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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

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To: A. Pole; A.J.Armitage; Askel5; arthurus; aruanan; BoneHead; Boru; blam; Citizen Tom Paine; ...
posted to folks who posted to (or were posted to) the old, closed topic Catastrophic event preceded Dark Ages - scientist begun by 09/08/2000 10:06:44 PDT by VadeRetro. I couldn't add the topic to the GGG group page because it's closed.

NOT A PING LIST, merely posted to: A. Pole; A.J.Armitage; Askel5; arthurus; aruanan; BoneHead; Boru; blam; Citizen Tom Paine; ClaireSolt; cannae; chit*chat; DBrow; Ditter; DJtex; Doctor Stochastic; Dukie; d14truth; deep dyou dyou; Eva; expat; Francohio; GOPJ; Gritty; ingeborg; JasonC; Jay W; Justa; janus; LadyDoc; LadyX; Lonesome in Massachussets; Lurking2Long; lavaroise; Makhno; Man; MHGinTN; Michael Rivero; Ohioan; OldAtlanta; PatrickHenry; parsifal; patton; Question_Assumptions; Rebelbase; RebelStorm; Redcloak; RightOnline; RightWhale; Romulus; randog; redhead; SAMWolf; Saint George; SamAdams76; ScottF; SevenDaysInMay; sneakypete; southernnorthcarolina; stboz; steve-b; Tench_Coxe; The Cruiser; The Duke; The_Reader_David; tet68; tillacum; tracer; VadeRetro; Warren

51 posted on 07/21/2004 7:07:36 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

I had fun just reading your this-is-not-a-ping-list list of flags.

Thanks for the heads up.


52 posted on 07/21/2004 8:03:26 AM PDT by Askel5
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To: Askel5
You're most welcome.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

53 posted on 07/21/2004 8:34:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: ValerieUSA
[wipes lipstick] Whoa... my head's still spinning...
54 posted on 07/22/2004 12:05:15 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv
Hey! What are you doing? Sneaking back here days later to revisit the *SMOOCH*? I guess there's no need to ever give you another if that one will do. *LOL*
55 posted on 07/22/2004 12:13:53 AM PDT by ValerieUSA
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To: #3Fan; A CA Guy; A.J.Armitage; Ada Coddington; advocate10; AK2KX; ALACA; alaskanfan; Aliska; ...
This is a ping, yes, but NOT A PING LIST per se. I'm merely posting to anyone who posted in the closed topics shown:
1 Ancient Site in Newfoundland Offers Clues to Vikings in America
2 The Curse of the Red-Headed Mummy
3 Redheads 'are neanderthal'


NOT A PING LIST, merely posted to: #3Fan; 1999; A CA Guy; A.J. Armitage; A.J.Armitage; Ada Coddington; advocate10; AK2KX; ALACA; alaskanfan; Aliska; Always Right; AppyPappy; Artist; Askel5; austinTparty; balrog666; Benrand; beowolf; better_dead_then_red; betty boop; big ern; Billthedrill; Black Jade; Black_Jade; Blam; BlueLancer; bmwcyle; BobF; boris; bribriagain; BurkeCalhounDabney; bvw; Caay_Okie; cactmh; cajunjim; Calling All Blondes...; CarrieOkie; Carrie_Okie; Carry_Okie; Caryy_Okie; Central Scrutiniser; Charles H.; COB1; color_tear; Congressman Billybob; Cool Guy; cool guy; crazykatz; Cyber Liberty; cypherpunk; Dan De Quille; Dan from Michigan; Dan(9698); Darth Sidious; Dec31; dennisw; dighton; Ditter; Doc On The Bay; efoley; elfman2; Eric in Mpls; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ExpatGator; falcondriver; feinswinesuksass; fella; FenianOfEire; ffighter; Fiddlstix; FITZ; fnord; Frankiedi; geaux; genealogy_prober; George Smiley; Glyphs; Godel; Goetz_von_Berlichingen; Gracey; Graewoulf; grasshopper2; Graves; Great Wall; GreatWall; headsonpikes; Hegewisch Dupa; High_fidility; Hillary's Lovely Legs; Hitlerys uterus; Hopalong; Hugh Akston; hunter112; iknowtoo; Incorrigible; independentmind; InvisibleChurch; Jay W; jeep jeep; jerseygirl; JimVT; JoeFromBurbank; Jonah Hex; Junior; Just another Joe; kancel; katykelly; keats5; Kevin Curry; LastOfTheBrunnen-G; Lazamataz; LBGA; lowbridge; machman; MadAsHell; madrussian; makoman; MalleusMaleficarum; March I Up; Mark17; mathurine; max61; McGavin999; Mercat; Mercuria; Michael Rivero; mike2right; Miss Marple; mollynme; Movemout; Myrddin; NativeSon; NC_Libertarian; netman; nmh; NoClones; nopardons; Norma; Nowhere Man; OKCSubmariner; Oneidam; Paradox; PennsylvaniaMom; Pharmboy; Publius6961; Question_Assumptions; r9etb; Razz Barry; reagandemo; redhead; Redhead2; RedwM; Republican Extremist; RepubMommy; RikaStrom; Roebucks; Romulus; Rowdee; Sabra Sun; SAMWolf; Sawdring; segis; Senator Pardek; Seruzawa; SevenDaysInMay; sirgawain; skraeling; sper175; SShultz460; Stingray; super 175; super175; supercat; supercat175; Swede Girl; T. P. Pole; tallhappy; Texan5; TexasRepublic; The Cruiser; TheGoodDoc; TN Republican; tophat9000; Travis McGee; truth_seeker; Twodees; Uff Da; uglybiker; usconservative; Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy; Vikingchick; VOA; Wild Game; willyone; Wm Bach; xsmommy; zbogwan2; Zipporah

56 posted on 07/22/2004 10:14:45 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

Oh too neat!

Thanks SunkenCiv!


57 posted on 07/22/2004 11:11:27 AM PDT by RikaStrom (Involved vs. Committed- take bacon and eggs, for example, the hen is involved, the pig is committed.)
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To: SunkenCiv

cool redheaded "kinda" ping list


58 posted on 07/22/2004 1:15:59 PM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks, I love to read about stuff like this, "forbidden archeology," and so on.


59 posted on 07/22/2004 1:38:50 PM PDT by Nowhere Man ("Laws are the spider webs through which the big bugs fly past and the little ones get caught.")
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To: SunkenCiv; Admin Moderator

Please remove it. This is a violation of people's privacy.


61 posted on 07/23/2004 8:27:11 AM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for the ping, I like stuff like this.


62 posted on 07/23/2004 10:01:26 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: SunkenCiv; farmfriend; FairOpinion; blam

You need to ask the admonitor to remove the list of names....

And all on the pinglist will need to bookmark this thread.....


63 posted on 07/25/2004 11:27:03 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (New Linux SUSE Pro 9.1 user here.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Admin Moderator; Lead Moderator; Jim Robinson
You need to ask the admonitor to remove the list of names....

I did back in mid July. Asking again.

64 posted on 07/25/2004 11:49:44 AM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: Admin Moderator

Please remove the list of names in post #60. Thanks.


65 posted on 07/25/2004 1:09:27 PM PDT by blam
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To: Admin Moderator
I can see their point, and would edit it out myself, but there isn't an edit button. Please chop out the offending stuff; despite the fact that it's merely a non-political ping list, I'm sure there are folks on there who may take umbrage with their inclusion. You have to admit though that it's pretty cool. ;')
66 posted on 07/25/2004 4:53:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: RikaStrom; Hegewisch Dupa; Nowhere Man; DBrow
RikaStrom: Oh too neat! Thanks SunkenCiv!
Hegewisch Dupa: cool redheaded "kinda" ping list
DBrow: Thanks for the ping, I like stuff like this.
Nowhere Man: Thanks, I love to read about stuff like this, "forbidden archeology," and so on.
You're all most welcome, and thanks for the kind remarks.
see Civ's favorites incl Books, Magazines, Movies, Music

67 posted on 07/25/2004 5:07:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All
Tip: Building Keyword list
With the demise of the Groups system here on FreeRepublic (which was itself a modification of an earlier system, from the years BC -- before 'Civ) it will be more important than ever to make sure new topics, as well as old ones we wish to keep track of, have a decent, coherent set of keywords.

1: Keywords have no spaces. "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" will wind up as "GLYPHS; GODS; GRAVES" if entered as shown. John Robinson is converting each old Group page to a keyword. The Gods, Graves, Glyphs pinglist should be entered as "godsgravesglyphs". This writer also requests that you enter "ggg". In fact, enter "ggg" even if you're in a hurry and don't want to enter anything. All who use FreeRepublic thank you.

2: Keywords should be obvious. That lack of spaces makes it unlikely that keyword searches will bear fruit if they have them. I'm not quite sure that's correct, but I'm sure we'll all find out.

3: Keywords can be added after the fact. If you find an article you wish to track, and it doesn't have a keyword that it should have, click on "add keyword" and type it in. If you're entering more than one, make sure they are separated by commas not spaces -- "bayofpigs, kennedy" not "bay of pigs kennedy". The second will result in the keyword "bayofpigskennedy" and a topic that will never be found again.

