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Security guard drops gun, worker shot in leg
St. Louis Post-Dispatch ^ | 2/03/2011 | Staff

Posted on 02/03/2011 10:12:04 AM PST by toma29

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

Chesterfield worker shot in leg after security guard drops gun

A security guard dropped his gun this morning and it fired a shot, hitting an employee of an insurance company in the leg, police say.

Capt. Steven Lewis of the Chesterfield Police Department described the worker's injuries as not life-threatening. The injured man was being treated at a local hospital.

The shooting happened about 9:30 a.m. Thursday at an office building at 390 South Woods Mill Road.

The building houses several businesses, but Lewis said it happened in an insurance company. Lewis didn't have the name of the firm. A worker at that address said there is no security guard employed at the firm.

Lewis said intital calls to 911 indicated a disgruntled worker was on site and there was an "active shooter" roaming the site.


(Excerpt) Read more at stltoday.com ...


TOPICS: Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: banglist; fife; guard; gun
Barney!!
1 posted on 02/03/2011 10:12:09 AM PST by toma29
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To: toma29
A security guard dropped his gun this morning and it fired a shot,...

I suppose that it could happen, but I am somewhat doubtful. What kind of gun was it?

2 posted on 02/03/2011 10:14:22 AM PST by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: meyer

It had to have been an older gun. Nowadays, it’s nearly impossible to get a firearm to fire without pulling the trigger.


3 posted on 02/03/2011 10:17:52 AM PST by toma29
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To: toma29; 6ppc
I'd like to know what kind of weapon, as the weapon would normally only fire if the trigger is held in the aft position when the hammer falls.

I think most weapons, especially modern handguns, unless the trigger is held, the firing pin is retained or blocked. Free-floating firing pins are old and not in use today.

Remember, the cowboy of old with his western six-shooter didn't have a round in the chamber because it might go off if the hammer was hit.

If the free-floating firing pin was still a factor, then people today would not have a round in the chamber under the hammer.

Something doesn't sound right. . .but maybe the firearm experts here in FR may be able to offer more info.

4 posted on 02/03/2011 10:18:58 AM PST by Hulka
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To: toma29
It had to have been an older gun. Nowadays, it’s nearly impossible to get a firearm to fire without pulling the trigger.

A very old gun. It smells fishy to me. Guns just don't go off when dropped, even with safetys off and fully cocked. If the trigger isn't pulled, there's always some sort of firing pin safety that prevents accidental discharge when dropped.

5 posted on 02/03/2011 10:19:51 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: toma29

I think there’s more, much more not being told.


6 posted on 02/03/2011 10:20:31 AM PST by Manly Warrior (US ARMY (Ret), "No Free Lunches for the Dogs of War" (my spelling is generally korrect!))
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To: toma29
A worker at that address said there is no security guard employed at the firm.

Well, not any more, at least...

7 posted on 02/03/2011 10:24:00 AM PST by WayneS (Enlightened statesmen will not always be at the helm. -- James Madison)
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To: meyer
What kind of gun was it?

A fully-automatic assault musket.

8 posted on 02/03/2011 10:26:33 AM PST by Cementjungle
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To: toma29

Did the shot employee’s policy cover it, at least?

Regards,


9 posted on 02/03/2011 10:27:17 AM PST by alexander_busek
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To: Hulka

Guy was bored, so he tied a string to the trigger and used the pistol as a yoyo. He was trying to walk the dog when it went off.


10 posted on 02/03/2011 10:28:20 AM PST by going hot (Happiness is a Momma Deuce)
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To: going hot
Having met a few rent-a-cops, that is believable.
11 posted on 02/03/2011 10:38:06 AM PST by Hulka
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To: alexander_busek

With obamacare, the doc will see him June 22.


12 posted on 02/03/2011 10:38:19 AM PST by GeorgiaDawg32 (A well armed lamb will contest the vote)
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To: toma29

IBBG

In before blaming Glock


13 posted on 02/03/2011 10:49:21 AM PST by Hacklehead (Liberalism is the art of taking what works, breaking it, and then blaming conservatives.)
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To: Yo-Yo

I have a friend who bought a new Kimber SIS
fancy pants pistol.
He was showing it to a friend in his kitchen when he accidentally dropped it.
The pistol landed on the muzzle on the Spanish tile floor, and discharged.
Luckily no one was hurt.
Besides being embarrassed, he was very angry as this model was supposed to have a firing pin block to prevent such an accidental discharge.
He returned it to Kimber and they found nothing wrong with it.
So even modern weapons can fire when dropped.
The SIS has been discontinued by Kimber.
(What a silly name for a pistol)


14 posted on 02/03/2011 10:50:49 AM PST by 9422WMR (Illegal is not a race.)
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To: toma29

Bush’s fault


15 posted on 02/03/2011 10:54:04 AM PST by camerongood210
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To: 9422WMR
I think your friend is BSing you. A 1911 has two or three safeties. Grip safety, thumb safety, and possibly a firing pin "Swartz" safety. The FP safety is found in all series II pistols from Kimber and found in other 1911's variously. If it was a series 2 what your friend claims is impossible, if it was a series 1 than its only practically impossible. A firing pin has to hit a primer with some force, and a drop from a minimal height wouldn't be enough to overcome the firing pin spring forget about hitting the primer hard enough to ignite the round.

