of all somebody who was not afraid of changes. He noticed the power of the peltasts at an early stage and managed to break down a Spartan phalanx with a group of peltasts during the battle of Lechaeum....
 

Ancient Near East
Ancient Curse, Modern War Hide Arabian Desert Tombs
  Posted by BlackVeil
On News/Activism 12/31/2004 12:11:54 AM PST · 9 replies · 330+ views


Yahoo News | 2 Dec 2004 | By Dominic Evans
MEDA'IN SALEH, Saudi Arabia (Reuters) - Sheltered from the world by an ancient religious curse and modern Middle East conflict, a spectacular ruined city lies almost hidden in the northern deserts of Saudi Arabia. More than 100 tombs and burial chambers are carved elaborately into rocky outcrops across the sands of this city, still bearing names and ornate religious symbols chipped into the sandstone 2,000 years ago. Nearby volcanic mountains, decorated with the 10,000-year-old art of prehistoric hunters, tower over a palm-filled oasis and an abandoned mud house village. Through them all snake the remains of an Ottoman railway, built...
 

Persia, Elam, etc
Human Sacrifice Was Common In Burnt City (Iran)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/28/2004 3:15:07 PM PST · 18 replies · 421+ views


Payvand | 12-27-2004
12/27/04Human Sacrifice Was Common in Burnt City Tehran (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) -- According to archeological research in the 5000-year-old burnt city, in eastern province of Sistan-Baluchistan, sacrificing human beings was a common practice in ancient times. After excavating a number of graves in the cemetery of the burnt city, the Iranian archeological team came across signs of murder and generally beheaded bodies.ìDuring excavations in the burnt city cemetery, we came across a grave with only one skull buried along with gifts and personal items needed for the afterlife. There was also another grave in the form of a...
 

Parthian Era Subterranean Village Discovered Near Maragheh
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/31/2004 12:19:44 PM PST · 6 replies · 277+ views


Teheran Times | 12-31-2004
Parthian era subterranean village discovered near Maragheh Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) -- Iranian archaeologists have discovered a Parthian era village under the earth near the Mehr Temple of the northwestern city of Maragheh, the director of the Maragheh Cultural Heritage and Tourism Department said on Wednesday. ìSince the Mehr Temple is one of the little known sites of Iran, our team planned to carry out some excavations around it to ascertain some details about the temple. The excavations resulted in the discovery of an underground village which archaeologists believe dates back to the Parthian era,î Nasser Zavvari added....
 

Photo Series: Persepolis, Iran - Capital of Persian Empire [History]
  Posted by freedom44
On Bloggers & Personal 08/27/2004 9:42:57 PM PDT · 33 replies · 722+ views


Iranian | 8/27/04 | Iranian
Cyrus the Great Cylinder, The First Charter of Human Rights By 546 BCE, Cyrus had defeated Croesus, the Lydian king of fabled wealth, and had secured control of the Aegean coast of Asia Minor, Armenia, and the Greek colonies along the Levant. Moving east, he took Parthia (land of the Arsacids, not to be confused with Parsa, which was to the southwest), Chorasmis, and Bactria. He besieged and captured Babylon in 539 and released the Jews who had been held captive there, thus earning his immortalization in the Book of Isaiah. When he died in 529, Cyrus's kingdom extended as...
 

Ancient Rome and Italy
Buried Women 'Were In Amazon Fighting Tribe' (More)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/29/2004 8:57:36 AM PST · 27 replies · 867+ views


Cumbria-Online | 12-29-2004 | Pam McClounie
BURIED WOMEN ëWERE IN AMAZON FIGHTING TRIBEí Published in News & Star on Wednesday, December 29th 2004 Fierce: Women may have fought in the Roman army By Pam McClounie TWO bodies unearthed from an ancient cemetery at Brougham, near Penrith, have changed expertsí views on Roman Britain. For the 1,750-year-old remains ñ found at the site in the 1960s ñ have been identified as women warriors who may have been from the fabled Amazon fighting tribe of Eastern Europe. The discovery has astonished archaeologists and historians because women were not previously known to have fought in the Roman army, which...
 

British Isles
Anglo Saxon Brooch Has Oldest Writing In English
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 06/07/2003 6:14:03 PM PDT · 49 replies · 56+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 6-7-2003 | Paul Stokes
Anglo Saxon brooch has oldest writing in English By Paul Stokes (Filed: 07/06/2003) What is believed to be the oldest form of writing in English ever found has been uncovered in an Anglo-Saxon burial ground. It is in the form of four runes representing the letters N, E, I and M scratched on the back of a bronze brooch from around AD650. The six inch cruciform brooch is among one million artefacts recovered from a site at West Heslerton, near Malton, North Yorks, since work began there in 1978. Dominic Powlesland, the archaeologist leading the excavation team, said: "This could...
 

Campaign To Bring 'Red Lady' Back To Swansea After 180 Years
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/27/2004 12:05:01 PM PST · 8 replies · 457+ views


IC Wales | 12-27-2004 | Robin Turner
Campaign to bring 'Red Lady' back to Swansea after 180 years Dec 27 2004 Robin Turner, Western Mail THE chairman of Swansea's tourism association is backing an Elgin Marbles style campaign to secure the return to Wales of the Red Lady of Paviland. The skeleton of the "red lady", complete with jewellery and a mammoth's head grave marker, is regarded as one of the world's most important archaeological finds. It was discovered in 1823 at Paviland Cave on Gower. Later analysis showed the skeleton to be that of a man, probably a chieftain, but the Red Lady tag has stuck....
 

Looking into Blackheath's mysterious cavern (Huge Cave system under London)
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 03/17/2004 6:04:02 AM PST · 37 replies · 631+ views


icSouthlondon | Sep 03.03 | Mandy Little
Land around a mysterious cavern underneath Blackheath could soon be under investigation. Parkman's, the surveyors who investigated a six-foot-wide crater that appeared in the A2 at Blackheath Hill last April has said further checks on land stability in the area are needed. Decisions on their report were to be made by Greenwich council last night. But the council, which would apply for a grant from English Partnerships to cover the costs of the investigation, is not yet sure how much it will cost. The collapse of the A2 into chalk pits after subsoil washed away triggered traffic chaos, hundreds of...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Archaeologists Find Ancient Village Near Tel-Aviv
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/27/2004 12:12:04 PM PST · 17 replies · 646+ views


Jerusalem Post | 12-27-2004 | AP
Dec. 26, 2004 19:29Archeologists find ancient village near Tel-Aviv By ASSOCIATED PRESS Archeologists have discovered a village near the Mediterranean coast dating from the 4th century B.C., the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Sunday - a rare find. The discovery provides an unusual insight into a turbulent period when there were intense struggles for control over the area, said Uzi Ad, who led the dig. During this period the region was under the rule of the Egyptian Ptolemy empire and then the Selucid Greeks from Syria before it was conquered by the Jewish Hasmonean dynasty in the second century B.C. "The...
 

Eusebius' Onomasticon: Geographical Knowledge in Byzantine Palestine
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 01/01/2005 1:36:08 AM PST · 1 reply · 50+ views


Palestine Exploration Fund | 17 March, 2004, Last modified 30 April, 2004 | Joan E. Taylor and Rupert L. Chapman
The most widely held view is that the modern site of Beitin was Bethel, however, the detailed information given by Eusebius did not particularly suit this identification... Eusebius had used Bethel as a central place for identification of the location of other places, second in importance only to Jerusalem, and had given distances from four other locations. The first of these, at the twelfth milestone north of Jerusalem, presented few problems, but the second, 4 milestones east of Gibeon, was more problematic, did not really fit Beitin, and was better suited to el-Bireh... Archaeologically, although both Eusebius and Jerome described...
 

The Battleground (Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David Or Shishak?)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/23/2003 4:49:06 PM PDT · 13 replies · 132+ views


Bibical Archaeology | 10-23-2003 | Timothy P. Harrison
The Battleground Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David or Shishak? Timothy P. Harrison Sidebar: Megiddo at A Glance Did King David conquer and destroy Megiddo? Well, that depends partly on the date of Stratum VI. Let me explain why. Most scholars accept David as a historical figure who was an active military ruler in the period portrayed in the Hebrew Bible (the early tenth century B.C.E.). However, there is considerably less agreement on how to interpret the archaeological evidence for this period. Thatís where Megiddo Stratum VI figures in. The dispute is over which archaeological material relates to the time...
 

Forgery: Museums urged to take a new look at Bible-era relics
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 01/01/2005 3:03:32 PM PST · 8 replies · 137+ views


Winston-Salem Journal | 1/1/05 | AP
Experts advised world museums to re-examine their Bible-era relics after Israel indicted four collectors and dealers on charges of forging items thought to be some of the most important artifacts discovered in recent decades. The indictments issued Wednesday labeled many such "finds" as fakes, including two that had been presented as the biggest biblical discoveries in the Holy Land - the purported burial box of Jesus' brother James and a stone tablet with written instructions by King Yoash on maintenance work at the ancient Jewish Temple. Shuka Dorfman, the head of the Israel Antiquities Authority, said that the scope of...
 

Scientists excited by stone record of Solomon's wisdom
  Posted by MadIvan
On News/Activism 01/17/2003 4:03:58 PM PST · 19 replies · 76+ views


The Times | January 18, 2003 | Stephen Farrell
THE scene is straight from The Maltese Falcon. A secret hotel rendezvous, and a Jewish messenger and his silent Arab accomplice waiting while the learned Israeli academic peers at a black stone tablet. Written in stone: the tablet has been carbon-dated at 2,300 years old but doubts remain about its true origins This was how it began a year and a half ago, the first sighting of what is either a state-of-the-art hoax or an ancient Hebrew inscription ó more than 2,000 years old ó confirming the Biblical account of Solomonís temple. The fragment, 31cm x 24cm x 7cm of...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Tunnels under Cusco
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 12/28/2004 9:45:15 AM PST · 19 replies · 1,087+ views


El Comercio Peru | FR Post 12-29-2004 | El Comercio Peru
Tunnels under Cusco Early chroniclers reported that by far the greatest amount of treasure in Cusco was in the Sun Temple (Koricancha). However, it disappeared before the conquistadors could get hold of it and melt it down. Despite the use of various forms of persuasion, the Spanish never found this horde. A team of investigators from Spain, using modern technology of radar and software producing 3D images, have suggested that there are tunnels connecting the former Incan temples (over which colonial churches were built) to Sacsahuaman. They have discovered the existence of huge tunnels over 5 metres deep under the...
 

Origins and Prehistory
A taste for trouble ("Caveman" Beer created - puts hair on your chest)!
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 02/19/2004 1:35:04 PM PST · 23 replies · 150+ views


The Scottsman | Thu 19 Feb 2004 | KEN BARRIE
AN ARCHAEOLOGIST recently recreated a neolithic brew based on ingredients excavated in Perthshire. The resulting ale tasted unpleasant, but clearly those who drank it originally were not put off. Ever since, the production and consumption of alcohol has been central to Scotland?s culture. It wasn?t just home-produced brew for which Scots developed a taste. Scotland did brisk international trade exporting a wide range of goods in exchange for claret, imported from France to Leith as early as the 12th century. Subsequently, wines from Spain were landed in Dumbarton, bound for Glasgow. In the other direction, export ales were developed from...
 

Brewers Concoct Ancient Egyptian Ale ("..tastes very different from today's beer.")
  Posted by yankeedame
On News/Activism 08/03/2002 8:09:31 AM PDT · 18 replies · 177+ views


BBC On-Line | Saturday, 3 August, 2002 | staff writer
Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian aleDid King Tut sup on the Old Kingdom recipe?A Japanese beer maker has taken a 4,400-year-old recipe from Egyptian hieroglyphics and produced what it claims is a brew fit for the Pharaohs. The Kirin Brewery Co. has called the concoction Old Kingdom Beer. It has no froth, is the colour of dark tea and carries an alcohol content of 10% - about double most contemporary beers. Sakuji Yoshimura, an Egyptologist at Waseda University in Tokyo, helped transcribe the recipe from Egyptian wall paintings. Kirin spokesman Takaomi Ishii said:...
 

Chemistry Used to Unlock Secrets in Archeological Remains
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 04/30/2002 6:10:04 PM PDT · 3 replies · 70+ views


VOA News | 27 Apr 2002 12:35 UTC | Written by Laszlo Dosa , Voiced by Faith Lapidus
Patrick McGovern "The site is very rich archeologically, has been excavated for the last 50 years by the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It has a large palace area with rooms, some of which are thought to have been kitchens for making the food for the palace, with jars of barley and other goods. Also, it has a whole series of tombs in which the burial was done in a special wooden chamber beneath a very large mound. It's almost as if you cut it yesterday and put the structure together. It is the earliest intact human building made of...
 

The Demon In The Freezer
  Posted by tallhappy
On News/Activism 10/29/2001 12:44:48 PM PST · 51 replies · 279+ views


New Yorker | 7-12-99 | RICHARD PRESTON
A REPORTER AT LARGE THE DEMON IN THE FREEZER How smallpox, a disease of officially eradicated twenty years ago, became the biggest bioterrorist threat we now face. _______________ BY RICHARD PRESTON THE smallpox virus first became entangled with the human species somewhere between three thousand and twelve thousand years ago -- possibly in Egypt at the time of the Pharaohs. Somewhere on earth at roughly that time, the virus jumped out of an unknown animal into its first human victim, and began to spread. Viruses are parasites that multiply inside the cells of their hosts, and they are the ...
 

Javanese Fossil Skull Provides New Insights into Ancient Humans
  Posted by PatrickHenry
On News/Activism 02/28/2003 3:48:16 AM PST · 67 replies · 44+ views


Scientific American | 28 February 2002 | Sarah Graham
A routine construction dig has turned up a fossil skull that is giving scientists a better glimpse inside the head of our ancient predecessor, Homo erectus. According to a report published today in the journal Science, the find suggests that the H. erectus population that occupied the island of Java was isolated from other Asian populations and probably made only minimal genetic contributions to the ancestry of modern humans. So far, more than 20 hominid skull fossils have been found at sites in Java. The latest, dubbed Sm 4 (see image), was recovered from the bed of the Solo River...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Experts Says
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 10/18/2001 1:46:50 PM PDT · 28 replies · 225+ views


National Geographic | 10-17-2001 | Hillary Mayall
Floods Swept Ancient Nile Cities Away, Expert Says By Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News October 17, 2001 Two cities that lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, Herakleion and Eastern Canopus, disappeared suddenly, swallowed by the sea. Now, an international team of scientists may have figured out the mystery of why it happened. The researchers have concluded that the two cities collapsed when the land they were built on suddenly liquefied. The cities of Herakleion and Eastern Canopus lay at the edge of the Mediterranean more than 1,200 years ago, but disappeared suddenly when ...
 

Stark contrast to Environmentalists' Claims - Middle Ages were warmer than today, say scientists
  Posted by Cincinatus' Wife
On News/Activism 04/06/2003 1:53:02 AM PST · 25 replies · 80+ views


Daily Telegraph | April 6, 2003 | Robert Matthews, Science Correspondent
Claims that man-made pollution is causing "unprecedented" global warming have been seriously undermined by new research which shows that the Earth was warmer during the Middle Ages. From the outset of the global warming debate in the late 1980s, environmentalists have said that temperatures are rising higher and faster than ever before, leading some scientists to conclude that greenhouse gases from cars and power stations are causing these "record-breaking" global temperatures. Last year, scientists working for the UK Climate Impacts Programme said that global temperatures were "the hottest since records began" and added: "We are pretty sure that climate change...
 

Middle Ages Were Warmer Than Today, Say Scientists
  Posted by Ethyl
On News/Activism 04/07/2003 8:46:28 PM PDT · 22 replies · 33+ views


UK Telegraph | Robert Matthews, Science Correspondent
Rush was reading this report today Middle Ages were warmer than today, say scientists By Robert Matthews, Science Correspondent (Filed: 06/04/2003) Claims that man-made pollution is causing "unprecedented" global warming have been seriously undermined by new research which shows that the Earth was warmer during the Middle Ages. From the outset of the global warming debate in the late 1980s, environmentalists have said that temperatures are rising higher and faster than ever before, leading some scientists to conclude that greenhouse gases from cars and power stations are causing these "record-breaking" global temperatures. Last year, scientists working for the UK Climate...
 

Major Climate Change Occurred 5,200 Years ago: Evidence Suggests That History May Repeat Itself
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/28/2004 3:08:55 PM PST · 79 replies · 2,195+ views


Ohio State University | 12-24-2004 | Ohio State University
Source: Ohio State University Date: 2004-12-24 Major Climate Change Occurred 5,200 Years Ago: Evidence Suggests That History Could Repeat Itself COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Glaciologist Lonnie Thompson worries that he may have found clues that show history repeating itself, and if he is right, the result could have important implications to modern society. Thompson has spent his career trekking to the far corners of the world to find remote ice fields and then bring back cores drilled from their centers. Within those cores are the records of ancient climate from across the globe. From the mountains of data drawn by analyzing...
 

Quake May Have Altered Earth's Rotation
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 12/27/2004 6:48:27 PM PST · 152 replies · 3,469+ views


Drudge Report | 12/27/04 | Matt Drudge
May have shortened the day by 3 microseconds, said gravity expert Richard Gross of Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena... On premise a slab slid into core, Gross said he's done calculations 'to see what effect this (earthquake) should have had.' The result: A day shortened... 'We won't know for weeks,' said a geophysicist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 'So it's a guess, as of now'...
 

Scientist say that recent earthquake is big enough to effect earth's rotation.
  Posted by alienken
On General/Chat 12/27/2004 7:00:43 PM PST · 18 replies · 1,977+ views


I heard this at the end of a news break on the radio once. Has anyone else heard anything about this? It sounds important if it's possible. What if the earth's axis or orbit around the sun was changed. I'm looking for links with info on this.
 

What Happened To The Rare Tribes (Tsunami)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 12/28/2004 6:34:30 PM PST · 116 replies · 2,995+ views


Times Of India | 12-28-2004 | Sanjay Dutta/Chandrika Mago
What happened to the rare tribes? SANJAY DUTTA & CHANDRIKA MAGO TUESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2004 11:19:06 PM NEW DELHI: An enormous anthropological disaster is in the making. The killer tsunami is feared to have wiped out entire tribes ó already threatened by their precariously small numbers ó perhaps rendering them extinct and snapping the slender tie with a lost generation. Officials involved in rescue operations are pessimistic, but still keeping their fingers crossed for the Sentinelese and Nicobarese, the two tribes seen as bearing the brunt of the killer wave. The bigger fear is for the Sentinelese, anthropologically the most...
 

Update on the "undersea ruins" off Cuba.
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 08/12/2002 7:37:18 PM PDT · 28 replies · 986+ views


VAISHNAVA News FROM REUTERS | CUBA, Dec 8 (VNN) | Author: Andrew Cawthorne
Explorers View 'Lost City' Ruins Under Caribbean FROM REUTERS CUBA, Dec 8 (VNN) ó Author: Andrew Cawthorne HAVANA (Reuters) - Explorers using a miniature submarine to probe the sea floor off the coast of Cuba said on Thursday they had confirmed the discovery of stone structures deep below the ocean surface that may have been built by an unknown human civilization thousands of years ago. Researchers with a Canadian exploration company said they filmed over the summer ruins of a possible submerged ''lost city'' off the Guanahacabibes Peninsula on the Caribbean island's western tip. The researchers cautioned that they did...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
The Poe Toaster to appear on the 19th?
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 01/11/2004 10:41:21 PM PST · 4 replies · 85+ views


eapoe.org | 2000 | E.A. Poe Society of Baltimore
The Poe Toaster E.A. Poe Society of BaltimoreSince 1949, on the night of the anniversary of Poe's birth, a mysterious stranger has entered this cemetery and left as tribute a partial bottle of cognac and three roses on Poe's grave. The identity of the stranger, referred to affectionately as the Poe Toaster, is unknown. The significance of cognac is uncertain as it does not feature in Poe's works as would, for example, amontillado. The presumption for the three roses is that it represents the three persons whose remains are beneath the monument: Poe, his mother-in-law (Maria Clemm) and his...
 

end of digest #24 20050101

166 posted on 01/01/2005 5:01:44 PM PST by SunkenCiv (the US population in the year 2100 will exceed a billion, perhaps even three billion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 164 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link, first of 2005, on time for a change, and Happy New Year to all, and a hearty welcome to the many people who have joined the ping list this week. GGG has 346 members as of right now:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050101
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

167 posted on 01/01/2005 5:06:16 PM PST by SunkenCiv (the US population in the year 2100 will exceed a billion, perhaps even three billion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 166 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Yowser! Lots of work went into this thread.

Bookmarked, and thank you.

168 posted on 01/01/2005 6:15:51 PM PST by NautiNurse (Osama bin Laden has more tapes than Steely Dan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 167 | View Replies]

To: NautiNurse
Thanks for joining the GGG list, and for your kind remarks. I spent way too much time this morning fooling with every linked topic listed in this topic, before I abandoned some of the ambition and did a duplication elimination (mechanized, but I dare dream) and alpha sort ignoring "the" "a" "an" and a few odds and ends. Someday I'll fix up the mechanized keyword sort I figured out. Until then, this should be handy, as it's just the topic names:
169 posted on 01/03/2005 9:41:50 AM PST by SunkenCiv (the US population in the year 2100 will exceed a billion, perhaps even three billion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 168 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #25
January 8, 2005


Ancient Egypt
Egypt Hopes to Solve Riddle of Tutankhamun Death
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 11/14/2004 7:05:30 AM PST · 28 replies · 495+ views


Science - Reuters | Sat Nov 13, 2004 | Tom Perry
CAIRO (Reuters) - Egypt plans to X-ray the mummy of Tutankhamun to find out what killed the king who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago and died while only a teen-ager. Archaeologists will move Tutankhamun's body from its tomb, which was discovered packed with treasure in 1922, to Cairo for tests which should resolve the mystery over whether he died naturally or was murdered. "We will know about any diseases he had, any kind of injuries and his real age," Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass told Reuters. "We will know the answer to whether he died normally or was...
 

Ancient Europe
Theory: Oetzi Murdered in Power Play
  Posted by SteveH
On News/Activism 01/04/2005 12:42:21 PM PST · 30 replies · 641+ views


Jan. 4, 2005 | Rossella Lorenzi
Theory: Oetzi Murdered in Power Play By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Jan. 4, 2005 ÷tzi the Iceman, the world's oldest and best-preserved mummy, might have been murdered in a struggle for power, according to a new theory that identifies the 5,300-year-old mummy as the powerful leader of a Neolithic community. Discovered in 1991 in a melting glacier in the ÷tztal Alps ó hence the name ó by the German hiker Helmut Simon, ÷tzi is thought to have died at about 45. He was hit by an arrowhead while being assaulted by his enemies, some of whose blood was found on...
 

Ancient Near East
7,000-Year-Old Artifacts Discovered In Bushehr Region (Iran)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/06/2005 11:04:28 AM PST · 15 replies · 423+ views


Tehran Times | 1-6-2005
7000-year-old artifacts discovered in Bushehr region Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) ñ- A joint Iranian and British archaeological team recently discovered 7000-year old artifacts and ruins dating back to the Chalcolithic era (7000? to 3500? B.C.) in northern Bushehr. The Iranian director of the team, Hossein Tofiqian, said on Tuesday that the team began the first stage of their activities last month and made significant finds. ìThe team began their work with the aim of discovering the social and economic status of the historical site during the Chalcolithic era in the fifth and sixth millennia B.C., while the previous...
 

British Isles
'High Status' Viking Site Found (UK)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/07/2005 11:18:48 AM PST · 17 replies · 640+ views


BBC | 1-7-2005
'High status' Viking site found A 10th Century Viking merchant's weight has been recovered Archaeologists in Cumbria say they have discovered what could be the country's most important Viking burial site. Experts are so excited about the find and its wealth of treasures, they are keeping its location a secret so they can work undisturbed. All that has been revealed is that it is near Barrow and contains artefacts dating back to the 10th Century. Another burial site has been uncovered in Cumbria, close to Cumwhitton village, near Carlisle. Both sites were found by metal detector enthusiasts. Barrow archaeologist, Steve...
 

Asia
New Desert Coffins Unearthed In Xinjiang
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/04/2005 4:10:06 PM PST · 16 replies · 418+ views


Xinhua News/China.org | 1-4-2004
New Desert Coffins Unearthed in Xinjiang Archeologists found the first wooden coffins with mud cover at Lop Nur Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, according to the regional archeology institute. Excavation of Xiaohe tomb complex began in October in 2003, leading to the discovery of 108 tombs so far. The most recent excavation yielded 33 tombs, including 25 for adults and eight for children. Those buried in coffins with mud cover may be of relatively high social status. But the conclusion can only be made after the coffins are opened, according to scientists with the institute. Archeologists have...
 

Biology and Cryptobiology
Bison Bone Discovery Turns B.C. History Upside-Down
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/01/2005 9:22:55 PM PST · 45 replies · 1,993+ views


My Telus | 12-31-2004
Friday, Dec 31, 2004 Bison bone discovery turns B.C. history upside-down PENTICTON (BC Newspaper Group) ó The year 2004 ends with a major story in archaeology, revealed by the use of new DNA technology on ancient bison bones scattered around western North America. The findings profoundly affect our understanding of how North America was populated by humans, and could have an impact on aboriginal politics as well. The conventional wisdom, taught to generations in school, speaks of a land bridge connecting Asia with Alaska. This now-submerged bridge was created by lower sea levels in the last ice age, which ended...
 