4: Keywords should come from the original article. What else follows along that line will sound a little too anal for most, but will result in a much better, much more comprehensive, and easier to use set of keywords we will all enjoy.
a: Load the article in a word processor, text editor, or other program capable of search and replace to insert line breaks (carriage returns, whatever you call them) and sorting a column of text.

b: Do a search and replace on the space character, changing all to line breaks.

c: Sort the column of text.

d: Begin to glimpse the genius / mania of being me.

e: Starting at the top of the sorted list (which will be in alpha order, with the duplicates conveniently grouped together), highlight the terms not to be included and delete them.

f: Get rid of "the" and "a" (which you should be able to do with search and replace, as long as you precede and follow the term with a line break) and other common words.

g: Select words (like names of people quoted, nations, technical terms) which are distinctive as well as terms related to the topic. For example, an article about the mass-murdering criminal Arafat should include keywords like "PLO" and "terrorism" as well as "Israel".
I hope this has been of some help to everyone.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list (alt)
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

68 posted on 07/25/2004 7:34:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother
My last hare-brained stunt (for today) -- this is a quicker way for me to add the keywords to each one (that part still has to be done manually). Feel free to ignore, unless you've got broadband and feel like helping out. Works best if this topic is in a brand new window, as it uses the "slave" window as FR does.
69 posted on 07/25/2004 8:18:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

OK working on this list starting at the bottom!


70 posted on 07/25/2004 10:20:30 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: SunkenCiv

Suddenly realized you may already have done these.


71 posted on 07/25/2004 10:24:17 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks! Yeah, I finished 'em about 12:05 am. :')
72 posted on 07/26/2004 9:14:48 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; SunkenCiv; 24Karet; 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; ...
This is the first in a series of roughly weekly Gods, Graves, and Glyphs pings. See the next message for the digest of recent additions to the list.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

73 posted on 07/28/2004 11:41:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All

American History
Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT with 9 comments


Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo gborzo@fieldmuseum.org 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Ba?l, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
     
 
Below Ground,Washington's Lost History ^
      Posted by foolscap
On News/Activism ^ 07/19/2004 6:03:43 AM PDT with 9 comments


washingtonpost.com ^ | 7/8/04 | arielle baker
It fell out of use sometime in the Taft administration and was razed to its foundation in 1912. After nearly a half-century of housing the horses that carried presidents, the Executive Stable -- what was left of it -- spent 90 years as part of Washington's paved-over past, joining centuries of foundation stones, bone fragments and other artifacts of everyday life beneath the ground. That is, until three years ago, when plans to improve security around the White House put the area in the hands of archaeologists charged with the task of uncovering the stable. "It's something you hadn't thought...
     
 

Precolumbian, Clovis, Preclovis
Did hardy Ice Age hunters find the West?  ^
      Posted by Holly_P
On News/Activism ^ 01/02/2004 8:42:57 PM PST with 35 comments


Springfield News-Leader ^ | 010204 | Paul Recer (A.P.)
<p>Washington ó A people who may have been ancestors of the first Americans lived in Arctic Siberia, enduring one of the most unforgiving environments on Earth at the height of the Ice Age, according to researchers who discovered the oldest evidence yet of humans living near the frigid gateway to the New World. Russian scientists uncovered a 30,000-year-old site where ancient hunters lived on the Yana River in Siberia, some 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle and not far from the Bering land bridge that then connected Asia with North America.</p>
     
 
European DNA Found In 7-8,000 Year Old Skeleton In Florida (Windover) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/14/2003 7:40:03 PM PDT with 115 comments


TLC ^ | 8-14-2003 | blam
Earlier I posted an article titled Bye, Bye Beringia (8,000 Year Old Site In Florida. I just turned on The Learning Channel and caught about ten minutes of the ending of a program titled, 'Secrets Of The Bog People: Windover', it is about this 'Windover' site in Florida. A doctor Gregory from Cornell said that preliminary DNA samples taken from the brains of some of the people indicate they are European. They also showed a reconstructed face of one of the skulls. I checked my TLC schedule and it indicates that another showing will be at 11:00PM CST tonight. This...
     
 
Ogham alphabet ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/27/2004 11:34:30 AM PDT with 5 comments


Glossemata GenealogicÊ ^ | The Alphabetary Heraldic
Ogham inscriptions : [600 bc] primitive inscriptions of the old Q-Celt (600 bc) or the newer P-Celt (400 bc) that survive in the British Isles. We have a total of approximately 375 Ogham inscriptions. Ireland has some 316 Ogham inscriptions, Wales has 40 inscriptions, and the Isle of Man has 10 inscriptions. One inscription survived at Silchester in southern England, and a few Pictish Ogham inscriptions have been found in Scotland, as far north as the Shetland Islands. Ogham script often runs upward, in a vertical manner, for it was originally written as notches on wooden staves. Oghams :...
     
 
PEOPLING OF THE AMERICAS: Late Date for Siberian Site Challenges Bering Pathway ^
      Posted by Lessismore
On News/Activism ^ 07/25/2003 6:40:03 PM PDT with 27 comments


Science Magazine ^ | 2003-07-25 | Richard Stone
As elusive as the Cheshire Cat, the first people to arrive in the Americas have tended to appear and vanish with each new twist in the archaeological record. The latest disappearing act may be taking place on page 501, where new evidence, some claim, casts another shadow over a once-cherished idea: that Asian big-game hunters crossed the Bering Land Bridge to give rise to the Clovis people, who were considered the first Americans. New dates show that a crucial Siberian site, thought to be a way station along the Bering road, wasn't occupied until after the Clovis had begun killing...
     
 
The Pinta, Santa Maria And A Chinese Junk? (More) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 02/03/2003 3:18:04 PM PST with 13 comments


Christian Science Moniter ^ | 1-29-2003 | Amanda Paulson
from the January 29, 2003 edition The Pinta, Santa Maria, and a Chinese junk? A new book claims the Chinese discovered America in 1421, but historians refute thesis. By Amanda Paulson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor To the Norsemen, the Japanese, and the Carthaginians; to the Irish, the Africans, and a long list of others who, it is claimed, crossed the oceans to America long before 1492, add one more: the Chinese. They toured up and down both coasts of the Americas, established colonies, made maps, and left behind chickens. That, at least, is the theory posed...
     
 
Who Were The Si-Te-Cah ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 11/23/2003 6:48:27 PM PST with 64 comments


Runestone.org ^ | Steve McNallen
WHO WERE THE SI-TE-CAH? Note the cranial similarities between this Lovelock Cave skull discovered in the 1920's and the Kennewick Man sketch by Jamie Chatters (Click on the site) ---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- This 1995 article by Steve McNallen was written months before the discovery of the Kennewick Man or the current controversy over ancient Caucasians in North America. In retrospect, it seems hauntingly prophetic. The history of the European peoples in the are we call California is generally assumed to have begun with the Spanish in the 1500's, followed later by the English (represented by Sir Francis Drake) and by the...
     
 

African, European, and Middle Eastern History and Prehistory
Burial complex of Mentuhotep II ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/27/2004 11:56:40 AM PDT


The History of the Ancient Egyptians ^ | May 2002 | Ian Bolton
Instead of building a 'saff' tomb like those of his predecessors, Mentuhotep II decided to build an impressive tomb by the cliffs of Deir el Bahri (the same location chosen in the 18th dynasty by Hatshepsut). A T-shaped terrace was built using masonary and by using the natural rock. The walls built on this terrace were then decorated both inside and out with painted relief carving.
     
 
Geologist rebuts claim of forged Jesus inscription on ossuary ^
      Posted by Phil V.
On News/Activism ^ 12/21/2003 5:31:47 AM PST with 9 comments


Ha'aretz ^ | Sun., December 21, 2003 | By Amiram Barkat, Haaretz Correspondent and AP
w w w . h a a r e t z d a i l y . c o m Last update†-†09:47 21/12/2003 Geologist rebuts claim of forged Jesus inscription on ossuary By Amiram Barkat, Haaretz Correspondent and AP The disputed ossuary. (Israel Antiquities Authority) The heated controversy over the authenticity of the inscription naming Jesus on an ancient burial box discovered a year ago has flared up again, after claims by an American geologist that the Israeli findings, dismissing the inscription on a small 2,000-year-old limestone ossuary as a forgery, were flawed. James Harrell published his opinion Friday...
     
 
Stone Age Sites Found Under North Sea (8,000BC) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 12/09/2003 5:30:54 PM PST with 78 comments


University Of Newcastle On Tyne ^ | 9-12-2003
Stone Age sites found under North Sea Date released 12 September 2003 Experts have discovered the first ever evidence of Stone Age settlements in the British North Sea, dating back as far as 10,000 years. Subject to further investigation, one of them could be the earliest underwater archaeological site in the UK. The exciting find, discovered by accident by a team from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, could lead to a rewriting of the history books and revolutionise our understanding of the way our ancestors lived. The discovery of several stone artefacts, including tools and arrowheads, have pinpointed...
     
 
Study: Neanderthals, Modern Humans Same Species ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/10/2002 5:42:43 AM PST with 76 comments


USA Today ^ | 12-26-2001 | Michael A. Stowe
<p>Humanity's first steps out of Africa along a path that led ultimately to dominion over the earth are subject to intense scientific debate. So is the role played by the Neandertals who roamed across Europe for 100,000 years before quietly disappearing. The two issues may well be related, and a University of Tennessee anthropologist reports statistical evidence that Neandertals and emerging modern humans likely interbred and evolved together.</p>
     
 

History and Prehistory of the Orient
Chinese Archaeologists Find 'World's Oldest Earrings' (8,000 Year Old) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/27/2004 11:11:24 AM PDT with 5 comments


SMH.com ^ | 7-27-2004
Chinese archaeologists find 'world's oldest earrings' July 27, 2004 Chinese archaeologists have discovered earrings they believe are the oldest found in the world. The jade earrings, which date to between 7500 and 8200 years ago, were unearthed at the Xinglongwa culture site in Chifeng city in Inner Mongolia, the Xinhua news agency said yesterday. The jade rings, called "Jue" in old Chinese, have diameters that measure 2.5 to six centimetres. Liu Guoxiang, head of an archaeological team under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said it was "magnificent" that the earrings were found in pairs that were almost similar in...
     
