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Sequential food storage Part 4 Cycling through your supplies.
N/A | Jan 14, 2011 | Doctor Prepper

Posted on 01/14/2011 8:59:56 AM PST by Doctor Prepper

If you’ve been keeping up with being prepared, then most likely you have made careful decisions on what to stockpile. The regular use and replenishment (‘Cycling’) of these supplies is an important part of this process.

You will want to establish replacement time lines guided by use-by dates, grouping together supplies with a similar shelf life. Keep in mind that longer periods mean higher probabilities that they will be unusable in times of emergency.

These are just a few examples of use-by dates from our own supplies. As with everything else, you will need to check though your supplies and come up with your own data. (Your mileage may vary)

Canned Ham 48 months
Canned Chicken 30 months

Canned Corn 23 months
Canned Beans 15 months

Pasta 23 months

Boxed Cereal (Dry) 12 months

Fruit juice (Plastic container) 11 months

Dry Pet food 12 months

Bottled water only seems to have a shelf Life of a few months. You can make of that what you will, but replacing it on a regular basis would seem to be a prudent move.

For simplicity’s sake, replacing supplies at half their typical shelf life is a good compromise between having to cycle through your supplies too much and risking spoilage by waiting too long.

For example, In the case of some canned meat products, this would be 15 – 20 months given average shelf lives of 40 – 30 months.

The bottom line is that using up and replacing your emergency supplies is just as important as getting the process started in the first place.

Links to the other parts of the series:

Sequential Food Storage Part I
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2640812/posts
Sequential food storage – Part 2 Assessing your family’s needs.
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2644216/posts

Sequential food storage – Part 3 Buying out the store
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2649528/posts


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Food; Reference; Society
KEYWORDS: emergencyprep; foodstorage; preparednes; prepper
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1 posted on 01/14/2011 8:59:58 AM PST by Doctor Prepper
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To: Doctor Prepper

save


2 posted on 01/14/2011 9:03:00 AM PST by varina davis (Life is not a dress rehearsal)
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To: Doctor Prepper

Bookmark


3 posted on 01/14/2011 9:04:41 AM PST by StaffiT (New Year, New Name)
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To: Doctor Prepper

bump,,,later on the links


4 posted on 01/14/2011 9:04:56 AM PST by piroque (Southern born and Raised,Love "G R I T S")
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To: Doctor Prepper
"FIFO". Learn it. Live it. Love it.

L

5 posted on 01/14/2011 9:05:35 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Doctor Prepper
"Bottled water only seems to have a shelf Life of a few months."
Canned water will last for decades. Of course, it's not cheap...
6 posted on 01/14/2011 9:07:43 AM PST by astyanax (Liberalism: Logic's retarded cousin.)
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To: StaffiT

I have food storage. However, we normally eat only fresh foods so I have been trying to figure out the best way to handle food storage in this circumstance.

Any others out there with this problem?


7 posted on 01/14/2011 9:11:36 AM PST by Chickensoup (Protecting US interests ONLY if US interests move back into the States and give US citizens jobs.)
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To: ChocChipCookie

PING!

For those who wish you may download my Preparedness Manual at:

http://www.mediafire.com/?zx5772aa15x6xga


8 posted on 01/14/2011 9:13:50 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Doctor Prepper

Prepper Ping!


9 posted on 01/14/2011 9:17:46 AM PST by Zffrtuyiy
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To: Doctor Prepper

Cycling through one’s supplies is fine, except for those people that eat mostly fresh foods. It forces those people to eat foods, that would not normally eat, ie emergency rations.


10 posted on 01/14/2011 9:18:21 AM PST by stuartcr (When politicians politicize issues, aren't they just doing their job?)
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To: Doctor Prepper

“regular use and replenishment (‘Cycling’)”

My family has been doing this for years. Without fail we find that eventually we’ve
almost eaten all the `food’, so we go to a `supermarket’ and buy more food.


11 posted on 01/14/2011 9:26:02 AM PST by tumblindice (yes, I do pretty much just blurt out whatever comes to mind)
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To: Chickensoup

“I have food storage. However, we normally eat only fresh foods so I have been trying to figure out the best way to handle food storage in this circumstance.”

If you don’t want to eat it and it is still within the experation date then how about donating it to a food pantry? For OPSEC reasons I wouldn’t metion why I was donating it and I would rotate to whom I donated it.


12 posted on 01/14/2011 9:31:02 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Chickensoup
I have food storage. However, we normally eat only fresh foods so I have been trying to figure out the best way to handle food storage in this circumstance. Any others out there with this problem?