The giant eagle of Middle Earth
  Posted by Willie Green
On General/Chat 01/04/2005 11:58:53 AM PST · 30 replies · 386+ views


Innovations-Report | January 4, 2005
For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. Peter Jackson¥s JRR Tolkien-inspired film trilogy Lord of the Rings features enormous eagles swooping down to rescue Sam and Frodo from a desolate New Zealand landscape masquerading as Mordor. The image of giant eagles flying around New Zealand, while fanciful, is not so far-fetched as it might appear. New genetic data published in the freely-available online journal PLoS Biology this week from researchers at Oxford and Canterbury Universities shed new light on the evolution of the extinct giant eagle that once ruled the skies in New Zealand. Before human settlement 700...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Black Death Mutant Gene Resists AIDS, Say Scientists (Virus)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/04/2005 7:21:29 PM PST · 72 replies · 1,471+ views


Cheshire Online | 1-4-2005 | Alan Weston
Black Death mutant gene resists Aids, say scientists Jan 4 2005 By Alan Weston, Daily Post IT HAS been described as the 'world's greatest serial killer'. The Black Death was a catastrophe which wiped out nearly half the European population, with 20m people dying between 1348 and 1350. But new research being carried out by a team from Liverpool University has shown that the disease may have produced an unexpected side-effect - resistance to the deadly HIV/Aids virus. Professor Christopher Duncan and Dr Susan Scott have already caused shockwaves among historians with their claim that the Black Death was caused...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Comet or Meteorite Impact Events in 1178AD?
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/03/2005 3:59:02 PM PST · 62 replies · 1,563+ views


SIS Conference | 1-26-2003 | Emilio Spedicato
1. Introduction As related by Clube and Napier in their monograph The Cosmic Winter, see [1], in the year 1178 A.D. four wise men of Canterbury were sitting outside on a clear and calm 18th June night, a half Moon standing placidly in the starry sky. Suddenly they noticed a flame jutting out of a horn of the Moon. Then they saw the Moon tremble and its colour change slowly from light brilliant to a darker reddish tone. Such a colour remained for all the time the Moon was visible during that phase. This story is found in a manuscript...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Air Jets to Protect Michelangelo's David
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 01/08/2005 1:47:41 PM PST · 33 replies · 546+ views


Discovery News | 1/7/05 | Rossella Lorenzi
Jan. 7, 2005 ó Michelangelo's David could soon be enveloped in invisible jets of air to protect it from dust and humidity tracked in by streams of sweaty tourists, the custodians of the Renaissance masterpiece in Florence announced. Experts at Florence's Galleria dell'Accademia, where the 500-year-old naked marble man attracts 1.2 million visitors a year, found that the statue was covered with grime just months after it was cleaned with a controversial "wet" technique that used distilled water. "We discovered that the David needs dusting often, every two months during the summer. Tourists bring a large, damaging quantity of dirt...
 

US Archaeologists Accused Of Plagiarism
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/06/2005 11:17:06 AM PST · 18 replies · 356+ views


ABC News | 1-6-2005
Last Update: Thursday, January 6, 2005. 4:00pm (AEDT)US archaeologists accused of plagiarism A Peruvian archaeologist has accused two US archaeologists of plagiarising her work on the Caral complex, recently determined to be the oldest site in the Americas. The official news agency Andina reported Ruth Shady accused Chicago-area archaeologists Jonathan Haas and his wife Winifred Creamer before the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) with taking her work on Caral, Ms Shady told Andina. Mr Haas and Ms Creamer may want to appear as the discoverers of the complex - one of the most important in the world due to its...
 

end of digest #25 20050108

170 posted on 01/09/2005 3:57:48 PM PST by SunkenCiv (the US population in the year 2100 will exceed a billion, perhaps even three billion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 166 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link, issue #25, a short digest compared with last week's behemoth.
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050108
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

171 posted on 01/09/2005 3:59:56 PM PST by SunkenCiv (the US population in the year 2100 will exceed a billion, perhaps even three billion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 170 | View Replies]

Quite a few topics on Neandertal/Neanderthal, other earlier varieties of human, because a bunch turned up in a search tonight that had never been added. They're now in the catalog, and will get an updated post, but will not generate a ping to everyone on the list. Just to be confusing, I threw in some in the extensive listing here that did get a ping. It's either figure out which is which, or visit this page.

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #25
January 1st, 2005


Oh So Mysterioso
Hertford, Home Of The Holy Grail (UK) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/09/2005 11:24:21 AM PST · 8 replies · 482+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 1-4-2005
Hertford, home of the Holy Grail An ancient secret society; a demand for a papal apology; and a network of hidden tunnels. Strange things have been stirring in Hertfordshire recently. Oliver Burkeman goes in search of the Knights Templar and, perhaps, the cup of Christ Tuesday January 4, 2005 The Guardian (UK) One of the problems with secret societies - especially the kind whose members exert a shadowy influence on the course of world events - is that they can be a bit difficult to track down. Never was this more true than of the Knights Templar, the ancient Catholic...
 

Spanish investigators have discovered Atlantis's archaeological evidences... 
  Posted by Maria Fdez-Valmayor
On News/Activism  11/25/2004 6:49:34 PM PST · 37 replies · 2,025+ views


Atlantis News's Agency (C.O.S.S.) | 11-25-2004 | Antonio Beltr·n Martinez
Spanish investigators have discovered Atlantis's archaeological evidences... Atlantis = Iberia. Atlantis in Gibraltar and Ibero-Morrocian. The Georgeo's theories (I Part) Extracts the Georgeo's theories an hipotesis. (Forum Atlantis-Rising 2001-2004)Official website of the Georgeos's tehories (in spanish)http://Atlantis.sitio.nethttp:// Spanish investigators have discovered archaeological evidences underneath the sea, near the coasts of Gibraltar, that could belong to the Atlantic civilization described by Plato with the name of Atlantis and that the Greek philosopher located exactly in front of the Columns of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar), next to the region of Gadeira (Cadiz, Andalusia) and of the Atlas (Morocco). The first findings were...
 

Those Enigmatic Erratics: Out-of-Place Artifacts or Out-of-Whack Chronology 
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/12/2005 11:11:11 AM PST · 3 replies · 125+ views


Strange | issue #22 | Philip Rife
This author personally subscribes to the catastrophic theory of history. Namely, that one or more times prior to our present recorded history, mankind achieved a high level of civilization--only to have nearly all traces of it obliterated by widespread destruction, either natural or manmade.
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Attila Descendents Want Recognition 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/11/2005 7:08:28 PM PST · 46 replies · 661+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 1-12-2005 | Kate Connolly
Attila descendants want recognition By Kate Connolly in Berlin (Filed: 12/01/2005) More than 2,000 Hungarian descendants of Attila the Hun, once described as the "Scourge of God", are demanding official recognition as an ethnic minority. "As a member of the European Union, Hungary should not be suppressing a minority," said Joshua Imre Novak, the group's self-appointed leader. Mr Novak has collected more than 1,000 signatures to pursue the group's claim through Hungary's parliament. Many experts dismiss the group's initiative as bogus, arguing that Hungary has no existing descendants of the barbarians who gave the country its name. Under Hungarian law,...
 

A Da Vinci Complex? Call It a Hypothesis 
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism  01/14/2005 8:26:14 PM PST · 6 replies · 399+ views


New York Times | 1/15/05 | JASON HOROWITZ
FLORENCE, Italy, Jan. 14 - Researchers at a military geography institute here say they have discovered - hiding practically in plain sight in their building - what might have been a workshop for Leonardo da Vinci. They have also homed in on fading frescoes that they think might have been painted by Leonardo or by a workshop student 500 years ago, although that hypothesis has not been put to the test by art historians or by scientific analysis. Italian museum officials are hoping that the discovery of the frescoes and five small rooms where Leonardo might have lived and worked,...
 

Egypt receives 8.103m tourists (over 8 million) 
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/13/2005 6:51:36 PM PST · 3 replies · 40+ views


Trade Arabia | Thursday, January 13, 2005 | Reuters
Egypt received 8.103 million tourists last year, a 34 per cent increase on 2003, the Al Ahram newspaper reported. The Tourism Ministry previously reported 6.04 million tourists visited Egypt in 2003, when the Iraq war hurt tourist numbers early in that year. A central bank report showed that tourism revenues were $6.12 billion last year, the newspaper reported... Tourism minister Ahmed el-Maghrabi said last month that Egypt wanted to double the number of tourists that visit the country to 16 million during the next 10 years.
 

Sakakawea: Myths Abound About Origin, Death Of Woman Who Aided Lewis And Clark 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/11/2005 5:51:00 PM PST · 64 replies · 1,100+ views


The Forum | 1-09-2005
Sakakawea: Myths abound about origin, death of woman who aided Lewis & Clark By Patrick Springer, The Forum Published Sunday, January 09, 2005 Sakakawea ambled into recorded history one "clear and pleasant" morning in a way that endeared her to an explorer still getting acclimated to the harsh plains weather. Sgt. John Ordway noted in his journal that two American Indian women visiting the Lewis and Clark Expedition's winter camp, still under construction, came with welcome gifts - four buffalo robes. "I Got one fine one myself," Ordway wrote on Nov. 11, 1804, at Fort Mandan in what is now...
 

Ancient Egypt
Curse of Tutankhamen finally laid to rest 
  Posted by Dallas
On News/Activism  12/19/2002 8:28:04 PM PST · 7 replies · 133+ views


ABC.net.au
After 80 years, the curse of Tutankhamen's tomb - credited with a host of untimely deaths since its discovery - has finally been disproven by an Australian epidemiologist. By comparing the survival of those exposed to the 'Mummy's Curse' to family members who were not, Dr Mark Nelson of Monash University shows there is no epidemiological basis for claims that desecrating the ancient tomb brought about untimely deaths. His analsys is published today in latest issue of the British Medical Journal. "It was just a bit of a fun thing to do," said Nelson, who has recently completed a doctorate...
 

Theban Mapping Project (Valley of the Kings etc) 
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/13/2005 8:03:55 PM PST · 11 replies · 104+ views


Theban Mapping Project | 1980s to present | Kent Weeks et al
The original page used client side image maps, and that was pretty, but a little search and replace turned it into a usable (I hope) table of links. Enjoy. FR LexiconPosting GuidelinesExcerpt, or Link only?Ultimate Sidebar ManagementHeadlinesDonate Here By Secure ServerEating our own -- Time to make a new start in Free RepublicPDF to HTML translationTranslation pageWayback MachineMy LinksFreeMail MeGods, Graves, Glyphs topicand groupBooks, Magazines, Movies, Music
 

India, SE Asia
Ancient forest tribe 'all safe' from tide  
  Posted by MassRepublicanFlyersFan
On News/Activism  01/09/2005 6:36:38 PM PST · 13 replies · 550+ views


AP | January 7, 2005 | Neelesh Misra and Rupak Sanyal
In a rare meeting with outsiders, the men said all 250 members of the tribe escaped inland and were surviving on coconuts. Even though the Jarawas sometimes meet with local officials to receive government-funded supplies, the tribe is wary of visitors.
 

Indian Town Sees Evidence Of Ancient Tsunami (1500 ya) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/15/2005 4:03:42 PM PST · 14 replies · 436+ views


MSNBC/AP | 1-15-2005
Indian town sees evidence of ancient tsunamiOnce-powerful city on same spot 'swallowed by the sea' Gautam Singh / APThis ancient Thirupallavaneeswaram Temple is one of the few remnants of ancient Poompuhar, which was a thriving capital city until it was "swallowed by the sea" more than 1,500 years ago.The Associated Press Updated: 2:33 p.m. ET Jan. 14, 2005POOMPUHAR, India - For generations, the people of Poompuhar have spoken of the days when their sleepy fishing town was the capital of a powerful kingdom, and traders came from Rome, Greece and Egypt to deal in pearls and silk. .
 

King Of Stone Age Tribe To Return To Jungle To Rebuild Lives 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/12/2005 5:00:25 PM PST · 7 replies · 279+ views


AFP/Yahoo | 1-12-2005
King of Stone Age tribe to return to jungle to rebuild lives Wed Jan 12, 3:02 PM ET South Asia - AFP PORT BLAIR, India (AFP) - The king and the queen of an endangered aboriginal tribe vowed to rebuild their jungle kingdom on an isolated Indian island which was smashed by tsunamis. King Jirake wields absolute power over his 48 Great Andamanese subjects on Strait Island, 250 kilometres (150 miles) from Port Blair, capital of the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago. The 62-year-old king and his queen Surmai shepherded their subjects to the safety of a hilltop as the giant...
 

Persia, Elam, etc
2500 Year Old Winged Man Of Pasargadae Threatened By Cold And Lichen 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/11/2005 5:32:52 PM PST · 19 replies · 421+ views


Tehran Times | 1-11-2005
2500-year-old Winged Man of Pasargadae threatened by cold and lichen Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN (MNA) -- The director of the Pasargadae Historical Cultural Complex said here on Sunday that the stone relief of the Winged Man at the ancient site has been seriously damaged by the cold and lichen and other environmental factors. "Experts began to study the detrimental effects two years ago after some cracks were observed on the relief," added Babak Kial. The Winged Man, considered to be Cyrus the Great by some archaeologists and historians, is a relief of a standing man with four wings who...
 

Three Ancient Romanian Maps Bolster Accuracy Of "Persian Gulf" Name (Arabian Gulf?) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/15/2005 4:35:16 PM PST · 24 replies · 421+ views


Tehran Times | 1-15-2005
Three ancient Romanian maps bolster accuracy of "Persian Gulf" name VIENNA (IRNA) -- Three ancient maps kept in a Romanian academy confirm the accuracy of the name Persian Gulf to denote waters off the southern coast of Iran, said an Iranian embassy official in Bucharest Friday. Speaking to IRNA, the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that researches made by the Romanian academy uncovered a map called "Asiac Nova Descripto" dating back to 1584 in which the Persian Gulf is historically referred to as "Mar Mesendin Ol Sinus Persicus." The Romanian academy is one of the most important...
 

Parthian Circular City Found In Khorasan (Iran) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/10/2005 3:16:42 PM PST · 8 replies · 273+ views


CHN (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) | 1-10-2004
1/10/2005 8:14:00 AM Parthian Circular City Found in Khorasan Tehran, Jan. 10 (CHN)ó Iranian archeologists have found the architectural plan of a Parthian circular city in Nehbandan castle in southern Khorasan. Nehbandan castle is one of the most important ancient cities in Iran that has signs of different historical periods. Though it hasnít been much excavated, archeologists have found remains from Parthian (250 BC ñ 226 AD) to Safavid (1501 ñ 1722) eras. "As this site hasnít been studied much, we began studying the structures in this historical complex 2 years ago and found out that it has a circular...
 

British Isles
New Prehistoric Rock Carvings Discovered In Northern England 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/14/2005 2:21:48 PM PST · 59 replies · 763+ views


University Of Newcastle On Tyne/Eureka | 1-14-2005 | Aron Mazel
Contact: Aron Mazel a.d.mazel@ncl.ac.uk 44-191-222-7845 University of Newcastle upon Tyne New prehistoric rock carvings discovered in Northern England Example of rock art at Weetwood Moor, Northumberland (credit, Aron Mazel) More than 250 new examples of England's finest array of prehistoric rock art carvings, sited close to the Scottish border, have been discovered by archaeologists compiling a unique database. Now over one thousand of the 'cup and ring' carvings can be admired on a new website, which carries 6,000 images and is said to be the most comprehensive of its kind in the world. The site, which goes live today, includes...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Biblical Plagues and Parting of Red Sea caused by Volcano 
  Posted by Betty Jane
On News/Activism  11/11/2002 12:44:06 PM PST · 52 replies · 635+ views


News.telegraph.co.uk | 11/11/02 | John Petre
Biblical plagues and parting of Red Sea 'caused by volcano' By Jonathan Petre, Religion Correspondent (Filed: 11/11/2002) Fresh evidence that the Biblical plagues and the parting of the Red Sea were natural events rather than myths or miracles is to be presented in a new BBC documentary. Moses, which will be broadcast next month, will suggest that much of the Bible story can be explained by a single natural disaster, a huge volcanic eruption on the Greek island of Santorini in the 16th century BC. Using computer-generated imagery pioneered in Walking With Dinosaurs, the programme tells the story of how...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Diving to Prove Indians Lived on the Continental Shelf 
  Posted by sarcasm
On News/Activism  07/30/2003 4:51:48 PM PDT · 60 replies · 347+ views


The New York Times | July 29, 2003 | ROBERT HANLEY
ORT HANCOCK, N.J., July 23 ó For most underwater archaeologists, the big dream these days is finding a shipwreck full of gold and antique treasures. But for Daria E. Merwin, the goal has a bit less glitter: discovering a 10,000-year-old heap of shells and some ancient arrowheads, spear points and cutting tools in the waters off New Jersey.Ms. Merwin, a 33-year-old doctoral student in anthropology, says such artifacts would help prove her thesis that prehistoric Indians lived 6,000 to 10,000 years ago on the exposed continental shelf before it was inundated by water from melting glaciers.For the next three weeks,...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Earth's Volcanism Linked To Meteorite Impacts 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  12/13/2002 8:36:39 AM PST · 31 replies · 142+ views


New Scientist | 12-13-2002 | Kate Ravilious
Earth's volcanism linked to meteorite impacts 14:31 13 December 02 Exclusive from New Scientist Print EditionSpace rocks are blamed for violent eruptions (Image: GETTY) Large meteorite impacts may not just throw up huge dust clouds but also punch right through the Earth's crust, triggering gigantic volcanic eruptions. The idea is controversial, but evidence is mounting that the Earth's geology has largely been driven by such events. This would also explain why our planet has so few impact crater remnants. Counting the number of asteroids we see in the sky suggests that over the past 250 million years, Earth should have...
 

LSU Researcher Solves Ancient Astronomy Mystery (Farnese Atlas) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/14/2005 2:36:12 PM PST · 27 replies · 907+ views


Innovations Report/LSU | 1-14-2005 | Bradley E. Schaefer/LSU
Physik Astronomie Louisiana State University 14.01.2005 LSU researcher solves ancient astronomy mystery An ancient mystery may have been solved by LSU Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Bradley E. Schaefer. Schaefer has discovered that the long-lost star catalog of Hipparchus, which dates back to 129 B.C., appears on a Roman statue called the Farnese Atlas. Hipparchus was one of the greatest astronomers of antiquity and his star catalog was the first in the world, as well as the most influential. The catalog was lost early in the Christian era, perhaps in the fire at the great library in Alexandria. The...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Aussies Find Bronze Age Canoe 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/15/2005 4:44:46 PM PST · 17 replies · 383+ views


The Australian | 1-14-2005
Aussies find bronze age canoe January 14, 2005 AUSTRALIAN archaeologists have unearthed one of the oldest log canoes ever found in South-East Asia. A team from the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra and conservators from the National Museum of Australia excavated a 2.5m section of the boat last month at Dong Xa, about 50 kilometres southeast of the capital Hanoi. The boat was used for burial and contained the body of an adult. It would have been about 10m long and was believed to have been used in the Red River delta area around 100BC by a people known...
 

Biology and Cryptobiology
Lost Apes Of The Congo (TIME Magazine) 
  Posted by K4Harty
On News/Activism  01/11/2005 7:48:52 PM PST · 36 replies · 1,044+ views


Time Magazine | 01/17/05 | Stefan Feris
TIME reporter travels deep into the African jungle in search of a mysterious chimp called the lion killer By STEPHAN FARIS Monday, Jan. 17, 2005 Ron Pintier was flying light and low above the northern wilds of the Democratic Republic of Congo when he saw a dark shape racing between two patches of tropical forest. "It was huge," says Pontier, a missionary pilot. "It was black. The skin was kind of bouncing up and down on it." From its bulk and color, Pontier thought it was a buffalo until he circled down for another look. "I saw it again just...
 

Prehistoric badger had dinosaurs for breakfast 
  Posted by TigerLikesRooster
On News/Activism  01/13/2005 5:32:06 PM PST · 33 replies · 658+ views


nature.com | 01/12/05 | Michael Hopkin
Prehistoric badger had dinosaurs for breakfast Michael Hopkin Fossil of a surprisingly large, carnivorous mammal is discovered in China. This artist's impression shows how the metre-long mammals might have looked. © Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Archaeologists have dug up a new species of mammal that roamed China during the reign of the dinosaurs. The creature was large enough to feast on young dinosaurs, exploding the myth that all of the mammals living back then were relatively tiny. Repenomamus giganticus, as the creature has been christened, was more than a metre long, about the size...
 

Scientists To Start DNA Analysis Of Ancient Horse Skeletons 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/10/2005 3:07:32 PM PST · 19 replies · 362+ views


China View/Xinhuanet | 1-10-2005
Scientists to start DNA analysis of ancient horse skeletons www.chinaview.cn 2005-01-10 15:19:28 XI'AN, Jan. 10 (Xinhuanet) -- Chinese and British scientists are planning for the DNA analysis of 12 horse skeletons unearthed from the burial ground of a prominent duke who lived more than 2,500 years ago in northwestern Shaanxi Province. Archeologists with Beijing University and Cambridge University have used a professional database to process data collected from the skeletons, including the size and weight of the skulls, spinalcolumns and limbs. A Cambridge laboratory will be entrusted to carry out the DNA analysis, after the State Administration of Cultural Heritage...
 

Neandertal et al and Multiregionalism
Anthropologist Claims Humans, Neanderthals, Australopithecines All Variations on One Species 
  Posted by bondserv
On News/Activism  01/02/2005 9:41:39 PM PST · 81 replies · 1,037+ views


Creation-Evolution Headlines | 01/01/2005 | Creation-Evolution Headlines
Anthropologist Claims Humans, Neanderthals, Australopithecines All Variations on One Species† †01/01/2005 According to a news story in the UK News Telegraph, all fossil hominims, including modern humans, Australopithecines, Neandertals and the recent Indonesian "hobbit man," belong to the same species: Homo sapiens.† Reporter Robert Matthews wrote about Maciej Henneberg (U of Adelaide) and his argument, based on skull sizes and body weights for 200 fossil specimens, that all known hominim bones fit within the range of variation expected for a single species.† Henneberg made the startling claim in the Journal of Comparative Human Biology, where he said, "All hominims appear...
 

Anthropologist Sets The Record Straight Regarding Neanderthal Facial Length 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  06/17/2003 6:58:40 PM PDT · 19 replies · 43+ views


New Scientist | 6-17-2003 | Washington University
Source: Washington University In St. Louis Date: 2003-06-17 About Face: Washington University Anthropologist Sets The Record Straight Regarding Neandertal Facial Length New scientific evidence challenges a common perception that Neandertals -- a close evolutionary relative to modern humans that lived 230,000 to 30,000 years ago -- possessed exceptionally long faces. Instead, a report authored by Erik Trinkaus, Ph.D., the Mary Tileston Hemenway Professor of Anthropology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, shows that modern humans are really the "odd man out" when it comes to facial lengths, which drop off dramatically compared with their ancestral predecessors....
 

Blow to Neanderthal breeding theory  
  Posted by presidio9
On News/Activism  05/13/2003 9:22:35 AM PDT · 82 replies · 79+ views


BBC | Tuesday, 13 May, 2003
Scientists know that Neanderthals and early human ancestors were distinct species, even though they lived during the same period. However, there is controversy over theories that Neanderthals made a contribution to the modern human gene pool. A skeleton uncovered in Portugal appeared to show both Neanderthal and human features. DNA taken The latest research, from the University of Ferrara in Italy, compared genetic material from Neaderthals, Cro-Magnon humans and modern Europeans. The DNA from the Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons was taken from their bones. The DNA came from cell structures called mitochondriae rather than the nucleus. They found that while, unsurprisingly,...
 

Bones of contention(Discovery of a new species of human astounds the world,but is it what it seems?) 
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism  01/13/2005 1:08:28 AM PST · 21 replies · 913+ views


Guardian (U.K.) | Thursday January 13, 2005 | John Vidal
The discovery of a new species of human astounded the world. But is it what it seems? John Vidal went to remotest Flores to find out If you want to understand human evolution, it may be worth starting with Johannes Daak from the remote village of Akel in the heavily forested centre of the Indonesian island of Flores. Johannes, from the Manggarai ethnic group, reckons he is 100 years old and says he owes his longevity and enduring strength to having only ever known one woman. He says he owes his stature to his ancestors. Johannes is no more than...
 

Excalibur, The Rock That May Mark A New Dawn For Man 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/09/2003 9:10:31 PM PST · 28 replies · 116+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 1-9-2003 | Giles Tremlett
Excalibur, the rock that may mark a new dawn for man Paleontologists claim 350,000-year-old find in Spanish cave pushes back boundary of early human evolution Giles Tremlett in Madrid Thursday January 9, 2003 The Guardian They have called it Excalibur, though it was plucked from a pit of bones rather than the stone of Arthurian legend. To the ordinary eye it is a hand-sized, triangular chunk of ochre and purple rock, its surface slightly scratched. But to the palaeontologists who found this axe-head buried in a deep cavern on a Spanish hilltop, it is proof of a terrible and defining...
 

Fossils Bridge Gap in African Mammal Evolution 
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism  12/03/2003 4:53:26 PM PST · 1,103 replies · 483+ views


Reuters to My Yahoo! | Wed Dec 3, 2003 | Patricia Reaney
LONDON (Reuters) - Fossils discovered in Ethiopia's highlands are a missing piece in the puzzle of how African mammals evolved, a team of international scientists said on Wednesday. Little is known about what happened to mammals between 24 million to 32 million years ago, when Africa and Arabia were still joined together in a single continent. But the remains of ancestors of modern-day elephants and other animals, unearthed by the team of U.S. and Ethiopian scientists 27 million years on, provide some answers. "We show that some of these very primitive forms continue to live through the missing years, and...
 