 
Christian Designs Found In Tomb Stones Of Eastern Han Dynasty ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/04/2002 3:00:50 PM PDT with 145 comments


CL2000.com ^ | 8-2-2002
Christian Designs Found in Tomb Stones of Eastern Han Dynasty [2002-08-02] Studies show that as early as 86 A.D., or the third year under the reign of "Yuanhe" of Eastern Han, Dynasty Christianity entered into China, 550 years earlier than the world accepted time. When studying a batch of stone carvings of Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 A.D.) stored and exhibited in the Museum of Xuzhou Han Stone Carvings, Christian theology professor Wang Weifan was greatly surprised by some stone engravings demonstrating the Bible stories and designs of early Christian times. Further studies showed that some of these engravings were made...
     
 
The Curse Of The Red-Headed Mummy ^
      Posted by blam
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 12/12/2003 9:21:21 PM PST with 27 comments


The Birdman.org ^ | 5-18-2001 | Heather Pringle
THE CURSE OF THE RED-HEADED MUMMY5-18-2001 by Heather Pringle Until he first encountered the mummies of Xinjiang, Victor Mair was known mainly as a brilliant, if eccentric, translator of obscure Chinese texts, a fine sinologist with a few controversial ideas about the origins of Chinese culture, and a scathing critic prone to penning stern reviews of sloppy scholarship. Mair's pronouncements on the striking resemblance between some characters inscribed on the Dead Sea Scrolls and early Chinese symbols were intensely debated by researchers. His magnum opus on the origins of Chinese writing, a work he had been toiling away at for...
     
 
Discovery Rewrites Chinese Vehicle History ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/26/2004 9:33:55 PM PDT with 16 comments


ABC Science News ^ | 7-26-2004
Monday, July 26, 2004. 10:09pm (AEST)Discovery rewrites Chinese vehicle history The discovery of 3,700-year-old chariot tracks has pushed back the appearance of vehicles in China by 200 years, the country's media has reported. "It advances the history of China's vehicle use up to the Xia Dynasty (2100 - 1600 BC)," said Xu Hong, who leads the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences' archaeological investigation team at the Erlitou archaeological site in Yanshi city, central Henan province. The two parallel tracks were discovered on the grounds of a palace at the site, Xinhua news agency reported. Erlitou, discovered in 1959, was the...
     
 
Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/27/2004 11:23:06 AM PDT with 2 comments


Xinhua News/China.org ^ | 7-27-2004
Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries More than 80 leading archeological experts are participating in an international conference in Chifeng, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, to exchange the latest information on Hongshan, a prehistoric relics site. Relics excavated at the Hongshan ("Red Mountain") site originated around 5000 BC to 6500 BC. Now a part of Chifeng City, the site was discovered in 1935. Some of the relics found at Hongshan have led archeologists to conclude that the heads of Chinese dragons may have been inspired by boars in addition to horses and cattle. Primitive people who struggled to survive by fishing and...
     
 
Siberian Graveyard's Secret (More Redheads) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/08/2004 9:41:32 AM PST with 93 comments


International Herald Tribune ^ | 1-8-2003
Siberian Graveyard's Secrets YEKATERINBURG, Russia In a medieval Siberian graveyard a few miles south of the Arctic Circle, Russian scientists have unearthed mummies roughly 1,000 years old, clad in copper masks, hoops and plates - burial rites that archaeologists say they have never seen before. . Among 34 shallow graves were five mummies shrouded in copper and blankets of reindeer, beaver, wolverine or bear fur. Unlike the remains of Egyptian pharaohs, the scientists say, the Siberian bodies were mummified by accident. The cold, dry permafrost preserved the remains, and the copper may have helped prevent oxidation. . The discovery adds...
     
 

Astronomy, Archaeoastronomy, and Catastrophism
Astronomers Revise Date of Ancient Greek-Persian Battle ^
      Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism ^ 07/22/2004 11:48:19 AM PDT with 10 comments


Iranian Cultural Heritage ^ | 7/22/04 | Iranian Cultural Heritage
A team of astronomer gumshoes has pinned down the date of an ancient Greek-Persian battle at Marathon that led to a long-distance run and the sport that survives today in its honor. Analysis of lunar records show the 490 B.C. battle occurred not on the long accepted date of September 12, but a full month earlier, researchers said. How important is a month for a professional runner more than 2,000 years ago? Apparently it's a matter of life and death. According the Greek historian Herodotus, Plutarch and others, after the Greek army routed their Persian attackers at Marathon the long-distance...
     
 
Astronomers unravel a mystery of the Dark Ages ^
      Posted by ckilmer
On News/Activism ^ 02/03/2004 2:54:24 PM PST with 62 comments


EurekAlert ^ | 3-Feb-2004 | Dr Derek Ward-Thompson
Public release date: 3-Feb-2004 Contact: Dr Derek Ward-Thompson derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk 029-2087-5314 Cardiff University Astronomers unravel a mystery of the Dark Ages Undergraduates' work blames comet for 6th-century "nuclear winter" Scientists at Cardiff University, UK, believe they have discovered the cause of crop failures and summer frosts some 1,500 years ago ñ a comet colliding with Earth. The team has been studying evidence from tree rings, which suggests that the Earth underwent a series of very cold summers around 536-540 AD, indicating an effect rather like a nuclear winter. The scientists in the School of Physics and Astronomy believe this was caused...
     
 
Big Chill Killed Off The Neanderthals ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/21/2004 3:26:51 PM PST with 74 comments


New Scientist ^ | 1-21-2004 | Douglas Palmer
Big chill killed off the Neanderthals 19:00 21 January 04 It is possibly the longest-running murder mystery of them all. What, or even who, killed humankind's nearest relatives, the Neanderthals who once roamed Europe before dying out almost 30,000 years ago? Suspects have ranged from the climate to humans themselves, and the mystery has deeply divided experts. Now 30 scientists have come together to publish the most definitive answer yet to this enigma. They say Neanderthals simply did not have the technological know-how to survive the increasingly harsh winters. And intriguingly, rather than being Neanderthal killers, the original human settlers...
     
 
The Dark Ages: Were They Darker Than We Imagined? ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 06/08/2003 10:31:29 PM PDT with 87 comments


The Universe ^ | 9-1999 | Greg Bryant
The Dark Ages : Were They Darker Than We Imagined? By Greg Bryant Published in the September 1999 issue of Universe As we approach the end of the Second Millennium, a review of ancient history is not what you would normally expect to read in the pages of Universe. Indeed, except for reflecting on the AD 837 apparition of Halley's Comet (when it should have been as bright as Venus and would have moved through 60 degrees of sky in one day as it passed just 0.03 AU from Earth - three times closer than Hyakutake in 1996), you may...
     
 
Did Asteroids And Comets Turn The Tides Of Civilization? ^
      Posted by blam
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/11/2002 1:56:44 PM PDT with 76 comments


Discovering Archaeology ^ | July/August 1999 | Mike Baillie
Did Asteroids and Comets Turn the Tides of Civilization? By Mike Baillie The heart of humanity seems at times to have lost its cadence, the rhythmic beat of history collapsing into impotent chaos. Wars raged. Pestilence spread. Famine reigned. Death came early and hard. Dynasties died, and civilization flickered. Such a time came in the sixth century A.D. The Dark Ages settled heavily over Europe. Rome had been beaten back from its empire. Art and science stagnated. Even the sun turned its back. "We marvel to see no shadows of our bodies at noon, to feel the mighty vigor of...
     
 
Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST with 56 comments


Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization ó ancient Mesopotamia ó more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
     
 
Reworked images reveal hot Venus  ^
      Posted by Central Scrutiniser
On News/Activism ^ 01/14/2004 5:25:16 PM PST with 42 comments


BBC ^ | 1-13-03 | Dr David Whitehouse
Reworked images reveal hot Venus By Dr David Whitehouse Mars it is not: Reprocessed Venus image As the world looks at Mars, an American scientist has produced the best images ever obtained from the surface of a rather different planet - Venus. The second planet from the Sun is blanketed with a thick layer of cloud. Computer researcher Don Mitchell used original digital data from two Soviet Venera probes that landed in 1975. His reprocessed and recalibrated images provide a much clearer view of the Venusian surface which is hotter even than the inside of a household oven. Original digital...
     
 


74 posted on 07/28/2004 11:44:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; blam; farmfriend
How do you like this method? Any suggestions? I've tried to organize the recent bumps a little, by category, and naturally just made up the categories. :')
75 posted on 07/28/2004 11:47:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv
You have been VERY busy. Much appreciated by this Freeper.

FGS

76 posted on 07/28/2004 11:52:49 PM PDT by ForGod'sSake (ABCNNBCBS: An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Categorization is good, but the problem is that you you'll probably end up with a number of things that don't fit the categories, and there are subcategories, etc.

But your categories sound fine.

But I think keeping this particular thread going, and posting a post, which includes links to that week's GGG articles is probably a good idea, and you could include the link to this thread in your GGG pings, so people know where can they get them all.


77 posted on 07/28/2004 11:57:36 PM PDT by FairOpinion (FIGHT TERRORISM! VOTE BUSH/CHENEY 2004.)
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To: FairOpinion
and you could include the link to this thread in your GGG pings, so people know where can they get them all.
good idea! and good heavens, I didn't think of that before. :'o

78 posted on 07/29/2004 12:00:22 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: ForGod'sSake
Thanks, I appreciate your kind remarks. :')
79 posted on 07/29/2004 12:00:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: FairOpinion
Hmm... let's try it...
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

80 posted on 07/29/2004 12:03:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

I like it this way!


81 posted on 07/29/2004 12:06:08 AM PDT by FairOpinion (FIGHT TERRORISM! VOTE BUSH/CHENEY 2004.)
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To: FairOpinion
The next refinement will be, to post the digest for the week, and *then* ping the list, with a link in the message, like this:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20040729
Too bad HTML doesn't work well in the mail system here, I could just send the message private. :')

82 posted on 07/29/2004 12:11:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: FairOpinion
Oops. This is the real one. Opens a window called "ggg". I just have to make sure the target modifer in the digest post points to "slave". :')

Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20040729
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

83 posted on 07/29/2004 12:16:30 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

Looks good -- maybe the way to do it is to use the "best article" of the week (as determined by you) and ping from there, then give the link to the post in the Apha thread, which contains that week's digest.

