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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)
Gods, Graves, Glyphs ^ | 7/17/2004 | various

Posted on 07/16/2004 11:27:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

click here to read article


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To: SunkenCiv; Admin Moderator

Please remove it. This is a violation of people's privacy.


61 posted on 07/23/2004 8:27:11 AM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for the ping, I like stuff like this.


62 posted on 07/23/2004 10:01:26 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: SunkenCiv; farmfriend; FairOpinion; blam

You need to ask the admonitor to remove the list of names....

And all on the pinglist will need to bookmark this thread.....


63 posted on 07/25/2004 11:27:03 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (New Linux SUSE Pro 9.1 user here.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Admin Moderator; Lead Moderator; Jim Robinson
You need to ask the admonitor to remove the list of names....

I did back in mid July. Asking again.

64 posted on 07/25/2004 11:49:44 AM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: Admin Moderator

Please remove the list of names in post #60. Thanks.


65 posted on 07/25/2004 1:09:27 PM PDT by blam
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To: Admin Moderator
I can see their point, and would edit it out myself, but there isn't an edit button. Please chop out the offending stuff; despite the fact that it's merely a non-political ping list, I'm sure there are folks on there who may take umbrage with their inclusion. You have to admit though that it's pretty cool. ;')
66 posted on 07/25/2004 4:53:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: RikaStrom; Hegewisch Dupa; Nowhere Man; DBrow
RikaStrom: Oh too neat! Thanks SunkenCiv!
Hegewisch Dupa: cool redheaded "kinda" ping list
DBrow: Thanks for the ping, I like stuff like this.
Nowhere Man: Thanks, I love to read about stuff like this, "forbidden archeology," and so on.
You're all most welcome, and thanks for the kind remarks.
see Civ's favorites incl Books, Magazines, Movies, Music

67 posted on 07/25/2004 5:07:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All
Tip: Building Keyword list
With the demise of the Groups system here on FreeRepublic (which was itself a modification of an earlier system, from the years BC -- before 'Civ) it will be more important than ever to make sure new topics, as well as old ones we wish to keep track of, have a decent, coherent set of keywords.

1: Keywords have no spaces. "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" will wind up as "GLYPHS; GODS; GRAVES" if entered as shown. John Robinson is converting each old Group page to a keyword. The Gods, Graves, Glyphs pinglist should be entered as "godsgravesglyphs". This writer also requests that you enter "ggg". In fact, enter "ggg" even if you're in a hurry and don't want to enter anything. All who use FreeRepublic thank you.

2: Keywords should be obvious. That lack of spaces makes it unlikely that keyword searches will bear fruit if they have them. I'm not quite sure that's correct, but I'm sure we'll all find out.

3: Keywords can be added after the fact. If you find an article you wish to track, and it doesn't have a keyword that it should have, click on "add keyword" and type it in. If you're entering more than one, make sure they are separated by commas not spaces -- "bayofpigs, kennedy" not "bay of pigs kennedy". The second will result in the keyword "bayofpigskennedy" and a topic that will never be found again.

4: Keywords should come from the original article. What else follows along that line will sound a little too anal for most, but will result in a much better, much more comprehensive, and easier to use set of keywords we will all enjoy.
a: Load the article in a word processor, text editor, or other program capable of search and replace to insert line breaks (carriage returns, whatever you call them) and sorting a column of text.

b: Do a search and replace on the space character, changing all to line breaks.

c: Sort the column of text.

d: Begin to glimpse the genius / mania of being me.

e: Starting at the top of the sorted list (which will be in alpha order, with the duplicates conveniently grouped together), highlight the terms not to be included and delete them.

f: Get rid of "the" and "a" (which you should be able to do with search and replace, as long as you precede and follow the term with a line break) and other common words.

g: Select words (like names of people quoted, nations, technical terms) which are distinctive as well as terms related to the topic. For example, an article about the mass-murdering criminal Arafat should include keywords like "PLO" and "terrorism" as well as "Israel".
I hope this has been of some help to everyone.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list (alt)
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

68 posted on 07/25/2004 7:34:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother
My last hare-brained stunt (for today) -- this is a quicker way for me to add the keywords to each one (that part still has to be done manually). Feel free to ignore, unless you've got broadband and feel like helping out. Works best if this topic is in a brand new window, as it uses the "slave" window as FR does.
69 posted on 07/25/2004 8:18:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv

OK working on this list starting at the bottom!