Personally I wouldn't buy a 1911 with a FPS and I carry in condition one or "cocked and locked". There would be a whole lot more ND's if .45s went off when they were dropped.

16 posted on 02/03/2011 11:55:30 AM PST by Durus (Don't talk about what you have done or what you are going to do. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Durus

Well, His wife and another friend were there, I saw the hole in the floor. I read the documents from Kimber responding to his complaint and denying any fault.
I’m a .45 fan myself, would not have believed it from most people, but this guy was telling the truth. Bank on it.


17 posted on 02/03/2011 2:28:54 PM PST by 9422WMR (Illegal is not a race.)
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To: Durus
Your's is the only cogent post here.

Methinks he tried to catch it.

Anyone who has competed in USPSA/IPSC and IDPA knows that if a pistol is dropped and the shooter tries to catch it, he will be disqualified. Furthermore, students in a formal professional training environment are taught to never try to catch a pistol.

In the case of 1911s, Hi Powers, and other pistols with a frame or slide mounted manual safety and other internal safeties, it's safe to say that if the gun were in a "safe" position (Condition 1 for instance), the weapon would not fire.

DA/SA weapons such as the classic Sig line and V3 H&Ks have long, 10# DA trigger pulls which would require significant effort to fire the weapon. That is the purpose of the DA trigger stroke on those weapons.

Striker fired weapons such as XDs, M&Ps, Glocks, etc. with their "safe trigger" and no external manual safety might be more prone to firing if the owner were to try to catch the weapon and happen to swipe the trigger. I've owned both a Glock a 22 and 19 and believe in this possibility.

Just my two cents.

18 posted on 02/03/2011 2:44:48 PM PST by Cobra64
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To: 9422WMR

It can happen if the pistol was out of battery pushed the case hard enough against the slide it could happen.
I never let me say it again I never rely solely on a safety on any type of gun to many people get shot with guns that are on safe or empty. I carry a 1911a 45 have for many years but I rely on safe handling not the safetys.


19 posted on 02/03/2011 2:48:37 PM PST by Lees Swrd ("Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe and preserve order in the world as well")
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To: Lees Swrd
How about a Type 94 8x22mm Nambu pistol he got from his grandfather as a battlefield war trophy. The Nambu had a long external sear bar that could cause the pistol to fire if the bar was pushed when the safety was OFF and a round cambered — before the trigger was pulled! It was known as the “suicide” pistol for a reason.
20 posted on 02/03/2011 8:25:06 PM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01

I actually got to handle one of those to say the least it was roughly made it looked like it was made the day before but man it was cheap looking.


21 posted on 02/03/2011 9:18:58 PM PST by Lees Swrd ("Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe and preserve order in the world as well")
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To: Lees Swrd
Pre-war and early war Type 94’s are well finished, but late war pistols are really crude. The design itself is defective, IMHO.

Other writers have said the exposed sear bar is is not a serious design flaw because other pistols have exposed sear bars (the P.08 Luger does, for example). However, even though several other designs share the same feature (exposed sear bar), none of them will fire if the bar is pushed on a loaded chamber. Other pistols with exposed sear bars have theirs much better protected.

At one time I had a Type 14 Nambu with the enlarged trigger guard. It was of early 1943 manufacture. The pistol, though well balanced, had several flaws: 1) springs tended to weaken easily, 2) firing pin was fragile and was prone to breakage, 3) the firing pin had two different pin diameters (not good for spares), 4) safety was awkward and prone to breakage, 5) fresh 8x22mm ammo was difficult to find, was underpowered, and was very expensive when found.

Conclusion: Nambus are good for a collection, but they are not reliable shooting sidearms.

22 posted on 02/03/2011 10:12:18 PM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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To: MasterGunner01

“. . . none of them will fire if the bar is pushed on a loaded chamber.”

Disclaimer: This is not 100 percent true. If you fiddle enough with the pistols that have exposed sear bars (such as the P.08 Luger), you can get them to fire accidentally with out touching the trigger. However, this is intentionally attempting to get the pistol to fire under such conditions.

In the case of the Type 94, the sear bar is so exposed it can be manipulated easily to cause an accidental discharge.


23 posted on 02/03/2011 10:20:43 PM PST by MasterGunner01 (To err is human; to forgive is not our policy. -- SEAL Team SIX)
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