How does that sound?


84 posted on 07/29/2004 12:16:41 AM PDT by FairOpinion (FIGHT TERRORISM! VOTE BUSH/CHENEY 2004.)
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To: SunkenCiv

You insensitive clod! You said "slave"! I thought that term had been stricken from the techie vocab. I demand reparations.


85 posted on 07/29/2004 12:25:08 AM PDT by ValerieUSA
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To: FairOpinion
Yeah, I like that too, a further refinement.
86 posted on 07/29/2004 12:27:23 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: ValerieUSA

What the Bible really says about Slavery: This and other information on the issue of Slavery as it applies to History and Religion What the Bible really says about Slavery:
This and other information
on the issue of Slavery
as it applies to History and Religion
2nd Ed

by Elreta Dodds
with Noreta Dennard


87 posted on 07/29/2004 12:31:05 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

Have I told you today yet, that you are doing great? ;)


88 posted on 07/29/2004 12:34:24 AM PDT by FairOpinion (FIGHT TERRORISM! VOTE BUSH/CHENEY 2004.)
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To: FairOpinion
It's like George Costanza and Marisa Tomei -- "not in the last five minutes." ;')
89 posted on 07/29/2004 12:45:08 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

Lizard tongue. Now that's funny!

Hey, can any of our graphics wizards out there do Kerry with his wagging lizard tongue?

You think his image advisers would make him aware of his habit. It really is unbecoming.


90 posted on 07/29/2004 6:08:23 AM PDT by Freeper Lady
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To: Freeper Lady
Posted in wrong topic? Now my interest is piqued...
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

91 posted on 07/29/2004 10:06:27 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All

Ancient Engineering
From Hand-drag to Jumbo: A Millennium of Dredging ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/30/2004 8:27:24 AM PDT with 1 comment


IADC (International Association of Dredging Companies) ^ | 1999 | IADC
In the 7th century BC, the Assyrian king Sennacherib constructed an 80-kilometre-long, 20-metre-wide stone-lined canal to bring fresh water to his capital Nineveh. Compared to 20th century standards, one is surprised to learn that the project, which included a 330-metre-long aqueduct, was completed in only one year and three months time.
     

Ancient Egypt
Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT with 1 comment


BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
[T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
     

Roman Empire
Archaeologist's dig reveals solution to ancient riddle of lost Roman town ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/30/2004 7:47:49 AM PDT


Telegraph Online ^ | Sunday 30 July 2000 | Adam Lusher
Brian Philp has spent 34 years quietly amassing evidence to support his theory that Noviomagus, a small "trading post" town on a busy Roman route between London and the south coast, lies beneath fields next to St John the Baptist church in West Wickham, Kent. Academics now say that his theory is so strong there should be a full excavation of the site... The location of Noviomagus has tantalised historians for centuries because it is well-documented in Roman records but no credible material evidence has ever been found... The scholar Robert Talbot suggested Old Croydon as a possible site...
     
 
New Dating For Wat's Dyke ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/30/2004 7:13:00 AM PDT


History Today ^ | August 1999 | Keith Nurse
The new information places the construction of the dyke within the shadowy period that began with the formal withdrawal of the Roman administration (AD 410) and ended with the absorption of the area into Mercia. The report concludes: 'The dyke should therefore be regarded as being contemporary with that other great fifth-century linear earthwork, the Wiltshire Wansdyke, rather than Offa's Dyke, and should be considered as an achievement of the post-Roman kingdom of the northern Cornovii, rather than the work of seventh- or eighth-century Mercia.'
     

Ancient Greece
Was There a Trojan War? ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/29/2004 11:43:38 PM PDT with 4 comments


Archaeology ^ | May/June 2004 | Manfred Korfmann
A spectacular result of the new excavations has been the verification of the existence of a lower settlement from the seventeenth to the early twelfth centuries B.C. (Troy levels VI/VIIa) outside and south and east of the citadel. As magnetometer surveys and seven excavations undertaken since 1993 have shown, this lower city was surrounded at least in the thirteenth century by an impressive U-shaped fortification ditch, approximately eleven and a half feet wide and six and a half feet deep, hewn into the limestone bedrock. Conclusions about the existence and quality of buildings within the confines of the ditch...
     
 
New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT with 11 comments


Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
     

Atlantis
Archaeologists to seek Kyrgyz Atlantis ^
      Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 07/30/2004 8:53:01 PM PDT with 8 comments


Big News Network.com ^ | Saturday 31st July, 2004 | Editorial Staff
A Kyrgyz-Russian expedition has embarked for an ancient city covered by Lake Issyk-Kul in Kyrgyzstan, local media reported Wednesday. Issyk-Kul, 2,250 square miles in area, is a mountain lake in the north of the country. Historians and legends tell about a disappeared island in the lake with fortifications near the north coast where Tamerlane, the Tartar conqueror in southern and western Asia and ruler of Samarkand, held noble prisoners in the 14th century, the Vecherniy Bishkek newspaper said. People have reported seeing stone buildings in on the bottom of northeast Issyk-Kul, not far from the mouth of the Tyup River....
     
 
The Search For Atlantis 'Ends At Ayia Napa' (Cyprus) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 09/27/2003 5:01:50 PM PDT with 76 comments


The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 9-28-2003 | Fiona Govan
The search for Atlantis 'ends at Ayia Napa' By Fiona Govan (Filed: 28/09/2003) It may be the answer generations of experts on the ancient world have been looking for. New research claims that the fabled ancient civilisation of Atlantis is located close to Cyprus. After nearly 10 years of research using ocean mapping technology and accounts from ancient texts, an American explorer says he has evidence that Atlantis lies beneath the deep blue waters off the southern tip of the island.Robert Sarmast, a self-proclaimed mythologist and expert on the ancient world, makes this claim in his book, Discovery of Atlantis...
     
 
Search For "Lost" Atlantis Centers On Strait Of Gibraltar ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/04/2002 4:45:18 PM PST with 37 comments


National Geographic ^ | 0104-2001
Search for "Lost" Atlantis Centers on Strait of Gibraltar The Record, Bergen County, New Jersey January 4, 2002 It was Plato, around 360 B.C., who first described an ancient, exotic island kingdom catastrophically buried beneath the sea when its once-virtuous people angered the gods with their pronounced tilt toward sin and corruption. Since then, creative souls ranging from Jules Verne to Kirk Morris, Maria Montez, Fay Spain, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Michael J. Fox, and Walt Disney have sought to explain and exploit the terrible fate that befell Atlantis. Vases from Atlantis? Archaeologists made an important find in the 1960s, lending support ...
     

Catastrophism & Astronomy
An Impact Event in 3114BC? The beginning of a Turbulent Millennium.  ^
      Posted by ckilmer
On News/Activism ^ 01/03/2003 8:06:06 PM PST with 40 comments


personal.eunet.fi ^
An Impact Event in 3114BC? The Beginning of a Turbulent Millennium. Recurring Phenomenon: The Cosmic DisasterThe Mayan CalendarStonehengeA Possible Source for the 3100 BC Event Collected and commented by Timo Niroma, Helsinki, Finland Go to the Evidence of Astronomical Aspects of Mankind's Past and Recent Climate Homepage Recurring Phenomenon: The Cosmic Disaster Besides the most evident cosmic catastrophes ca. 2200 BC and 2345 BC there are other events during the Holocene that are so widely global and difficult to explain by only the Earth's own mechanisms that a cosmic explanation must evidently be taken into account. The first so-called...
     

Precolumbian, Clovis, & PreClovis
Professor Says Mayan Calendar Does Not Portend Earth's Doom (2012AD) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/01/2003 3:18:59 PM PST with 58 comments


Tuscaloosa News ^ | 1-1-2003 | Steve Reeves
Professor says Mayan calendar does not portend Earthís doom By Steve Reeves January 01, 2003 TUSCALOOSA | Does our planet have only a scant 10 more years of existence left? Some people believe the ancient Mayan calendar suggests the end of the world will come on Dec. 21, 2012. But University of Alabama professor Enrique Gomez is not among them. ìThe world wonít end in 2012," laughed Gomez, who teaches in UAís astronomy and physics department. ìI can assure you of that." Gomez, a native of Mexico City, said he is much more interested in Mayan culture and how the...
     

Gods Graves Glyphs digest for 2004-07-31
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

92 posted on 07/31/2004 12:18:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; SunkenCiv; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Arrowhead1952; ...
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link (second issue).

Please check your email for a message from me regarding this digest format (IOW, do you like it).

As I neglected to do so, please send a private message to me (or include it in your poll response) regarding my use of the "comic sans ms" font, as there has been a slight undercurrent of dissent about my use of it. I'll be glad to discontinue its use if there's a groundswell of non-support for it. If you like it, tell me that too.
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20040731
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

93 posted on 07/31/2004 12:25:33 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All
Here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link (second issue) with the correct link. Boy, I love makin' a splash. Unfortunately, they're mostly belly-flops. ;'(
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20040731
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

94 posted on 07/31/2004 12:28:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

Wow!

I can't believe I've only just discovered your ping list/thread.

Thanks for all of your hard work. I can't wait to begin reading!