Fresh debate over human origins 
  Posted by PatrickHenry
On News/Activism  12/26/2002 8:02:36 AM PST · 116 replies · 67+ views


BBC News | 24 December 2002 | staff
The theory that we are all descended from early humans who left Africa about 100,000 years ago has again been called into question. US researchers sifting through data from the human genome project say they have uncovered evidence in support of a rival theory. Most scientists agree with the idea that our ancestors first spread out of Africa about 1.8 million years ago, conquering other lands. What happened next is more controversial. The prevailing theory is that a second exodus from Africa replaced all of the local populations, such as Europe's Neanderthals. Some anthropologists, however, advocate the so-called multiregional theory,...
 

Gene for Red Hair May Help Suppress Pain in Women 
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism  03/25/2003 5:57:32 AM PST · 28 replies · 162+ views


Reuters via Yahoo | March 24, 2003 | Linda Carroll
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A gene found in redheads and fair-skinned people may also play a role in the body's natural pain suppression system. But the gene, Mc1r, appears to impact pain suppression only in women, according to the study, published Monday in the advance online publication of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (news - web sites). The researchers found that redheaded women were able to tolerate more pain than other people when given an analgesic drug called pentazocine. All redheaded men, as well as men and women who did not have red hair, had similar-and...
 

Genes May Be Reason For Jews' Low Alcoholism Rate 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  09/17/2002 8:21:39 AM PDT · 75 replies · 183+ views


Ananova | 9-17-2002
Genes may be reason for Jews' low alcoholism rate Genes, and not religious conviction, explain why Jewish people typically have fewer drink problems than non-Jews. Researchers in the US say a genetic mutation carried by at least a fifth of Jews appears to protect against alcoholism. The same inherited trait is fairly common in Asian people, but is much rarer in white Europeans. The Daily Telegraph says the findings could help explain why Israel has one of the lowest levels of alcoholism in the developed world. The mutation, called ADH2*2, is involved in the way the body breaks down alcohol...
 

How likely is human extinction? 
  Posted by Momaw Nadon
On News/Activism  04/14/2004 6:15:04 AM PDT · 518 replies · 315+ views


Mail & Guardian Online | Tuesday, April 13, 2004 | Kate Ravilious
Every species seems to come and go. Some last longer than others, but nothing lasts forever. Humans are a relatively recent phenomenon, jumping out of trees and striding across the land around 200 000 years ago. Will we persist for many millions of years to come, or are we headed for an evolutionary makeover, or even extinction? According to Reinhard Stindl, of the Institute of Medical Biology in Vienna, the answer to this question could lie at the tips of our chromosomes. In a controversial new theory he suggests that all eukaryotic species (everything except bacteria and algae) have an...
 

The naked ape / As it turns out, clothes do make the man  
  Posted by Willie Green
On News/Activism  09/02/2003 2:24:40 PM PDT · 9 replies · 16+ views


The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Tuesday, September 02, 2003 | Editorial
<p>The expression "clothes make the man" may be more prescient than imagined. New theories about our evolutionary development are making the rounds in scientific journals that attempt to explain why modern humans shed the fur that characterized earlier hominids.</p> <p>Evidence is mounting that when our ancestors wandered out of the forests and onto the African savannas 1.7 million years ago, they weren't simply leaving leafy trees behind. Many millennia before the heartbreak of psoriasis, early humans had an affliction that surely would've led to an unbearably itchy existence, if not extinction, had we not shed our matted body hair over hundreds of generations.</p>
 

Neanderthals 'Had Hands Like Ours' 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/27/2003 3:07:42 PM PST · 23 replies · 56+ views


BBC | 3-27-2003 | Helen Briggs
Neanderthals 'had hands like ours' By Helen Briggs BBC News Online science reporter The popular image of Neanderthals as clumsy, backward creatures has been dealt another blow. Neanderthals used tools and had a capacity for speech It was always thought they were a somewhat ham-fisted lot. However, computer reconstructions of fossilised bones show their hands had almost the same manual dexterity as ours. Far from being "butter fingered", they would have been adept at using implements such as axes and knives. The finding is important because it casts doubt on the idea that Neanderthals died out because of a physical...
 

Neanderthal Hunters Rivalled Human Skill 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  09/24/2003 8:19:27 AM PDT · 22 replies · 113+ views


BBC | 9-23-2003 | Will Knight
Neanderthal hunters rivalled human skills 17:34 23 September 03 NewScientist.com news service Neanderthals were not driven from northern Europe by vastly superior human hunters, suggests an analysis of hunting remains. The study by Donald Grayson of the University of Washington and Francoise Delpech of the University of Bordeaux challenges a popular theory that the primitive peoples died out because they were far less skillful hunters. The pair examined the fossilised remains of butchered animals from a cave in southwest France. Neanderthals inhabited southern France from 65,000 years before the present until roughly 40,000 to 35,000 years ago. Neanderthals disappeared from...
 

New species may have relatives in next villlage 
  Posted by aculeus
On News/Activism  01/12/2005 5:52:22 PM PST · 22 replies · 587+ views


The Guardian (UK) | January 13, 2005 | John Vidal
A growing number of scientists are challenging the sensational discovery last year of a new species of one-metre-tall intelligent humans whose 13,000-year-old bones were said to have been found in an Indonesian cave. According to some leading anthropologists in Australia, Indonesia and elsewhere, Homo floresiensis is not "one of the most important discoveries of the last 150 years" as was widely reported last October, but a pygmy version of modern Homo sapiens with a not uncommon brain disease. Now a leading critic of the Homo floresiensis theory is to send researchers to a village near the cave where the bones...
 

Neandertals Not Our Ancestors, DNA Study Suggests (Whewww!!!)  
  Posted by NormsRevenge
On News/Activism  05/14/2003 10:49:29 PM PDT · 48 replies · 128+ views


National Geographic News | 5/14/03 | Hillary Mayell
One more piece of evidence has been added to the debate on whether there was any interbreeding between Neandertals and early modern humans. Around 50,000 years ago, small groups of anatomically modern humans migrated out of Africa and began to colonize the rest of the world. Known as Cro-Magnons for the site in France where the earliest remains were found, these early humans co-existed with the Neandertals then living in Europe until the Neandertals became extinct roughly 30,000 years ago. What happened and whyódid the two groups war, did they mate, did they even meet?óhas been an enduring puzzle...
 

Neanderthals Matured Faster Than Modern Man -Study  
  Posted by Junior
On News/Activism  04/28/2004 12:57:48 PM PDT · 86 replies · 106+ views


Science - Reuters | 2004-04-28 | Patricia Reaney
LONDON (Reuters) - Neanderthals may conjure up images of an uncivilized, brutish species but they were surprisingly early developers, researchers said Wednesday. Although Neanderthals disappeared from Europe about 30,000 years ago, scientists at the French research institute CRNS in Paris have uncovered new details about them by studying teeth fossils. The findings, reported in the science journal Nature, suggest Neanderthals reached adulthood by the age of 15 -- about three years before early modern humans -- probably ate a high calorie diet and were a distinct species from modern humans. "Neanderthals, despite having a large brain, were characterized by a...
 

Oldest member of human family found 
  Posted by jennyp
On News/Activism  07/11/2002 4:13:07 PM PDT · 62 replies · 161+ views


Nature | 07/11/2002 | John Whitfield
After a decade of digging through the sand dunes of northern Chad, Michel Brunet found a skull 6-7 million years old. He named it ToumaÔ.ToumaÔ is thought to be the oldest fossil from a member of the human family. It's a dispatch from the time when humans and chimpanzee were going their separate evolutionary ways. A thrilling, but confusing dispatch1,2. Sahelanthropus tchadensis - ToumaÔ's scientific name - was probably one of many similar species living in Africa at that time. "There must have been a group of apes knocking around between 5 and 8 million years ago for which there's...
 

One million year "Homo-erectus" Found In Iran 
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/11/2005 11:08:39 AM PST · 12 replies · 245+ views


CHN | Jan 5, 2005 | staff
In their paleontological studies in Maragheh region, experts have so far found pieces of fossilized horse, giraffe, rhino, and elephant dating back to at least a million years ago. The discovery of these fossils close to the teeth has helped the scientists reach a more precise date for the teeth... Paleontological studies in Maragheh region is done under the supervision of the Natural History Museum with the cooperation of Tabriz University in eastern Azerbaijan that currently holds the 1-million-year teeth for more research.
 

A Rebuilt Neanderthal 
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism  12/31/2002 4:38:20 PM PST · 95 replies · 1,319+ views


The New York Times | 12-31-02 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
In a laboratory in the upper recesses of the American Museum of Natural History, away from the public galleries, Dr. Ian Tattersall, a tall Homo sapiens, stooped and came face to face with a Neanderthal man, short and robust but bearing a family resemblance ó until one looked especially closely. A paleoanthropologist who has studied and written about Neanderthals, Dr. Tattersall was getting his first look at a virtually complete skeleton from this famously extinct branch of the hominid family. Nothing quite like it has ever been assembled before, the foot bones connected to the ankle bones and everything else...
 

Seeking answers to a new Mystery Ape 
  Posted by Ahban
On News/Activism  08/13/2003 8:47:06 PM PDT · 15 replies · 103+ views


CNN | august 9th 2003 | Marsha Walton
<p>A skull belonging to a 'mystery ape,' on the left, is placed next to a chimpazee skull for comparison. Researchers say the mystery ape is much more 'flat-faced' and substantially bigger.</p> <p>We cannot rule out the possibility that it is a new species of ape, or a new subspecies or some form of hybrid.</p>
 

When Humans Faced Extinction 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  06/10/2003 8:05:32 AM PDT · 124 replies · 159+ views


BBC | 6-10-2003 | Dr David Whitehouse
When humans faced extinction By Dr David Whitehouse BBC News Online science editor Humans may have come close to extinction about 70,000 years ago, according to the latest genetic research. From just a few, six billion sprang The study suggests that at one point there may have been only 2,000 individuals alive as our species teetered on the brink. This means that, for a while, humanity was in a perilous state, vulnerable to disease, environmental disasters and conflict. If any of these factors had turned against us, we would not be here. The research also suggests that humans (Homo sapiens...
 

London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals... 
  Posted by IGBT
On News/Activism  01/16/2005 12:47:07 PM PST · 164 replies · 2,396+ views


Planet Save.com | 1/14/05 | Planet Save.com
London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals, according to a new study by British scientists. Researchers at the John Radcliffe Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford were quoted by The Times as saying the so-called "ginger gene" which gives people red hair, fair skin and freckles could be up to 100 000 years old. They claim that their discovery points to the gene having originated in Neanderthal man who lived in Europe for 200 000 years before Homo sapien settlers, the ancestors of modern man, arrived from Africa about 40 000 years ago. Rosalind Harding, the...
 

end of digest #25 20050115

172 posted on 01/16/2005 6:52:19 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on January 13, 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 170 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050115
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

173 posted on 01/16/2005 6:54:22 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on January 13, 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 172 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
SunkenCiv, thanks for the ping on this one, I will bookmark it and have a slew of reading to do this week. Nice work.

K4

174 posted on 01/16/2005 7:06:21 PM PST by IllumiNaughtyByNature (If Islam is a religion of peace they better fire their PR guy!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: K4Harty

Thanks! I realized too late (about ten minutes ago) that I stuck one in the Neandertal section that might have looked better in the Biology section. Oh well. ;')


175 posted on 01/16/2005 7:28:22 PM PST by SunkenCiv (I last updated my profile on January 13, 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 174 | View Replies]

Erratum: I neglected to change the digest # and date for the previous issue. Also my apologies for the lateness of this issue.

Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #27
January 22nd, 2005


Oh So Mysterioso
New Chemical Testing Points to Ancient Origin for Burial Shroud of Jesus
  Posted by swilhelm73
On News/Activism 01/20/2005 3:16:23 PM PST · 47 replies · 1,069+ views


Yahoo | January 19, 2005
DALLAS, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Shroud of Turin Association for Research (AMSTAR), a scientific organization dedicated to research on the enigmatic Shroud of Turin, thought by many to be the burial cloth of the crucified Jesus of Nazareth, announced today that the 1988 Carbon-14 test was not done on the original burial cloth, but rather on a rewoven shroud patch creating an erroneous date for the actual age of the Shroud. The Shroud of Turin is a large piece of linen cloth that shows the faint full-body image of a blood-covered man on its surface. Because many believe...
 

Shroud Of Turin - New Date?
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/19/2005 11:46:04 AM PST · 187 replies · 3,804+ views


Yahoo | 1-19-2005 | Michael Minor
New Chemical Testing Points to Ancient Origin for Burial Shroud of Jesus; Los Alamos Scientist Proves 1988 Carbon-14 Dating of the Shroud of Turin Used Invalid Rewoven Sample Wednesday January 19, 8:32 am ET DALLAS, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Shroud of Turin Association for Research (AMSTAR), a scientific organization dedicated to research on the enigmatic Shroud of Turin, thought by many to be the burial cloth of the crucified Jesus of Nazareth, announced today that the 1988 Carbon-14 test was not done on the original burial cloth, but rather on a rewoven shroud patch creating an erroneous date...
 

Ancient Greece
East Bulgaria Reveals Minoan Pertainence
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 4:25:15 PM PST · 3 replies · 179+ views


Novinite | 1-18-2005
East Bulgaria Reveals Minoan Pertainence 18 January 2005, Tuesday. The Eastern Rhodopes revealed an old-times funeral site obviously pertaining to an ancient Crete-Micenae cult dating 3,500 years ago. The demographic researcher Mincho Gumarov of Kardzhali has donated the local museum with unique finds of ceramics, bronze and silver. The artifacts from the late bronze epoch were found in the nearby Samara cave. The find's pertainence to the epoch of legendary Micenae derives from the found labris (short two-face ritual axe, characteristic of that civilisation) and a silver amulet of the cult to Mother Earth, as well as pieces of surgery...
 

Shrine To Hercules Unearthed
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/21/2005 6:30:26 PM PST · 60 replies · 938+ views


Kathimerini | 1-21-2005 | AP Valmas
Shrine to Hercules unearthedArchaeologists in Thebes discover remains of altar, dwellings used for more than 3,000 years APPanayiotis Valmas, the head restorer at the Museum of Thebes, is pictured last month brushing a tiny ancient bronze statue of the mythological hero Hercules slaying a lion. The figure was found at an ancient prayer site. By Derek Gatopoulos - The Associated Press THEBES - Rummaging in the dirt, Costas Kakoseos pulls up pieces of history steeped in legend. It is an archaeological site dubbed ìHerculesí Houseî ó the place, experts say, that the ancient Greeks may have held to be the...
 

Ancient Rome
Focus: The search for the lost library of Rome
  Posted by RightWingAtheist
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 11:33:31 AM PST · 25 replies · 710+ views


The Sunday Times (UK) | January 23 2005 | Robert Harris
Even in our age of hyperbole, it would be hard to exaggerate the significance of what is at stake here: nothing less than the lost intellectual inheritance of western civilisation Down a side street in the seedy Italian town of Ercolano, wafted by the scent of uncollected rubbish and the fumes of passing motor-scooters, lies a waterlogged hole. A track leads from it to a high fence and a locked gate. Dogs defecate in the undergrowth where addicts discard their needles. Peering into the dark, stagnant water it is hard to imagine that this was once one of the greatest...
 

Gladiators - More Showbusiness Than Slaughter
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat 01/20/2005 4:46:25 PM PST · 16 replies · 306+ views


Scotsman | 1-20-2005 | James Reynolds
Gladiators - more showbusiness than slaughter JAMES REYNOLDS SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT Key points ï New theory says Gladiators were pampered stars not abused slaves ï Gladiators earned so much from sport that Emperor capped their salaries ï Study of 158 images of combat shows combatants did not fight to death Key quote "Gladiators were entertainers, sports stars, and they were the privately owned, pampered Beckhams of their day. They did not go into the arena to die, because they cost far too much for that to happen on anything like a regular basis" - Bryn Walters, director of the British Association...
 

Potholers Discover Ancient Roman Mosaic
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/18/2005 8:27:59 PM PST · 14 replies · 455+ views


Telegraph (UK) | 1-19-2005 | Bruce Johnson
Potholers discover ancient Roman mosaic By Bruce Johnston (Filed: 19/01/2005) Potholers exploring a site near Nero's palace have discovered a mosaic showing ancient Romans trampling grapes to make wine. The 10ft by 6.5ft mosaic depicts three naked figures crushing the grapes with their feet, while a fourth entertains them by playing a double flute and another man piles the fruit in a basket. Using a remote-controlled camera, the potholers filmed the fragment at the edge of the largely unexcavated, 14-acre bathing complex in Rome built by the Emperor Trajan, itself lying on top of the ruins of Nero's lavish residence,...
 

Ancient and Medieval Europe
Danish Archaeologists In Search Of Vikings In Iran
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 3:35:39 PM PST · 21 replies · 584+ views


Payvand | 1-20-2005
1/20/05Danish Archaeologists in Search of Vikings in Iran Tehran, Jan. 20 (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) ñ Researchers from the Copenhagen Museum in Denmark have traveled to the coasts of the Caspian Sea, northern Iran, in search of clues of relationships between Iranians and Vikings. A few years ago, a researcher from the Copenhagen Museum, Nadia Haupt, discovered more than one thousand coins and relics that did not belong to the Danish or other Scandinavian cultures, and therefore set to find out more about the historical roots of the Danish civilization. The ancient items that took the attention of experts...
 

Genes Promoting Fertility Are Found in Europeans
  Posted by 4mor3
On News/Activism 01/16/2005 5:11:46 PM PST · 25 replies · 682+ views


New York Times | January 16, 2005 | Nicholas Wade
Researchers in Iceland have discovered a region in the human genome that, among Europeans, appears to promote fertility, and maybe longevity as well. Though the region, a stretch of DNA on the 17th chromosome, occurs in people of all countries, it is much more common in Europeans, as if its effect is set off by something in the European environment. A further unusual property is that the region has a much more ancient lineage than most human genes and the researchers suggest, as one possible explanation, that it could have been inserted into the human genome through interbreeding with one...
 

The Mysterious End Of Essex Man (UK)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 3:16:48 PM PST · 38 replies · 720+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 1-23-2005 | Robin McKie
The mysterious end of Essex man Archaeologists now believe two groups of early humans fought for dominance in ancient Britain - and the axe-wielders won Robin McKie, science editor Sunday January 23, 2005 The Observer Divisions in British culture may be deeper than we thought. Scientists have discovered startling evidence that suggests different species of early humans may have fought to settle within our shores almost half a million years ago. They have found that two different groups - one wielding hand-axes, the other using Stone Age Stanley knives to slash and kill - could have been rivals for control...
 

Asia
Poor Ships Saved Japan From Mongolian Army
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/21/2005 10:20:18 AM PST · 17 replies · 734+ views


The Star | 1-20-2005
Poor ships saved Japan from Mongolian army PARIS: Science has dealt a blow to a Japanese legend which says the country was twice saved from a Mongolian fleet thanks to a ìdivine wind,î or kamikaze, that destroyed the invaders' ships. A 900-ship fleet, sent by the Mongolian emperor Kublai Khan in 1274, met resistance from Japanese samurai before being forced into retreat by bad weather and was then ripped to pieces by the kamikaze. Kublai Khan tried again years later, amassing a vast fleet of 4,400 ships from China and Korea, most of which were sunk by strong winds off...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Amazing hominid haul in Ethiopia
  Posted by aculeus
On News/Activism 01/19/2005 2:22:02 PM PST · 47 replies · 984+ views


BBC News | January 19, 2005 | Unsigned
Fossil hunters working in Ethiopia have unearthed the remains of at least nine primitive hominids that are between 4.5 million and 4.3 million years old. The fossils, which were uncovered at As Duma in the north of the country, are mostly teeth and jaw fragments, but also include parts of hands and feet. All finds belong to the same species - Ardipithecus ramidus - which was first described about a decade ago. Details of the discoveries appear in the latest issue of Nature magazine. Scientists say features of a phalanx, or foot bone, unearthed at the site show the hominid...
 

Prehistoric dwarf astounds scientists / Island discovery could rewrite human evolution
  Posted by Former Military Chick
On News/Activism 10/28/2004 5:25:14 AM PDT · 51 replies · 958+ views


Deseret News | October 28, 2004 | Joseph B. Verrengia
In an astonishing discovery that could rewrite the history of human evolution, scientists say they have found the skeleton of a new human species, a dwarf, marooned for eons in a tropical Lost World while modern man rapidly colonized the rest of the planet. Chris Stringer, director of human origins studies at the Natural History Museum in London, holds a cast taken from a skull that is said to be that of a new species in the evolution of humans named Flores Man. Richard Lewis, Associated Press Chris Stringer, director of human origins studies at the Natural History Museum in...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Evidence May Back Human Sacrifice Claims
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 2:26:53 PM PST · 88 replies · 1,862+ views


My Way News | 1/22/05 | MARK STEVENSON/AP
MEXICO CITY (AP) - It has long been a matter of contention: Was the Aztec and Mayan practice of human sacrifice as widespread and horrifying as the history books say? Or did the Spanish conquerors overstate it to make the Indians look primitive? In recent years archaeologists have been uncovering mounting physical evidence that corroborates the Spanish accounts in substance, if not number. Using high-tech forensic tools, archaeologists are proving that pre-Hispanic sacrifices often involved children and a broad array of intentionally brutal killing methods. For decades, many researchers believed Spanish accounts from the 16th and 17th centuries were biased...
 

Scientists Can't Examine Columbus' Tomb
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 2:21:06 PM PST · 12 replies · 404+ views


My Way News | 1/23/05 | JOSE MONEGRO
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) - Authorities said Saturday that more discussions are needed before a Spanish research team can examine a tomb purportedly holding Christopher Columbus' remains, setting back efforts to determine if claims that he is buried in Spain are true. The government initially had agreed to reopen the tomb on Feb. 15, but authorities later backtracked after the event was heavily publicized. Dominican authorities were upset with reports that researchers would do more than visually inspect the bones. The dispute over which set of remains are authentic has simmered for more than 100 years. The tomb is...
 

Team Searching For Columbus' Remains
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/18/2005 7:47:22 AM PST · 17 replies · 334+ views


AP/Yahoo | 1-17-2005 | Daniels Wools
Team Searching for Columbus' Remains Mon Jan 17, 3:19 PM ET Science - AP By DANIEL WOOLLS MADRID, Spain - Spanish researchers said Monday they've won permission to open a tomb in the Dominican Republic purported to hold remains of Christopher Columbus, edging closer to solving a century-old mystery over whether those bones or a rival set in Spain are the real thing. A team of two high school teachers from Seville and a leading Spanish forensic geneticist has been testing 500-year-old bone slivers for more than two years to try to pinpoint the final resting place of the explorer...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Archaeologists excited over old toilets!
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 01/21/2005 3:50:17 PM PST · 48 replies · 820+ views


IAFRICA | Posted Thu, 20 Jan 2005 | AFP
Archaeologists excited over old toilets Posted Thu, 20 Jan 2005 Excited archaeologists are sifting through the contents of 150-year-old New Zealand toilets to get a better understanding of the everyday lives of early settlers. Although there is plenty of oral and written history, there are gaps which can only be answered by lifting the lid on the sanitary habits of pioneering families, they say. About 30 of New Zealand's leading archaeologists arrived in Wellington on Thursday to start a five-week project to collect and document information from historic sites along an inner-city bypass route. The old toilets, locally referred to...
 

How did Abe Lincoln's assassin really meet his end?
  Posted by churchillbuff
On General/Chat 01/18/2005 7:17:10 PM PST · 29 replies · 560+ views


washingtontimes | Jan 8 05 | Nofziger
THE LEGEND OF JOHN WILKES BOOTH: MYTH, MEMORY, AND A MUMMY By C. Wyatt Evans University Press of Kansas , $24.95, 224 pages, illus. REVIEWED BY LYN NOFZIGER Was John Wilkes Booth really killed by Sgt. Boston Corbett in the barn on the Garrett farm in southern Maryland, or did he escape and spend the rest of his life as a homeless, friendless wanderer, winding up, finally, as a side show mummy in a traveling carnival? Or, on the other hand did he escape to England and die there? And the second question: Why did he murder Lincoln in the...
 

Hurricane Scientist Leaves U.N. Team. U.S. Expert Cites Politics in a Letter
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 01/23/2005 12:58:57 PM PST · 36 replies · 710+ views


WP | Jan. 23, 2005 | Juliet Eilperin
A federal hurricane research scientist resigned last week from a U.N.-sponsored climate assessment team, saying the group's leader had politicized the process. Chris Landsea, who works at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's hurricane research division in Miami, said Monday that he would not contribute to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's chapter on atmospheric and surface climate conditions because the lead author had told reporters global warming contributed to intense Atlantic hurricanes last year. "It is beyond me why my colleagues would utilize the media to push an unsupported agenda that recent hurricane activity...
 

end of digest #27 20050122

176 posted on 01/24/2005 10:50:18 PM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 172 | View Replies]

To: Ragnar54; 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
My apologies to Ragnar54, whom I neglected to add to the ping list when you asked last week.

Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050122
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

177 posted on 01/24/2005 10:56:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv (In the long run, there is only the short run.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 176 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #28
January 29th, 2005


Let's Have Jerusalem
Archaeologist Unearths Bibical Controversy
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/26/2005 8:44:58 PM PST · 154 replies · 3,072+ views


Globe And Mail | 1-25-2005 | Michael Valpy
Archeologist unearths biblical controversy Artifacts from Iron Age fortress confirm Old Testament dates of Edomite kingdom By MICHAEL VALPY Tuesday, January 25, 2005 Canadian archeologist Russell Adams's interest is in Bronze Age and Iron Age copper production. He never intended to walk into archeology's vicious debate over the historical accuracy of the Old Testament -- a conflict likened by one historian to a pack of feral canines at each other's throats. Yet by coincidence, Prof. Adams of Hamilton's McMaster University says, he and an international team of colleagues fit into place a significant piece of the puzzle of human history...
 

Archeologist unearths biblical controversy
  Posted by Catholic54321
On Religion  01/27/2005 10:42:23 PM PST · 8 replies · 216+ views


chn | 26 January 2005
Canadian archeologist Russell Adams's interest is in Bronze Age and Iron Age copper production. He never intended to walk into archeology's vicious debate over the historical accuracy of the Old Testament -- a conflict likened by one historian to a pack of feral canines at each other's throats. Yet by coincidence, Prof. Adams of Hamilton's McMaster University says, he and an international team of colleagues fit into place a significant piece of the puzzle of human history in the Middle East -- unearthing information that points to the existence of the Bible's vilified Kingdom of Edom at precisely the time...
 

Archeologist finds evidence of Old Testament Validity
  Posted by NYer
On News/Activism  01/29/2005 6:12:28 AM PST · 357 replies · 3,783+ views


Catholic News Agency | January 28, 2005
Hamilton, Ontario, Jan. 28, 2005 (CNA) - Canadian archaeologist Russell Adams, a professor at McMaster University has recently unearthed evidence, which helps to show the historical accuracy of the Bible.Professor Adams and his team of colleagues have found information that points to the existence of the Biblical Kingdom of Edom existing at precisely the time Scripture claims it existed. The evidence flies in the face of a common belief that Edom actually came into existence at least 200 years later. According to the Canadian Globe and Mail, the groupís findings ìmean that those scholars convinced that the Hebrew Old Testament...
 

Mesopotamia
Gilgamesh Tomb Believed Found
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/30/2005 2:51:03 PM PST · 87 replies · 2,152+ views


AINA/BBC | 1-25-2005
Gilgamesh Tomb Believed Found Posted 01-25-2005 10:02:40 (GMT 1-25-2005 (BBC) -- Archaeologists in Iraq believe they may have found the lost tomb of King Gilgamesh - the subject of the oldest "book" in history. The Epic Of Gilgamesh - written by a Middle Eastern scholar 2,500 years before the birth of Christ - commemorated the life of the ruler of the city of Uruk, from which Iraq gets its name. Now, a German-led expedition has discovered what is thought to be the entire city of Uruk - including, where the Euphrates once flowed, the last resting place of its famous...
 

Ancient Egypt
Mysterious Inscription on the Great Pyramid
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/29/2005 9:57:01 PM PST · 30 replies · 341+ views


RobertSchoch.net | 2004 | Robert Schoch
The inscription shown below occurs above the original entrance of the Great Pyramid.† I don't think it is original, but it could be relatively old.† If you have any idea what it may mean, I would greatly appreciate hearing from you.
 

Ancient Australia
Arid Australian Interior Linked To Lanscape Burning By Ancient Humans
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/26/2005 12:28:52 PM PST · 50 replies · 691+ views


University Of Colorado-Boulder | 1-26-2005 | Gifford Miller/Jim Scott
Contact: Gifford Miller gmiller@colorado.edu 303-492-6962 Jim Scott 303-492-3114 University of Colorado at Boulder Arid Australian interior linked to landscape burning by ancient humans The image of a controlled burn in the interior of Australia today, featured on the cover of the January 2005 issue of Geology, illustrates how Australia might have looked 50,000 years ago. Photo courtesy Gifford Miller, University of Colorado at Boulder Click here for a high resolution photograph. Landscape burning by ancient hunters and gatherers may have triggered the failure of the annual Australian Monsoon some 12,000 years ago, resulting in the desertification of the country's interior...
 

Ancient Greece
Excavation of Sybil's Cave to begin Tuesday
  Posted by restornu
On General/Chat  01/16/2005 7:16:21 PM PST · 5 replies · 140+ views


The Hudson Reporter | 01/16/2005 | By Tom Jennemann
First phase will include benches, historic marker The uncovering of Sybil's Cave, which has long been a dream of local historians and residents, is about to become a reality. Sybil's Cave is located off of Sinatra Drive on the property of Stevens Institute of Technology, across from the Castle Point Park fishing pier. In the cave's storied history, it was a site for picnics, a source of water for health seekers, and the inspiration for an Edgar Allan Poe detective story. Last year, Mayor David Roberts said that after years of hearing old-timers' legends about the cave, it was worth...
 

Ancient and Medieval Europe
Clay hearths up to 34,000 years old
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  01/26/2005 11:00:12 PM PST · 6 replies · 112+ views


Archaeology magazine | January/February 2005 Volume 58 Number 1 | From the Trenches
Now that the Olympics are over, archaeologists in Greece are back to business. They've found the world's oldest clay hearths. According to a report in Antiquity, the more than 70 clay hearths, ranging from 34,000 to 23,000 years old, were identified in a single cave in the northwestern Peloponnese. Remarkably, they've also uncovered four well-preserved 2,500-year-old pomegranates, found inside a sealed bronze vessel during a salvage excavation near ancient Corinth. The oxidation of the bronze prevented microorganisms from growing and destroying the fruit, says the archaeologist who made the find. Scientists are eager to study the remarkable specimens, which are...
 

Asia
7,000 Year-Old Village Found In Ningbo (China)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/26/2005 12:17:54 PM PST · 37 replies · 629+ views


Peoples Daily/China.org | 1-26-2005
7,000-year-old Village found in Ningbo The Ningbo Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology announced this month that, after a 4-month excavation of 725 square meters, they have confirmed the discovery of a 7,000-year-old village of the early Hemudu culture. The site is at Fujiashan in the Jiangbei District of Ningbo City, in the eastern province of Zhejiang. According to a specialist from the institute, the site is one of the largest-scale, highest-yield and best-preserved sites in the province after the Hemudu site itself. The relics excavated showed it to be a Neolithic site in the early stage of Hemudu culture,...
 

Archaeologists Find Ancient Musical Instruments
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/27/2005 11:43:50 AM PST · 27 replies · 500+ views


Vietnam News Agency | 1-26-2005
Archaeologists find ancient musical instruments (26-01-2005) Musical instruments thought to be about 3,000 years old have been found by a team of Vietnamese archeologists. Known as lithophones, the ancient instruments are typically made of 11 slabs of stone. The lithophones were found in the southern province of Binh Duong in early January at a site that stretches some 20ha near a small hill in My Loc village in Tan My Commune of Tan Uyen District. The broken instruments were buried deep in an 8sq.m pit, said Dr Bui Chi Hoang, deputy director of the Archaeology Centre of the Southern Institute...
 

Archaeoastronomy
Ancient Mound Used In Summer Moon Ritual (3,500BC)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/28/2005 8:15:15 AM PST · 18 replies · 639+ views


Bangor News | 1-27-2005
Ancient mound used in summer moon ritual Thursday, January 27, 2005 - Bangor Daily News Sacred monuments The "hippie" revolution of the 1960s may have been predated by some 6,000 years if researchers' suspicions about the chambered mound called Gavrinis are correct. The mound, more than 26 feet high, is located on a small island off France's Brittany coast and dates to 3500 B.C., making it older than the pyramids. A passage into the mound extends for 40 feet before ending in a chamber. What immediately catches the eye are the walls that are covered with etchings of concentric rings,...
 

Archaeologists Find 'Russian Stonehenge' (4,000 Years Old )
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/29/2005 11:51:49 AM PST · 16 replies · 456+ views


Big News Network/UPI | 1-28-2005 | UPI
Archaeologists find 'Russian Stonehenge' Big News Network.com Friday 28th January, 2005 (UPI) Russian archaeologists have found the site of a 4,000-year-old concentric wooden structure resembling Britain's Stonehenge, the Art Newspaper reported Friday. Evidence of the structure was found near Ryazan southeast of Moscow at the confluence of the Oka and Pronya rivers. The area long known for its archaeological treasures was settled by tribes migrating from Eurasia thousands of years ago. The report quoted Ilha Ahmedov of Moscow's State History Museum as saying a recent dig had uncovered evidence of a circular structure that would have been formed of wooden...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Archaeologists Eagerly Home In On Parker Digs (Colorado - 5K YA)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  01/27/2005 2:54:35 PM PST · 6 replies · 379+ views


Denver Post | 1-27-2005 | Kathy Human
Article Published: Thursday, January 27, 2005Archaeologists eagerly home in on Parker digs By Katy Human Denver Post Staff Writer Among the relics found at the Rueter-Hess Reservoir construction site in Parker are, from top to bottom, a Mallory point and McKean Complex points dating back about 4,500 years; a gorget preform, left, with the indication of being drilled; two 2,000-year- old arrowheads; and a bison bone that probably was cut or broken by humans. Parker - Five thousand years ago, a band of ancient people built homes on the edge of a stream in what is now Parker. It was...
 

Aztecs Cooked, Skinned, Ate Humans (Barbequed long pig)
  Posted by quidnunc
On News/Activism  01/27/2005 10:37:51 PM PST · 109 replies · 1,623+ views


Discovery News | January 25, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
New finds from an archaeological site near Mexico City support certain written and pictorial evidence concerning Aztec human sacrifice that historians previously doubted because the accounts seemed too exaggerated to be true. The discovery adds to the growing collection of evidence supporting human sacrifice and cannibalism among the founders of the Mexican empire. It also suggests that researchers might now be able to verify some 16th century Spanish accounts on the subject. The Spanish and the Aztecs documented at least four observations of cannibalism in the 16th and 17th centuries. Spanish conquistador Hern·n CortÈs (1485-1547), whose men conquered the Aztecs...
 

end of digest #28 20050129

178 posted on 01/31/2005 10:04:05 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 176 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050129
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

179 posted on 01/31/2005 10:05:48 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 178 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #29
Saturday, February 5, 2005


Origins and Prehistory
High notes of the singing Neanderthals
  Posted by K4Harty
On News/Activism 01/30/2005 6:25:53 PM PST · 37 replies · 855+ views


timesonline.co.uk | 01/30/05 | Jonathan Leake
NEANDERTHALS have been misunderstood. The early humanoids traditionally characterised as ape-like brutes were deeply emotional beings with high-pitched voices. They may even have sung to each other, writes Jonathan Leake.
 

'Man the Hunter' theory is debunked in new book
  Posted by aculeus
On News/Activism 02/03/2005 2:27:13 PM PST · 150 replies · 1,773+ views


Washington University in St. Louis | February 2, 2005 | By Neil Schoenherr
Feb. 2, 2005 ó You wouldn't know it by current world events, but humans actually evolved to be peaceful, cooperative and social animals. In a new book, an anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis goes against the prevailing view and argues that primates, including early humans, evolved not as hunters but as prey of many predators, including wild dogs and cats, hyenas, eagles and crocodiles. Despite popular theories posed in research papers and popular literature, early man was not an aggressive killer, argues Robert W. Sussman, Ph.D., professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences. Sussman's book, "Man the Hunted:...
 

Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/02/2005 10:06:38 AM PST · 24 replies · 524+ views


Discovery | 2-1-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Feb. 1, 2005 ó A recent excavation of 400,000-year-old stone tools in Britain suggests that two groups of early humans could have competed with each other for food and turf. In the past, anthropologists have argued that only one group of ancient humans lived in Britain, and that these hominids created and used both axes and flake knives, which were made by flaking off small particles from a larger rock, or by breaking off a large flake that was then used as the tool. Some form of prehistoric human had...
 

Oh So Mysterioso
Man Offers $10K for Pedro Mountain Mummy
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On News/Activism 02/02/2005 10:45:41 PM PST · 27 replies · 327+ views


Yahoo | Wednesday, February 2, 2005 | Reuters
John Adolfi, of Syracuse, N.Y., said he wants the mummy so it can undergo DNA testing, X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging... Adolfi hypothesizes that modern science would prove that Pedro was an adult at the time of his death ó perhaps one of the "little people" spoken of in Arapaho and Shoshone tales. But George Gill, an anthropology professor at the University of Wyoming, has a different theory. After reviewing X-rays taken of the mummy in the 1950s, Gill concluded that it was an infant with anencephaly, a birth defect in which only the brain stem develops.
 

Ancient and Medieval Europe
Ancient Church Found (Norway)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/04/2005 4:17:20 PM PST · 42 replies · 698+ views


Aftenposten | 2-4-2005
Ancient church found The site of a nearly 1,000-year-old church has been found in Skien, making it likely Norway's oldest. Norway may have been converted to Christianity far earlier than believed. This hole indicates that the site boasted a post church nearly 1,000 years ago. PHOTO: KJELL-HENRIK SEMB Christianity in Norway Christian influence gradually came to Norway via trade, marriage ties, Viking raids, Christian Celtic slaves and eventually missionaries. Olav the Holy (Olav Haraldsson, St. Olav), who lived from 995-1030, officially introduced Christianity to Norway. The first churches in Norway were stave and post churches. The only remains of post...
 

Treasure Found In Viking Market
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/02/2005 10:15:42 AM PST · 23 replies · 771+ views


BBC | 2-2-2005
Treasure found in Viking market A 10th Century Viking merchant's weight was recoveredArchaeologists believe what they originally thought was a Viking burial ground in Cumbria, may actually have been a 10th Century market. Excited experts unearthed a wealth of treasures at the site, near Barrow. They were particularly impressed with a merchant's weight, which is the size of a finger and shows a dragon design with two figures. But after a month of study, experts have moved away from an initial theory that the site was a burial ground. The dig has unearthed several more metal objects which indicate the...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Researchers Find Rare Letters From Fifth Century Gaza Strip
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 01/30/2005 3:49:26 PM PST · 45 replies · 800+ views


AFP | 1-24-2005
Researchers find rare letters from fifth century Gaza Strip Mon Jan 24, 3:48 PM ET Mideast - AFP GENEVA (AFP) - Swiss researchers have uncovered a rare exchange of letters written in ancient Greek during the fifth century in what is now the Gaza Strip , the University of Fribourg said. The discovery offers proof of a rich intellectual society in a region that is better known today for a bitter and bloody standoff between Israel and the Palestinian Authority, said one of the researchers, Professor Jacques Schamp. Located amid mounds of manuscripts stored at the Marciana National Library in...
 

Asia
Lost city believed found in Johor (Malaysia)
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 02/03/2005 12:31:50 AM PST · 16 replies · 515+ views


The Star (Malaysia) | TEOH TEIK HOONG and AUDREY EDWARDS
PETALING JAYA: A 1,000-year-old lost city, possibly older than Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Borobudur in Indonesia, is believed to have been located in the dense jungles of Johor. The discovery of what is thought to be the site of Kota Gelanggi or Perbendaharaan Permata (Treasury of Jewels) by an independent Malaysian researcher has prompted museum officials to plan an expedition to confirm the finding. If indeed the site is that of the lost city , it is set to transform the historical landscape of the region, said Raimy Che-Ross, who spent 12 years researching Malay manuscripts all over the...
 

Ancient Egypt
Scientists Find Fossil Proof Of Egypt's Ancient Climate
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/03/2005 8:54:52 PM PST · 6 replies · 414+ views


Washington University At St Louis | 2-2-2005 | Tony Fitzpatrick
Scientists find fossil proof of Egypt's ancient climate 'At a snail's pace' By Tony Fitzpatrick Feb. 2, 2005 ó Earth and planetary scientists at Washington University in St. Louis are studying snail fossils to understand the climate of northern Africa 130,000 years ago. While that might sound a bit like relying on wooly bear caterpillars to predict the severity of winter, the snails actually reveal clues about the climate and environment of western Egypt, lo those many years ago. They also could shed light on the possible role weather and climate played in the dispersal of humans "out of Africa"...
 

Ancient Rome
Focus: The search for the lost library of Rome
  Posted by snarks_when_bored
On News/Activism 02/01/2005 10:08:49 AM PST · 25 replies · 817+ views


Times Online (U.K.) | January 23, 2005 | Robert Harris
Focus: The search for the lost library of RomeRobert HarrisEven in our age of hyperbole, it would be hard to exaggerate the significance of what is at stake here: nothing less than the lost intellectual inheritance of western civilisation Down a side street in the seedy Italian town of Ercolano, wafted by the scent of uncollected rubbish and the fumes of passing motor-scooters, lies a waterlogged hole. A track leads from it to a high fence and a locked gate. Dogs defecate in the undergrowth where addicts discard their needles. Peering into the dark, stagnant water it is hard to...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Giant Pearl Tied to Family Squabbles
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 01/30/2005 2:31:56 PM PST · 80 replies · 1,175+ views


Las Vegas Sun | 1/29/05 | JON SARCHE/AP
Legend has it the so-called Pearl of Allah was created as a symbol of peace 2,500 years ago in ancient China. To Victor Barbish, the 14-pound gem has been nothing but a big headache. The football-sized grayish lump has been tied to enough greed, drama and intrigue to rival any Agatha Christie mystery, including two contract killings and a court fight that ended with one of the largest jury awards of its type in Colorado history. "It draws the wrong type of people," said Barbish, the pearl's majority owner who lives in Colorado Springs. "It's only a pearl. It has...
 

end of digest #29 20050205

180 posted on 02/05/2005 7:32:04 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 178 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050205
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

181 posted on 02/05/2005 7:38:18 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 180 | View Replies]

for the last time on FR, and in a place where it will be of some use to me:

2005
January
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  
February
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28  
   
March
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31  
   
April
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
   
May
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31  
   
June
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30  
   
July
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31  
August
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31  
   
September
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30  
   
October
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  
November
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30  
   
December
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
   


182 posted on 02/05/2005 7:51:09 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 180 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #30
Saturday, February 12, 2005


Asia
Chinese Used Diamonds To Polish Sapphire-Rich Stone In 2500 BC 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/11/2005 1:50:32 PM PST · 6 replies · 290+ views


Eureka Alert/Harvard University ^ | 2-11-2005 | Steve Bradt
Public Release: 11-Feb-2005 ArchaeometryChinese used diamonds to polish sapphire-rich stone in 2500 BC Researchers have uncovered strong evidence that the ancient Chinese used diamonds to grind and polish ceremonial stone burial axes as long as 6,000 years ago -ñ and incredibly, did so with a level of skill difficult to achieve even with modern polishing techniques. The finding, reported in the February issue of the journal Archaeometry, places this earliest known use of diamond worldwide thousands of years earlier than the gem is known to have been used elsewhere. Harvard University's Asia Center, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Princeton...
 

Road builders plunder Great Wall 
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism  02/10/2005 4:09:28 PM PST · 10 replies · 405+ views


News.com.au ^ | 2/10/05 | AFP
ROAD builders demolished a large section of China's World Heritage-listed Great Wall last month in an indication of the perilous state of one of the world's best known landmarks, state media said today. Almost 100m of the wall in northern Ningxia autonomous region was levelled in two overnight raids by construction workers who used the material to pave a road, the Ningxia Daily said. The destroyed area near Zhongwei city was constructed during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) in an region known as "the Great Wall Museum" because of the profusion of rammed earth sections of the wall. Less than 2500km...
 

Tsunami throws up India relics 
  Posted by CarrotAndStick
On News/Activism  02/11/2005 8:30:44 AM PST · 21 replies · 1,006+ views


BBC News ^ | Friday, 11 February, 2005, 13:31 GMT | BBC News
The deadly tsunami could have uncovered the remains of an ancient port city off the coast in southern India. Archaeologists say they have discovered some stone remains from the coast close to India's famous beachfront Mahabalipuram temple in Tamil Nadu state following the 26 December tsunami. They believe that the "structures" could be the remains of an ancient and once-flourishing port city in the area housing the famous 1200-year-old rock-hewn temple. Three pieces of remains, which include a granite lion, were found buried in the sand after the coastline receded in the area after the tsunami struck. Undersea remains "They...
 

Ancient and Medieval Europe
Ancient Engravings Found In Somerset Cave 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/08/2005 5:29:13 PM PST · 11 replies · 407+ views


University Of Bristol ^ | 2-7-2005
Ancient engravings found in Somerset cave [07 February 2005] Two members of the University of Bristol Spelaeological Society have discovered an engraving in a cave in the Mendip Hills, Somerset, which may be at least 10,000 years old. Graham Mullan and Linda Wilson, who have spent much of the last ten years studying Palaeolithic cave art, recently began a systematic search of caves in southern Britain in the belief that such works in this country would not simply be confined to those found at Creswell Crags, Nottinghamshire. The first results of this study are a series of inscribed crosses found...
 

Maximus Factor AKA Ancient Avon 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/07/2005 5:00:55 PM PST · 8 replies · 253+ views


Discover ^ | 2-7-2005 | Jocelyn Selim
Maximus Factor aka Ancient Avon By Jocelyn Selim February 07, 2005 | Anthropology Courtesy of the Museum of London A Roman-era container of white cosmetic cream, found during an archaeological dig in London, offers a glimpse at vanity 2,000 years ago, when a pale, even complexion apparently was the rage. Richard Evershed, a chemist at the University of Bristol, analyzed the creamís ingredients and recreated the ancient recipe, which consisted mainly of rendered animal fat and starch that was probably obtained from boiling grains. ìIt shows a surprising degree of technological sophistication,î he says, noting that the color came from...
 

Ancient Egypt
Mummy Tar In Ancient Egypt 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/06/2005 2:35:27 PM PST · 11 replies · 358+ views


Geo Times ^ | 2-6-2005
Mummy tar in ancient Egypt For millennia, ancient Egyptians used oil tar to preserve bodies. New geologic research shows that the tar came from several sources, shedding light on how trade routes of old compare to those of today. New research suggests that ancient Egyptians used oil tar from Gebel Zeit in Egypt, shown here, and from the Dead Sea to preserve mummies. Image courtesy of James Harrell. All tar sands -- crude oils, asphalts and bitumen -- contain source-specific compounds, known as biomarkers, which have unique chemical signatures that are closely related to the biological precursors of the oil....
 

Ancient Greece
Science To Test (Jason) Argonaut Myth 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/09/2005 11:40:18 AM PST · 44 replies · 964+ views


Kathimerini ^ | 2-9-2005
Science to test Argonaut myth Gold jewelry found last year in an unplundered Mycenaean royal tomb on the outskirts of Volos will be tested for links with one of the most enduring ancient Greek myths, the Argonautsí expedition, an archaeologist said yesterday. The 14th century BC treasure -- gold beads from necklaces and jewelry made of gold and semiprecious stones -- was found with vases and other offerings in four pits inside the tholos tomb, a beehive-like subterranean structure usually associated with Late Bronze Age royal burials. According to local antiquities director Vassiliki Adrimi-Sismani, the Culture Ministry has approved tests,...
 

Ancient Rome
Scavenging the Empire [how Medieval Christians viewed Roman ruins and used them to make monasteries] 
  Posted by Mike Fieschko
On General/Chat  02/11/2005 6:42:45 AM PST · 2 replies · 52+ views


The Rhine River blog [Landscape, Region and History.] ^ | Feb 6, 2005 | Nathanael
This passage, from Vito Fumagalli's Landscapes of Fear: Perceptions of Nature and the City in the Middle Ages, looks at how Medieval Christians looked at the ruins of the Roman Empire, both physical and spiritual, and used them to make monasteries.. Everywhere towns had decayed and had lost their central position. The ancient world had created a highly sophisticated and essentially urban civilization: the Romans, like the Etruscans before them, had been city builders and the vast and complex network of their towns had had a profound influence on the landscape. ... Over time, however, the vast reaches of...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Excavation Unearths Oldest Archaeological Site In UAE 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/08/2005 4:40:08 PM PST · 11 replies · 400+ views


Khaleej Times ^ | 2-8-2005 | Prerna Suri
Excavation unearths oldest archaeological site in UAE By Prerna Suri 8 February 2005 DUBAI -- The oldest archaeological site in the UAE dating back to 7,000 years, has been discovered on the island of Marawah, located about 100km west of Abu Dhabi, according to Dr Mark Beech, Senior Resident Archaeologist for the Abu Dhabi Islands Archaeological Survey (ADIAS). Dr Beech disclosed the findings at a lecture organised by the Dubai Natural History Group which was attended by a large crowd. The lecture covered important findings and discoveries by ADIAS during their excavation in 2004 including a skeleton of what is...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Newly Found (Human) Species Goes Missing Again (Floresiensis) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  02/09/2005 11:31:13 AM PST · 17 replies · 717+ views


The Age ^ | 2-10-2005 | Stephen Cauchi
Newly found species goes missing again By Stephen Cauchi Science reporter February 10, 2005 The disputed Homo Floresiensis. Photo: Robert Pearce The remains of an extinct metre-high human species have become virtually as hidden as they were before their discovery last year rocked the world of palaeontology. One of Indonesia's leading palaeontologists is refusing to hand back the remains to the team that found them on the Indonesian island of Flores. As reported last year, Professor Teuku Jacob, of Gadjah Mada University, grabbed the remains of the seven creatures - dubbed "hobbits" - and locked them in his safe, refusing...
 

