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Read This First Before You Decide That Preppers Are Crazy
TEC ^ | 4-2-2012 | Michael Snyder

Posted on 04/03/2012 11:13:52 AM PDT by blam

Read This First Before You Decide That Preppers Are Crazy

April 2, 2012
Michael Snyder

Do you believe that preppers are a few cards short of a full deck? Do you assume that anyone that is "preparing for doomsday" does not have their elevator going all the way to the top floor? Well, you might want to read this first before you make a final decision that all preppers are crazy. The information that you are about to read shook me up a bit when I first looked it over. To be honest, I had no idea how incredibly vulnerable our economic system is to a transportation disruption. I am continually getting emails and comments on my websites asking "how to prepare" for what is coming, so when I came across this information I knew that I had to share it with all of you. Hopefully what you are about to read will motivate you to prepare like never before, and hopefully you will share this information with others.

Originally, I was going to write an article about the rising unemployment in Europe today. Did you know that unemployment in the eurozone is now at a 15 year high? It has risen for 10 months in a row with no end in sight.

But I have written dozens of articles about the economic crisis in Europe already. So before starting on that article I started thinking of all the "preparation" questions I have been getting lately and I went over and checked out one of my favorite preparation websites: shtfplan.com.

Well, an article had just been posted over there about a report put out by the American Trucker Associations entitled "When Trucks Stop, America Stops".

I went and found that original report and I was stunned as I read it.

The truth is that our "just in time" inventory and delivery systems leave us incredibly vulnerable to a nationwide disaster.

You see, it is very expensive to hold and store inventory, so most manufacturers and retailers rely on a continual flow of deliveries that are scheduled to arrive "just in time", and this significantly reduces their operating expenses.

This is considered to be good business practice for manufacturers and retailers, but it also means that if there was a major nationwide transportation disruption that our economic system would grind to a halt almost immediately.

Once store shelves are picked clean, they would not be able to be replenished until trucks could get back on the road. In the event of a major nationwide disaster, that could be quite a while.

So what could potentially cause a nationwide transportation shutdown?

Well, it is easy to imagine a lot of potential scenarios - a volcanic eruption, a historic earthquake, an EMP attack, a solar megastorm, a war, a major terror attack, an asteroid strike, a killer pandemic, mass rioting in U.S. cities, or even martial law.

If something caused the trucks to stop running, life in America would immediately start changing.

So exactly what would that look like?

The following is an excerpt from the report mentioned above put out by the American Trucker Associations entitled "When Trucks Stop, America Stops"....

*****

A Timeline Showing the Deterioration of Major Industries Following a Truck Stoppage

The first 24 hours

• Delivery of medical supplies to the affected area will cease.
• Hospitals will run out of basic supplies such as syringes and catheters within hours. Radiopharmaceuticals will deteriorate and become unusable.
• Service stations will begin to run out of fuel.
• Manufacturers using just-in-time manufacturing will develop component shortages.
• U.S. mail and other package delivery will cease.

Within one day

• Food shortages will begin to develop.
• Automobile fuel availability and delivery will dwindle, leading to skyrocketing prices and long lines at the gas pumps.
• Without manufacturing components and trucks for product delivery, assembly lines will shut down, putting thousands out of work.

Within two to three days

• Food shortages will escalate, especially in the face of hoarding and consumer panic.
• Supplies of essentials—such as bottled water, powdered milk, and canned meat—at major retailers will disappear.
• ATMs will run out of cash and banks will be unable to process transactions.
• Service stations will completely run out of fuel for autos and trucks.
• Garbage will start piling up in urban and suburban areas.
• Container ships will sit idle in ports and rail transport will be disrupted, eventually coming to a standstill.

Within a week

• Automobile travel will cease due to the lack of fuel. Without autos and busses, many people will not be able to get to work, shop for groceries, or access medical care.
• Hospitals will begin to exhaust oxygen supplies.

Within two weeks

• The nation’s clean water supply will begin to run dry.

Within four weeks

• The nation will exhaust its clean water supply and water will be safe for drinking only after boiling. As a result gastrointestinal illnesses will increase, further taxing an already weakened health care system.

This timeline presents only the primary effects of a freeze on truck travel. Secondary effects must be considered as well, such as inability to maintain telecommunications service, reduced law enforcement, increased crime, increased illness and injury, higher death rates, and likely, civil unrest.

*****

Earlier in the report, the reasons why America's water supply would be in such jeopardy are described in greater detail....