95 posted on 08/05/2004 9:46:14 AM PDT by pax_et_bonum (Sometimes these brain cells have a mind of their own.)
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To: pax_et_bonum
Thanks for the kind remarks. The list was begun (I believe) by Ernest_at_the_Beach, passed to FarmFriend, then to FairOpinion. FO passed it to me a few weeks, oh, a little over a month ago I guess. StayAt HomeMother and FO are my backups, a "general staff" strategy that should keep the list alive for a good while. Most of the new threads (and the old ones that I've been adding in) were originated by blam, or noticed first by him. So, as you can see, I don't work all that hard. :') Spend waaaaay too much time online though.
96 posted on 08/05/2004 11:26:24 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All

Gods, Graves, Glyphs Weekly Digest #3
Africa
An Ancient Link To Africa Lives On In Bay Of Bengal ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 12/10/2002 1:09:21 PM PST · 40 replies · 31+ views


The New York Times ^ | 12-10-2002 | Nicholas Wade
An Ancient Link to Africa Lives on in Bay of Bengal By NICHOLAS WADE Inhabitants of the Andaman Islands, a remote archipelago east of India, are direct descendants of the first modern humans to have inhabited Asia, geneticists conclude in a new study. But the islanders lack a distinctive genetic feature found among Australian aborigines, another early group to leave Africa, suggesting they were part of a separate exodus. The Andaman Islanders are "arguably the most enigmatic people on our planet," a team of geneticists led by Dr. Erika Hagelberg of the University of Oslo write in the journal Current...
 

Ancient Map Of Africa Poses Questions ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 11/12/2002 8:21:38 AM PST · 38 replies · 80+ views


cooltech.iafrica ^ | 11-12-2002
Ancient map of Africa poses questions The unveiling in South Africa's parliament on Monday of a replica of an ancient Chinese map of the then known world which includes a recognisable outline of Africa is raising intriguing questions of which foreigners first explored the continent. "The idea is to take us beyond what we have been ... brainwashed into believing" declared Speaker Frene Ginwala at the opening of the exhibition, which includes other maps and rock art. The "Da Ming Hun Yi Tu", the Amalgamated Map of the Great Ming Empire, dates back to 1389, decades before the first European...
 

Egypt
Egypt announces discovery of 30,000 year-old skeleton ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 05/08/2002 7:59:57 PM PDT · 6 replies · 11+ views


ABC ^ | MAY 8 2002 | ABC Editorial Staff
Egypt announces discovery of 30,000 year-old skeleton Wednesday, 8 May 2002 The skeleton of a human being who lived more than 30,000 years ago has been discovered in southern Egypt by Belgian archaeologists, an Egyptian official announced. "Anthropologists have set his, or her, age to be between 30,000 and 33,000 years ago," Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said. It was the oldest skeleton ever found in northern Africa, Mr Hawass said. A team from the University of Leuven found the skeleton buried in a seated position facing east, with the head turned upward, the director of...
 

New Egyptian King Discovered ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 04/26/2002 5:19:20 PM PDT · 19 replies · 27+ views


Discovery News ^ | April 26 2002 | By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News
April 26 A new Egyptian king has been discovered, according to Italian archaeologists digging at Luxor. Known to be a high-ranking priest in the theocratic state of Amon at Thebes, Harwa was also a king ruling southern Egypt during the obscure period of the so-called Black Pharaohs, the Nubian kings of the 25th Dynasty. A fat, bald man with a large face, almond-shaped eyes and thin lips, as portrayed in a statue, Harwa was born in the 8th century B.C. into a family of Theban priests. He must have been at the beginning of his career when Piankhy, the black...
 

Royal Nubia lies under sand ^
  Posted by vannrox
On General/Chat ^ 04/22/2002 3:38:54 PM PDT · 11 replies · 68+ views


National Post ^ | 4-22-02 | Margaret Munro
Royal Nubia lies under sand Canadian archaeologists in Sudan, using magnetometers, have found a 2,000-year-old palace in the heart of the ancient black civilization If his partner had not fallen into an ancient tomb and broken both legs, Professor Krzysztof Grzymski would have discovered the ancient Nubian royal palace even sooner. Still, Grzymski, a professor at the University of Toronto and a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum, is a happy archaeologist these days. He and his colleague, who is walking again, have found what they believe are the remains of a palace and a colonnade built more than...
 

Faith and Philosophy
Straights Answers: Why Do Priests Use Incense?  ^
  Posted by NYer
On Religion ^ 07/21/2004 7:51:24 PM PDT · 37 replies · 345+ views


Catholic Herald ^ | Fr. William Saunders
Why do priests use incense at Mass? — A reader in AlexandriaIncense is an aromatic substance which is the resin from certain trees. When burned over charcoal, the incense produces a sweet smelling aroma. To make the smoke thicker and to enhance the fragrance, sometimes other perfumes are blended with the incense. The use of incense in the ancient world was common, especially in religious rites where it was used to keep demons away. Herodotus, the Greek historian, recorded that it was popular among the Assyrians, Babylonians and Egyptians. In Judaism, incense was included in the thanksgiving offerings of oil, grain,...
 

Ancient Navigation
Ancient Vessel Traces Voyages Of The Past ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 06/13/2002 2:31:03 PM PDT · 9 replies · 46+ views


Cyprus Mail ^ | 6-13-2002
Ancient vessel retraces voyages of the past By Stefanos Evripidou IT LOOKS like a tree house stuck on a bamboo banana. In reality it's the incarnation of a pre-Pharaonic reed boat, designed and built to unravel the mysteries of prehistoric navigation. The Abora II drifted in to Larnaca marina yesterday. Weighing in at six- tonnes, the vessel is a totra-reed boat. It is 11.5 metres long, 3.5 metres wide and 1.5 metres deep. The man responsible for building the huge boat is Dominique Goerlitz, a biology teacher at a school in Germany. As a student, Goerlitz was fascinated by the...
 

Rome and Italy
Burial with the Romans ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/01/2004 7:15:21 PM PDT · 1 reply · 101+ views


British Archaeology magazine, March 2003 ^ | March 2003 | Alison Taylor
Victims of every age, social class and sex were chosen. An exceptional proportion had a physical impairment of some kind. 'Overkill' was normal - a single individual might, for example, be garotted, bludgeoned, drowned and have his or her throat cut before being cast into the bog. In Britain this prehistoric practice, although always a rare event, was apparently unaffected by the Roman conquest... [T]he ritual killings of prisoners of war, sent to Rome to be paraded around the streets and executed in public, carried on.
 

The Etruscans: Reopening the Case of the Mute Civilization ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/04/2004 11:39:04 AM PDT · 14 replies · 91+ views


New York Times ^ | May 27, 2001 | Alan Riding
Yet even the catalog is wary of answering the question central to the "mystery" of the Etruscans: where did they come from? Did they migrate from Greece or beyond? Did they travel down from the Alps? Or, as their pre- Indo-European language might suggest, were they a people indigenous to today's Tuscany who suddenly acquired the tools for rapid development? Such are the pros and cons of each theory, the French historian Dominique Briquel notes in his catalog essay, that "the problem must be held to be unresolved." ...[T]hey spoke the same language, which also existed in a written...
 

Vandals Threaten Italian Monuments ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/01/2004 1:00:25 PM PDT · 2 replies · 33+ views


Archaeology Odyssey ^ | July 28, 2004 | editors
A number of Italian statues, fountains and archaeological sites have been under attack from vandals and professional thieves recently, obliging authorities to take extra measures to protect them. The wave began last month in Venice, when a 38-year-old man with a history of psychological problems was caught three days into a rampage in which he took a hammer to five of the city’s historical sites. Coverage of the event has spurred copycat instances, mostly in Rome. Last week the 360-year-old Fontana delle Api (Fountain of Bees), commissioned by Pope Urban VIII and created by Gianlorenzo Bernini, was attacked by...
 

You Say London, they say Londinium ^
  Posted by PaulKersey
On News/Activism ^ 10/11/2002 9:53:11 PM PDT · 13 replies · 7+ views


New York Times ^ | October 12, 2002 | REUTERS
---------------------------------------- October 12, 2002 You Say 'London,' They Said 'Londinium' By REUTERS ONDON, Oct. 11 — Archaeologists excavating an ancient site in London said today that they had unearthed the oldest known plaque inscribed with the city's Roman name, a variant of Londinium. "This is hugely important," said Francis Grew, curator of archaeology at the Museum of London. "It is the first real monumental inscription with the word Londinium on it. It is also visually the most important inscription we have even found in London." The Italian marble plaque, found in Southwark at the junction of three key Roman roads,...
 

Eastern Mediterranean
Alexander The Great's Death Debated ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/03/2004 11:38:37 AM PDT · 46 replies · 994+ views


Discovery Channel ^ | 8-2-2004
Alexander the Great's Death Debated Aug. 2, 2004 — What killed ancient world conqueror Alexander the Great is still a mystery, pitting scientists who favor West Nile virus against those who lean toward a death from typhoid. History says that Alexander, king of Macedonia, died at 32 in 323 B.C. after several days of fever in Babylon. However, the cause of the fever was always unclear.Alexander In The Fog Several hypotheses have been advanced: poisoning, malaria, or cirrhosis of the liver caused by Alexander's penchant for drink, as well as typhoid or west Nile virus. “ The dispute resurfaced in...
 
Amazon Warrior Women ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · 25 replies · 626+ views


PBS ^ | Current | PBS
Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
 

Ancient Treasure Trove Uncovered ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 12/18/2002 9:37:24 AM PST · 8 replies · 15+ views


Ananova ^ | 12-18-2002
Ancient treasure trove uncovered Archaeologists have found a 2,700-year-old temple which contains objects from across the ancient world. Gold and silver figures, jewellery and shells from throughout the Mediterranean were gathered in one place on the small Greek island of Kithnos in the Aegean Sea. The finds suggest the temple was for a female god. Many of the objects were originally from Egypt, Italy and Phoenicia which is now Lebanon and Israel. The ancient city was founded during the 10th century BC and abandoned four centuries later, said Alexander Mazarakis-Ainian, over seeing the dig. He is an associate professor at...
 