70 posted on 07/25/2004 10:20:30 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: SunkenCiv

Suddenly realized you may already have done these.


71 posted on 07/25/2004 10:24:17 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks! Yeah, I finished 'em about 12:05 am. :')
72 posted on 07/26/2004 9:14:48 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; farmfriend; StayAt HomeMother; SunkenCiv; 24Karet; 7.62 x 51mm; 75thOVI; ...
This is the first in a series of roughly weekly Gods, Graves, and Glyphs pings. See the next message for the digest of recent additions to the list.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.

73 posted on 07/28/2004 11:41:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: All

American History
Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT with 9 comments


Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo gborzo@fieldmuseum.org 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Ba?l, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
     
 
Below Ground,Washington's Lost History ^
      Posted by foolscap
On News/Activism ^ 07/19/2004 6:03:43 AM PDT with 9 comments


washingtonpost.com ^ | 7/8/04 | arielle baker
It fell out of use sometime in the Taft administration and was razed to its foundation in 1912. After nearly a half-century of housing the horses that carried presidents, the Executive Stable -- what was left of it -- spent 90 years as part of Washington's paved-over past, joining centuries of foundation stones, bone fragments and other artifacts of everyday life beneath the ground. That is, until three years ago, when plans to improve security around the White House put the area in the hands of archaeologists charged with the task of uncovering the stable. "It's something you hadn't thought...
     
 

Precolumbian, Clovis, Preclovis
Did hardy Ice Age hunters find the West?  ^
      Posted by Holly_P
On News/Activism ^ 01/02/2004 8:42:57 PM PST with 35 comments


Springfield News-Leader ^ | 010204 | Paul Recer (A.P.)
<p>Washington ó A people who may have been ancestors of the first Americans lived in Arctic Siberia, enduring one of the most unforgiving environments on Earth at the height of the Ice Age, according to researchers who discovered the oldest evidence yet of humans living near the frigid gateway to the New World. Russian scientists uncovered a 30,000-year-old site where ancient hunters lived on the Yana River in Siberia, some 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle and not far from the Bering land bridge that then connected Asia with North America.</p>
     
 
European DNA Found In 7-8,000 Year Old Skeleton In Florida (Windover) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/14/2003 7:40:03 PM PDT with 115 comments


TLC ^ | 8-14-2003 | blam
Earlier I posted an article titled Bye, Bye Beringia (8,000 Year Old Site In Florida. I just turned on The Learning Channel and caught about ten minutes of the ending of a program titled, 'Secrets Of The Bog People: Windover', it is about this 'Windover' site in Florida. A doctor Gregory from Cornell said that preliminary DNA samples taken from the brains of some of the people indicate they are European. They also showed a reconstructed face of one of the skulls. I checked my TLC schedule and it indicates that another showing will be at 11:00PM CST tonight. This...
     
 
Ogham alphabet ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/27/2004 11:34:30 AM PDT with 5 comments


Glossemata GenealogicÊ ^ | The Alphabetary Heraldic
Ogham inscriptions : [600 bc] primitive inscriptions of the old Q-Celt (600 bc) or the newer P-Celt (400 bc) that survive in the British Isles. We have a total of approximately 375 Ogham inscriptions. Ireland has some 316 Ogham inscriptions, Wales has 40 inscriptions, and the Isle of Man has 10 inscriptions. One inscription survived at Silchester in southern England, and a few Pictish Ogham inscriptions have been found in Scotland, as far north as the Shetland Islands. Ogham script often runs upward, in a vertical manner, for it was originally written as notches on wooden staves. Oghams :...
     