According to the American Water Works Association, Americans drink more than one billion glasses of tap water per day. For safety and security reasons, most water supply plants maintain a larger inventory of supplies than the typical business. However, the amount of chemical storage varies significantly and is site specific. According to the Chlorine Institute, most water treatment facilities receive chlorine in cylinders (150 pounds and one ton cylinders) that are delivered by motor carriers. On average, trucks deliver purification chemicals to water supply plants every seven to 14 days. Without these chemicals, water cannot be purified and made safe for drinking.
Without truck deliveries of purification chemicals, water supply plants will run out of drinkable water in 14 to 28 days. Once the water supply is drained, water will be deemed safe for drinking only when boiled. Lack of clean drinking water will lead to increased gastrointestinal and other illnesses, further taxing an already weakened healthcare system.
Can you see why I always recommend that you make sure that you and your family have access to fresh water and a way to purify it?

This report should be very sobering for all of us.

What would you and your family do if you had no food, no clean water and the stores were shut down because their supplies were gone?

An article by Tess Pennington entitled "Emergency Items: What Will Disappear First" contains a list of 100 things that are likely to disappear from store shelves first. The following are the first 10 things on her list....

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy…target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 – 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice – Beans – Wheat

You can find the rest of the list right here.

Most Americans just assume that they will always be able to run out to the supermarket or to Wal-Mart and buy anything that they need.

But if the trucks stop running that will change almost overnight.

After reading the information above, does anyone out there still believe that preppers are crazy?

The truth is that there are good, solid reasons why millions of Americans have been storing up food, water filters and other supplies.

Our world is becoming increasingly unstable, and all of us need to get educated about how to prepare for the difficult years that are coming.

One nightmarish event can change everything that we take for granted in a single moment.

Just remember what happened after Hurricane Katrina. Even though that was only a regional disaster, millions of people had their lives completely turned upside down by that tragedy.

Don't make the mistake of assuming that just because the U.S. has always known tremendous peace and prosperity since World War II that things will always be that way.

Our lives will only continue to be "normal" as long as the trucks continue running.

When the trucks stop running in America, there will be mass chaos.

Are you prepared for that?


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: collapse; emergencyprep; prepperping; preppers; selfreliance; shtf; survivalping; thecomingdarkness; trucking
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bttt


101 posted on 04/04/2012 5:36:09 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: Kartographer; blam; JRandomFreeper

Not to interrupt this fin impeachment of ... whatever, but ...

K - I have had a brain phart. Make an upper pipe extension for that fine rocket stove you built, and a lower fuel box extension for the fire.

Rig up a metal trash can with racks, and a hole in the side.

When the power goes out, use the rocket stove for a heat source, flip the trash can over it, and smoke everything thawing in the freezer.

This has been bugging me, because we have half a cow in the freezer - hate to lose it.

Meanwhile, my neighbors continue to stock food & fuel, while I stock guns & ammo - when do think I should tell them that we will share?

(Has everyone lost their sense of humor?)


102 posted on 04/04/2012 7:21:00 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
We have hurricane parties....that's to eat all the food in the freezers before it goes bad...invite everyone.

I have a generator and save my food in the freezers though.

103 posted on 04/04/2012 7:27:17 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

I, too, have a generator - but that will only work for a couple of weeks, given the fuel on hand.

After that - time to smoke a cow.

And we have done, in this suburb of DC - lost power for a week in Isabel, los not one pound of hamburger to thawing.

But there are limits. At some point, you have to ask, is the outage local, and is is temporary?

Because fuel might have a better use than running the generator.


104 posted on 04/04/2012 7:34:37 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
when do think I should tell them that we will share.

Well, telling people that they will share is a whole different kettle of fish than having neighbors that you have previously worked out arrangements with.

One I'm fine with. One I'm not.

And if you try to use a rocket stove to smoke meat, you are going to cook it. And it will spoil. If you are serious about smoking meat, I have years of experience at it, and am a culinary school graduate (I won't poison you). I'd be glad to pass along some tips.

Guns and ammo only go so far. Real world skills that you have practiced are much more valuable than threats and trying to wing it.

'Study to show thyself approved of God, a workman that needeth not be ashamed...' 2 Tim 2:15

/johnny

105 posted on 04/04/2012 7:34:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

You are probably right - a rocket stove would be too hot to smoke meat.

Unless you only burned little sticks in it, and slowly.

I dunno, just thinking out loud.

From reading your cooking posts, I readily admit that you would be better at it than I - and a great one to have in the bunker (except for your odd dog.)