Ancient Warrior Grave Unearthed In Lebanese Port (Sidon) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 09/15/2002 7:47:38 AM PDT · 2 replies · 12+ views


ABC News ^ | 9-16-2002
Mon, Sep 16 2002 12:39 AM AEST Ancient warrior grave unearthed in Lebanese port Archaeologists have unearthed several Bronze Age graves, including that of an ancient warrior interred with his axe, in the southern Lebanese port city of Sidon. Excavation team director Claude Doumet Serhal said the excavations are "among the most important archaeological projects in Lebanon as they are taking place in the centre of the city of modern Sidon." He also said the warrior's grave dated back to the Middle Bronze Age, around the second millennium BC, and included an unusually well preserved bronze duck-bill axe with a...
 

Archaeoligists: Iraqi Dam Threatens City ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 02/05/2003 6:34:50 AM PST · 6 replies · 18+ views


ABC News via AP ^ | Feb. 3 2003 | AP Editorial Staff
Feb. 3 — An Iraqi dam under construction on the Tigris River threatens to submerge the remains of the spiritual capital of the ancient Assyrian empire in an act archaeologists liken to flooding the Vatican.Much of the city of Ashur, which thrived for more than 1,000 years until the Babylonians razed it in 614 B.C., could vanish under a lake to be created by the Makhoul dam, U.S. and European archaeologists said.More than 60 outlying historical sites are also threatened.Ashur, or Assur, was of such importance that it lent its name to the Assyrian civilization itself."Losing it would be...
 

Capital City Of Ancient Superpower Discovered (Medes) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 10/26/2002 12:56:48 PM PDT · 24 replies · 61+ views


Independent (UK) ^ | 10-26-2002 | David Keys
Capital city of ancient superpower discovered By David Keys Archaeology Correspondent 26 October 2002 British archaeologists have discovered a capital city of one of the ancient world's most mysterious superpowers. The metropolis, covering more than a square mile, was the main western administrative centre of the ancient Median Empire, a vast Middle Eastern imperial state which flourished in the first half of the 6th century BC between the fall of the Assyrian empire and the rise of Persia. The discovery reveals the sheer scale of the threat which would soon be posed to Europe by the ancient Middle East. For...
 

City in the Clouds (Sagalassos, ancient city in Turkey) ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/01/2004 1:17:54 PM PDT · 2 replies · 40+ views


Archaeology (Archaeological Institute of America) ^ | July 2003-August 2004 | Marc Waelkens and Tijl Vereenooghe
[D]uring the mid-nineteenth century, William Hamilton described it as the best preserved ancient city he had ever seen. Toward the end of that century, Sagalassos and its theater became famous among students of classical antiquity... [A] British-Belgian team led by Stephen Mitchell started surveying the site in 1985. Since 1990, Sagalassos has become a large-scale, interdisciplinary excavation of the Catholic University of Leuven, directed by Marc Waelkens.
 

Playing for all Elgin Marbles ^
  Posted by Dog Gone
On News/Activism ^ 08/01/2004 8:48:19 AM PDT · 84 replies · 675+ views


Houston Chronicle ^ | August 1, 2004 | SUSAN NAGEL
Dispute between Greece, England resumes with Olympics Games With the Olympic Games soon to open in Athens, one of the more bitter rivalries in history is set to resume, and it doesn't involve parallel bars or water polo. The Greek government is spending tens of millions of dollars on a museum atop the Acropolis in hopes that Britain will choose this occasion to return the Elgin Marbles, the elaborate sets of sculptures pried off the Parthenon and shipped to London two centuries ago. The British, unsurprisingly, have not complied. To understand why the sculptures mean so much to both...
 

Reviving Two Old Series ^
  Posted by A.J.Armitage
On News/Activism ^ 11/27/2002 4:15:06 PM PST · 62 replies · 161+ views


I used to do two series of threads. One was about politics and government in the Greco-Roman civilization, and the other was my own columns. Here's a list of them: Ancient Politics and Government The Athenian Constitution, Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, and Part Five by Aristotle Chapter One of Polybius and the Founding Fathers by Marshall Davies Lloyd Deeds of Augustus by Caesar Augustus Cicero by Plutarch The Conspiracy of Catiline by Sallust Lives of the Twelve Caesars by Suetonius JuliusAugustusTiberiusCaligulaClaudiusNe The American Constitutionalist-In Defense of "Underage" Drinking -Anarchy vs. the Right to Life -Calling a...
 

Sensational Finding at Samoil Fortress ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/04/2004 12:45:16 AM PDT · 2 replies · 47+ views


Republic of Macedonia cultural website ^ | March 10, 2002 | Ministry of Culture
This is an epochal discovery for the Macedonian, Balkan and European archaeology since it sheds additional scientific light to the widely famous Trebenista necropolis near Ohrid. The tomb and all the items found in there date back to 5th B.C. pointing to the oldest burial within the Lichnidos necropolis... The mask and glove were found in a tomb with around 70 funeral items made in various materials: pottery, amber, glass items, iron, bronze, silver and gold. Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.The GGG Digest -- Gods, Graves,...
 

Xenophon's Retreat ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/04/2004 12:51:05 AM PDT · 2 replies · 41+ views


Archaeology ^ | April 7, 1997 | Norman Hammond
British scholar Timothy Mitford believes he has found the spot from which a Greek army first sighted the Black Sea during its flight from the forces of the Persian king Artaxerxes II in 401 B.C. Earlier that year Artaxerxes had defeated his brother Cyrus at Cunaxa on the Euphrates, crushing the latter's bid for the throne. Among Cyrus' forces was a contingent of Greek mercenaries known as the Ten Thousand, led by the Athenian general and historian Xenophon, who recounts the event in his Anabasis. After the battle Xenophon led his troops through the Tigris and upper Euphrates valleys,...
 

Eastern Asia
Ancient Pottery With Plowing Design Unearthed (2,800BC, China) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/07/2004 11:17:13 AM PDT · 11 replies · 283+ views


Xinhuanet/China View ^ | 8-7-2004
Ancient pottery with plowing design unearthed www.chinaview.cn 2004-08-07 10:57:27 LANZHOU, Aug. 7 (Xinhuanet) -- A 4,800-year-old piece of colored pottery bearing designs of plowing was recently unearthed at Lintao County in northwest China's Gansu Province. Chinese archaeologists believe the pottery, which is 30-cm-talland 34-cm in width, belongs to the Majiayao culture, a historical period in about 3300 B.C. to 2050 B.C.. The picture on the pottery vividly portrays a scene of plowing in simple black lines. Beside the farmland is a river, painted in several zigzag lines. Wang Zhi'an, president of the Gansu Provincial Majiayao Culture Society, said the design...
 

The Powerful Kings of the Van Kingdom ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/01/2004 6:34:59 PM PDT · 3 replies · 54+ views


Turkish government website ^ | 2000 | editors
It is not certain when the reign of Ishpuini, who succeeded Sarduri, began. According to information gained from cuneiform inscriptions on tablets found near Zivistan Castle (now Elmal?), which is 15 km to the south of Van, Ishpuini was Sarduri's son. Thus it is probable that he ascended the throne in 825 or 824 B.C. One of the most important inscriptions made by King Ishpuini is the one describing the acquisition of the city of Musasir by the Urartu at Kelishin (Kel-i Shin). According to the information provided by the bilingual inscription on the Kelishin Stele, King Ishpuini had...
 

Ruins of 4,300-year-old prehistoric city found in China ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 01/23/2003 2:54:23 PM PST · 28 replies · 20+ views


ABC ^ | Thursday, January 23, 2003. Posted: 21:01:28 (AEDT) | Editorial Staff
ABC Online Ruins of 4,300-year-old prehistoric city found in China. 23/1/2003. ABC News Online [This is the print version of story http://www.abc.net.au Thursday, January 23, 2003. Posted: 21:01:28 (AEDT) Ruins of 4,300-year-old prehistoric city found in China Chinese archaeologists have discovered the ruins of a prehistoric city dating back an estimated 4,300 years in southwest Sichuan province, state press said. The find provided evidence that the region along the upper reaches of the Yangtze River, with the Chengdu Plain at the core, played an important role in the origin and development of Chinese civilization, experts said. The ancient city...
 

Precolumbian, Clovis, Preclovis
The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians in Minnesota in 1362 ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 07/22/2002 2:22:42 PM PDT · 34 replies · 51+ views


Ripsaw News ^ | FR post 07-21-02 | By Jim Richardson and Allen Richardson
Subject: The Kensington Runestone; verified as proof of Scandinavians inMinnesota in 1362 <http://www.ripsawnews.com/2001.08.15/co Verified at LastThe Strange and Terrible Storyof the Kensington RunestoneBy Jim Richardson andAllen Richardson The comfortable scientific and scholarly worlds of history, archeology,runology and Scandinavian linguistics have all been rocked by recentdevelopments surrounding a single stone in west centralMinnesota. The Kensington Runestone, thought for over 100 years to be a hoax, nowstands verified as a genuine artifact commemorating the deaths of 10medireview Scandinavians in Minnesota in the year 1362. A recent piece of linguistic scholarship by Dr. Richard Nielsen has hit thescene, which seems to demonstrate conclusively...
 

Maine Coon Cat (Straight Dope Mailbag) ^
  Posted by SunkenCiv
On General/Chat ^ 08/05/2004 11:19:14 PM PDT · 3 replies · 103+ views


Straight Dope Science Advisory Board ^ | 29-Jun-1999 | SDSTAFF Jill
One of the oldest breeds of cats in North America is the Maine Coon Cat, and some say 40% of the originals had extra toes. One article said it evolved as a "snowshoe foot" to help these cats walk in the snow. Cute story, but probably [expletive deleted] ...The breed closest to the Maine Coon Cat is the Norwegian Forest Cat which evolved in the same climate and lends credence to one theory that ancestors of the Coon Cat may have even come to the New World onboard Viking ships. I like that theory best.
 