 
PEOPLING OF THE AMERICAS: Late Date for Siberian Site Challenges Bering Pathway ^
      Posted by Lessismore
On News/Activism ^ 07/25/2003 6:40:03 PM PDT with 27 comments


Science Magazine ^ | 2003-07-25 | Richard Stone
As elusive as the Cheshire Cat, the first people to arrive in the Americas have tended to appear and vanish with each new twist in the archaeological record. The latest disappearing act may be taking place on page 501, where new evidence, some claim, casts another shadow over a once-cherished idea: that Asian big-game hunters crossed the Bering Land Bridge to give rise to the Clovis people, who were considered the first Americans. New dates show that a crucial Siberian site, thought to be a way station along the Bering road, wasn't occupied until after the Clovis had begun killing...
     
 
The Pinta, Santa Maria And A Chinese Junk? (More) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 02/03/2003 3:18:04 PM PST with 13 comments


Christian Science Moniter ^ | 1-29-2003 | Amanda Paulson
from the January 29, 2003 edition The Pinta, Santa Maria, and a Chinese junk? A new book claims the Chinese discovered America in 1421, but historians refute thesis. By Amanda Paulson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor To the Norsemen, the Japanese, and the Carthaginians; to the Irish, the Africans, and a long list of others who, it is claimed, crossed the oceans to America long before 1492, add one more: the Chinese. They toured up and down both coasts of the Americas, established colonies, made maps, and left behind chickens. That, at least, is the theory posed...
     
 
Who Were The Si-Te-Cah ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 11/23/2003 6:48:27 PM PST with 64 comments


Runestone.org ^ | Steve McNallen
WHO WERE THE SI-TE-CAH? Note the cranial similarities between this Lovelock Cave skull discovered in the 1920's and the Kennewick Man sketch by Jamie Chatters (Click on the site) ---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- This 1995 article by Steve McNallen was written months before the discovery of the Kennewick Man or the current controversy over ancient Caucasians in North America. In retrospect, it seems hauntingly prophetic. The history of the European peoples in the are we call California is generally assumed to have begun with the Spanish in the 1500's, followed later by the English (represented by Sir Francis Drake) and by the...
     
 

African, European, and Middle Eastern History and Prehistory
Burial complex of Mentuhotep II ^
      Posted by SunkenCiv
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/27/2004 11:56:40 AM PDT


The History of the Ancient Egyptians ^ | May 2002 | Ian Bolton
Instead of building a 'saff' tomb like those of his predecessors, Mentuhotep II decided to build an impressive tomb by the cliffs of Deir el Bahri (the same location chosen in the 18th dynasty by Hatshepsut). A T-shaped terrace was built using masonary and by using the natural rock. The walls built on this terrace were then decorated both inside and out with painted relief carving.
     
 
Geologist rebuts claim of forged Jesus inscription on ossuary ^
      Posted by Phil V.
On News/Activism ^ 12/21/2003 5:31:47 AM PST with 9 comments


Ha'aretz ^ | Sun., December 21, 2003 | By Amiram Barkat, Haaretz Correspondent and AP
w w w . h a a r e t z d a i l y . c o m Last update†-†09:47 21/12/2003 Geologist rebuts claim of forged Jesus inscription on ossuary By Amiram Barkat, Haaretz Correspondent and AP The disputed ossuary. (Israel Antiquities Authority) The heated controversy over the authenticity of the inscription naming Jesus on an ancient burial box discovered a year ago has flared up again, after claims by an American geologist that the Israeli findings, dismissing the inscription on a small 2,000-year-old limestone ossuary as a forgery, were flawed. James Harrell published his opinion Friday...
     