I am a scientist, a mathematician, and an engineer - by definition, I am a lousy cook. For example, I LIKE army chow. Better than what I produce.

As for telling people that they will share - sheez, that line is funny.

Not that I would ever do it.


106 posted on 04/04/2012 7:46:41 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
Not more than once, anyway. ;)

I also have an engineering background. Did AF, DOD contract, and telecom, in that order for most of my adult life. I build a good, solid network.

As an engineer, I would tell you to keep the temp (for beef) near 140F to dry 1/4" strips after salting for 12 hours in a brine that you can float a raw egg in. Use enough slightly wet wood to create a thick cloud of smoke. However you get to those conditions is up to your engineering mind.

As far as science goes... (most) dangerous bacteria require several conditions to thrive. take away any of them and they don't do well.

Water is #1. Salt, drying, and smoke help with that.

Temperature is #2. If you keep the meat at or above 140F, bacteria won't grow while you dry/smoke it. Keeping it frozen works well, too, but that's your engineering problem. ;)

/johnny

107 posted on 04/04/2012 8:01:46 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

“Brine you can float a raw egg in.”

That, actually, is a usefull standard. LOL.

Thanks.


108 posted on 04/04/2012 8:07:56 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I have a sudden vision of myself, slowly adding salt to a beaker of water, until an egg floats - cackling madly, and tacking notes about ppm -

I assume you mean an egg in the shell? No pickled, like my grandad?


109 posted on 04/04/2012 8:12:59 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
I have a hydrometer, because I make beer and wine, but not everyone has one, so I didn't give you a specific gravity.

God has provided some useful benchmarks for us. Freezing and boiling of water... floating eggs in brine... stuff like that. ;)

/johnny

110 posted on 04/04/2012 8:13:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: patton
Raw egg in shell.

You have to stir and may have to heat the water to get the salt to dissolve. Hot liquid and stirring with a raw shell egg involved turns into badly made poached eggs.

Besides throwing off the specific gravity, which is measured at standard temperature.

And it's not ppm. It's ounces per gallon. Is why I have cheap SALT (not mineral) blocks that weigh 50 lbs.

Did you know that roman soldiers were paid in salt originally? It's a precious substance, if you can't get it, and need it.

How much salt do you have in your house right now? How much do you need to live per year?

/johnny

111 posted on 04/04/2012 8:23:15 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/poulsci/tech_manuals/gravity_determination.html

Who knew eggs were so complex? LOL.

Salt? A few thousand pounds. I own a plow truck - the stuff is everywhere.

Actually, I tried to reduce my salt holdings this year - but the weather did not cooperate. Only used up #900. Sigh.


112 posted on 04/04/2012 8:34:43 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: Iron Munro

IM,

I read Matt Bracken’s Enemies trilogy over the past two weekends. Now there’s some stuff to get you in a prepping frame of mind. Very telling scenarios, kind of felt like we’re on the verge of living them, real soon......


113 posted on 04/04/2012 8:38:05 PM PDT by The FIGHTIN Illini (Beware of politicians saying they can fix anything)
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To: patton
Who knew eggs were so complex? LOL.

The 101 pleats in a chef's hat represent the 101 ways he demonstrated to prepare eggs. ;)

Escoffier has pages and pages in his old book, just on eggs. A friend of mine, retired cardiologist, raises chickens and thinks eggs are one of the great foods.

I have to agree. I even had one as a project in an early structural engineering class. Mine did survive the drop with help from paper and plastic straws and elmers glue. ;)

/johnny

114 posted on 04/04/2012 8:50:12 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: The FIGHTIN Illini

bttt


115 posted on 04/04/2012 8:53:09 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55
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To: patton
Salt? A few thousand pounds.

Rich man.

That will preserve several tons of meat, and vegetables (hope you like kraut and kimchee).

/johnny

116 posted on 04/04/2012 8:53:50 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Quix

Thanks for the ping!


117 posted on 04/04/2012 8:54:58 PM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: JRandomFreeper

Actually, I love both kraut and kimchee. Good for you, too, as long as it is unpasturized.

Salt is as easy to get as water from the Chesapeake bay - go collect a gallon of bay water, pour it in a cookie sheet, set it in the sun, and let the water evaporate.

Water one gets from the Patomac river - right above great falls. That is where the water intakes are for DC, Southern MD, and NVA. Sure, it is treated with chlorine, et al. but it needn’t be. You can drink it right out of the river.