Textbook on Arabs removes blunder  ^
  Posted by kattracks
On News/Activism ^ 04/15/2004 11:28:01 PM PDT · 51 replies · 28+ views


Washington Times ^ | 4/16/04 | George Archibald
<p>An Indian tribe has forced distributors of an Arab studies guide for U.S. teachers to remove an inaccurate passage that says Muslim explorers preceded Christopher Columbus to North America and became Algonquin chiefs.</p> <p>Peter DiGangi, director of Canada's Algonquin Nation Secretariat in Quebec, called claims in the book, the "Arab World Studies Notebook," "preposterous" and "outlandish," saying nothing in the tribe's written or oral history support them.</p>
 

Tomb with three bodies found in abandoned city of Teotihuacan ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 09/30/2002 1:15:32 PM PDT · 18 replies · 11+ views


The Mexico News ^ | 9/30/2002 | Monica Medel
Archeologists found several offerings of "exceptional quality" in the mortuary chamber. Tomb with three bodies found in abandoned city of Teotihuacan Monica Medel, EFE - 9/30/2002 A tomb containing the remains of three bodies has been discovered in the Pyramid of the Moon at Teotihuacan, the well-known ruins outside Mexico City. The find is one of the most important in recent years and will provide valuable information on the lives led by the people of Teotihuacan, who disappeared in the mists of history after the city was abandoned in the year 600. The remains were found by a multidisciplinary...
 

Tribes Fail To Halt Study Of Ancient Skeleton (Kennewick Man) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/09/2003 8:58:39 PM PST · 13 replies · 15+ views


Oregonian ^ | 1-9-2003 | Richard L. Hill
Tribes fail to halt study of ancient skeleton 01/09/03 RICHARD L. HILL Four Northwest tribes lost another round in federal court Wednesday in their effort to halt a scientific study of the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man.U.S. Magistrate John Jelderks in Portland rejected the tribes' request to delay the study until the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals can hear the legal dispute. In August, Jelderks ruled that eight anthropologists who sued the federal government could proceed to study the 9,300-year-old remains. The Nez Perce, Umatilla, Colville and Yakama tribes appealed his decision and later asked Jelderks to delay the...
 

The Vikings knew more about climate change than today's eco-activists ^
  Posted by LibWhacker
On News/Activism ^ 08/10/2003 11:38:14 PM PDT · 7 replies · 15+ views


The Calgary Herald ^ | 8/10/03 | Dennis T. Avery
The Medieval Warming and the Little Ice Age are historical realities, widely reported in Viking sagas. Neither can be explained by concentrations of greenhouse gases. Almost unnoticed outside the Washington Beltway, one of the capital's most eminent wise men suddenly has become the most prominent person denying a "scientific consensus" on global warming. James Schlesinger, the United States' first secretary of energy under former U.S. president Jimmy Carter, penned a reflective op-ed in The Washington Post on July 7 that ought to be required reading by the nation's science and environmental reporters who seem to have jumped en masse onto...
 

Who Really Discovered America? ^
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat ^ 07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · 168 replies · 88+ views


Hope Of Israel ^
Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
 

The Vinland Map
Study: New World Map Is a Forgery ^
  Posted by Pharmboy
On News/Activism ^ 07/29/2002 4:41:39 PM PDT · 36 replies · 78+ views


AP ^ | 7-29-02 | DIANE SCARPONI
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Yale University's parchment map of the Vikings' travels to the New World, purportedly drawn by a 15th century scribe, is a clever 20th century forgery, according to a new study. The Vinland Map AP Photo The study is the latest development in a debate that began in the 1960s when the map was given to the university by benefactor Paul Mellon. Scholars who believe it is real have said it predates Christopher Columbus and proves he was not the first European to reach America. But researchers at University College in London who analyzed the ink...
 

Columbus
Christophoros Columbus: A Byzantine Prince from Chios, Greece ^
  Posted by Destro
On General/Chat ^ 08/05/2004 5:48:37 PM PDT · 12 replies · 93+ views


grecoreport.com ^ | 1982 | Ruth G. Durlacher-Wolper
Christophoros Columbus: A Byzantine Prince from Chios, Greece, by Ruth G. Durlacher-WolperCover of the book by Ruth G. Durlacher-Wolper. Over 500 years ago, Admiral Christophoros Columbus stepped upon the soil of San Salvador Island, Bahamas, in the New World, with the banner of the Royal Standard of Spain flying in all its glory. The captains of La Nina and La Pinta followed him off the La Santa Maria, carrying the banners of the Green Cross. Behind them came the weary crew -- men whose faith had weakened during the hard journey, but who had had their faith revived time and...
 

DNA Results Could ID Columbus ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/22/2004 8:15:04 AM PST · 3 replies · 7+ views


Discovery.com ^ | 1-22-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
DNA Results Could ID Columbus By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Columbus' Remains Jan. 21, 2004 — The long-standing cultural dispute over Christopher Columbus' final resting place could take a new turn as further DNA tests are carried out by an Italian university. DNA technology will be applied by the University of Pavia's laboratories to fragments of bones now kept in a box in the university's library. The remains come from Santo Domingo, one of Columbus' debated burial places. "They were given by the bishop of Santo Domingo to Pavia University in 1880, as it was thought that Columbus studied here....
 

Reputed Columbus Remains in Spain Exhumed ^
  Posted by NormsRevenge
On News/Activism ^ 06/02/2003 7:15:01 PM PDT · 12 replies · 24+ views


Yahoo News! ^ | 6/2/03 | Ciaran Giles - AP
Reputed Columbus Remains in Spain Exhumed By CIARAN GILES, Associated Press Writer MADRID, Spain - A chest containing the supposed remains of Christopher Columbus was exhumed Monday for DNA and other tests to determine whether the bones are really those of the famed explorer. The test aims to settle a long debate over where Colombus is buried: in Spain's Seville Cathedral or in a sprawling monument in the Dominican Republic's capital, Santo Domingo. In the presence of two descendants of Columbus — Jaime and Anunicada Colon de Carvajal — researchers removed two boxes from an ornate tomb at the cathedral...
 

Ship confirmed as one used by Christopher Columbus ^
  Posted by LarryLied
On News/Activism ^ 05/02/2002 8:29:21 AM PDT · 9 replies · 4+ views


Ananova ^ | 5/02/02 | staff
Experts are confident a ship found off the Panama coast did belong to Christopher Columbus. After six months of research, scientists and archaeologists are sure the ship was used on his last trip to America. It was found 155 miles east of Panama City. Director of the National Culture Institute of Panama, Rafael Ruiloba, told the Clarin newspaper: "There is now sufficient evidence that this is La Vizcaina." Researchers have learned the ship was made with the same material and using the same process used at the end of the 15th century. It also coincides with the historic description of...
 

Was Columbus Greek? ^
  Posted by Destro
On News/Activism ^ 12/23/2002 9:33:24 AM PST · 37 replies · 31+ views


greecetravel.com ^ | 2003 | Matt Barrett
Was Columbus Greek?Was Columbus a woolworker from Genoa or a Byzantine Prince and sailor from the island of Chios in what was then the Republic of Genoa? The ferry that sails between the island of Lesvos and Athens port city of Pireaus stops at the island of Chios, a few miles off the coast of Asia Minor. If you are traveling from Athens it arrives at four a.m. and unless you are awakened by the change in the rhythm of the ship's engines as it slows down and backs into the quay you won't even know you have been there....
 

Coins and Epigraphy
Ancient Chess History Unearthed ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/28/2002 7:08:20 AM PDT · 44 replies · 51+ views


BBC ^ | 7-27-2002
Saturday, 27 July, 2002, 16:22 GMT 17:22 UK Ancient chess history unearthed The chess piece was found in the ancient city of Butrint A team of British archaeologists have unearthed evidence suggesting that Europeans were playing chess as early as the sixth century. An ivory chess piece, excavated at a Byzantine palace in what is now southern Albania, is more than 500 years older than any previously discovered. Leaders of the University of Anglia expedition said it proves the game has a much longer history in Europe than was previously thought. Until now chess historians had agreed that the game...
 

Bulgarian Archaeologists Find 3,000 Year-Old Pictograms, Say May Be Thracian Script ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/04/2004 10:48:58 AM PDT · 7 replies · 354+ views


Bulgarian News Network ^ | 8-402004
21:05 - 03.08.2004Bulgarian Archaeologists Find 3,000 Year-old Pictograms, Say May Be Thracian Script SOFIA (bnn)- Archaeologists exploring remains of a Bronze Age fortress in southern Bulgaria said Tuesday they found traces of primitive scripture supposed to have been used by Thracian tribes that once lived in that area. The pictograms, painted on 3, 000 year-old ceramic utensils, were found near the ancient Perperikon fortress, some 300 kilometers (186 miles) southeast of Sofia, archaeological team leader Nikolay Ovcharov told state TV. He said the discovery could back a still unconfirmed hypothesis that the Thracians, had a script of their own. The...
 

Coin Discovery Sparks Treasure Hunt In Norway (Roman & Chinese Coins) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/02/2004 3:27:57 PM PDT · 3 replies · 326+ views


IOL ^ | 8-3-2004
Coin discovery sparks treasure hunt in Norway August 02 2004 at 03:45PM Oslo - A surprise find of old Chinese and Roman coins on a mountain in the Gudbrandsdalen valley in central Norway has triggered gold fever in the region, reports said on Monday. Roald Nilsen made the lucky discovery in May when he was hiking with his dog in mountains bordering the valley, which has long been an important trade route and now is a popular location for tourists and hikers. The valley and its history were used as a backdrop in Henrik Ibsen's famed play Peer Gynt. No...
 