Salt of the Early Earth 
  Posted by LibWhacker
On News/Activism  02/06/2005 8:17:25 PM PST · 25 replies · 596+ views


Astrobiology Magazine ^ | 2/6/05 | Leslie Mullen
Scientists have long assumed that life originated in the sea. If life did spring from salt water, that could explain why all organisms use salt. But Paul Knauth, an astrobiologist with Arizona State University, says while we always assume that life came from the ocean, this theory has never been proven. He suggests we need to consider the possibility that life originated in fresh water.The next time you reach for that bag of salty chips, think for a moment about salt and life. Humans need a certain amount of salt; it is necessary for the delivery of nutrients, the transmission...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Italy faces wartime communist killings 
  Posted by Tailgunner Joe
On News/Activism  02/08/2005 12:19:20 PM PST · 18 replies · 648+ views


Herald Sun ^ | 09feb05
ITALIAN state television has exhumed old hatreds between the political Right and Left in Italy with the dramatisation of a World War II massacre that was banished from the history books. RAI this week broadcast Il Cuore nel Pozzo (The Heart in a Pit) about the slaughter in the 1940s of about 15,000 Italians living in disputed territory in the mountains of modern-day Slovenia and Croatia. The film portrays screaming children ripped from their mothers' arms and families set before firing squads - not by Benito Mussolini's Fascists, but by Italian communists and Yugoslav partisans. "This tragedy was hidden to...
 

Jewish settlers left strong imprint in the Rio Grande Valley 
  Posted by SJackson
On News/Activism  02/06/2005 6:34:55 AM PST · 45 replies · 590+ views


Brownsville Herald ^ | 12-7-05 | Travis M. Whitehead
ROMA, February 6, 2005 -- Stone offerings in cemeteries and candles on Friday nights have been a tradition for some local families for generations. Some of those traditions bear a lingering memory of the Sefardim -- Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition in the 15th and 16th centuries. Many settled in northern Mexico, practicing their religion in secret and changing their names to hide their heritage. Some even converted to Catholicism. ìEventually, the Inquisition got all the way up here,î said Noel Benavides, a local historian. ìSome of them didnít relinquish their religion; some were executed if they didnít accept...
 

end of digest #30 20050212

183 posted on 02/11/2005 11:51:50 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 180 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050212
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

184 posted on 02/11/2005 11:54:24 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 183 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; Dustbunny

You may find this thread of interest.


185 posted on 02/12/2005 4:42:50 PM PST by farmfriend ( Congratulations. You are everything we've come to expect from years of government training.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 184 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #31
Saturday, February 19, 2005


Ancient Europe
For Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens, Was It De-Lovely?[Did they shtup?]
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 02/15/2005 7:42:02 PM PST · 41 replies · 844+ views


NY Times | February 15, 2005 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
Frank Franklin II/Associated Press A reconstructed Neanderthal skeleton, right, stands next to a modern human version The scientists did not get around to the nitty-gritty question until the fourth hour of a two-and-a-half-day symposium on Neanderthals, held recently at New York University. A strong consensus was emerging, they agreed, that the now-extinct Neanderthals were a distinct evolutionary entity from modern humans, presumably a different species. They were archaic members of the human family, robust with heavy brow ridges and forward-projecting faces, who lived in Europe and western Asia from at least 250,000 years ago until they vanished from the...
 

Alpine Iceman (Oetzi) Reveals Stone Age Secrets
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/17/2005 11:46:50 AM PST · 49 replies · 1,384+ views


Swissinfo.org | 2-17-2005 | Sophie Hardach
February 17, 2005 4:30 AM Alpine iceman reveals Stone Age secrets By Sophie Hardach BOLZANO, Italy (Reuters) - Some 5,300 years after his violent death, a Stone Age man found frozen in the Alps is slowly revealing his secrets to a global team of scientists. But despite more than a decade of high-tech efforts by geneticists, botanists and engineers many questions about his life and death remain unsolved. And rumours of a deadly curse on those who found him continue to swirl. German amateur mountaineer Helmut Simon and his wife spotted Oetzi, as he became known, in the mountains between...
 

Ancient Rome
City of Fables Unearths Real Heroes from Roman Era
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 02/12/2005 8:48:49 PM PST · 29 replies · 692+ views


Reuters | 2/11/05 | Jeremy Laurence
COLCHESTER, England (Reuters) - It is the home of Humpty Dumpty, Old King Cole and Camelot -- or so legend has it. But archeologists raking over the past can now go one better for the English city of Colchester. After painstaking excavation work they have proof of real heroes from the ancient world. Last month they revealed the remains of a Roman Circus or chariot racing track. In the past 30 years archeologists in the city have unearthed evidence dating back to Roman rule over 2,000 years ago, rewriting British history along the way. The circus underlines the city's importance...
 

The Dead Peoples Society ("Europe still languishes in nostalgia for the mud and stink Ö")
  Posted by quidnunc
On News/Activism 02/14/2005 2:12:42 PM PST · 16 replies · 647+ views


The Asia Times | February 15, 2005 | Spengler
After the revival of the Welsh language, can Faliscan be far behind? Europe's interest in its 50 or so "minority languages" is growing, in inverse proportion to its birthrate. One or two of the 6,700 languages spoken on the planet go extinct every fortnight, but not all of them will go down without a fight. Peeking through the perforations in the veneer of European civilization are cultures that pre-date Rome. With apologies to comedian Robin Williams, a more fitting name for "Western civilization" might be the "Dead Peoples Society". The 17th-century philosopher Thomas Hobbes wrongly qualified the pope as "the...
 

Millionaire to fund dig for lost Roman library [Villa of the Papyri]
  Posted by Mike Fieschko
On News/Activism 02/14/2005 7:42:21 AM PST · 29 replies · 497+ views


The Times [London, UK] | Feb 13, 2005 | Nick Fielding
A PHILANTHROPIST has stepped forward to fund excavations at the ancient city of Herculaneum in Italy, where scholars believe a Roman library lies buried beneath 90ft of lava from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79. David W Packard, whose family helped to found the Hewlett-Packard computer company, is concerned that the site may be poorly conserved or that excavation of the library may not continue unless he underwrites the work. Herculaneum, south of present-day Naples, was buried by the same eruption that destroyed nearby Pompeii. ìIt is hard to imagine anything more exciting than excavating at Herculaneum,î said Packard,...
 

Ruins Support Myth of Rome's Founding
  Posted by Unam Sanctam
On News/Activism 02/15/2005 5:44:26 AM PST · 41 replies · 1,025+ views


AP | Feb. 14, 2005 | Sarah Barden
ROME - Legend has it that Rome was founded in 753 B.C. by Romulus and Remus, the twin sons of Mars, the god of war, who were suckled as infants by a she-wolf in the woods. Now, archaeologists believe they have found evidence that at least part of that tale may be true: Traces of a royal palace discovered in the Roman Forum have been dated to roughly the period of the eternal city's legendary foundation. Andrea Carandini, a professor of archaeology at Rome's Sapienza University who has been conducting excavations at the Forum for more than 20 years, said...
 

Asia
Mysterious city of black stone
  Posted by K4Harty
On News/Activism 02/13/2005 8:19:20 PM PST · 19 replies · 1,138+ views


The Star Online | 02/12/05 | AUDREY EDWARDS AND ZUHRIN AZAM AHMAD
KOTA TINGGI: Villagers and orang asli in this part of Johor have grown up with stories about a mysterious lost city made of black stone.
 

The sea claimed an ancient capital of India. Now it has given it back
  Posted by CarrotAndStick
On News/Activism 02/13/2005 8:05:17 PM PST · 21 replies · 1,097+ views


The Independent | 14 February 2005 | Jan McGirk
Two granite lions placed as guardians of an ancient city proved impotent before the power of the sea. But that same force has brought them to light centuries later. The Boxing Day tsunami has revealed what archaeologists believe to be the lost ruins of an ancient city off Tamil Nadu in Southern India. The 30-metre waves, which reshaped the Bay of Bengal and swept more than 16,000 Indians to their deaths, shifted thousands of tons of sand to unearth the pair of elaborately carved stone lions near the 7th-century Dravidian Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram. Indian archaeologists believe these granite beasts...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Archeologists discover St. Paul's tomb
  Posted by Mike Fieschko
On News/Activism 02/17/2005 12:58:57 PM PST · 203 replies · 4,085+ views


Catholic World News | Feb 17, 2005 | unknown
Rome, Feb. 17 (CWNews.com) - Vatican archeologists believe that they have identified the tomb of St. Paul in the Roman basilica that bears his name. A sarcophagus which may contain the remains of St. Paul was identified in the basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls, reports Giorgio Filippi, a archeology specialist with the Vatican Museums. The sarcophagus was discovered during the excavations carried out in 2002 and 2003 around the basilica, which is located in the south of Rome. Having reached what they believe is a positive identification of the tomb, Vatican experts will soon make a public...
 

Coptic Trove
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/18/2005 6:35:39 PM PST · 3 replies · 230+ views


Ahram | 2-18-2005 | Nevine El-Aref
Coptic trove Luxor's west bank was the site of a significant find, reports Nevine El-Aref In Al-Gurna where several excavation missions are probing for more Ancient Egyptian treasures under the sand, a team from the Polish Centre for Mediterranean Archaeology has stumbled on a major Coptic trove buried under the remains of a sixth-century monastery located in front of a Middle Kingdom tomb. Excavators unearthed two papyri books with Coptic text along with a set of parchments placed between two wooden labels as well as Coptic ostraca, pottery fragments and textiles. The head of the team, Tomaz Gorecki, said the...
 

Vatican to announce St. Paul's tomb found
  Posted by wolfman
On News/Activism 02/18/2005 9:09:38 PM PST · 45 replies · 609+ views


WorldNetDaily.com
MUCH ABOUT HISTORY Vatican to announce St. Paul's tomb found Sarcophagus could contain remains of apostle Posted: February 18, 2005 1:00 a.m. Eastern © 2005 WorldNetDaily.com Vatican archeologists are preparing to announced they have positively identified the tomb of St. Paul the apostle. Basilica in Rome where Vatican says it found remains of St. Paul Giorgio Filippi, a specialist with the Vatican Museums, said a sarcophagus that might still contain the apostle's remains was identified in the basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome, reported Catholic World News. The independent Catholic news service said the sarcophagus was discovered...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Oldest fossil 'rabbit' unearthed (55 million years ago)
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 02/17/2005 7:46:34 PM PST · 40 replies · 468+ views


BBC | Thursday, 17 February, 2005
Gomphos had long hindlimbs, just like a modern rabbit The fossilised skeleton of a rabbit-like creature that lived 55 million years ago has been found in Mongolia, Science magazine reports. Gomphos elkema, as it is known, is the oldest member of the rabbit family ever to be found. Gomphos was surprisingly similar to modern rabbits - and probably hopped around on its elongated hindlimbs. The fossil adds weight to the idea that rabbit-like creatures first evolved no earlier than 65 million years ago. "This skeleton is very complete," co-author Robert Asher, of Humboldt Universit‰t, Berlin, Germany, told the BBC News...
 

PreColumbian
12,000-Year-Old Bones Found in Kansas
  Posted by Mr. Mojo
On News/Activism 02/15/2005 4:44:02 PM PST · 44 replies · 1,036+ views


AP (via Yahoo) | Feb 15, 2002
GOODLAND, Kan. - Scientists say mammoth and camel bones unearthed in northwest Kansas that date back 12,200 years could be part of "one of the most important archaeological sites in North America." The bones, found last June in Sherman County near the Colorado border, were alongside a piece of stone that archaeologists say was the kind used in tools that humans once used to butcher animals. Archaeological geologist Rolfe Mandel of the Kansas Geological Survey said carbon-14 dating completed last week shows the bones are between 12,200 and 12,300 years old, which could mean humans lived on the Great Plains...
 

Discovery Could Change Dates For Human Arrival On The Great Plains
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/15/2005 12:14:05 PM PST · 20 replies · 647+ views


News Wise | 2-15-2005 | University Of Kansas
Source: University of Kansas Released: Sat 12-Feb-2005, 09:00 ET Embargo expired: Tue 15-Feb-2005, 00:00 ET Discovery Could Change Dates for Human Arrival on the Great Plains Dated by carbon-14 methods at 12,200 years old, recently discovered bones could be the oldest evidence of human occupation in Kansas, and they may be the oldest evidence of humans on the Great Plains. For photos related to the story, go to http://www.kgs.ku.edu Newswise ó Bones of now-extinct animals and a rock fragment discovered last summer in northwestern Kansas could rewrite the history of humans on the Great Plains. The bones, which appear to...
 

Field Between Tecate, Ensenada Yields Tools (Ancient Hunters In Baja)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/16/2005 10:26:20 AM PST · 7 replies · 159+ views


SignonSandiego.com | 2-16-2005 | Sandra Dribble
Field between Tecate, Ensenada yields tools By Sandra Dibble UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER February 16, 2005 TIJUANA ñ For the first time in Baja California, archaeologists have found significant evidence of hunters who settled the region between 7,000 and 10,000 years ago. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, known as INAH, announced the recent recovery of more than 150 stone knives, spearheads, cutting utensils and other carved items from an open field between Tecate and Ensenada. The items are being linked to the San Dieguito people acknowledged as the earliest settlers of the region. San Dieguito sites have been amply...
 

Tribes Appeal Kennewick Man Ruling, Seek Role In Future Finds
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/16/2005 10:58:59 AM PST · 21 replies · 350+ views


Seattlepi.com | 2-16-2005 | AP
Wednesday, February 16, 2005 Last updated 8:04 a.m. PT Tribes appeal Kennewick Man ruling, seek role in future finds THE ASSOCIATED PRESS KENNEWICK, Wash. -- Indian tribes that failed to block the scientific examination of the 9,400-year-old remains known as Kennewick Man are appealing a court ruling in hopes of gaining a role in future discoveries. The appeal of a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was brought Monday by the Nez Perce Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Yakama Indian Nation, which claim Kennewick Man as an aboriginal ancestor. "It's a fundamental...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
New FBI Art Unit Recovers Looted Seals from Iraq
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 02/16/2005 7:39:15 PM PST · 23 replies · 530+ views


Reuters | 2/16/05 | Jon Hurdle
PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation unveiled a new unit on Wednesday to tackle the multi-billion dollar market in stolen art and announced the FBI's first recovery of artifacts looted from Iraq after the U.S. invasion. The objects, eight Mesopotamian stone seals about 5,000 years old, were purchased in Iraq by a U.S. marine as a souvenir of his tour of duty. He handed them to the FBI in Philadelphia after an archeologist confirmed their authenticity and said they had been stolen from one of Iraq's many archeological sites. The soldier paid a trinket salesman about $300 for...
 

Searching for the truth - Mystery of the Melungeons takes a very interesting turn
  Posted by Engraved-on-His-hands
On News/Activism 02/12/2005 9:52:39 AM PST · 54 replies · 1,340+ views


Citizen Tribune (Morristown, TN) | 02/11/2005 | Kim Lobrillo
For more than 200 hundred years the mysterious origins of the Melungeons has mystified many who were searching for facts. Recent research compiled by the Melungeon Research Committee (MRS) reveals the most probable theory thus far.
 

Shoppers rush to pyramid Wal-Mart
  Posted by traumer
On News/Activism 11/07/2004 4:06:24 PM PST · 82 replies · 1,947+ views


BBC | 5 November, 2004
Bargain-hungry Mexican shoppers have flocked to a new Wal-Mart supermarket that environmentalists claim will threaten one of the nation's treasures. Around 200 shoppers queued for hours to be the first to enter the store, which is half a mile from the ancient Mexican pyramids at Teotihuacan. "People need the well-being of their families more than culture," said one. Environmental groups had argued that the store was too close to the ruins and would erode the local way of life. While the Wal-Mart store was overflowing with shoppers on its opening day, a handful of local opponents kept a vigil...
 

Oh So Mysterioso
SHROUD OF TURIN - SKEPTICAL INQUIRER - NO BULL FACTS
  Posted by Swordmaker
On General/Chat 02/08/2005 10:03:05 AM PST · 96 replies · 857+ views


skepticalspectacle.com | February 2005 | Daniel Porter
The true skeptical inquirer knows no certainty: that is his misfortune; he is aware of it, and that is his gift. Imagine slicing a human hair lengthwise, from end to end, into 100 long thin slices, each slice one-tenth the width of a single red blood cell. The images on the Shroud, at their thickest, are this thin. The faint images, golden-brownish, formed by a caramel-like substance, are wholly part of a super-thin film of starch fractions and sugars. Where this film is not brown, it is clear.† Knowing the way certain ancient linen was made, the film covering just...
 

Plato Treasure Map Leads Atlantis Hunter to Cyprus
  Posted by Junior
On News/Activism 10/30/2003 1:44:23 PM PST · 14 replies · 167+ views


Science - Reuters | 2003-10-29 | Michele Kambas and Jean Christou
An image from Robert Sarmast's book ' Discovery of Atlantis: The Startling Case for the Island of Cyprus' claims to show the location of the legendary land Atlantis as part of a land mass that connected Cyprus and the Middle East. Drawn from accounts by the ancient Athenian lawmaker Solon, Plato's description of a powerful civilization destroyed by the wrath of God has fired the dreams of explorers for centuries. Using deep-sea imagery, simulations of the sea bed, and following some 50 clues found in Plato's Critias and Timaeus Dialogues, Sarmast said he has discovered a sunken rectangular land mass...
 

Recent News! They discover proof that Atlantis did not submerge complete but only one part...
  Posted by Maria Fdez-Valmayor
On Bloggers & Personal 01/06/2005 11:36:29 AM PST · 62 replies · 1,040+ views


Atlantis News Agency. APP. EFE. AFP. Madrid. Spain. | 01-06-2005 | Antonio Beltr·n Martinez
Recent News! They discover proof that Atlantis did not submerge complete but only one part...By Salvador Morales. Atlantis News Agency. Madrid, Spain. 01-06-2005. The Spanish investigator and scriptologist, Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, has discovered paleographical proofs that in fact the island or peninsula (NÍsos) denominated like Atlantis or Atlantic, it was divided in two parts below the sea. To date all atlantologists and students of the Timaeus and the Critias de Plato had thought that in texts of the Greek philosophist narrated the collapse of the all island or Atlantis peninsula, nevertheless, Georgeos Diaz-Montexano has reviewed the oldest texts known writings in...
 

end of digest #31 20050219

186 posted on 02/20/2005 12:53:25 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("Are you an over due book? Because you've got FINE written all over you!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 183 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050219
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

187 posted on 02/20/2005 12:54:54 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("Are you an over due book? Because you've got FINE written all over you!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 186 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #32
February 26, 2005


Origins and Prehistory
Anthropologist resigns in 'dating disaster'
  Posted by ovrtaxt
On News/Activism 02/19/2005 4:36:58 AM PST · 38 replies · 815+ views


worldnetdaily.com | February 19, 2005 | WorldNetDaily
A flamboyant anthropology professor, whose work had been cited as evidence Neanderthal man once lived in Northern Europe, has resigned after a German university panel ruled he fabricated data and plagiarized the works of his colleagues. Reiner Protsch von Zieten, a Frankfurt university panel ruled, lied about the age of human skulls, dating them tens of thousands of years old, even though they were much younger, reports Deutsche Welle. "The commission finds that Prof. Protsch has forged and manipulated scientific facts over the past 30 years," the university said of the widely recognized expert in carbon data in a prepared...
 

Anthropologist resigns in 'dating disaster'
  Posted by Woodworker
On News/Activism 02/19/2005 7:36:30 AM PST · 809 replies · 7,521+ views


Worlnetdaily | February 19, 2005 | unattributed
Panel says professor of human origins made up data, plagiarized works A flamboyant anthropology professor, whose work had been cited as evidence Neanderthal man once lived in Northern Europe, has resigned after a German university panel ruled he fabricated data and plagiarized the works of his colleagues. Reiner Protsch von Zieten, a Frankfurt university panel ruled, lied about the age of human skulls, dating them tens of thousands of years old, even though they were much younger, reports Deutsche Welle. "The commission finds that Prof. Protsch has forged and manipulated scientific facts over the past 30 years," the university said...
 

Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk (Humerus break)
  Posted by InvisibleChurch
On News/Activism 02/19/2005 7:28:21 AM PST · 26 replies · 708+ views


www.scrappleface.com
Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk by Scott Ott (2005-02-19) -- A disgraced German anthropology professor, who pretended to use carbon dating to establish a link between Neanderthals and modern man, told reporters today that he regularly drinks 40,000-year-old milk and drives a Porsche Carrera made in 736 BC. Frankfurt Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten resigned this week from a 30-year career as one of the world's leading anthropologists, when a panel concluded his carbon dating of human bones was incorrect by thousands of years. The inquiry found that one skull, which Mr. Protsch claimed came from a 27,400-year-old human fossil,...
 

History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud
  Posted by FNU LNU
On News/Activism 02/21/2005 9:44:35 AM PST · 106 replies · 1,425+ views


The Guardian | February 19, 2005 | Luke Harding
History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud Flamboyant anthropologist falsified dating of key discoveries Luke Harding in Berlin Saturday February 19, 2005 The Guardian It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull....
 

Fossils Push Human Emergence Back To 195,000 Years Ago
  Posted by tricky_k_1972
On News/Activism 02/19/2005 8:44:08 AM PST · 46 replies · 665+ views


TERRADAILY | Feb 17, 2005 | Salt Lake City UT (SPX)
Fossils Push Human Emergence Back To 195,000 Years Ago Omo I skeletal parts (National Museum of Ethiopia) The bones of an early member of our species, Homo sapiens, known as Omo I, excavated from Ethiopia's Kibish rock formation. The bones are kept in the National Museum of Ethiopia. When the first bones from Omo I were found in 1967, they were thought to be 130,000 years old. Later, 160,000-year-old bones of our species were found elsewhere. Now, scientists from the University of Utah, Australian National University and Stony Brook University have determined that Omo I lived about 195,000 years ago...
 

Biology and Cryptobiology
Ancient Crocodile Found in Australia
  Posted by FairOpinion
On News/Activism 02/23/2005 11:38:15 PM PST · 89 replies · 1,315+ views


Yahoo News | Feb. 23, 2005 | Reuters
SYDNEY (Reuters) - A new species of crocodile which lived 40 million years ago has been discovered in tropical Australia, filling a gap in the evolution of the prehistoric-looking crocodile, researchers said on Thursday. Two nearly complete skulls and a lower jaw of a new species of crocodile that belonged to a group called Mekosuchinae were unearthed by miners in the northern state of Queensland, said Australia's Monash University researcher Lucas Buchanan. "There is a big gap from about 30 to 60 million years ago of which we have no clue, except for these guys," Buchanan told Reuters on Thursday....
 

Ice age bacteria brought back to life
  Posted by aimhigh
On News/Activism 02/25/2005 12:57:59 PM PST · 89 replies · 1,234+ views


www.NewScientist.com | 2/25/2005 | Kelly Young
A bacterium that sat dormant in a frozen pond in Alaska for 32,000 years has been revived by NASA scientists. Once scientists thawed the ice, the previously undiscovered bacteria started swimming around on the microscope slide. The researchers say it is the first new species of microbe found alive in ancient ice. Now named Carnobacterium pleistocenium, it is thought to have lived in the Pleistocene epoch, a time when woolly mammoths still roamed the Earth. NASA astrobiologist Richard Hoover, who led the team, said the find bolsters the case for finding life elsewhere in the universe, particularly given this week's...
 

Life on the Scales - Simple Mathematical Relationships Underpin Much of Biology and Ecology
  Posted by furball4paws
On News/Activism 02/20/2005 10:36:58 AM PST · 61 replies · 736+ views


Science News | 2/23/2005 | Erica Klarreich
An article purporting to show simple mathematical relationships in Biology and Ecology.
 

Prehistoric 'Bear-Dog' Fossil Unearthed
  Posted by aculeus
On News/Activism 02/24/2005 4:22:48 PM PST · 77 replies · 1,199+ views


Wired (AP) | February 23, 2005 | AP
BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) -- Scientists are marveling at a fossil find in California's San Joaquin Valley that has produced the remains of a never-before-seen badger-like creature and a monstrous predator that looks like a cross between a bear and a pit bull. Among the discoveries was the skull of an animal that appears to be an entirely new genus within the same family as otters, skunks and weasels. "It just blew me out of my mind," Xiaoming Wang, associate curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, said after seeing the fossil of the badger-like...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, and PreClovis
Cosmic Rays To Solve Ancient Mexican (Pyramid) Mystery
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/21/2005 12:26:52 PM PST · 11 replies · 455+ views


Scotsman | 2-21-2005 | John von Radowitz
Cosmic Rays to Solve Ancient Mexican Mystery By John von Radowitz, PA Science Correspondent Sub-atomic particles created by cosmic rays from space are to be used to probe a giant Mexican pyramid and solve one of the worldís greatest archaeological mysteries. Investigators are to install detectors beneath the Pyramid of the Sun that look for muons ñ charged particles generated when cosmic rays hit the atmosphere which continuously shower the Earth. They hope the rate at which muons pass through the pyramid will reveal any hidden burial chambers inside. The step pyramid, about 30 miles north-east of Mexico city, is...
 

Cosmic rays may reveal pre-Aztec tomb secrets
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 02/21/2005 6:26:33 PM PST · 30 replies · 542+ views


UK Telegraph | 2/21/05 | Nic Fleming
Scientists are using cosmic ray detectors to uncover the secrets of the earliest large metropolis of the Americas. Archaeologists and nuclear physicists are working together to measure the passage of muons, subatomic particles from deep space, through the 2,000-year-old Pyramid of the Sun to discover whether it was a mausoleum or a ceremonial monument. They believe the experiment will lead them to burial chambers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference was told. Many experts believe that the pyramid, the third largest in the world, holds the mysteries of the pre-Aztec Teotihuacan civilisation. Arturo Menchaca-Rocha, the director of...
 