If one lives in MI - you are sitting on the biggest salt mine in the world. It is under the city of Detroit.

Funny, huh?


118 posted on 04/04/2012 9:05:38 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
The first big cities were set up where salt was easily available. Think Ur in Mesoptomia (Iraq), and other ancient sites. Some are deserts today because of the salt content after the global cooling and great drying.

So that's pretty standard for pre-industrial age societies. Which is when most of the east coast cities were settled.

Now, in the industrial age, we can get salt anywhere, as long as the technology holds out.

/johnny

119 posted on 04/04/2012 9:13:30 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: The FIGHTIN Illini
I read Matt Bracken’s Enemies trilogy over the past two weekends. Now there’s some stuff to get you in a prepping frame of mind. Very telling scenarios, kind of felt like we’re on the verge of living them, real soon......

I think you are correct - the events seem perfectly plausible today, probably in part because we have actually watched (lived through) much of the groundwork being laid by the government.

ie: Why does Homelend Security need 450 million rounds of high performance HST ammunition?

The Department Of Homeland Security Is Buying 450 Million New Bullets

120 posted on 04/04/2012 9:22:14 PM PDT by Iron Munro (If Repub's paid as much attention to Rush Limbaugh as the Dem's do, we wouldn't be in this mess)
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To: JRandomFreeper
"Think Ur in Mesoptomia (Iraq), and other ancient sites."

Ur was a sea side town when Abraham lived there. Today, it is 100 miles inland. Silting.

121 posted on 04/04/2012 10:56:15 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Yep. The great drying, as more ice is locked up in the ice caps.

Didn't help their irrigation techniques brought solvent salts to the surface.

We need a sea-level rise to bring life back to the former great fertile crescent. And fewer goats, and more trees.

/johnny

122 posted on 04/04/2012 11:04:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: patton; JRandomFreeper

” Salt? A few thousand pounds. I own a plow truck - the stuff is everywhere. “

Is it ‘food grade’ salt? (and not Halite or some other salt-like ice-melting variant??)

Is ‘food grade’ salt necessary for the brining->smoking process??

I have ready availability of salt blocks (for livestock) - would this be acceptable (if I can figure a way to grind it up) for brining->smoking and/or salting->drying meat and fish??

Would there be some variation of these techinques for vegetables??

(I’ve just recently become interested in this tried-and-true method for food preservation, and I’m beginning to realize how woefully inadequate is my knowledge on the subject... ;))


123 posted on 04/05/2012 3:22:54 AM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: Paved Paradise
Meanwhile, I would like to hear the prepper’s defense of their amassing supplies/food for years and years because of a belief in some doomsday scenario when the Lord asks them about how they used their resources and time and talent for Him

I would like to year your defense of amassing money for years and years because of a belief that some day you'll be too old to work when the Lord asks you how you used their resources and time and talent for Him.

124 posted on 04/05/2012 4:44:13 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: JRandomFreeper; driftdiver; bgill

Good thoughts/advice. Thanks folks. I’ll bring this up at our next meeting.


125 posted on 04/05/2012 5:08:14 AM PDT by appalachian_dweller (Live each day as if it's your last. It might be.)
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To: wolfcreek

>> It’s not necessary to run it continuously <<

If we have any type of extended event, we will only run our generator to draw water from the well. By my calculations, we could make our propane last up to six months.

It will still be noisy when running though.

We are going to get a hand pump for our well. My worry is that the well is too deep for a hand pump. From what I’ve seen, hand pumps are only good to depths of 60 feet.


126 posted on 04/05/2012 5:12:13 AM PDT by appalachian_dweller (Live each day as if it's your last. It might be.)
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To: Repeat Offender
Water doesn't magically come out of the faucet in a rural area when there is no electricity to run the pump.

It was probably 15 years ago that we has a neighborhood meeting after a huge flood. I was running the meeting and had off handedly mentioned I'd filled every container I could find with water. Even old timers asked how I knew to do that. Really?!? It's not rocket science to look at the sky and watch the evening news weather reports. All services out here are iffy so every time there's a big storm, I'm filling water bottles just in case. On Tuesday, the electricity went out for no reason and the first thing I thought of was no water for the garden.

127 posted on 04/05/2012 5:30:09 AM PDT by bgill
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To: blam

128 posted on 04/05/2012 6:00:04 AM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas gerit ;-{)
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To: Uncle Ike

Some is plain old rock salt, some halite, some other stuff.

None of it is “food grade.”