Store what you eat. Eat what you store. Keep it rotating. Simple as that. Augment with fresh.
13 posted on 01/14/2011 9:32:24 AM PST by rickomatic
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To: Doctor Prepper

Many GOYA fruit juice cans have very long codes - I have GOYA cans in my pantry that go to 2015 that I bought last year.

I don’t know of another ‘regular grocery’ item like these that stamp code out to 5 years.

Check out the Spanish sections in your grocery stores.


14 posted on 01/14/2011 9:33:11 AM PST by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: tumblindice

Yes, of course you do, our point is that you need to have ‘Buffer’ of stored food for when supermarket food is unavailable.


15 posted on 01/14/2011 9:33:59 AM PST by Doctor Prepper (Dig a well Before you are thirsty - Chinese proverb)
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To: astyanax

I seem to recall from the 50’s that adding bleach to stored water kept it indefinitely. I suppose you could not store it in plastic...need a tank of some kind. Has this been debunked?


16 posted on 01/14/2011 9:34:42 AM PST by kiltie65
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To: astyanax

I seem to recall from the 50’s that adding bleach to stored water kept it indefinitely. I suppose you could not store it in plastic...need a tank of some kind. Has this been debunked?


17 posted on 01/14/2011 9:36:18 AM PST by kiltie65
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To: stuartcr; Chickensoup

Fresh foods are always better – the foods that generally ring the inside wall of a supermarket.

But there may be times when it is unavailable and your only choice may be what you have stockpiled. You may need to eat the canned or dried versions of your normal fresh foods.

Having a “Fresh” supply of food that you have already tried will better than the alternative.


18 posted on 01/14/2011 9:43:26 AM PST by Doctor Prepper (Dig a well Before you are thirsty - Chinese proverb)
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To: Doctor Prepper

I use a permanent marker to mark the last 2 digits of the ‘best by’ year on the labels of canned goods. That makes it easy to recognize which ones should be cycled for more immediate use.


19 posted on 01/14/2011 9:44:58 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: Doctor Prepper

Yes, when the fresh food is unavailable, one has to eat what they have saved. Fortunately that day has not come. I give my stored food to the food bank when it nears expiration and buy new.


20 posted on 01/14/2011 9:49:09 AM PST by stuartcr (When politicians politicize issues, aren't they just doing their job?)
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To: kiltie65

Chlorine (as well as iodine) is a common water treatment.
I know there are tablets available for both.
As for bleach, I’m sure it would work but I have no idea as to the amount or time frame required.
But I’ll bet that someone here does. :)


21 posted on 01/14/2011 9:49:31 AM PST by astyanax (Liberalism: Logic's retarded cousin.)
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To: astyanax

“Canned water will last for decades.”

Ain’t that the truth. In our survival vests (Naval Aviation) we had two little cans of water that, I swear, came from just after WWII.

As long as you got the “hollow bong” when you slapped the bottom it was good to go!!

At least the government got it money’s worth on this buy!!!! LOL


22 posted on 01/14/2011 9:50:20 AM PST by lowbuck (The Blue Card (US Passport) Don't leave home without it.)
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To: Kartographer

opsec?


23 posted on 01/14/2011 9:51:14 AM PST by Chickensoup (Protecting US interests ONLY if US interests move back into the States and give US citizens jobs.)
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To: rickomatic

I augment my fresh food, with very little that can be stored.


24 posted on 01/14/2011 9:51:41 AM PST by stuartcr (When politicians politicize issues, aren't they just doing their job?)
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To: Doctor Prepper

bookmark


25 posted on 01/14/2011 9:54:41 AM PST by razorback-bert (Some days it's not worth chewing through the straps.)
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To: kiltie65

I take just-emptied 2 quart juice bottles, wash them out, fill 7/8s up, and then freeze them in our deep freeze. I figure as long as the power holds up they should be good forever.


26 posted on 01/14/2011 9:55:44 AM PST by scan59 (Markets always regulate better than government can.)
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To: Chickensoup
Operations security - Loose lips sink ships.

Example: I know of this one person who is a big time Zero-bot that works at one of these charities.

It might not be a good idea to be known around town as a “Hoarder” as they would call it.

27 posted on 01/14/2011 9:59:35 AM PST by StaffiT (New Year, New Name)
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To: kiltie65
Water doesn't go bad, but things can happened to it over time to make it unusable as is or unpalatable. Most plastics leech over time this can put things in your water that your would prefer not to drink and can effect the taste. Water also can go ‘flat’ which you can quickly fix by just pouring the water back and forth between to clean containers.