Study: Native Americans Weren't The First
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/25/2005 6:08:54 PM PST · 75 replies · 1,138+ views


The Discovery Channel | 9-6-2004 | Jennifer Viegas
Study: Native Americans Weren't the First By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Sept. 6, 2004 ó DNA analysis of skulls found in Baja California that belonged to an extinct tribe called the Pericues reveal that the Pericues likely were not related to Native Americans and that they probably predated Native Americans in settling the Americas, according to an announcement Monday. The finding, released at the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BA) Festival of Science in Exeter, England, adds support to the theory that a number of groups arrived in the Americas via different routes and at varying times, possibly...
 

Underwater Arrowheads, Tools Dazzle Maritime Historians (Mi'kmaq - 8,000 YO)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/20/2005 11:24:20 AM PST · 37 replies · 744+ views


CBC | 2-17-2005
Underwater arrowheads, tools dazzle Maritime historians Last Updated Thu, 17 Feb 2005 15:28:09 EST CBC News HALIFAX - Archaeologists are showing off a treasure trove they call one of the most significant discoveries of Mi'kmaq artifacts in Nova Scotia. Hundreds of arrowheads and tools, some 8,000 years old, were discovered last summer along the Mersey River, near Kejimkujik National Park in the southwest region of the province. Workers from Nova Scotia Power were doing repairs to generating stations on the river. As water levels dropped in some areas, the riverbed was exposed for the first time since dams were built...
 

Ancient Greece
Digs at Archontiko, Pella uncover more gold-clad warriors
  Posted by afraidfortherepublic
On News/Activism 02/23/2005 10:30:15 AM PST · 15 replies · 510+ views


KATHIMERINI English Edition | 2-23-05 | Iota Myrtsioti
Finds in 141 tombs add to picture of ancient Macedonia Bronze helmet with gold decoration from a mid-sixth-century-BC warriorís grave. Many Macedonian officers were buried in full armor, together with swords, spears and knives. By Iota Myrtsioti - Kathimerini The gold of the ancient Macedonians still gleams on the soldiersí uniforms being unearthed by excavations in the ancient necropolis of Archontiko in Pella. Fully armed Macedonian aristocrats, gold-bedecked women in elaborate jewelry, faience idols and clay vases of exceptional beauty had lain concealed for centuries in 141 simple rectangular trench graves that were discovered recently in the ancient settlement. For...
 

In Search of the Real Troy
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · 17 replies · 163+ views


Saudi Aramco World | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-namesóWilusa and Taruisaóthat sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The kingís name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexanderócalled Paris in Homerís Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
 

Ancient Rome
Ruins may support tale of Rome's origin (Romulus & Remus Given Boost)
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 02/19/2005 11:00:06 PM PST · 22 replies · 901+ views


Washington Times | 2/19/05 | Rachel Sanderson
Italian archaeologists digging in the Forum have unearthed the ruins of a palace they say confirms the legend of Rome's birth -- a discovery that may force the rewriting of Western history. Most contemporary historians dismiss as fable the tale that Romulus founded Rome in 753 B.C. and built a walled city on the slopes of the Palatine hill where he and his twin brother, Remus, were suckled by a wolf in their infancy. Andrea Carandini of Rome's La Sapienza University has spent 20 years trying to prove the skeptics wrong and last month he and his team hit on...
 

Paleoclimatology
new header

Global Warming and Global Cooling are as Old as the Black Plague
  Posted by Brian_Baldwin
On News/Activism 02/22/2005 8:25:26 PM PST · 34 replies · 718+ views


2/22/05 | various
In the 1200ís in Europe something began to change. Most of the wealth of Europe came from the produce of land. Pollen evidence, as well as glacial evidence, prove that from 750 AD to 800 AD, and again two hundred years later from 1150 AD to 1200 AD, Europeís weather suddenly starting warming, known as the ìMedieval Warmî. Pollen studies of the beech forests along the Fernau glacier and in the Ardenes region of Northern France prove that these forests started to expand their borders during the late Eight Century from their A.D. 200 borders, and we discover that Alpine...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Researchers have found 9,000-year-old mangrove forests.
  Posted by Lessismore
On News/Activism 02/22/2005 7:19:40 PM PST · 45 replies · 851+ views


Australian Broadcasting | February 23, 2005 | Reuters
Ancient mangrove forests found under reef North Queensland marine researchers have opened a window into the past by exposing ancient mangrove forests entombed beneath the Great Barrier Reef. Dr Dan Alongi from the Australian Institute of Marine Science says they have unearthed 9,000-year-old mangroves in old river channels that were swamped when sea levels rose after the last ice age. He says the relic mangroves show an abrupt rise in the sea level, 20 times faster than previously thought. "Material was very much intact, it didn't even have time to fully decompose when it was buried, so it does tell...
 

Tsunami Uncovers Ancient City in India
  Posted by Unam Sanctam
On News/Activism 02/18/2005 6:12:00 AM PST · 16 replies · 677+ views


AP/Red Nova | Feb. 18, 2005
MAHABALIPURAM, India (AP) -- Archaeologists have begun underwater excavations of what is believed to be an ancient city and parts of a temple uncovered by the tsunami off the coast of a centuries-old pilgrimage town. Three rocky structures with elaborate carvings of animals have emerged near the coastal town of Mahabalipuram, which was battered by the Dec. 26 tsunami. As the waves receded, the force of the water removed sand deposits that had covered the structures, which appear to belong to a port city built in the seventh century, said T. Satyamurthy, a senior archaeologist with the Archaeological Survey of...
 

Were the dinosaurs done in by fungus?
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 02/22/2005 11:40:37 PM PST · 16 replies · 164+ views


Boston Globe | February 22, 2005 | Carolyn Y. Johnson
"The forests went out. The fungi proliferated, and the Earth became a giant compost pile. An enormous number of spores were released," said Dr. Arturo Casadevall, an infectious disease researcher who proposed last month that air thick with fungal spores after the meteor hit could have overwhelmed animals' immune systems, causing sickness and death... "It's just a beautifully creative suggestion," said Nicholas Money, a mycologist, or mold expert, from Miami University of Ohio and author of "Carpet Monsters and Killer Spores: A Natural History of Toxic Mold." ...Casadevall, of Albert Einstein College of New York... has long been troubled by...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Carbon Dating Backs Bible on Edom
  Posted by Pendragon_6
On News/Activism 02/18/2005 7:19:50 AM PST · 25 replies · 682+ views


South Bend Tribune | 17 Feb 2005 | Richard N. Ostling
February 17, 2005 Carbon dating backs Bible on Edom By RICHARD N. OSTLING Associated Press Writer Evidence of biblical kingdom of Edom Some archaeologists are convinced that pottery remains and radiocarbon work in Jordan were from a site that was part of the Edomite state. The Mideast's latest archaeological sensation is all about Edom. The Bible says Edom's kings interacted with ancient Israel, but some scholars have confidently declared that no Edomite state could have existed that early. The latest archaeological work indicates the Bible got it right, those experts got it wrong and some write-ups need rewriting. The findings...
 

Coptic manuscripts unearthed in Pharaonic tomb in Egypt
  Posted by xzins
On Religion 02/25/2005 7:30:48 PM PST · 9 replies · 97+ views


Middle East Times
Coptic manuscripts unearthed in Pharaonic tomb in Egypt Published February 21, 2005 CAIRO -- Polish experts excavating in the southern city of Luxor have discovered three ancient Coptic manuscripts in a Pharaonic tomb, Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities said on Saturday. The find was the single most important Coptic discovery since 1945 when a pair of bedouins stumbled onto the Coptic codices in Nag Hammadi in Egypt's western desert, it said. The manuscripts date to the sixth century and were concealed in a Middle Kingdom (2000 to 1800 BC) tomb in Luxor, about 710 kilometers (440 miles) south of Cairo,...
 

Medieval Europe
VIking ship cracking up (Norway)
  Posted by franksolich
On News/Activism 02/25/2005 12:31:47 PM PST · 94 replies · 1,297+ views


Aftenposten | February 25, 2005 | tr. Nina Berglund
Viking ship cracking upEperts are worried about one of Norway's national treasures. Archaeologists have discovered cracks in the hull of he famed Oseberg Viking ship, which may halt plans to move the vessel to a new museum.The archaeologists have been carefully going over the nearly 1,200-year-old ship, and are concerned about what they see, reports newspaper Aftenposten.Removal of the vessel's top deck has revealed some exciting new details, like graffiti from the Viking age and details of the ship's rigging. But it's also exposed cracks that make archaeologists worry the ship won't tolerate any move to new quarters.There have been...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Lincoln: Tyrant, Hypocrite or Consumate Statesman? (Dinesh defends our 2d Greatest Prez)
  Posted by churchillbuff
On News/Activism 02/18/2005 11:27:18 PM PST · 381 replies · 2,849+ views


thehistorynet. | Feb 12, 05 | D'Souza
The key to understanding Lincoln's philosophy of statesmanship is that he always sought the meeting point between what was right in theory and what could be achieved in practice. By Dinesh D'Souza Most Americans -- including most historians -- regard Abraham Lincoln as the nation's greatest president. But in recent years powerful movements have gathered, both on the political right and the left, to condemn Lincoln as a flawed and even wicked man. For both camps, the debunking of Lincoln usually begins with an exposÈ of the "Lincoln myth," which is well described in William Lee Miller's 2002 book Lincoln's...
 

Question about steam locomotives
  Posted by franksolich
On General/Chat 02/10/2005 4:02:38 PM PST · 6 replies · 169+ views


blatant shameless vanity | February 10, 2005 | self
Okay, so I am sitting around after work, at peace with the world and seeking argument from no one, when I learn that the famous 4-8-8-4 "Big Boy" steam locomotives of the Union Pacific were NOT the largest in the world. I am confused, because every book I have about railways insists the "Big Boys" were the largest steam locomotives, ever, in the world. But the the Guiness Book of World Records throws a loop, insisting that in 1916 the Virginian Railway had a 2-8-8-8-4-6 locomotive, and that between 1914 and 1929, the Erie Railroad ran a freight train using...
 

Warren G. Harding Was Black (my head hurts)
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 02/23/2005 12:21:00 AM PST · 28 replies · 270+ views


Stewart Synopsis | 2002 (Revised: 02/20/05) | M. Stewart
NORAD encryption uses fractalization from the oil at Teapot Dome Scandal. The US was using the oil at Teapot Dome for early attempts at "Artificial Intelligence" even in Harding's time. The basis for all US Codes and radio encryption started in WW1 at Teapot Dome Scandal. It was this early work that would eventually lead to the Breaking of Enigma's Code and Japan's "Purple" Machine. There are indications that Harding was not aware of the significance of Teapot Dome when he allowed the drilling rights to be transferred.
 

end of digest #32 20050226

188 posted on 02/26/2005 3:26:50 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 186 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050226
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

189 posted on 02/26/2005 3:28:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 188 | View Replies]

To: suem2

Ping!!


190 posted on 03/03/2005 3:25:31 PM PST by manna
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 189 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #33
Saturday, March 5, 2005


Ancient Egypt
ARCHAEOLOGY: Ancient Alexandria Emerges, By Land and By Sea
  Posted by Lessismore
On News/Activism 02/26/2005 2:26:57 PM PST · 5 replies · 632+ views


Science Magazine | 2005-02-25 | Andrew Lawler
Excavators are finding surprisingly late signs of intellectual life in the ancient capital of Hellenistic Egypt and discovering that geology played a dramatic role in the city's fall OXFORD, U.K.--For centuries the massive Pharos lighthouse, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, guided sailors to the busy wharves that made Alexandria a prosperous center of Mediterranean culture and home to the greatest library of ancient times. Yet while rivals Rome and Constantinople survived the chaotic period following the collapse of the Roman Empire, Alexandria faded from the historical record. By the 8th century C.E. the famed metropolis had...
 

Ancient Greece
Archaeological dig sniffs out world's oldest perfumery
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 02/26/2005 3:25:39 PM PST · 7 replies · 369+ views


The Scotsman | 2/25/05 | MICHAEL THEODOULOU
MUSKY, with a woody tone and spicy hints of cinnamon - the perfect fragrance for a Bronze Age date. Italian archaeologists have discovered the worldís oldest perfumery and have identified the smells popular with the people of the time. The perfumery was found at a sprawling archaeological site on a hillside overlooking the Mediterranean at Pyrgos-Mavroraki, 55 miles south-west of Nicosia. "This is 4,000 years old. Without a doubt, it is the oldest production site for perfume in the world," said Maria Rosario Belgiorno, the excavation team leader. The site was destroyed by an earthquake in antiquity but the calamity...
 

New Colossus of Rhodes will keep watch on drunken Britons
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 02/27/2005 1:47:12 PM PST · 11 replies · 493+ views


UK Telegraph | 2/27/05 | Harry de Quetteville
More than two millennia after it was toppled by an earthquake, the Colossus of Rhodes - one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - is to rise again. Instead of standing astride the venerable port of Rhodes town, however, the 100ft bronze figure will tower over the island's downmarket resort of Faliraki, infamous for the drunken antics of thousands of British tourists who go there every year. Faliraki, about five miles south of Rhodes town, boasts a strip of bars and clubs a third of a mile long, where cut-price alcohol lures hordes of tourists on drinking binges...
 

Ancient Rome
Diggers find oven at Roman hotspot
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/04/2005 12:49:03 AM PST · 8 replies · 264+ views


Manchester Online | Monday, 28th February 2005 | Clarissa Satchell
A ROMAN oven and pieces of pottery have been uncovered beneath the site of a new shopping arcade. Developers are building a £120 million centre, the Grand Arcade, in Wigan but because of the town's rich Roman heritage they have asked a team of archaeologists to carry out a dig on the site. As a result the team of experts has uncovered the first Roman remains to be found in the town for more than 20 years. In addition to the Roman oven and pottery, remains of Westerwold German stoneware have been uncovered at the shopping centre site off Station...
 

Mesopotamia
Why Had Mesopotamians Built Mari (3,000BC)
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat 03/02/2005 2:42:48 PM PST · 13 replies · 211+ views


Middle-East Online | 3-2-2005 | Annick Benoist
Why had Mesopotamians built Mari? French archeologist solves mystery of ancient Mesopotamian city purpose-built in desert for metallurgical industry. By Annick Benoist - PARIS The mystery of an ancient Mesopotamian city has finally been lifted after 25 years of meticulous work by a French archaeologist who has revealed it was one of the first "modern cities", purpose-built in the desert for the manufacture of copper arms and tools. In a new book entitled "Mari, the Metropolis of the Euphrates", Jean-Claude Margueron said the third millennium BC city, in modern day Syria, was "one of the first modern cities of humanity....
 

Elam Persia, Parthia, Iran
Ancient Zoroastrians forbade begging but encouraged people to help the poor
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 03/03/2005 7:03:48 PM PST · 25 replies · 323+ views


Tehran Times | 4/3/05 | Tehran Times
TEHRAN ñ- Although some lived in poverty in ancient Iran, beggars were looked down upon because people helped the poor and needy voluntarily due to their religious beliefs. A law that prohibited begging was established in ancient times in Iran, but that does not mean that there was no sign of poverty in those years. In ancient times, those who lacked the daily necessities were usually supported by a close relative, since Zoroaster said that helping the poor was a good deed. The poor lived in houses made of low-quality mud bricks which were much smaller compared to the homes...
 

India
India finds more 'tsunami gifts'
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/03/2005 12:52:31 AM PST · 10 replies · 528+ views


BBC | Sunday, 27 February, 2005
Indian divers have found more evidence of an ancient port city, apparently revealed by December's tsunami. Stone structures that are "clearly man-made" were seen on the seabed off the south coast, archaeologists say. They could be part of the mythical city of Mahabalipuram, which legend says was so beautiful that the gods sent a flood that engulfed six of its seven temples. Other relics were revealed when the powerful waves washed away sand as they smashed into the Tamil Nadu coast. 'Clear pattern' The Archaeological Survey of India launched the diving expedition after residents reported seeing a temple and other...
 

Asia
Test Shows Sticky Porridge Used To Cement Ancient Chinese Wall
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/27/2005 10:59:51 AM PST · 37 replies · 568+ views


China View/Xinhuanet | 2-27-2005 | China View
Test shows sticky porridge used to cement ancient Chinese wall www.chinaview.cn 2005-02-27 20:56:07 XI'AN, Feb. 27 (Xinhuanet)-- The legend that ancient Chinese craftsmen used glutinous rice porridge in the mortar while building ramparts has been verified by archaeological research in northwest China's Shaanxi Province. In a recent maintenance to the ancient city wall of Xi'an, the provincial capital, workers discovered that the plaster remnants on the ancient bricks were quite hard to remove, said Qin Jianming,a researcher with the Xi'an Preservation and Restoration Center ofCultural Relics. A chemical test showed that the mortar reacted the same as glutinous rice to...
 

Oh So Mysterioso
Shadow Shroud
  Posted by Swordmaker
On General/Chat 02/27/2005 1:45:05 AM PST · 34 replies · 326+ views


ShadowShroud.com | N.D.Wilson
The Shroud of Turin has long confused, amazed, and befuddled both its critics and proponents. There are many issues surrounding the Shroud and the debate over its authenticity. This site will avoid most of those issues. This site contains the results of a crude experiment that could potentially explain how the Shroud was produced. For centuries no one has been able to explain how a photonegative image of a man could be three-dimensionally encrypted onto linen by medieval forgers unable even to appreciate the completeness of their own art. The Shadow Theory postulates that such an image could be created...
 

Epigraphy and Language
Semerano, The Scholar Feared By The Academy, Awarded (2001)
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 02/27/2005 9:36:15 PM PST · 3 replies · 88+ views


ADN - Italy Global Nation - Cultura e Scuola | 2001 | staff writer
Giovanni Semerano had to wait 90 years before receiving his first institutional acknowledgement for his important discoveries concerning ancient languages, in particular, the Etruscan language. Semerano has revolutionized the theories tied to the Indo-European languages as the root of the current Mediterranean and European languages. He was defined a "heretic" scholar because he erased centuries of philosophical studies that saw in the Greek-Latin philosophies the origins of European culture. Thanks to his etymological studies the 90-year-old philosopher instead sustains that Western culture derives from the Shiites and the Assyrians.
 

Origins and Prehistory
Hobbit was 'not a diseased human'
  Posted by Willie Green
On General/Chat 03/03/2005 12:51:29 PM PST · 10 replies · 150+ views


BBC News | Thursday, 3 March, 2005 | Paul Rincon
For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. The famous skeleton from Indonesia nicknamed the "Hobbit" does not belong to a modern human pygmy with a brain disease, as some scientists argue. That is the main finding of a detailed examination of the creature's braincase, published in Science. The authors say their study of the Hobbit's brain supports the idea it is a new, dwarf species of human. However, others contend the report does little to quash their theory it was actually a small, diseased person. The remains of the small hominid from the Indonesian island of Flores were...
 

Theory: Iceman Oetzi Wore High-Tech Shoes
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/02/2005 9:53:42 AM PST · 29 replies · 831+ views


Discovery | 2-23-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
Theory: Iceman Oetzi Wore High-Tech Shoes By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Feb. 23, 2005 ó ÷tzi, the copper ax-wielding iceman found frozen in the Alps where he had trekked over 5,300 years ago, wore high-tech snowshoes, according to a closer look at artifacts found with his remains. If the new theory holds, ÷tzi's footwear would become the world's first known snowshoes, and in a landslide victory. The current likely record-holders are not even actual shoes, but rather carvings of what look to be snowshoes found within Iron Age petroglyphs that date to approximately 500 B.C. ÷tzi's Moccasin? The Shoe from...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Ancient Earth Drawings Found In Peru (Older Than Nazca Lines)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 02/28/2005 12:30:36 PM PST · 40 replies · 1,332+ views


Sun Sentinel/AP | 2-28-2005
Ancient Earth Drawings Found in Peru By Associated Press Posted February 28 2005, 7:25 AM EST LIMA, Peru -- Archaeologists have discovered a group of giant figures scraped into the hills of Peru's southern coastal desert that are believed to predate the country's famed Nazca lines. About 50 figures were etched into the earth over an area roughly 90 square miles near the city of Palpa, 220 miles southeast of Lima, El Comercio newspaper reported. The drawings -- which include human figures as well as animals such as birds, monkeys, and felines -- are believed to be created by members...
 

Lost Society Tore Itself Apart (Moche)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/03/2005 11:54:49 AM PST · 22 replies · 651+ views


BBC | 3-3-2005 | Nick Davidson
Lost society tore itself apart By Nick Davidson BBC Horizon The largest pyramid constructed by the Moche, the Huaca del Sol Two thousand years ago, a mysterious and little known civilisation ruled the northern coast of Peru. Its people were called the Moche. They built huge and bizarre pyramids that still dominate the surrounding landscape; some well over 30m (100ft) tall. They are so heavily eroded, they look like natural features; only close up can you see they are made up of millions of adobe mud bricks. These pyramids are known as "huacas", meaning "sacred site" in the local Indian...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Afghanistan reels over extent of pillage
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 04/20/2002 8:25:43 AM PDT · 16 replies · 186+ views


International Herald tribune | 4-02 | Celestine Bohlen
NEW YORK Shortly before the Taliban in Afghanistan issued orders to blow up the giant, 1,500-year-old Buddhas of Bamian, which they destroyed in March 2001, a squad of Islamic fundamentalists systematically ransacked a storeroom of artwork from the National Museum in Kabul. They went through boxes of ancient Buddhist and Gandharan statuary, smashing anything with a human or animal image that they deemed idolatrous. . The rubble - all that is left of an unknown number of priceless antiquities - remained hidden until January, when Paul Bucherer, director of a small museum in Switzerland dedicated to Afghan culture, was ushered...
 

Japanese Daily's Report On Discovery Of Buddha Statues In Iran Denied
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat 05/16/2002 3:12:39 PM PDT · 7 replies · 79+ views


Tehran Times | 5-15-2002
Japanese Daily's Report on Discovery of Buddha Statues in Iran Denied TEHRAN TIMES CITY DESK TEHRAN -- Director General of Cultural Heritage Department of Fars Province denied reports on discovery of Buddha statues in the province. A Japanese daily *******Asahi******* in its Monday issue said 19 statues of Buddha have been unearthed in the central Iranian province. However, the Iranian official said, "In no historical period, Iran has been under the influence of Buddha culture." Since the 1979 victory of Islamic Revolution no expert group from Japan has conducted excavation operations in Fars Province, he said adding therefore the report...
 

Scientists Map Out Destroyed Afghan Buddha in Preparation for Reconstruction
  Posted by kattracks
On News/Activism 11/13/2003 1:39:55 AM PST · 9 replies · 150+ views


TBO.com | 11/13/03 | Naomi Koppel
GENEVA (AP) - Swiss-based scientists have created a model of a huge Buddha statue destroyed by the former Taliban regime in Afghanistan and said they hope it will be used to rebuild the ancient figure. The team used 30-year-old photographs and special software to build the three-dimensional model, which represents the larger of two standing Buddhas the hardline Islamic group blew up with dynamite in March 2001. International outcry followed the destruction of the giant Buddhas, which were chiseled into the cliff more than 1,500 years ago in Bamiyan Valley on the ancient Silk Route linking Europe and Central Asia....
 

end of digest #33 20050305

191 posted on 03/04/2005 11:44:17 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 188 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050305
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

192 posted on 03/04/2005 11:45:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 191 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

thanks


193 posted on 03/05/2005 6:36:15 AM PST by restornu (In our daily lives we see ego at work, refusing to give place for faith unto repentance.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 192 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Fantastic!!! Thank you so much for this. I missed hearing "The Father of Underwater Archaeology" (who is related to my husband in some great-great kind of way) this week, and was SO disappointed. This will give me plenty of reading to take my mind off of what I missed.


194 posted on 03/05/2005 9:16:17 AM PST by I'm ALL Right! (Welcome to my addiction.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: I'm ALL Right!; restornu

You're most welcome.


195 posted on 03/05/2005 6:45:44 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 194 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #34
Saturday, March 12, 2005


Ancient Egypt
King Tut Not Murdered, but Leg Fracture May Have Caused Infection, Tests Show 
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism  03/08/2005 5:29:13 AM PST · 48 replies · 888+ views


AP | Mar 8, 2005 | Paul Garwood
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - The results of a CT scan done on King Tut's mummy indicate the boy king was not murdered, but may have suffered a badly broken leg shortly before his death at age 19 - a wound that could have become infected, Egypt's top archaeologist said Tuesday. Zahi Hawass, secretary general if the Supreme Council of Antiquities, announced the results of the CT scan about two months after it was performed on Tut's mummy. Hawass said the remains of Tutankhamun, who ruled about 3,300 years ago, showed no signs that he had been murdered - dispelling a...
 

British Isles
Chariot find is a victory for Scots 
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism  03/10/2005 8:55:45 PM PST · 35 replies · 745+ views


The Guardian | March 10, 2005 | Martin Wainwright
The centuries-long tussle for prestige between England and Scotland may be about to end in victory for the clans, with new archaeological evidence suggesting that the first national leader of the British Isles was a Scot. The remains of a mysterious figure found in an Iron Age chariot burial under the A1M motorway was of "exceptional significance" according to academics, who have also unearthed the leftovers of one of Britain's biggest feasts at his funeral site in Yorkshire. Decorated with jewellery and finely wrought harness and chariot gear, the 2,400-year-old grave is thought to have been a rallying-point for Britain's...
 