129 posted on 04/05/2012 7:09:59 AM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: Uncle Ike; JRandomFreeper

Some water softener salt is considered “food grade” - I don’t know which. But, if you sort that out, you can buy salt in #50 bags for a few bucks.


130 posted on 04/05/2012 11:21:30 AM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
Sodium chloride is sodium chloride. Our bodies need it to survive. Don't put too much store in 'food grade' when your life is on the line. It's a government thing, and we all know how that works out.

Halite is salt. Livestock salt blocks (not mineral blocks) are safe enough for human consumption. I'll eat them, even if I couldn't use them in a restaurant.

/johnny

131 posted on 04/05/2012 11:50:30 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: patton
On that note, about 'food grade'.... I started making a new batch of pastrami today. I actually used potassium nitrate (saltpeter) in the cure brine.

Big no-no in the FDA manual, but I personally think it's better than the other nitrates for curing.

As a free man, I've decided that the benefit outweighs the potential downside. I don't need government telling me what I should consume within my own home.

/johnny

132 posted on 04/05/2012 11:55:37 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Paved Paradise

I guess that in all of your Bible “reading” you skipped over Jesus’ parable of the 10 Virgins, their lamps and the wedding feast.


133 posted on 04/05/2012 12:00:24 PM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

LOL - I didn’t know you can buy saltpeter in bulk anymore.


134 posted on 04/05/2012 12:00:32 PM PDT by patton (DateDiff)
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To: patton
Old stock. It's a mineral. It doesn't go bad. And you are probably correct that it would take a ream of paperwork and 2 congresscritters to buy it today.

Besides, not much is required for meat preservation.

That's the point to stockpiling stuff, so you can have it when you need it, regardless of why it's not available.

/johnny

135 posted on 04/05/2012 12:05:46 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

.” I actually used potassium nitrate (saltpeter) in the cure brine. “

From the reading I’ve been doing on the subject this afternoon, it seems that saltpeter is an essential ingredient for curing pork, especially hams and bacon...

J, you seem pretty knowledgable on the subject — is there any reasonable method to extend shelf life of cured meat (dried, salted, smoked) beyond the 90-100 days that the articles I read seem to agree on??


136 posted on 04/05/2012 12:47:35 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: appalachian_dweller

Here’s one that claims about 200 ft.

http://www.bisonpumps.com/deep-well-hand-pump.htm


137 posted on 04/05/2012 12:56:11 PM PDT by wolfcreek (‘closed eye’ mentality is the reason for our current reality)
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To: appalachian_dweller

I should of kept looking: 350ft.

http://www.simplepump.com/index.html


138 posted on 04/05/2012 12:58:14 PM PDT by wolfcreek (‘closed eye’ mentality is the reason for our current reality)
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To: Uncle Ike
Instacure #1 and #2 are the 'approved' subs for saltpeter. One is for wet, one is for dry.

I keep dried sausages and meats for up to a year, regularly. The longer you keep them, the dryer they need to be. Keeping them cool also helps. I have a 54F special fridge for making/aging sausage/cheese/beer.

The other thing is local molds. If it gets fuzzy, cheese or meat, it can be wiped down with vinegar.

The bottom line is that you are trying to keep bad bacteria from growing. Bacteria need water, most of the nasties need oxygen, though some are anerobic, acidity and temperature also affect them. And finally, so does time.

The trick is to bind up the food so the nasties can't get to it and reproduce.

/johnny

139 posted on 04/05/2012 1:18:06 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

” The other thing is local molds. If it gets fuzzy, cheese or meat, it can be wiped down with vinegar. “

My late father - son of German Wisconsin farmers - taught us that cheese and sausage weren’t fully ready until they had a good layer of mold...

Not sure how that applies to modern store-bought products, though... ;)


140 posted on 04/05/2012 1:30:04 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: piroque

marked


141 posted on 04/05/2012 1:48:55 PM PDT by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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To: Uncle Ike
Bleu cheese and camembert or Brie come to mind. Several sausages are best with a coating of good mold. Most folks don't want that. I'm great with it, but I eat most everything, including durian. ;)

Your mileage may vary.

