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Best Performance and Average Input Oscars on Bloomberg's Debate
Blogges and Personal ^ | 12 Oct 11 | Xzins

Posted on 10/12/2011 5:47:42 AM PDT by xzins

Last night's Meet the Media Question and Answer Session with Bloomberg.com will not get rave reviews.

First, Limited access to this Q&A was insured by Bloomberg's minor presence on TV and Radio. While there was also access via the internet (buffering....buffering), it seems a safe bet to assume that many went without seeing this additional attempt by the media to determine the Republican nominee for POTUS.

The overall Q&A itself was entirely predictable. Those who've seen the other Q&As could have pre-scripted this one. There were no surprising questions, answers, or techniques employed. Absolutely nothing jumped out. Some were probably sad they made the effort to connect via the internet. The diet for the evening was the standard list of bullets already expected from each candidate.

With no new substance to discuss, we are left to talk about performance -- as if this were Oscar night and actors were gushing over their producers and directors.

Oscars go to: Cain, Gingrich, Romney, and Santorum.

AverageOscars go to: Perry, Huntsman, Paul, and Bachmann.

FailureOscars go to: Bloomberg and this boring rehash.

Translating the above goes as follows. Oscar winners held their own. Gingrich, as usual, did better than the others. Cain was clearly next in line followed by the "clear enunciation award" shared between Romney and a feisty Santorum.

All the other candidates kept to their points and made no mistakes.

Dear Mayor Bloomberg....this was such a disappointment. They'll not be naming Oscar night after you any time soon.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous; Politics
KEYWORDS: campaign; election

1 posted on 10/12/2011 5:47:46 AM PDT by xzins
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To: xzins

this blogger seems to like Gingrich


2 posted on 10/12/2011 5:52:56 AM PDT by dalebert
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To: xzins
“Those who've seen the other Q&As could have pre-scripted this one.”

Exactly why I never watch this stuff.

Incidentally, at this point,unless someone catches Cain in bed with a four year old boy, he has my vote.

3 posted on 10/12/2011 5:56:00 AM PDT by SMARTY ("Socialism means slavery." Lord Acton)
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To: SMARTY

Cain did well. He can win my vote if he clears some things up first.

Gingrich is the smartest guy with the best ideas, but last night’s dullness was restricting even to him.


4 posted on 10/12/2011 5:59:58 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True Supporters of our Troops PRAY for their VICTORY!)
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To: xzins

We put entirely too much emphasis on ‘performance’ at these debates. Romney was clearly the best prepared, sharpest and most articulate ‘debater’ on that stage last night. Hands down! But, is that who we want as our nominee???? God spare us from that disaster!


5 posted on 10/12/2011 6:05:50 AM PDT by pgkdan (Perry and Cain 2012! Any order you like.)
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To: xzins

Cain was flat out wrong in his response to Paul about the fed reserve. That concerns me. I am no fan of Paul but he was right about the quotes. Not going to help Herman.

We may get stuck with Mitt the Mormon.


6 posted on 10/12/2011 6:10:06 AM PDT by bluecollarman (Wanted,,,,witty tagline.)
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To: xzins

“...last night’s dullness was restricting...”

Right!

I believe that kind of stage managing of debates is thoroughly deliberate and calculated with conscious effort and precision. The debates display the predictably biased MSM grandstanding and their tendency show biz theatrics. This is how the MSM influences choices which should be made in a way completely detached from the MSM preferences and tactics.

That’s why I don’t (can’t) watch them. You are really watching ‘how the MSM presents debates 101’, and NOT learning about candidates.

Some candidates bear this kind of, by now, institutionalized obfuscation better than others.

Until this beauty contest has run its course, I don’t watch.


7 posted on 10/12/2011 6:16:25 AM PDT by SMARTY ("Socialism means slavery." Lord Acton)
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To: bluecollarman

Which chairman from the last 40 years would you have picked? The question limited the answer to choosing the least of the worst.


8 posted on 10/12/2011 6:18:58 AM PDT by Ingtar (I closed my eyes, only for a moment, and the moment's gone...)
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To: pgkdan

I’d disagree about Romney being the best debater. Gingrich’s stuff about frank and dodd


9 posted on 10/12/2011 6:22:13 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True Supporters of our Troops PRAY for their VICTORY!)
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To: bluecollarman
Cain was flat out wrong in his response to Paul about the fed reserve.

The problem with questions like that is that none of the other candidates have had to answer it. Kind of like everyone bashing Cain's tax plan when they haven't put forward anything more than vague, feel good talking points themselves. Paul stumbled when asked to articulate who he would appoint to the Fed or what he'd do about it and the Fed has been his flagship issue for 30 years.

10 posted on 10/12/2011 6:23:33 AM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Ingtar

Burns served as Fed Chairman from February 1970 until the end of January 1978. He has a reputation of having been overly influenced by political pressure in his monetary policy decisions during his time as Chairman[2] and for supporting the policy, widely accepted in political and economic circles at the time, that Fed action should try to maintain an unemployment rate of around 4 percent.


Nevertheless, Miller maintained a Keynesian belief that inflation could “prime the pump” of the economy, and would at any rate be self-correcting.[4] He thus pursued a strongly dovish policy and opposed raising interest rates. The effect of this was to send the dollar’s value spiraling downward. In November 1978, only 11 months into his term, the dollar had fallen nearly 34% against the German mark and almost 42% against the Japanese yen, prompting the Carter administration to launch a “dollar rescue package” including emergency sales from the U.S. gold stock, borrowing from the International Monetary Fund, and auctions of Treasury securities denominated in foreign currencies.