Key To An Ancient Tongue ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/23/2002 12:31:32 PM PDT · 14 replies · 25+ views


Philadelphi Enquirer ^ | 7-22-2002 | Faye Flam
Posted on Mon, Jul. 22, 2002 Key to an ancient tongue Penn archaeologists have puzzled over the cuneiform writings for decades. At last, a Sumerian dictionary may be ready by 2004. By Faye Flam Inquirer Staff Writer Steve Tinney and Tonia Sharlach hold cuneiform tablets from the collection at Penn’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The two Sumerologists are working on the 30-year dictionary project. The people known as Sumerians are credited with starting the first civilization and building the first settlements worthy of being called cities. They also invented writing, and then they wrote and wrote and wrote, filling...
 

Scholars decipher a stunning find -an unknown canon in an ancient dialect! ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 10/03/2002 11:26:55 AM PDT · 13 replies · 11+ views


The Chronicle of Higher Learning. ^ | From the issue dated October 4, 2002 | By PETER MONAGHAN
From the issue dated October 4, 2002 http://chronicle.com A Lost Buddhist Literary Tradition Is Found Scholars decipher a stunning findan unknown canon in an ancient dialect By PETER MONAGHAN Seattle In certain cliffhangers on late-night television, dashing and strangely underdressed archaeologists in faraway places unearth artifacts of uncertain provenance. The discoveries cast new light on an ancient civilization. In reality, archaeologists are less swashbuckling, but once in a great while they do turn up objects -- ancient manuscripts, say, inscribed in little-known languages -- that have that effect. Through some stunning finds over the last decade, researchers studying early Buddhist manuscripts here...
 

Scrolls, Scripts & Stelae- A Norwegian Collector Shows BAR His Rare Inscriptions ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 08/27/2002 7:42:34 AM PDT · 2 replies · 20+ views


Biblicial Archaeology Review ^ | FR Post 8-26-2 | Hershel Shanks
Scrolls, Scripts & Stelae A Norwegian Collector Shows BAR His Rare Inscriptions Hershel Shanks If you have a Dead Sea Scroll for sale, you should get in touch with Martin Schøyen (pronounced Skoo-yen) in Oslo. He is a prime prospect. He already owns several Dead Sea Scroll fragments—making him one of the few individuals in the world (I can think of only one other) who own Dead Sea Scroll material. In his spacious London pied-à-terre, Schøyen also has one of the unusual pottery jars from Qumran in which the Bedouin found the first intact scrolls in 1947 or 1948....
 

Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!) ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · 8 replies · 8+ views


UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
 

Paleontology & Biology
Dingo's Origins Tracked By DNA ^
  Posted by blam
On General/Chat ^ 08/02/2004 3:41:34 PM PDT · 3 replies · 74+ views


BBC ^ | 8-2-2004
Dingo's origins tracked by DNA The dingo may have been introduced on a single occasion to Australia A genetic analysis of the Australian dingo suggests the dogs tagged along on an epic expansion of people out of southern China around 6,000 years ago. An international team claims that dingoes descend from a small group that could have been introduced to Australia in a "single chance event" from Asia. Evidence from mitochondrial DNA suggests that the wild dogs arrived on the continent around 5,000 years ago. The work appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Peter Savolainen of the...
 

The Dixie Dingo ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 11/30/2001 1:40:40 PM PST · 80 replies · 165+ views


Carolinadog.org ^ | U of Carolina
"The Dixie Dingo" "The Native American Dog" "The American Dingo" " Southern Aboriginal Dog" "The Indian's Dog" Still living Wild in the bottom land swamps and forests of the Southeastern United States. Genetic (mitochondrial DNA) testing being performed at the University of South Carolina, College of Science and Mathematics, indicates that these dogs, related to the earliest domesticated dogs, are the remnant descendants of the feral pariah canids who came across the Bering land mass 8,000 to 11,000 years ago as hunting companions to the ancestors of the Native Americans. However, their future in the wild looks bleak. Loss ...
 

Documentary Redraws Humans' Family Tree ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 01/28/2003 1:06:27 PM PST · 17 replies · 28+ views


National Geographic News ^ | January 21, 2003 | Hillary Mayell
Documentary Redraws Humans' Family Tree Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News January 21, 2003 By analyzing DNA from people in all regions of the world, geneticist Spencer Wells has concluded that all humans alive today are descended from a single man who lived in Africa around 60,000 years ago. Modern humans, he contends, didn't start their spread across the globe until after that time. Most archaeologists would say the exodus began 100,000 years ago—a 40,000-year discrepancy. Wells's take on the origins of modern humans and how they came to populate the rest of the planet is bound to be...
 

Mammoth Skeleton Found In Russia's Voronzh ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/31/2003 9:23:28 AM PST · 2 replies · 11+ views


Pravda ^ | 1-31-2003
Mammoth Skeleton Found in Russia’s Voronezh Region Ancient volcanic catastrophe turned out to be a treasure for modern scientistsArchaeologists of the St.Petersburg Material Culture Institute found almost a whole skeleton of a mammoth last summer. The remarkable event happened in Russia’s Voronezh region, not far from the village of Kostenki. Twenty-six objects of the paleolith era have been found in that area since 1879. Every object that was found there, was in a very good condition: hearths, animal bones, constructions made of mammoth bones, stone and bone things, decorations, and works of art. The layers of eruptive ashes were found...
 

New four-winged feathered dinosaur?  ^
  Posted by ZGuy
On News/Activism ^ 01/28/2003 1:54:40 PM PST · 16 replies · 73+ views


AIG ^ | 1/28/03 | Jonathan Sarfati
Papers have been flapping with new headlines about the latest in a long line of alleged dinosaur ancestors of birds. This one is claimed to be a sensational dinosaur with feathers on its hind legs, thus four ‘wings’.1 This was named Microraptor gui—the name is derived from words meaning ‘little plunderer of Gu’ after the paleontologist Gu Zhiwei. Like so many of the alleged feathered dinosaurs, it comes from Liaoning province of northeastern China. It was about 3 feet (1 meter) long from its head to the tip of its long tail, but its body was only about the size...
 

Scientist Says Fossils From Dinosaur Discovered in Southwestern Japan ^
  Posted by BenLurkin
On General/Chat ^ 08/03/2004 7:08:03 PM PDT · 3 replies · 51+ views


Associated Press ^ | Aug 3, 2004 | Associated Press
TOKYO (AP) - A Japanese hiker has discovered six bones believed to be from a dinosaur that live 78 million years ago, a researcher said Tuesday. The fragments of teeth and bone are thought be from a Lambeosaurus, said Haruo Saegusa, a researcher at the Museum of Nature and Human Activities in Sumoto. Lambeosaurus is a type of Hadrosaur, the so-called duck-billed dinosaur, that grew to more than 30 feet long, weighed about 4 tons and lived 78 million years ago. Hadrosaurs survived by eating plants and avoiding carnivores and were very common throughout much of the ancient world, but...
 

Catastrophism and Astronomy
Black Sea Trip Yields No Flood Conclusion (Noah's Flood?) ^
  Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/31/2004 4:37:21 PM PDT · 6 replies · 540+ views


Newsday ^ | 7-31-2004 | Richard Lewis
Black Sea Trip Yields No Flood Conclusions By RICHARD C. LEWIS Associated Press Writer July 30, 2004, 2:06 PM EDT PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Four years ago, scientists thought they had found the perfect place to settle the Noah flood debate: A farmer's house on a bluff overlooking the Black Sea built about 7,500 years ago -- just before tidal waves inundated the homestead, submerged miles of coastline and turned the freshwater lake into a salty sea. Some believed the rectangular site of stones and wood could help solve the age-old question of whether the Black Sea's flooding was the event...
 

'Oldest star chart' found ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 01/21/2003 3:26:34 PM PST · 33 replies · 10+ views


BBC NEWS ^ | Tuesday, 21 January, 2003, 10:50 GMT | By Dr David Whitehouse
'Oldest star chart' found The oldest image of a star pattern, that of the famous constellation of Orion, has been recognised on an ivory tablet some 32,500 years old. The tiny sliver of mammoth tusk contains a carving of a man-like figure with arms and legs outstretched in the same pose as the stars of Orion. The claim is made by Dr Michael Rappenglueck, formerly of the University of Munich, who is already renowned for his pioneering work locating star charts painted on the walls of prehistoric caves. The tablet also contains mysterious notches, carved on its sides and...
 

Stellar cellar discovery ^
  Posted by vannrox
On News/Activism ^ 01/23/2003 5:51:46 AM PST · 9 replies · 10+ views


CHINA DAILY ^ | 01/21/2003 | WANG CHUNSHENG
Stellar cellar discovery (WANG CHUNSHENG) 01/21/2003 About 3 tons of ancient coins were unearthed from a cellar in Lushan County, Pingdingshan City of Central China's Henan Province, last Monday. The cellar also contained dozens of iron ware pieces and a porcelain bowl. It was found during renovations of an old house at the Lushan No 2 Senior High School. The cellar is in irregular cuboid form and occupies 1.2 by 1.4 by 0.7 cubic metres. Some experts believe the owner of this fortune dug the cellar to store food in case of emergency. More than 30 types of coins were...
 

*end of digest*

97 posted on 08/08/2004 6:38:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; SunkenCiv; 24Karet; ...
Two days late, here's the weekly Gods Graves Glyphs ping list digest link:
Gods Graves Glyphs Digest 20040807
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

98 posted on 08/09/2004 1:34:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach
this is from the keyword "ancient", in alpha order. Bound to be quite a few duplicates with ggg, etc, but there's only 158 of 'em. ;') I'll post the "add keyword" (see "in reply to" message) links if needed:
99 posted on 08/09/2004 9:34:54 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All
I'm not too thrilled with the keyword problem. There is no page two (no results, I mean; the page comes up, with no keyword topics). The obsolete link that turned up on Google DID work, but entered an older page somewhere into the list, rather than the actual page 2 (or 3, or whatever). Anyway, this post will pad the topic out to 100, so that the fourth issue of the digest will be at the top of a nice clean new page. Feel free to ignore this P&M message.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

100 posted on 08/14/2004 6:00:37 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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