I store my water in bulk using tap water which is cheaper than bottle water and surprising often cleaner and/or the same water used in main bottle waters, in 5-15-55 gallon containers and simple switch it out by using older containers to water my plants and garden then refill them adding a few drops of bleach and then placing a last fill date with a dry erase marker. Water is arguably the most important prep you need to store and is also the bulkiest, but without adequate clean water no amount of food will keep you alive long.

28 posted on 01/14/2011 10:04:46 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: tumblindice

Ha ha! It took me a minute, but ‘ha ha’ nonetheless!


29 posted on 01/14/2011 10:11:26 AM PST by radiohead (Buy ammo, get your kids out of government schools, pray for the Republic.)
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To: Chickensoup
"opsec?"

Operations Security. The less others know about your preps the less you have to worry about having to fight to protect them.
There are always plenty of 'Zombies' and 'grasshoppers' around who will want what you have and believe you should share your preps and believe me nice people can get ugly real quick in panic situations. Look at the fights a stores that break out when blizzards are on their way or over bottled water when there is a big water system breakdown. It is explained best by this quote which I placed in my Preparedness Manual:

"Let me tell you something about humans, nephew: They're a wonderful, friendly people - as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working.
"But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those friendly, intelligent, wonderful people...will become as nasty and as violent as the most blood-thirsty klingon." Quark from: The Siege of AR-558 (#7.8)" (1998)

30 posted on 01/14/2011 10:15:12 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Doctor Prepper

I have a hard time eating other peoples food that dates back to a incident i had as a kid.

Anyways about 3 years back i agreed to have dinner over a friend and his new wifes house.
As i’m eating the spaghetti and meatballs (the same meal that started this whole phobia to begin with) i decided it needed more grated cheese.
i dump more Kraft grated on the food and eat a few more bites.
Then i decided to check the use by date on the bottom of the can.

THE CHEESE WAS FROM THE REAGAN ADMINISTRATION!!
Not only that but i also picked out a giant packing staple and a piece of Cellophane out of the meal.
ARGH!!!!

Needless to say my phobia of others home cooked meals remains in place.


31 posted on 01/14/2011 10:16:51 AM PST by mowowie
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To: lowbuck
"...two little cans of water that, I swear, came from just after WWII."
Sounds like the perfect complement for the pre-WWII MRE.
;)
32 posted on 01/14/2011 10:17:05 AM PST by astyanax (Liberalism: Logic's retarded cousin.)
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To: Kartographer

A good way to keep track of dates i imagine would be to hang a Sharpie marker on some string in the pantry or whatever and date the packages as you buy and stock them.


33 posted on 01/14/2011 10:19:51 AM PST by mowowie
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To: mowowie

That plus a spread sheet. ;-)


34 posted on 01/14/2011 10:24:37 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Chickensoup
Chickensoup said: "Any others out there with this problem?"

Yes.

I'm just getting started, but I have decided a couple of things.

One tactic is to store a good quantity of canned grains and beans that have a shelf-life of thirty years. These are foods that we do eat (beans, rice, and oats) but with the intention of leaving the stored food alone with the expectation that these can simply be replaced in, say, twenty years with little economic impact. We will draw from this supply whatever we do need, and replace it with newer stock. Food in this form costs probably double what it would without the longer shelf-life.

I will store some wheat, too, but first we are going to figure out how to make use of it. We are not big bread eaters.

There are also some foods with a shelf-life around ten years. We will store a good quantity of these and learn how to incorporate some of it into our usual diets. These are freeze-dried products and are pretty expensive compared to what we normally eat. We've ordered some samples to first prove that we can eat them. There are also some canned cheese and canned butter which have lifetimes that might approach ten years. I'm still a little uncertain about this.

Finally, there are some canned foods that we eat infrequently but that would be extremely useful in an emergency. I am encouraging my wife to buy these in greater amounts such that we can rotate these and keep them from exceeding their shelf lives. Canned soups, chili, spam, and a few other items. In the past we have stored one or two cans. Now we will store whatever seems to be a two year supply, for example, if that seems to be the shelf-life, and then rotate the stock carefully. Should an emergency occur, we would expect to have about ten times more of these products than otherwise with this plan.

We live in a rural area with a well to supply water. If the electricity goes out, we have a generator to run the well and some appliances. It's hard to say how long we could make the stored gas last. I have just 15 gallons stored in containers, with another thirty or so in vehicles that don't get run much. If there was a chance that the electricity would be off for an extended time, we would be challenged to use what is stored in our freezer.

What I have identified to do so far is quite a bit less than what might be optimum, but it will be vastly superior to doing nothing. When our fresh food runs out, we will have to change our diets. But that is so much better than having to look for food in a time of emergency.

Thinking about worst-case scenarios also helps to motivate one to prepare for other emergencies. I finally bought some new fire-extinguishers to replace the aging one we keep in our kitchen. How silly would it be to be prepared for total national anarchy, but unprepared to handle a grease fire on the stove.