I've lived on a remote mountainside without cash income for months at a stretch, and had folks come over for dinner because the food was good. I just asked that they bring a gift of coffee, flour, salt or booze. And I sometimes provided the drinks, depending on what fruit was in season. Neighbor and I once drank 6 gallons of plum wine in a week and a half. He stopped by every evening with tobacco. ;)

/johnny

142 posted on 04/05/2012 1:56:44 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

” mold. Most folks don’t want that. I’m great with it, but I eat most everything “

A little mold doesn’t bother me, largely due to my upbringing, I guess — even with bread, I just cut the moldy part off and proceed... ;)

And, in truth, I kinda miss the hanging hard sausage and wheels of Wisconsin cheese (and, from one memorable occasion from my youth, Virginia ham) with their green coating - Good Eats!!!

By the way, the irony is not lost on me that I’m struggling to learn skills that were second-nature to my Grandmothers... ;)


143 posted on 04/05/2012 2:04:04 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: driftdiver

Psst I think it was Joseph that stored 7 years of grain.


144 posted on 04/05/2012 2:13:48 PM PDT by verga (Party like it is 1773)
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To: verga

You’re right of course, I had my stories confused. Doesn’t change my point.


145 posted on 04/05/2012 2:17:56 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: blam

They are not kidding about supplies getting short in the stores in a hurry. We had a rare desert snow storm and the freeway was closed off and on for just two days- stores had many empty shelves, most things that were necessary items were gone in a flash. It is not just groceries, there was a pipe breaking freeze last winter and plumbing supplies disappeared from El Paso for over a week until they caught up with demand. Anyone that doesn’t stockpile enough to at least survive short-term is really in trouble in even a minor situation.


146 posted on 04/05/2012 3:05:59 PM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: MrB
Those that don’t have the truth of God’s Word, and the Spirit to understand it, are truly anxious and worried and looking for something to pin that anxiety on.

Sun spots. Meteors. Peak Oil. EMP.

People of Christ, look UP, for your redemption is nigh.

Christ is the answer to that anxiety.

1 Peter 5:6-7 6 Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, 7 casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you.

People without Christ need to look to Him as well, because when it's all said and done, everybody dies some time and then what? Being prepped is a good thing for the here and now but what about when that's over?

Eternity is a long time. People need to be ready for that as well.

I am prepped for the short term but if I'm going to survive, it's going to be God's doing and if I don't, I'll be in a way better place anyway, so it's no great loss. If someone doesn't know Christ, they really ought to be planning an hanging around as long as possible. They can use whatever of mine they find when I'm gone.

147 posted on 04/05/2012 3:12:09 PM PDT by metmom ( For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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To: wolfcreek

Thanks fore that link WC. I’ve been looking for a backup pump. My well is 400 ft deep.


148 posted on 04/05/2012 3:14:42 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: MrB; MeganC
Look on the bright side. Most of those you’re referring to are simply TOO LAZY to make the trip out to your farm or ranch and steal your stuff.

Actually, the bright side is that the urban dwelling thugs and gang bangers may know how to survive in the city, but when confronted with uncontrolled nature, they don't do so well. I've seen some stunning ignorance and reactions to animals which aren't dogs or cats.

I seriously doubt many of them know how to survive in the wild that they'll have to traverse to reach many of us. This is especially true if any of this happens in the winter or colder months. When I see how many people are out driving about in weather in the teens without good warm clothing because they figure that they're only going to be out for a few minutes, I have little hope that they'd know how to make it for real.

Not to mention the number of brain dead teenagers who walk around in t-shirts and jeans when it's snowing out, claiming the whole time *It's not cold*. Well, you may be able to lie to me and lie to yourself, but the laws of physics are the laws of physics and hypothermia is hypothermia because the body loses heat at a certain rate whether they like to admit it or not.

Many of them won't survive outdoors because they've never learned to survive outdoors. Look at the survival rates of others caught outdoors even when they have been taught basic survival skills.

149 posted on 04/05/2012 3:25:52 PM PDT by metmom ( For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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To: Paved Paradise; MrB; bgill; Kartographer
Whatever happened to “love thy neighbor?”

How ironic that you're all concerned about loving your neighbor when we know that since you're not prepping, you're going to be on the receiving end of it.

Well, what about you? How are you going to be showing love to your neighbor when the shtf? By sitting there with him starving together? By going to them and expecting them to hand out food that they've thoughtfully stored away to feed their family and give it to you instead at their expense?

By not preparing you'll be incapable of doing what you're criticizing and condemning others for not doing. You'll simply be part of the problem because you'll be depending on handouts to eat that someone else could be eating. By prepping, not only can you share what you have, but you also free up food for the others who can't/won't/didn't prep.

150 posted on 04/05/2012 3:35:56 PM PDT by metmom ( For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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