 
Stone Age Sites Found Under North Sea (8,000BC) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 12/09/2003 5:30:54 PM PST with 78 comments


University Of Newcastle On Tyne ^ | 9-12-2003
Stone Age sites found under North Sea Date released 12 September 2003 Experts have discovered the first ever evidence of Stone Age settlements in the British North Sea, dating back as far as 10,000 years. Subject to further investigation, one of them could be the earliest underwater archaeological site in the UK. The exciting find, discovered by accident by a team from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, could lead to a rewriting of the history books and revolutionise our understanding of the way our ancestors lived. The discovery of several stone artefacts, including tools and arrowheads, have pinpointed...
     
 
Study: Neanderthals, Modern Humans Same Species ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/10/2002 5:42:43 AM PST with 76 comments


USA Today ^ | 12-26-2001 | Michael A. Stowe
<p>Humanity's first steps out of Africa along a path that led ultimately to dominion over the earth are subject to intense scientific debate. So is the role played by the Neandertals who roamed across Europe for 100,000 years before quietly disappearing. The two issues may well be related, and a University of Tennessee anthropologist reports statistical evidence that Neandertals and emerging modern humans likely interbred and evolved together.</p>
     
 

History and Prehistory of the Orient
Chinese Archaeologists Find 'World's Oldest Earrings' (8,000 Year Old) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/27/2004 11:11:24 AM PDT with 5 comments


SMH.com ^ | 7-27-2004
Chinese archaeologists find 'world's oldest earrings' July 27, 2004 Chinese archaeologists have discovered earrings they believe are the oldest found in the world. The jade earrings, which date to between 7500 and 8200 years ago, were unearthed at the Xinglongwa culture site in Chifeng city in Inner Mongolia, the Xinhua news agency said yesterday. The jade rings, called "Jue" in old Chinese, have diameters that measure 2.5 to six centimetres. Liu Guoxiang, head of an archaeological team under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said it was "magnificent" that the earrings were found in pairs that were almost similar in...
     
 
Christian Designs Found In Tomb Stones Of Eastern Han Dynasty ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 08/04/2002 3:00:50 PM PDT with 145 comments


CL2000.com ^ | 8-2-2002
Christian Designs Found in Tomb Stones of Eastern Han Dynasty [2002-08-02] Studies show that as early as 86 A.D., or the third year under the reign of "Yuanhe" of Eastern Han, Dynasty Christianity entered into China, 550 years earlier than the world accepted time. When studying a batch of stone carvings of Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 A.D.) stored and exhibited in the Museum of Xuzhou Han Stone Carvings, Christian theology professor Wang Weifan was greatly surprised by some stone engravings demonstrating the Bible stories and designs of early Christian times. Further studies showed that some of these engravings were made...
     
 
The Curse Of The Red-Headed Mummy ^
      Posted by blam
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 12/12/2003 9:21:21 PM PST with 27 comments


The Birdman.org ^ | 5-18-2001 | Heather Pringle
THE CURSE OF THE RED-HEADED MUMMY5-18-2001 by Heather Pringle Until he first encountered the mummies of Xinjiang, Victor Mair was known mainly as a brilliant, if eccentric, translator of obscure Chinese texts, a fine sinologist with a few controversial ideas about the origins of Chinese culture, and a scathing critic prone to penning stern reviews of sloppy scholarship. Mair's pronouncements on the striking resemblance between some characters inscribed on the Dead Sea Scrolls and early Chinese symbols were intensely debated by researchers. His magnum opus on the origins of Chinese writing, a work he had been toiling away at for...
     
 
Discovery Rewrites Chinese Vehicle History ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/26/2004 9:33:55 PM PDT with 16 comments


ABC Science News ^ | 7-26-2004
Monday, July 26, 2004. 10:09pm (AEST)Discovery rewrites Chinese vehicle history The discovery of 3,700-year-old chariot tracks has pushed back the appearance of vehicles in China by 200 years, the country's media has reported. "It advances the history of China's vehicle use up to the Xia Dynasty (2100 - 1600 BC)," said Xu Hong, who leads the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences' archaeological investigation team at the Erlitou archaeological site in Yanshi city, central Henan province. The two parallel tracks were discovered on the grounds of a palace at the site, Xinhua news agency reported. Erlitou, discovered in 1959, was the...
     