Volcker raised the federal funds rate, which had averaged 11.2% in 1979, to a peak of 20% in June 1981. The prime rate rose to 21.5% in 1981 as well.

Volcker’s Fed elicited the strongest political attacks and most widespread protests in the history of the Federal Reserve (unlike any protests experienced since 1922), due to the effects of the high interest rates on the construction and farming sectors, culminating in indebted farmers driving their tractors onto C Street NW and blockading the Eccles Building.[13]

Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz said about him in an interview:
Paul Volcker, the previous Fed Chairman known for keeping inflation under control, was fired because the Reagan administration didn’t believe he was an adequate de-regulator. (Paul’s favorite for some reason.)


In 2000, Greenspan raised interest rates several times; these actions were believed by many to have caused the bursting of the dot-com bubble. However, according to Nobel laureate Paul Krugman “he didn’t raise interest rates to curb the market’s enthusiasm; he didn’t even seek to impose margin requirements on stock market investors. Instead, he waited until the bubble burst, as it did in 2000, then tried to clean up the mess afterward.”[23] In autumn 2001, as a decisive reaction to the September 11 attacks and various corporate scandals which undermined the economy, the Greenspan-led Federal Reserve initiated a series of interest cuts that brought down the Federal Funds rate to 1% in 2004.

On February 1, 2006, President Bush appointed Bernanke to a fourteen-year term as a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and to a four-year term as Chairman.[26][27] By virtue of the chairmanship, he sits on the Financial Stability Oversight Board that oversees the Troubled Asset Relief Program. He also serves as Chairman of the Federal Open Market Committee, the System’s principal monetary policy making body.


11 posted on 10/12/2011 6:28:37 AM PDT by Ingtar (I closed my eyes, only for a moment, and the moment's gone...)
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To: Ingtar
Roomey and Newt. Huntsman ( who will never win took some steam out of Cain about the Pizza price and he admitted he been a member of the Federal reserve under Greenspan and liked him.

The author of two bubble's in the last 20 years.

12 posted on 10/12/2011 6:48:22 AM PDT by scooby321
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To: xzins

No one is watching these non-debates. The clips that Fox showed this morning were pitiful. The Sominex company should sue the GOP for unfair competition.


13 posted on 10/12/2011 6:51:40 AM PDT by txrefugee
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To: xzins
I’d disagree about Romney being the best debater. Gingrich’s stuff about frank and dodd

That's part of my point. Anyone who watched and was interested in substance would agree with you. But substance is NOT what these 'debates' are about. That's why I say that Romney won. Too many people are focused on looks and style, even here on FR.

14 posted on 10/12/2011 6:55:08 AM PDT by pgkdan (Perry and Cain 2012! Any order you like.)
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To: pgkdan

I would add Gingrich to your tagline. :>)


15 posted on 10/12/2011 6:59:10 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True Supporters of our Troops PRAY for their VICTORY!)
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To: pgkdan

I would like a debate where the same question was asked of each candidate. Just go down the line. No counter responses, or cross talk. Next question- start with a different person and procede down the line.

Simplistic, I know, but a chance to see comparisons on views.


16 posted on 10/12/2011 7:04:55 AM PDT by Exit148
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To: xzins

Been thinking about it! Whoever the next President is I hope he finds a place for Newt where he can be a real asset! Unless, of course, Newt is the next President.


17 posted on 10/12/2011 7:07:14 AM PDT by pgkdan (Perry and Cain 2012! Any order you like.)
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To: pgkdan

I have no doubt that watching a Gingrich/Obama debate would be like watching Cheney dismantle John Edwards.

That was probably the most fun debate I’ve watched in my entire life of watching politics.


18 posted on 10/12/2011 7:09:27 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True Supporters of our Troops PRAY for their VICTORY!)
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To: Exit148
Simplistic? Yes, sure. But also the best way for the voters who watch these things to actually learn something about where candidates actually stand. The moderators have entirely too much control over these media events. By asking the questions they get to drive all the attention to or awy from whoever they want. Don't like Herman Cain's 999 tax plan...let everyone then explain what they'd do and why.

I like your idea...I'd love to see something like that.

19 posted on 10/12/2011 7:12:56 AM PDT by pgkdan (Perry and Cain 2012! Any order you like.)
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To: xzins

The loser was clearly Karen Tumulty, when she attempted to get Bachmann and Gingrich to admit that “Wall Street” caused the credit meltdown. Bachmann clearly articulated the case that government was at fault, a hard-hit, ground-rule double, perhaps, then Gingrich hit a homer by mentioning “jail”, “Barney Frank”, and “Chris Dodd” in the same sentence.

Two runs.

It’s a shame that statistically no one watched this, as for some, it may have been the first time they heard that someone could be at fault other than Wall Street.

This is why I think we have a strong field, not a weak one.

Yes, the 9-9-9 plan may be flawed, but it was talked about.

All night.

This can only be good for the battlefield prep stage of the war we now find ourselves in to save capitalism.


20 posted on 10/12/2011 8:29:05 AM PDT by wayoverontheright
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To: wayoverontheright

Can’t disagree. If there was a highlight last night, that exchange would be on the play-of-the-week rerun.


21 posted on 10/12/2011 8:38:17 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True Supporters of our Troops PRAY for their VICTORY!)
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To: scooby321

Pick a better one out of the list? The question was which one was the best in the last 40 years, wasn’t it?


22 posted on 10/12/2011 9:27:03 AM PDT by Ingtar (I closed my eyes, only for a moment, and the moment's gone...)
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