Devon Divers Find 3,000 Year Old Bronze Age Artefacts On Shipwreck Site 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/08/2005 3:32:45 PM PST · 11 replies · 415+ views


GNN (Government News Network) | 3-8-2005
Tuesday 8 March 2005 12:40 Maritime And Coastguard Agency (National) DEVON DIVERS FIND 3,000 YEAR OLD BRONZE AGE ARTEFACTS ON SHIPWRECK SITE A group of divers have discovered a submerged hoard of Bronze Age artefacts off Salcombe, Devon. The find includes swords and rapiers, palstave axe heads, an adze, a cauldron handle, and a gold bracelet. The artefacts have been reported to English Heritage and declared to the Receiver of Wreck at the Maritime & Coastguard Agency, as it is believed that these relics come from an ancient shipwreck. The artefacts are currently being studied at the British Museum, which...
 

Elam Persia, Parthia, Iran
Ancient Earrings Discovered At Burnt City Disprove Ornament Theory 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/09/2005 5:46:51 PM PST · 28 replies · 503+ views


Tehran Times | 3-9-2005
Ancient earrings discovered at Burnt City disprove ornament theory Tehran Times Culture Desk TEHRAN -- Archaeologists have found a pair of silver earrings in a grave of a woman in the 5200-year-old Burnt City which disproves the theory that the inhabitants of the city never used earrings, the director of the Iranian archaeological team working in the region said on Tuesday. A skeleton of a woman with one circular silver earring on each side of her skull was unearthed during the last days of the excavations at the cemetery of the Burnt City, Mansur Sajjadi added. The Burnt City is...
 

Discovery Of 3,000-Year-Old Artist In Espidej (Iran) 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/07/2005 4:23:24 PM PST · 13 replies · 298+ views


CHN Iran | 3-7-2005
Discovery of 3000-year-old Artist in Espidej Tehran, Mar. 7 (CHN) ñ The skeleton of a 3000-year-old artist buried alongside the tools used for his metalwork has been found in Espidej of Sistan-Baluchistan. Excavations in the 3000-year-old site of Espidej led the archaeologists to the discovery of a tomb belonging to an artist, buried with his tools which include an awl, a bronze scoop, a grindstone, and a water container used for freezing copper and bronze. The tools are evidence that metal arts were blooming in the area, and even sent from Espidej to other regions inside and outside Iran. The...
 

Epigraphy and Language
Coin Discovery Sheds Light On Turkic Civilization 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/11/2005 12:03:58 PM PST · 8 replies · 269+ views


Turkish Daily News | 3-10-2005
Coin discovery sheds light on Turkic civilization Thursday, March 10, 2005 Gˆkt¸rk find refutes claims that the Turkic peoples were merely plunderers and barbarians ANKARA - Turkish Daily News Ancient coins from the first known Turkic culture, the Gˆkt¸rks, have been discovered during archeological excavations in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, reported the Do?an News Agency. Associate Professor Yavuz Dalo?lu, an instructor at Dokuz Eyl¸l University who presented the findings of historian Dr. Babayar Gaybullah to the public, stated that claims asserting that the Gˆkt¸rk people did not have any structure of governance have been proven wrong by this discovery. He...
 

Mesopotamia
French archaeologist solves mystery of Mesopotamian city 
  Posted by Lessismore
On News/Activism  03/05/2005 10:04:47 AM PST · 12 replies · 521+ views


The Daily Star | Thursday, March 03, 2005 | By Annick Benoist
Existence of major metallurgy center explains why Mari had been built PARIS, France: The mystery of an ancient Mesopotamian city has finally been lifted after 25 years of meticulous work by a French archaeologist who has revealed it was one of the first "modern cities," purpose-built in the desert for the manufacture of copper arms and tools. In a new book entitled "Mari, the Metropolis of the Euphrates," Jean-Claude Margueron said the third millennium B.C. city, in modern-day Syria, was "one of the first modern cities of humanity. Created from scratch in one phase of construction with the specific goal...
 

Climate
How Prehistoric Farmers Saved Us From A New Ice Age 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/06/2005 3:02:28 PM PST · 59 replies · 1,004+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 3-6-2005 | Robin McKie
How prehistoric farmers saved us from new Ice Age Robin McKie, science editor Sunday March 6, 2005 The Observer Ancient man saved the world from a new Ice Age. That is the startling conclusion of climate researchers who say man-made global warming is not a modern phenomenon and has been going on for thousands of years. Prehistoric farmers who slashed down trees and laid out the first rice paddies and wheatfields triggered major alterations to levels of greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, they say. As a result, global temperatures - which were slowly falling...
 

Viking sagas read through the lens of climate change 
  Posted by Squawk 8888
On News/Activism  03/10/2005 8:19:28 AM PST · 28 replies · 795+ views


EurekAlert | March 9, 2005
Ancient Icelandic sagas may be full of treachery, death and destruction, but the real villain behind all the foment could well have been climate change. According to a Canadian scientist, there's a direct link between changes in regional temperatures and the thematic content of the sagas. The research is based on newly reconstructed temperature records gained from ocean sediment cores collected off the coast of Vestfirdir, the northwest peninsula of Iceland by scientists from the University of Colorado. Analysis of mollusc shells within these cores has provided an astounding, almost weekly, record of temperature changes in the region. "The difficult...
 

Origins and Prehistory

Worldwide Phylogeography of Wild Boar Reveals Multiple Centers of Pig Domestication 
  Posted by Lessismore
On Bloggers & Personal  03/11/2005 1:07:29 PM PST · 11 replies · 236+ views


Science Magazine | 2005-03-11 | See Below
Greger Larson,1* Keith Dobney,2 Umberto Albarella,3 Meiying Fang,4 Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith,5 Judith Robins,5 Stewart Lowden,6 Heather Finlayson,7 Tina Brand,8 Eske Willerslev,1 Peter Rowley-Conwy,2 Leif Andersson,4 Alan Cooper1* Abstract Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from 686 wild and domestic pig specimens place the origin of wild boar in island Southeast Asia (ISEA), where they dispersed across Eurasia. Previous morphological and genetic evidence suggested pig domestication took place in a limited number of locations (principally the Near East and Far East). In contrast, new genetic data reveal multiple centers of domestication across Eurasia and that European, rather than Near Eastern, wild boar are the...
 

HUMANS EVOLVED FROM PIGS - not from monkeys, new theory states! 
  Posted by MRMEAN
On General/Chat  02/24/2005 8:48:44 AM PST · 53 replies · 649+ views


The Weekly World News | 04/19/2004
HUMANS EVOLVED FROM PIGS - not from monkeys, new theory states! Charles Darwin was wrong -- humans evolved from pigs, not apes. And that explains the Biblical prohibition against consuming the flesh of our oinking relatives, according to a startling new theory. "It's hard to believe, but you and Porky Pig are kissing cousins," says genetic scientist Dr. Basil Hainwright of London."Dim recollections of a time when we trotted on all fours and rolled in the mud with our family members probably survived into Neolithic times."And so it is hardly surprising that dietary laws making taboo the eating of...
 

Were Cavemen Painting For Their Gods? 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/06/2005 3:20:58 PM PST · 42 replies · 726+ views


The Telegraph (UK) | 2-23-2005
Were cavemen painting for their gods? (Filed: 23/02/2005) The meaning of Ice Age art has been endlessly debated, but evidence is increasing that some was religiously motivated, says Paul Bahn At least 70,000 years ago, our ancestors began to adorn their bodies with beads, pendants and perhaps tattoos; by 35,000 years ago, they had begun to paint and engrave animals, people and abstract motifs on cave walls, like those in Lascaux, France, and Altamira in Spain. They sculpted voluptuous figurines in ivory or stone, such as the Venus of Willendorf. Underestimating art: 35,000 years ago, our ancestors began painting representations...
 

Ethiopia Archaeologists Make Important Fossil Find 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/05/2005 4:31:47 PM PST · 24 replies · 555+ views


Reuters - UK | 3-5-2005
Ethiopia Archaeologists Make Important Fossil Find Sat Mar 5, 2005 12:03 PM GMT ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - Archaeologists studying human origins in eastern Ethiopia have discovered 12 fossils that appear to be older than the famous fossil "Lucy," the team leader said on Saturday. "The discovery of 12 early hominid foss?øil specimens estimated to be between 3.8 to 4 million years old will be important in terms of understanding the early phases of human evolution before Lucy," Ethiopian archeologist Yohannes Haile Selassie told a news conference. "It is hoped that the new discoveries will allow scientists to connect the dots,...
 

Scientists unearth world's oldest biped skeleton in Ethiopia 
  Posted by Toddsterpatriot
On News/Activism  03/05/2005 6:39:43 PM PST · 19 replies · 432+ views


Yahoo News | Saturday March 5, 2005 | AFP
ADDIS ABABA (AFP) - A joint Ethiopian-US team of paleontologists announced they had discovered the world's oldest biped skeleton to be unearthed so far, dating it to between 3.8 and four million years old. "This is the world's oldest biped," Bruce Latimer, director of the natural history museum in Cleveland, Ohio, told a news conference in the Ethiopian capital, adding that "it will revolutionize the way we see human evolution." The bones were found three weeks ago in Ethiopia's Afar region, at a site some 60 kilometres (40 miles) from Hadar where Lucy, one of the first hominids, was discovered...
 

Health
Caveman Diet to Stay Healthy 
  Posted by Coleus
On General/Chat  03/02/2005 9:44:56 PM PST · 20 replies · 314+ views


AJCN | February 2005
Diet-related chronic diseases represent the single largest cause of death and sickness in the United States and most Western countries. Yet while these diseases are epidemic in contemporary Westernized populations and typically afflict two-thirds of the adult population, they are rare or nonexistent in hunter-gatherers and other less Westernized cultures.Why? There is an increasing awareness that the profound environmental changes, such as diet and other lifestyle conditions that began with the introduction of agriculture and animal husbandry (the care and breeding of domestic animals), occurred too recently for the human genome to adapt to.Thus, universal characteristics of preagricultural human diets...
 

Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV 
  Posted by Pyro7480
On News/Activism  03/10/2005 3:11:16 PM PST · 47 replies · 1,526+ views


Yahoo! News (Reuters) | 3/10/2005 | n/a
Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV LONDON (Agence de Presse Medicale) - The persistent epidemics of hemorrhagic fever that struck Europe during the Middle Ages provided the selection pressures that have made 10 percent of Europeans resistant to HIV infection, according to a UK study. A mutation called delta-32 in the cellular receptor dubbed CCR5 protects against HIV infection, and is found more often in Europeans than other populations. Scientists have previously suggested that the genetic mutation became common because it protected people against the Black Death or smallpox epidemics, while those with normal CCR5 were wiped out. But...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Ancient Artifacts Found On North Carolina Campus 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/08/2005 3:15:39 PM PST · 29 replies · 663+ views


National Geographic News | 3-7-2005 | Willie Drye
Ancient Artifacts Found on North Carolina Campus Willie Drye for National Geographic News March 7, 2005 The discovery of 2,000-year-old artifacts on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is prompting archaeologists to rethink their theories about the early presence of Native Americans in North Carolina. The artifacts include spear points and pottery fragments. Their location indicate that small bands of roaming Indians made a seasonal home on ground that later became the site of the nation's first state university, said Steve Davis, associate director of UNC's Research Laboratories of Archeology. "They were living as bands...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Super Volcano Will Challenge Civilization, Geologists Warn 
  Posted by AntiGuv
On News/Activism  03/08/2005 4:16:02 AM PST · 134 replies · 2,931+ views


SPACE.com | March 8, 2005 | Robert Roy Britt
The eruption of a super volcano "sooner or later" will chill the planet and threaten human civilization, British scientists warned Tuesday. And now the bad news: There's not much anyone can do about it. Several volcanoes around the world are capable of gigantic eruptions unlike anything witnessed in recorded history, based on geologic evidence of past events, the scientists said. Such eruptions would dwarf those of Mount St. Helens, Krakatoa, Pinatubo and anything else going back dozens of millennia. "Super-eruptions are up to hundreds of times larger than these," said Stephen Self of the United Kingdomís (U.K.) Open University. "An...
 

Faith and Philosophy
Triumphalism in Science (re The Triumph of Sociobiology by John Alcock) 
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat  11/25/2004 6:04:55 PM PST · 6 replies · 124+ views


American Scientist | September-October 2001 | reviewed by Jon Beckwith
[Alcock] uncritically accepts the conclusions from highly contested studies of the genetics of human behavior, such as the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart of Thomas J. Bouchard and his colleagues. In fact, the field of human behavior genetics is in a crisis stage, as the great hope of finding behavioral genes with the new DNA technologies has disappointed. Many of the concerns about this field of research parallel those offered by the critics of sociobiology -- that researchers have paid too little attention to nongenetic factors in collecting and analyzing their data. Alcock is at his worst when describing...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Report: Malaria, Not Murder, Killed Medicis 
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism  03/11/2005 11:37:11 AM PST · 9 replies · 263+ views


NY Newsday | 3-9-2005 | Bryn Nelson
Report: Malaria, not murder, killed Medicis BY BRYN NELSON STAFF WRITER March 9, 2005 Two brothers in the Medici dynasty of Renaissance Italy likely were not the long-rumored victims of murder, a new analysis of their centuries-old bones has concluded. Despite the tremendous wealth and power of the Florence-based family, one that produced popes and intellectuals, commissioned art by Michelangelo and protected Galileo from persecution, the two teenagers and their mother instead may have succumbed to a disease that killed without regard to fame or fortune: malaria. "We found no signs of violence at all, none at all," said Long...
 

Riddle of a lost Chinese city on the Atlantic coast 
  Posted by Destro
On General/Chat  03/08/2005 12:42:07 PM PST · 86 replies · 651+ views


asianpacificpost.com | Feb 24, 2005 | asianpacificpost.com
Riddle of a lost Chinese city on the Atlantic coast Feb 24, 2005 On May 16, a Canadian architect will tell the United Nations of a lost Chinese city on the Atlantic coast of North America, lending weight to the theory that the Chinese arrived in the New World some 70 years before Christopher Columbus. A Canadian architect has discovered what is believed to be the lost naval base of Chinaës foremost explorer on the Atlantic coast of North America, lending weight to the theory the Chinese arrived in the New World some 70 years before Christopher Columbus. The revelation...
 

end of digest #34 20050312

196 posted on 03/12/2005 8:12:26 AM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 191 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Congratulations, contributors, the digest covers more categories than it has in ages, maybe ever.

Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050312
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

197 posted on 03/12/2005 8:14:53 AM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, February 20, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 196 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #35
Saturday, March 19, 2005


Africa
Iron Age Pops Out Of KZN Sewer (50-100K Years Old, South Africa)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 09/07/2002 7:49:11 AM PDT · 14 replies · 216+ views


IOL | 9-6-2002
Iron Age pops out of KZN sewer September 06 2002 at 11:42AM Iron Age artefacts between 50,000 and 100,000 years old were unearthed while workers were digging to lay a new sewerage pipe near Amanzimtoti on Thursday. Pieces of iron smelting furnaces, slag and iron ore, arrowheads and bits of human bone had so far been found, said Gavin Anderson of the Natal Museum in Pietermaritzburg. Once the area had been fully excavated, the artefacts would be displayed in the museum, he said. - Sapa
 

Ancient Egypt
Archaeologist Discovers Ancient Ships In Egypt
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/18/2005 11:32:08 AM PST · 9 replies · 521+ views


B U Bridge | 3-18-2005 | Tim Stoddard
Archaeologist discovers ancient ships in Egypt By Tim Stoddard Kathryn Bard had 'the best Christmas ever' this past December when she discovered the well-preserved timbers and riggings of pharaonic seafaring ships inside two man-made caves on Egypt's Red Sea coast. They are the first pieces ever recovered from Egyptian seagoing vessels, and along with hieroglyphic inscriptions found near one of the caves, they promise to shed light on an elaborate network of ancient Red Sea trade. Bard, a CAS associate professor of archaeology, and her former student Chen Sian Lim (CAS'01) had been shoveling sand for scarcely an hour on...
 

Supplicants Send Their Mail To Unseen Powers That Be (Anthropology)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/16/2005 3:32:48 PM PST · 4 replies · 118+ views


Egypt Today | 3-16-2005 | Fayza Hassan
Supplicants send their mail to the unseen powers that be By Fayza Hassan Egypt Today ArchivesMany believe Bab Zuweila to be a mystical site CUSTOMS DIE HARD, nowhere more than in Egypt. Archaeological documents show that from as early as the Old Kingdom up to modern times, an endemic and persistent distrust in medicine and justice, as practiced in the land, often led the Egyptians to address their requests for health and legal redress directly to their dead relatives and the gods. Later, when monotheistic religions prevailed, they were addressed to saints whose extraordinary powers had become firmly rooted in...
 

British Isles
Divers Suprised By Iron Age Port (UK)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 09/17/2002 9:22:11 AM PDT · 16 replies · 96+ views


The Guardian (UK) | 9-17-2002 | Marv Kennedy
Divers surprised by iron age port Maev Kennedy, arts and heritage correspondent Tuesday September 17, 2002 The Guardian Archaeologists diving deep beneath the ferries and yachts criss-crossing Poole harbour have found startling evidence of the oldest working harbour in Britain, built centuries before the Roman invasion. Timber pilings excavated from a deep layer of silt on the sea bed have been radio-carbon dated at 250BC, the oldest substantial port structures by several centuries anywhere on the British coast. They suggest an iron age trading complex, with massive stone and timber jetties reaching out into the deep water channel, providing berths...
 

Searching for the Welsh-Hindi link
  Posted by CarrotAndStick
On News/Activism 03/15/2005 2:58:17 AM PST · 41 replies · 675+ views


BBC | Monday, 14 March, 2005, 10:31 GMT | BBC
A BBC journalist is urging helpful linguists to come forward to help solve a mystery - why the Hindi (India's official language, along with English) accent has so much in common with Welsh. Sonia Mathur, a native Hindi speaker, had her interest sparked when she moved from India to work for the BBC in Wales - and found that two accents from countries 5,000 miles apart seemed to have something in common. It has long been known that the two languages stem from Indo-European, the "mother of all languages" - but the peculiar similarities between the two accents when spoken...
 

Elam Persia, Parthia, Iran
Nowruz: Persian New Year
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 03/18/2005 9:32:35 AM PST · 7 replies · 91+ views


Payvand | 3/18/05 | Payvand
Once again Persian homes prepare for the New Year or Nowruz celebrations. All Persian households follow the practices of this, the oldest of Persian celebrations, which heralds the end of winter and cold and the coming of spring. The house goes through a spring cleaning preparing it for new events in the New Year. Fish bowls containing gold fishes, green wheat or lentil sprouts that have bloomed in decorative plates and shapes, hyacinths and tulips, red apples, mirrors and colored eggs adorn tables on decorative Persian fabrics. In the folds of the Koran fresh money notes are placed to bless...
 

Origins and Prehistory
Neanderthals Sang Like Sopranos
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/15/2005 5:34:39 PM PST · 55 replies · 858+ views


ABC Science News | 3-15-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
Neanderthals sang like sopranos Jennifer Viegas Discovery News Tuesday, 15 March 2005 Neanderthals spoke in a high-pitched, sing-song voice, says one researcher. But not everyone is convinced (Image: iStockphoto) Neanderthals had strong, yet high-pitched, voices that the stocky hominins used for both singing and speaking, says a UK researcher. The theory suggests that Neanderthals, who once lived in Europe from around 200,000 to 35,000 BC, were intelligent and socially complex. It also indicates that although Neanderthals were likely to have represented a unique species, they had more in common with modern humans than previously thought. Stephen Mithen, a professor of...
 

A Family Tree in Every Gene [Races DO Exist: NYT]
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism 03/14/2005 3:10:30 AM PST · 73 replies · 1,124+ views


NY Times Op-Ed Page | March 14, 2005 | ARMAND MARIE LEROI
London ó Shortly after last year's tsunami devastated the lands on the Indian Ocean, The Times of India ran an article with this headline: "Tsunami May Have Rendered Threatened Tribes Extinct." The tribes in question were the Onge, Jarawa, Great Andamanese and Sentinelese - all living on the Andaman Islands - and they numbered some 400 people in all. The article, noting that several of the archipelago's islands were low-lying, in the direct path of the wave, and that casualties were expected to be high, said, "Some beads may have just gone missing from the Emerald Necklace of India." The...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Experts Uncover Ancient Mayan Remains
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/15/2005 11:49:58 PM PST · 10 replies · 387+ views


Yahoo News! | Sun Mar 6 | FREDDY CUEVAS
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - Scientists working at the Copan archaeological site in western Honduras said Sunday they have unearthed the 1,450-year-old remains of 69 people, as well as 30 previously undiscovered ancient Mayan buildings. Copan, about 200 miles west of Tegucigalpa, the capital, flourished between A.D. 250 and 900, part of a vast Mayan empire which stretched across parts of modern-day Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. The site was eventually abandoned, due at least in part to overpopulation, historians believe. Seiichi Nakamura, one of a team of Japanese scientists working alongside Honduran counterparts, said the human remains likely belong...
 

Mother Of Us All, Or Sister? Olmecs A Puzzle
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/15/2005 5:42:09 PM PST · 54 replies · 777+ views


Times Union | 3-15-2005 | John Noble Wilford
Mother of us all, or sister? Olmecs a puzzle By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD, New York Times First published: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 On a coastal flood plain etched by rivers flowing through swamps and alongside fields of maize and beans, the people archaeologists call the Olmecs lived in a society of emergent complexity. It was more than 3,000 years ago, along the Gulf of Mexico around Veracruz. The Olmecs moved a veritable mountain of earth to create a plateau above the plain, and there planted a city, the ruins of which are known today as San Lorenzo. The Olmecs are...
 

Roots of Mesoamerican Writing
  Posted by jimtorr
On News/Activism 12/07/2002 4:54:13 AM PST · 20 replies · 128+ views


Science Magazine, Academic Press Daily "Inscight" | Posted 5 December 2002, 5 pm PST | ERIK STOKSTAD
Roots of Mesoamerican Writing For 7 centuries, the Maya recorded their history in elaborate stone carvings. Archaeologists have deciphered these hieroglyphs, but haven't been certain about their origins. Now a team describes what is potentially the oldest evidence of writing in the Americas. For many archaeologists, the two artifacts suggest that Maya script originated in an earlier culture known as the Olmec. Several clues have long suggested that the Olmec civilization, which flourished from 1200 B.C. to 400 B.C., was the first to develop cultural traditions, including writing, later adopted by the Maya, who reigned from about A.D. 300 to...
 

Let's Have Jerusalem
Genetic evidence links Jews to their ancient tribe
  Posted by Sabramerican
On News/Activism 11/19/2001 3:41:35 PM PST · 125 replies · 752+ views


JP | 11/20/2001 | By Judy Siegel
Genetic evidence links Jews to their ancient tribe By Judy Siegel JERUSALEM (November 20) - Genetic evidence continues to provide additional proof to the claims that the Jewish people are descended from a common ancient Israelite father: Despite being separated for over 1,000 years, Sephardi Jews of North African origin are genetically indistinguishable from their brethren from Iraq, according to The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. They also proved that Sephardi Jews are very close genetically to the Jews of Kurdistan, and only slight differences exist between these two groups and Ashkenazi Jews from Europe. These conclusions are reached in an ...
 

The Lemba (The Black Jews Of Southern Africa)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/14/2005 6:53:09 PM PST · 50 replies · 703+ views


The Free Man Institute | 3-14-2005
T h e L e m b a The Black Jews of Southern Africa Historical Introduction Over 2,700 years ago, the Assyrians exiled the ten tribes of the Kingdom of Israel. "In the ninth year of Hoshea, the king of Assyria captured Samaria and he carried them away to Assyria and placed them in Halah, and on the Habor, the river of Gozan, and in the cities of Medes." In the years 722-721 BC (over 2700 years ago), the Ten Tribes who comprised the northern Kingdom of Israel disappeared. Conquered by the Assyrian King Shalmaneser V, they were exiled to...
 

Archaeoastronomy
Ancient Knife Proves Longer Astronomical History
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/12/2005 11:40:38 AM PST · 45 replies · 901+ views


Xinhuanet/China View. | 3-12-2005
Ancient knife proves longer astronomical history www.chinaview.cn 2005-03-12 09:51:05 XINING, March 12 (Xinhuanet) -- Archaeologists in northwest China's Qinghai province claimed that a 5,000-year-old stone knife with designs of constellations will extend China's history of astronomical observation by 1,000 years. The finely-polished stone knife, six centimeters long and threecentimeters wide, was unearthed at the Laomao Ruins, a New Stone Age site nine kilometers west of Lamao Village in Qinghai. Archaeologists also unearthed many other relics from the site including pottery pieces, stone and bone tools. Liu Baoshan, head of the Qinghai Provincial Cultural Relics andArchaeology Research Institute, said seven holes...
 

O So Mysteriouso
Mystery Of Delhi's Iron Pillar Unraveled
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/13/2005 1:55:06 PM PST · 43 replies · 1,264+ views


India Express | 7-18-2002
Mystery of Delhi's Iron Pillar unraveled Press Trust Of India Thursday, July 18, 2002 New Delhi, July 18: Experts at the Indian Instituteof Technology have resolved the mystery behind the 1,600-year-old iron pillar in Delhi, which has never corroded despite the capital's harsh weather. Metallurgists at Kanpur IIT have discovered that a thin layer of "misawite", a compound of iron, oxygen and hydrogen, has protected the cast iron pillar from rust. The protective film took form within three years after erection of the pillar and has been growing ever so slowly since then. After 1,600 years, the film has grown...
 