35 posted on 01/14/2011 10:38:09 AM PST by William Tell
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To: TomGuy; Doctor Prepper
We use a marker on each can - month/year of purchase; makes the rotation a lot simpler.

Re bottled water - what we get always has a use-by date of two years from bottling date.

36 posted on 01/14/2011 10:43:38 AM PST by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: William Tell

Can you get a hand pump for your well?

I my Preparedness Manual I have the following quote from a Sarajevo War Survivor:

“Living near a well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.”


37 posted on 01/14/2011 10:47:23 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: StaffiT

You must live in a strange little town.


38 posted on 01/14/2011 11:09:54 AM PST by stuartcr (When politicians politicize issues, aren't they just doing their job?)
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To: stuartcr

LOL! Well, don’t we all?


39 posted on 01/14/2011 11:19:41 AM PST by StaffiT (New Year, New Name)
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.


40 posted on 01/14/2011 11:19:54 AM PST by twistedwrench
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To: William Tell

Canned soups, chili, spam, and a few other items.


And food banks love those types of food.


41 posted on 01/14/2011 11:20:30 AM PST by Atlas Sneezed ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: Kartographer
Kartographer said: "Can you get a hand pump for your well?"

I think so. I will be looking into it. The owner of the company we normally use for well problems was unwilling to consider it. He seemed to believe that the risk of damaging the existing wiring to the submersible pump was too great.

Having a way to get water on our property without electricity would considerably lengthen the amount of time we could keep the place habitable.

42 posted on 01/14/2011 11:28:33 AM PST by William Tell
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To: CottonBall; spitter; Flamenco Lady

Ping


43 posted on 01/14/2011 2:15:10 PM PST by Doctor Prepper (Dig a well Before you are thirsty - Chinese proverb)
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To: Doctor Prepper

bookmark


44 posted on 01/14/2011 3:04:33 PM PST by spitter
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To: Doctor Prepper

The dates on can’s aren’t etched in stone.

Best to go by the FIFO rule..but don’t get too tied up on dates.

Water can be reconditioned and purified.


45 posted on 01/14/2011 3:41:54 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (Liberals are educated above their level of intelligence.. Thanks Sr. Angelica)
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To: lowbuck

I have a couple jerry cans from the 40’s in my basement.I guess they will do to store water. I always fill them up right before a major storm kicks up.


46 posted on 01/14/2011 3:54:03 PM PST by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free, Free Republic.com baby.)
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To: TASMANIANRED

I’m just recommending the use of them for stock rotation during “Normal” times as a guide.

If and when TSHTF it would be a whole different ballgame.


47 posted on 01/17/2011 8:04:58 AM PST by Doctor Prepper (Dig a well Before you are thirsty - Chinese proverb)
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To: mware

Another option would be some of those collapsible plastic water containers.

They don’t take up too much space Collapsed and stored but can be filled when storm clouds are on the horizon.


48 posted on 01/17/2011 8:08:32 AM PST by Doctor Prepper (Dig a well Before you are thirsty - Chinese proverb)
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To: Doctor Prepper
For those interesting in an ongoing survival thread, here's a great one. Lots to read and lots of info on prepping, food storage, food preparation, gardening, building, and news stories. And lots of great Freepers willing to share their expertise.

Weekly Roundup - Living On Nothing Edition [Survival Today - an On going Thread #3]

I'll also post a link to this thread over there. We preppers need to band together.
49 posted on 01/18/2011 8:29:54 AM PST by CottonBall
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To: Chickensoup; William Tell
<I have food storage. However, we normally eat only fresh foods so I have been trying to figure out the best way to handle food storage in this circumstance.

I've also been incorporating some of what William Tell posted. I have super pails set aside of beans and wheat berries - and they should last 30 years. I don't see the need to use those and start rotating them yet. Especially since, at the moment, I can buy the same products for cheaper without the long-term storage packaging. I have also bought some cans of other staples - dry milk, butter, etc - that will last 10-20 years.

I have started experimenting with cooking with all these things, though, so that I am prepared if/when I need to use them. One unexpected side effect is that I've really learned to enjoy grinding wheat berries and making homemade 100% whole wheat bread. The aroma of the freshly ground wheat is wonderful and my friends are enjoying my bread baking (since I'm constantly changing recipes and experimenting on them).

So, from advice I've gotten from others - do learn to use what you are storing so that when the time comes, you are prepared to use the stuff. I do like my fresh foods too - and won't be giving those up until I have to!
50 posted on 01/18/2011 9:32:50 AM PST by CottonBall
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