 
Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 07/27/2004 11:23:06 AM PDT with 2 comments


Xinhua News/China.org ^ | 7-27-2004
Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries More than 80 leading archeological experts are participating in an international conference in Chifeng, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, to exchange the latest information on Hongshan, a prehistoric relics site. Relics excavated at the Hongshan ("Red Mountain") site originated around 5000 BC to 6500 BC. Now a part of Chifeng City, the site was discovered in 1935. Some of the relics found at Hongshan have led archeologists to conclude that the heads of Chinese dragons may have been inspired by boars in addition to horses and cattle. Primitive people who struggled to survive by fishing and...
     
 
Siberian Graveyard's Secret (More Redheads) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/08/2004 9:41:32 AM PST with 93 comments


International Herald Tribune ^ | 1-8-2003
Siberian Graveyard's Secrets YEKATERINBURG, Russia In a medieval Siberian graveyard a few miles south of the Arctic Circle, Russian scientists have unearthed mummies roughly 1,000 years old, clad in copper masks, hoops and plates - burial rites that archaeologists say they have never seen before. . Among 34 shallow graves were five mummies shrouded in copper and blankets of reindeer, beaver, wolverine or bear fur. Unlike the remains of Egyptian pharaohs, the scientists say, the Siberian bodies were mummified by accident. The cold, dry permafrost preserved the remains, and the copper may have helped prevent oxidation. . The discovery adds...
     
 

Astronomy, Archaeoastronomy, and Catastrophism
Astronomers Revise Date of Ancient Greek-Persian Battle ^
      Posted by freedom44
On News/Activism ^ 07/22/2004 11:48:19 AM PDT with 10 comments


Iranian Cultural Heritage ^ | 7/22/04 | Iranian Cultural Heritage
A team of astronomer gumshoes has pinned down the date of an ancient Greek-Persian battle at Marathon that led to a long-distance run and the sport that survives today in its honor. Analysis of lunar records show the 490 B.C. battle occurred not on the long accepted date of September 12, but a full month earlier, researchers said. How important is a month for a professional runner more than 2,000 years ago? Apparently it's a matter of life and death. According the Greek historian Herodotus, Plutarch and others, after the Greek army routed their Persian attackers at Marathon the long-distance...
     
 
Astronomers unravel a mystery of the Dark Ages ^
      Posted by ckilmer
On News/Activism ^ 02/03/2004 2:54:24 PM PST with 62 comments


EurekAlert ^ | 3-Feb-2004 | Dr Derek Ward-Thompson
Public release date: 3-Feb-2004 Contact: Dr Derek Ward-Thompson derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk 029-2087-5314 Cardiff University Astronomers unravel a mystery of the Dark Ages Undergraduates' work blames comet for 6th-century "nuclear winter" Scientists at Cardiff University, UK, believe they have discovered the cause of crop failures and summer frosts some 1,500 years ago ñ a comet colliding with Earth. The team has been studying evidence from tree rings, which suggests that the Earth underwent a series of very cold summers around 536-540 AD, indicating an effect rather like a nuclear winter. The scientists in the School of Physics and Astronomy believe this was caused...
     
 
Big Chill Killed Off The Neanderthals ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 01/21/2004 3:26:51 PM PST with 74 comments


New Scientist ^ | 1-21-2004 | Douglas Palmer
Big chill killed off the Neanderthals 19:00 21 January 04 It is possibly the longest-running murder mystery of them all. What, or even who, killed humankind's nearest relatives, the Neanderthals who once roamed Europe before dying out almost 30,000 years ago? Suspects have ranged from the climate to humans themselves, and the mystery has deeply divided experts. Now 30 scientists have come together to publish the most definitive answer yet to this enigma. They say Neanderthals simply did not have the technological know-how to survive the increasingly harsh winters. And intriguingly, rather than being Neanderthal killers, the original human settlers...
     
 
The Dark Ages: Were They Darker Than We Imagined? ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 06/08/2003 10:31:29 PM PDT with 87 comments


The Universe ^ | 9-1999 | Greg Bryant
The Dark Ages : Were They Darker Than We Imagined? By Greg Bryant Published in the September 1999 issue of Universe As we approach the end of the Second Millennium, a review of ancient history is not what you would normally expect to read in the pages of Universe. Indeed, except for reflecting on the AD 837 apparition of Halley's Comet (when it should have been as bright as Venus and would have moved through 60 degrees of sky in one day as it passed just 0.03 AU from Earth - three times closer than Hyakutake in 1996), you may...
     
 
Did Asteroids And Comets Turn The Tides Of Civilization? ^
      Posted by blam
On General Interest (Chat) ^ 07/11/2002 1:56:44 PM PDT with 76 comments


Discovering Archaeology ^ | July/August 1999 | Mike Baillie
Did Asteroids and Comets Turn the Tides of Civilization? By Mike Baillie The heart of humanity seems at times to have lost its cadence, the rhythmic beat of history collapsing into impotent chaos. Wars raged. Pestilence spread. Famine reigned. Death came early and hard. Dynasties died, and civilization flickered. Such a time came in the sixth century A.D. The Dark Ages settled heavily over Europe. Rome had been beaten back from its empire. Art and science stagnated. Even the sun turned its back. "We marvel to see no shadows of our bodies at noon, to feel the mighty vigor of...
     
 
Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago) ^
      Posted by blam
On News/Activism ^ 02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST with 56 comments


Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization ó ancient Mesopotamia ó more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
     
 
Reworked images reveal hot Venus  ^
      Posted by Central Scrutiniser
On News/Activism ^ 01/14/2004 5:25:16 PM PST with 42 comments


BBC ^ | 1-13-03 | Dr David Whitehouse
Reworked images reveal hot Venus By Dr David Whitehouse Mars it is not: Reprocessed Venus image As the world looks at Mars, an American scientist has produced the best images ever obtained from the surface of a rather different planet - Venus. The second planet from the Sun is blanketed with a thick layer of cloud. Computer researcher Don Mitchell used original digital data from two Soviet Venera probes that landed in 1975. His reprocessed and recalibrated images provide a much clearer view of the Venusian surface which is hotter even than the inside of a household oven. Original digital...
     
 


74 posted on 07/28/2004 11:44:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 73 | View Replies]

To: FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; blam; farmfriend
How do you like this method? Any suggestions? I've tried to organize the recent bumps a little, by category, and naturally just made up the categories. :')
75 posted on 07/28/2004 11:47:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: SunkenCiv
You have been VERY busy. Much appreciated by this Freeper.

FGS

76 posted on 07/28/2004 11:52:49 PM PDT by ForGod'sSake (ABCNNBCBS: An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Categorization is good, but the problem is that you you'll probably end up with a number of things that don't fit the categories, and there are subcategories, etc.

But your categories sound fine.

But I think keeping this particular thread going, and posting a post, which includes links to that week's GGG articles is probably a good idea, and you could include the link to this thread in your GGG pings, so people know where can they get them all.


77 posted on 07/28/2004 11:57:36 PM PDT by FairOpinion (FIGHT TERRORISM! VOTE BUSH/CHENEY 2004.)
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To: FairOpinion
and you could include the link to this thread in your GGG pings, so people know where can they get them all.
good idea! and good heavens, I didn't think of that before. :'o

78 posted on 07/29/2004 12:00:22 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: ForGod'sSake
Thanks, I appreciate your kind remarks. :')
79 posted on 07/29/2004 12:00:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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To: FairOpinion
Hmm... let's try it...
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

80 posted on 07/29/2004 12:03:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
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