Old balls still scorch
  Posted by Registered
On News/Activism 05/06/2002 1:04:11 PM PDT · 28 replies · 309+ views


Nature | 05.06.02 | David Adam
Old balls still scorch Pores made shipwrecked cannon balls glow spontaneously. 6 May 2002 DAVID ADAM Cannonball run: iron may heat rapidly in air after years in the ocean. © AP Goodness gracious! Two British chemists believe they have solved the 26-year-old mystery of how shipwrecked cannonballs that were rescued from the deep spontaneously erupted into great balls of fire."They were glowing bright red and you could feel the heat coming off them as the desk began to smoke," recalls Bob Child, now a chemist at the National Museums and Galleries of Wales in Cardiff.It all happened in 1976,...
 

Is Iron Causing All the Flares?
  Posted by LibWhacker
On News/Activism 11/19/2003 9:15:52 AM PST · 174 replies · 811+ views


Universe Today | 11/18/03
Dr. Oliver Manuel, a professor of nuclear chemistry, believes that iron, not hydrogen, is the sun's most abundant element. In a paper accepted for publication in the Journal of Fusion Energy, Manuel asserts that the 'standard solar model' -- which assumes that the sun's core is made of hydrogen -- has led to misunderstandings of how such solar flares occur, as well as inaccurate views on the nature of global climate change. Recent solar flares erupting on the sun's surface have unleashed powerful geomagnetic storms -- gigantic clouds of highly charged particles that pose a threat to electric utilities, high-frequency...
 

A Mission to the Earth's Core
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism 02/10/2005 10:59:13 AM PST · 106 replies · 1,863+ views


Published in the December-2003 issue of Analog Science Fiction & Fact Magazine | 06/22/2003 | by John G. Cramer
Adventure stories involving the exploration of the interior of Planet Earth have a long and distinguished history in science fiction. Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864) was perhaps the first such tale. Despite the title, the story involves explorers following the instructions of a 17th century runic message on a trip that descends into the crater of an Icelandic volcano and into a long tunnel connecting to a vast cave containing a conveniently phosphorescent ceiling, an ocean, islands, dinosaurs, and mastodons, all in the interior of the Earth some miles beneath the surface. Following Verne's...
 

Climate
Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change
  Posted by ckilmer
On News/Activism 04/16/2004 5:29:53 AM PDT · 29 replies · 122+ views


Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) | APRIL 15, 2004 | PRESS RELEASE
Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change PRESS RELEASE APRIL 15, 2004 EMBARGOED: Not for release until Thursday, 15 April 2004 at 14:00 Eastern Time MOSS LANDING RESEARCHERS REVEAL IRON AS KEY TO CLIMATE CHANGE MOSS LANDING, California - A remarkable expedition to the waters of Antarctica reveals that iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have controlled Earth's climate during past ice ages. A multi-institutional group of scientists, led by Dr. Kenneth Coale of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) and Dr. Ken Johnson of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), fertilized two key areas...
 

Deep freeze dealt death knell to bison (Ice Age)
  Posted by Fatalis
On News/Activism 11/25/2004 7:25:47 PM PST · 32 replies · 702+ views


CBC News Online | 11/25/2004
WASHINGTON - Hunters may not be to blame for the decline in bison populations, according to a new study that points the finger at climate change. Scientists had thought bison were hunted to the brink of extinction when people first crossed an ice-free bridge between what's now Alaska and Siberia. Two subspecies of bison now live in North America. Now researchers say bison DNA shows their genetic diversity began to decline more than 20,000 years before humans reached eastern Beringia in what is now North America, according to archeological evidence.Scientists at Oxford University analysed DNA samples from 442 fossils from...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Mystery object lights up Northwest sky
  Posted by Mr.Atos
On News/Activism 03/12/2005 9:33:14 PM PST · 135 replies · 5,994+ views


FOX 12 OREGON | 03.12.05 | NA
PORTLAND - A flaming object was spotted streaking through the Saturday night sky across Western Oregon and the impact was heard all the way from Salem to Medford, according to various reports. Newspapers across the western half of the state and KPTV were getting phone calls from people who saw the object. Summer Jensen of Portland said she was sitting in her living room with her father when they saw the flash of light outside and rushed to see what it was. "I've never seen anything like that," Jensen said, adding that the object appeared to be moving slowly compared...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Medieval Norwegian church found in deepest Poland
  Posted by franksolich
On General/Chat 03/14/2005 1:54:29 AM PST · 21 replies · 369+ views


Eastern European ping list | not specified | not specified
While waiting for the morning edition of that excellent newspaper in Oslo, the Aftenposten, to pop up on the computer screen, I checked out a "lead" given me by twinself of the Eastern European ping list.There is apparently an ancient Norwegian, a Viking, church right smack in the middle of the Carpathian Mountains of Poland.I have been all over the place, and so am used to finding unusual things in unusual places, but this one seems a gem, a jewel.This church was originally built around 1180, on the shores of Lake Vang in southern Norway (Vangsmjosi), near Mount Grindafjellet. It...
 

Tiny wasps save Cranach altar from woodworm
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 03/13/2005 5:05:15 PM PST · 16 replies · 664+ views


UK Telegraph | 3/13/05 | Katy Duke
A sixteenth-century altar in one of Germany's most historically important cathedrals has been saved from woodworm not by the application of chemicals, but by a swarm of wasps. The Cranach altar in the Erfurt Cathedral was being destroyed by the wood-eating insects, but officials delayed taking action because they feared that chemical treatments might damage its 11 painted panels. Instead they adopted a pioneering technique which may now be emulated in historic buildings across Europe: releasing 3,000 parasitic wasps, which feed on woodworm larvae. The towering wooden altar, riddled with holes, and the large painting above it which also showed...
 

The Brass Monkey: Myth or Fact?
  Posted by WaterDragon
On News/Activism 08/04/2002 5:13:20 AM PDT · 65 replies · 663+ views


Oregon Magazine | August 4, 2002 | Larry Leonard
(Our pal, Camber, the old son-of-a-gun, found this one in his email box. It's been circulating on the net. Is it myth?) In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters carried iron cannons. Those cannon fired round iron balls. It was necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon. But how to keep them from rolling about the deck....?(snip) Click here to read complete article.
 

end of digest #35 20050319


198 posted on 03/19/2005 12:19:45 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, March 13, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 196 | View Replies]

To: 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; Adder; Androcles; albertp; asgardshill; BradyLS; Carolinamom; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link.
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20050319
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

199 posted on 03/19/2005 12:21:43 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Sunday, March 13, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 198 | View Replies]


Gods, Graves, Glyphs
Weekly Digest #36
Saturday, March 26, 2005


Ancient Egypt
Archaeologists discover beautiful coffins in ancient Egyptian cave
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/24/2005 2:02:28 AM PST · 6 replies · 563+ views


Hindustan Times | March | Jamie Tarabay
Archaeologists uncovered three coffins and a remarkably well-preserved mummy in a 2,500-year-old tomb that they found by accident, opening a secret door hidden behind a statue, Egypt's chief archaeologist said on Wednesday. The Australian team was exploring a much older tomb -- dating back 4,200 years -- belonging to a man believed to have been a tutor to the 6th Dynasty King Pepi II, when they moved a pair of statues and discovered the door, said Zahi Hawass, Egypt's top antiquities official. Inside, they found a 26th Dynasty tomb with "three beautiful coffins," each with a mummy, and "inside one...
 

Cleopatra seduced the Romans with her irresistible . . . mind
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/15/2005 8:10:16 PM PST · 99 replies · 1,556+ views


The Times (U.K.) | March 14, 2005 | Ben Hoyle
LONG before Shakespeare portrayed her as history's most exotic femme fatale, Cleopatra was revered throughout the Arab world -- for her brain. Medieval Arab scholars never referred to the Egyptian queen's appearance, and they made no mention of the dangerous sensuality which supposedly corrupted Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Instead they marvelled at her intellectual accomplishments: from alchemy and medicine to philosophy, mathematics and town planning, a new book has claimed. Even Elizabeth Taylor, who famously played the title role in the 1963 epic Cleopatra, would have struggled to inject sex appeal into this queen. Arab writers depict Cleopatra's court...
 

Colossal find (Ramses II statue at Akhmim)
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 03/22/2005 11:28:52 PM PST · 22 replies · 256+ views


Al-Ahram Weekly | 12 - 18 August 2004, issue #703 | staff writer
The remains of a colossal seated statue of Ramses II, thought to be about 13 metres tall and weighing 700 tons, have been discovered in a shanty area of the Upper Egyptian city of Akhmim, adjacent to the open-air museum. The lower part of the limestone statue is seated on a throne, to the right and left of which are figures of two of the pharaoh's daughters and princess- queens, Merit-Amun and Bint-Anath. The statue and the throne are carved from a single block and stand on a huge limestone base covered with carved hieroglyphic texts.
 

Mohammed Abdel Maqsoud :Pharaonic fortress found inside turquoise mines in Sinai
  Posted by nickcarraway
On Bloggers & Personal 03/22/2005 7:06:28 PM PST · 2 replies · 39+ views


Egypt Online | March 21,2005
An Egyptian-Canadian mission unearthed a Fort from the Old Kingdom in Fairuz area in South Sinai. The mission, which is represented by experts from Egypt's Supreme Council for Antiquities and Toronto University, was conducting digging operations in Sahl El Markha site, 160 kilometers south of Suez, on the Western Coast of Sinai. Dr. Mohamad Abdel Maqsoud, director-general of the Lower Egypt and Sinai monuments, said the unearthed stone fort rose three to Four metres high. "The Fort was discovered inside turquoise and copper mines in the area.
 

Remains of ancient Egyptian seafaring ships discovered
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 03/24/2005 11:37:24 PM PST · 4 replies · 75+ views


New Scientist | March 23 2005 | Emma Young
The pottery finds include items the Italian researchers think could be from Yemen... "The Yemeni pottery is very interesting because it was suspected that there were contacts across the Red Sea - and this proves that there were," Baines says. The naval artefacts included two curved cedar planks which might have been parts of steering oars... It is not clear exactly why the artefacts were sealed up inside the caves. But it is possible that they were offerings to the Egyptian gods. "That sounds very plausible to me, not least because previous excavations found a structure made of stone anchors...
 

Mystery of the Cocaine Mummies
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat03/25/2005 8:28:56 PM PST · 10 replies· 63+ views


lime.weeg.uiowa.edu ^| 8 September 1996 | EQUINOX - Channel 4 - UK
For in Manchester, the mummies under the care of Rosalie David, the Egyptologist [Keeper of Egyptology, Manchester Museum] once so sure that Balabanova had made a mistake, produced some odd results of their own... "We've received results back from the tests on our mummy tissue samples and two of the samples and the one hair sample both have evidence of nicotine in them. I'm really very surprised at this."
 

Ancient Navigation
Ancient Navigators Could Have Measured Longitude -- in Egypt in 232 B.C. !
  Posted by ex-Texan
On News/Activism01/12/2003 11:19:24 AM PST · 86 replies· 338+ views


21st Century: Science and Technology Magazine ^| Fall 2001 | Rick Sanders
Ancient Navigators Could Have Measured Longitude -- in Egypt in 232 B.C. !by Rick Sanders Around the year 232 B.C., Captain Rata and Navigator Maui set out with a flotilla of ships from Egypt in an attempt to circumnavigate the Earth. On the night of August 6-7, 2001, between the hours of 11 PM and 3 AM, this writer, and fellow amateur astronomer Bert Cooper, proved in principle that Captain Rata and Navigator Maui could have known and charted their location, by longitude, most of the time during that voyage. The Maui expedition was under the guidance of Eratosthenes, the...
 

Study Says Medieval New World Map Is Real
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism11/25/2003 6:25:37 PM PST · 52 replies· 351+ views


Associated Press ^| Nov 25, 2003 | DIANE SCARPONI
This is a copy of the 'Vinland Map' as seen at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., in this Feb. 13, 1996 file photo. Experts dispute its authenticity. Two new studies add fresh fuel to a decades-old debate about whether the parchment map of the Vikings' travels to the New World, purportedly drawn by a 15th century scribe, is authentic or a clever 20th century forgery. Both studies were published independently in scholarly journals, the researchers announced Monday, Nov. 24, 2003. (AP Photo/Ho) NEW HAVEN, Conn. - The latest scientific analysis of a disputed map of the medieval New World...
 

Asia
Dr. Cameron of Tura finds a 2300-year-old shroud
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/17/2005 12:23:06 AM PST · 6 replies · 302+ views


merimbula.yourguide.com | Wednesday, 16 March 2005
A team coordinated by Tura Beach archaeologist Dr Judith Cameron has discovered and preserved the oldest complete shroud found in Southeast Asia, dating back some 2,300 years to the Bronze Age Dongson culture. The cloth was found in a wooden boat-shaped coffin covered by thick black mud in a canal in the Red River plains area of Vietnam in December last year. In what has been hailed as a major find, team leader Professor Peter Bellwood of the Australian National University said that the boat coffin - unearthed at Dong Xa, 50km southeast of Hanoi - was possibly also the...
 

N.E. Asia: The Ancient Yan and the Ye-maek Chosun(spread of Iron Culture)
  Posted by TigerLikesRooster
On News/Activism 03/20/2005 6:27:41 AM PST · 11 replies · 176+ views


Upkorea | 03/20/05 | Wontack Hong
The Ancient Yan and the Ye-maek Chosun † wthong@wontockhong.pe.kr † The Ancient Yan and the Ye-maek Chosun Yan Initiating the Korean Iron Age Wontack Hong Professor, Seoul University The proto-Turko-Mongol populations, who had first settled around Transbaikalia across the Great Altai, dispersed further across the Greater Xing°Øan Range to become the proto-Xianbei-Tungus in Manchuria, and an offshoot of them tracked a warmer and moister climate down through the Korean peninsula to become the rice-cultivating farmers. The Korean peninsula is an extension of central Manchuria towards the sea, having a long strip of plains in the west flanked by high...
 

The Sand Dune Forgotten By Time (Caucasian Mummies In China - More )
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/19/2005 3:48:39 PM PST · 60 replies · 1,238+ views


China.Org | 3-19-2005
The Sand Dune Forgotten by Time Archaeologists working in the extreme desert terrain of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region have moved a step closer to unraveling the mystery of a 40-century-old civilization. They unearthed 163 tombs containing mummies during their ongoing and long excavation at the mysterious Xiaohe tomb complex. And it's all thanks to the translation of a diary kept by a Swedish explorer more than 70 years ago. "We have found more than 30 coffins containing mummies," said Idelisi Abuduresule, head of the Xinjiang Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute and the excavation team. The complex is believed to...
 

British Isles
Ancient coin worth a pretty penny
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 03/21/2005 11:34:22 PM PST · 8 replies · 198+ views


CNN | Thursday, October 7, 2004 | Spinks
American collector Allan Davisson purchased the coin, which was found by an amateur searcher using a metal detector near the River Ivel in Bedfordshire, north of London, in 2001. It is the only known coin to bear the name of King Coenwulf of Mercia, who ruled a region of southern England from 796 to 821.
 

Townhouse reveals real skeletons in closet
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/17/2005 12:53:55 AM PST · 11 replies · 837+ views


icWales
SKELETONS in the closet were a real-life problem for Ashford Price when he opened a cupboard in his late aunt's bedroom to be confronted with dozens of human remains. The grand Georgian townhouse in the stately sweep of Swansea's leafy St James's Crescent had hidden a secret for decades until its owner, Brenda Morgan, 84, passed away. Police were immediately called after the discovery, but suspicions were dampened when it was noticed all the bones had been carefully cleaned and numbered. The remains were in fact 42 human skeletons dating back over 3,000 years to the Bronze Age. They had...
 

Ancient Rome
Bernheze Roman Bronze Hoard from the Netherlands
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat 03/23/2005 11:56:02 PM PST · 4 replies · 76+ views


Minerva: the International Review of Ancient Art and Archaeology | Last Updated: Friday, 9 July, 2004 at 3:10:29pm | Ruurd B. Halbertsma
Until now no traces of a sanctuary or riverine context have been found, which might indicate a religious deposition for the wine-set. It is possible that the valuable bronzes were hidden underground during the period of the hostile Germanic incursions in the second half of the 3rd century AD.
 

New hope in hunt for Roman library
  Posted by Engraved-on-His-hands
On News/Activism 02/13/2005 6:10:07 PM PST · 15 replies · 520+ views


The Australian | 02/14/2005 | Nick Fielding
A PHILANTHROPIST has stepped forward to fund excavations at the ancient city of Herculaneum in Italy, where scholars believe a Roman library lies buried beneath 3m of lava from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79.
 

India
'Bhimbetka Paintings Over 25,000 Years Old' (India)
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/23/2005 7:25:51 PM PST · 17 replies · 466+ views


Hindustan Times | 3-21-2005 | Sravani Sarkar
ëBhimbetka paintings over 25,000 years old' Sravani SarkarBhopal, March 21,2005 CONTESTING THE claim of the Western scientific community that Indian rock paintings are comparatively quite modern than those found in their part of world, eminent city archaeologist Dr Narayan Vyas has come up with a path-breaking research work that seeks to prove that Bhimbetka rock paintings are as old as the oldest rock paintings known in the world -- i.e around 25,000 years. The post-doctoral research work titled ëA comparative study of rock paintings of Raisen District, with special emphasis on Bhimbetka' has earned Dr Narayan Vyas -- presently superintending...
 

Tsunami reveals a town's ancient ruins
  Posted by nickcarraway
On News/Activism 03/19/2005 2:41:25 PM PST · 6 replies · 980+ views


CNN | Thursday, March 17, 2005
MAHABALIPURAM, India (AP) -- For a few minutes, after the water had receded far from the shore and before it came raging back as a tsunami, the fishermen stood along the beach and stared at the reality of generations of legends. Or so they say. Spread across nearly a mile, the site was encrusted with barnacles and covered in mud. But the fishermen insist they saw the remains of ancient temples and hundreds of refrigerator-sized blocks, all briefly exposed before the sea swallowed them up again. "You could see the destroyed walls covered in coral, and the broken-down temple in...
 

Elam Persia, Parthia, Iran
archaeologist Says Central Asia Was Cradle Of Ancient Persian Religion
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/19/2005 8:59:31 PM PST · 16 replies · 471+ views


AFP/Yahoo | 3-18-2005
Archeologist says Central Asia was cradle of ancient Persian religion Fri Mar 18, 6:24 PM ET Science - AFP ATHENS (AFP) - The mysterious Margianan civilisation which flowered in the desert of what is now Turkmenistan some 4,000 years ago was the cradle of the ancient Persian religion of Zoroastrianism, Greco-Russian archeologist Victor Sarigiannidis claimed here. He said the theory would provoke controversy amongst his fellow archeologists, but said his excavations around the site of Gonur Tepe have uncovered temples and evidence of sacrifices that would consistent with a Zoroastrian cult. The religion was founded by Zarathustra, a Persian prophet...
 

Esther's Iranian tomb draws pilgrims of all religious stripes
  Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism 03/22/2005 9:48:58 AM PST · 22 replies · 432+ views


Haaretz | 3/22/05 | Helen Eliassian
Though the holiday of Purim is celebrated by Jews worldwide, the story, based as it is in Persia, has special resonance for the Jews of Iran. Recent decades have proved difficult for Persian Jews, many of whom fled the country after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. From a community of about 100,000, an estimated 25,000 to 35,000 now remain. This month, Jews from across Iran will pray at a shrine in Hamadan, in northwestern Iran, dedicated to the heroes of the Purim story. They will likely be met upon arrival by Muslims and Christians, who pray year-round at the unusual shrine....
 

Origins and Prehistory
Did Use of Free Trade Cause Neanderthal Extinction?
  Posted by Woodworker
On News/Activism 03/25/2005 3:54:29 AM PST · 31 replies · 593+ views


Newswise | 24-Mar-2005 | Mr. James Kearns
Economics-free trade may have contributed to the extinction of Neanderthals 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to a paper published in the "Journal of Economic Organization and Behavior." "After at least 200,000 years of eking out an existence in glacial Eurasia, the Neanderthal suddenly went extinct," writes University of Wyoming economist Jason Shogren, along with colleagues Richard Horan of Michigan State University and Erwin Bulte from Tilburg University in the Netherlands. "Early modern humans arriving on the scene shortly before are suspected to have been the perpetrator, but exactly how they caused Neanderthal extinction is unknown." Creating a new kind of caveman...
 

Biology and Cryptobiology
Frozen Woolly Mammoth Arrives in Japan
  Posted by satchmodog9
On News/Activism 11/19/2004 7:35:37 PM PST · 64 replies · 980+ views


yahoo news | 11/18/04 | some fool from AP
TOKYO - World fairs have typically focused on the wonders of the future, highlighting new technologies from glass and steel construction in the 19th century to satellites and computers today. But next year's fair is different. The Japanese organizers of the 2005 world's fair have shipped a 18,000-year-old frozen woolly mammoth from Siberia to become the centerpiece attraction. Naoki Suzuki, the Japanese scientist overseeing the Aichi Expo exhibit, said Friday the preserved head, tusks and front leg of the mammoth have arrived in Nagoya near the fair site, about 170 miles west of Tokyo.
 

Tissue Find Offers New Look Into Dinosaurs' Lives
  Posted by wagglebee
On News/Activism 03/24/2005 5:31:46 PM PST · 24 replies · 551+ views


New York Times | 3/24/05 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
Alive as dinosaurs may seem to children, knowledge of them as living creatures is limited almost entirely to what can be learned from bones that have long since turned to stony fossils. Their soft tissues, when rarely recovered, have lost their original revealing form. A 70-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex recently discovered in Montana, scientists reported today, has apparently yielded the improbable: soft tissues, including blood vessels and possibly cells, that "retain some of their original flexibility, elasticity and resilience." In a paper being published on Friday in the journal Science, the discovery team said that the remarkable preservation of the tissue...
 

PreColumbian, Clovis, PreClovis
Amazonian find stuns researchers
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism09/20/2003 6:15:45 PM PDT · 41 replies· 393+ views


The Seattle Times ^| 9-20-03 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Amazonian find stuns researchers Deep in the Amazon forest of Brazil, archaeologists have found a network of 1,000-year-old towns and villages that refutes two long-held notions: that the pre-Columbian tropical rain forest was a pristine environment that had not been altered by humans, and that the rain forest could not support a complex, sophisticated society. A 15-mile-square region at the headwaters of the Xingu River contains at least 19 villages that are sited at regular intervals and share the same circular design. The villages are connected by a system of broad, parallel highways, Florida researchers reported in yesterday's issue of...
 

Peruvian Family Claims Machu Picchu
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism 03/23/2005 7:10:23 PM PST · 13 replies · 420+ views


UK News Yahoo | 3-22-2005
Peruvian family claims Machu Picchu LIMA, Peru (Reuters) - Peru's poor Zavaleta family has only one thing to say to the thousands of tourists who trek along the Inca trail to the renowned citadel Machu Picchu every year: "Hey you, get off our land!" The family says it is the lawful owner of a large part of the Machu Picchu sanctuary, Peru's most famous national treasure, and will start proceedings next week to sue the state for recognition of its ownership rights. "The Zavaletas bought the land in 1944 and have title deeds that date from 1898," their lawyer Fausto...
 

Thoroughly Modern Miscellany
Music heard again after 400 years
  Posted by nickcarraway
On General/Chat 03/17/2005 12:40:09 AM PST · 5 replies · 122+ views


BBC | Wednesday, 16 March, 2005
Music written especially for the chapel at a north Wales castle will be performed for the first time in nearly 400 years on Wednesday.The 17th Century pieces lay undiscovered in the library of Chirk Castle until 1969 when they were sold at auction to an anonymous bidder. It has taken experts at the University of Wales in Bangor five years to transcribe and edit the collection. The music will be sung at chapel concert by the university's choir. The concert will include works by William Deane, who was the organist at Wrexham parish church. The collection also includes music by...
 

Rapper gives Chaucer new life
  Posted by SmithL
On General/Chat 03/20/2005 7:30:57 AM PST · 13 replies · 144+ views


Contra Costa Times | 3/20/5 | Quynh Tran
More than 500 students from English and performing arts classes at Oakland's Skyline High School were treated to a performance by hip-hop Chaucer rapper Dirk "Baba" Brinkman this week. Brinkman, 26, put to music literary classics "The Pardoner's Tale" and "The Wife of Bath's Tale" and rhymed along. Rappers aren't looking at classical work like Chaucer's for their material, Brinkman said, but the similarities are there. Ancient Anglo-Saxon forms and today's rap rhythms both use verses and couplets that end in rhyme, he said, and create poetry intended for oral expression. "Baba's taking 14th century Chaucer and making it accessible...
 

Sir Mix-A-Lot's "Baby Got Back" translated into Latin
  Posted by Constitution Day
On News/Activism 10/15/2003 11:54:03 AM PDT · 113 replies · 5,123+ views


Livejournal.com | 10/08/2003 | Quislibet [Livejournal]
Yes, you read the thread title correctly. - CD De clunibus magnis amandis oratioMixaloti equitis mehercle!(By Hercules!)Rebecca, ecce! tantae clunes isti sunt! (Rebecca, behold! Such large buttocks she has!)amica esse videtur istorum hominum rhythmicorum.(She appears to be a girlfriend of one of those rhythmic-oration people.)sed, ut scis,(But, as you know)quis homines huiusmodi intellegere potest?(Who can understand persons of this sort?) colloquuntur equidem cum ista eo tantum, quod scortum perfectum esse videtur.(Verily, they converse with her for this reason only, namely, that she appears to be a complete whore.) clunes, aio, maiores esse! (Her buttocks, I say, are rather large!)nec possum...
 

end of digest #36 20050326


200 posted on 03/25/2005 10:35:41 PM PST by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Friday, March 25, 2005.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 198 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-50 ... 101-150151-200201-250 ... 1,451-1,492 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson