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SIMPLE WOUND CLOSURE 101:
Modern Survival Online ^ | 4/11/12 | Doc Morgan

Posted on 04/11/2012 6:36:32 PM PDT by Kartographer

here are essentially two ways to heal a wound: 1) Primary intent: bringing the wound edges together via bandage, suture, or glue. 2) Secondary intent: allowing the wound to heal “as is” when primary intent is not indicated (such as a very contaminated, dirty wound with multiple deep entry points). It’s important to close a wound by primary intent for several reasons: 1) Hemostasis (stopping bleeding): because if you lacerated a vessel with your injury, you will need to ligate it somehow. Granted, if you lacerate a major artery, you will just need to apply pressure because ligating it may compromise blood flow to whatever body area it feeds. 2) Infection prevention: since our skin provides a barrier to bacteria, this is pretty obvious why closing a wound is important to restoring that barrier. There are, however, exceptions to this rule when the wound is fairly contaminated, and by closing the wound you may actually trap bacteria under the skin and cause a deeper infection. I will explain how to minimize this chance. 3) Cosmesis: if you have a deep laceration in an area where “looking good” or “not looking like Frankenstein” is important, then repair is indicated.

(Excerpt) Read more at modernsurvivalonline.com ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: firstaid; medicine; preparedness; prepperping; preppers; selfreliance; shtf; survival; survivalping; wound; woundcare; wounds
Some basic 'meatball' medicine, which may come in handy.
1 posted on 04/11/2012 6:36:40 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!


2 posted on 04/11/2012 6:39:35 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

I like meatballs. They taste gooooood!!!


3 posted on 04/11/2012 6:45:07 PM PDT by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Kartographer

I have an emergency med kit that came with 5 sutures.

I have yet to rip apart an orange and teach myself how to do it... poor orange!!!
At least it wouldn’t scream and wiggle...


4 posted on 04/11/2012 6:45:12 PM PDT by djf (Obama - the "OJ verdict" of presidents!!)
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To: Kartographer

Always carry instant glue with you. Best thing for cuts. Also great for cracked skin around nails. Gorilla glue is next best thing to cover cuts, just have to not be touching it until it sets.


5 posted on 04/11/2012 6:46:29 PM PDT by SkyDancer ("Talent Without Ambition Is Sad - Ambition Without Talent Is Worse")
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To: djf
I have yet to rip apart an orange and teach myself how to do it... poor orange!!! At least it wouldn’t scream and wiggle...

You can practice on your cat. Just make sure the kids aren't around. They won't understand. After the cat is done with you you can sew yourself up.

6 posted on 04/11/2012 6:48:19 PM PDT by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: Kartographer

Some good advice. Out here on the Farm, we’ve all tended to a lot of wounds, of all sizes and difficulties. It isn’t fun, but it is necessary to know how.


7 posted on 04/11/2012 6:49:25 PM PDT by carriage_hill (I'd vote for a "orange juice can", before 0bummer&HisRegimeFromHell, gets another 4yrs. Can-> later.)
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To: Kartographer

bfl


8 posted on 04/11/2012 6:52:28 PM PDT by Oshkalaboomboom
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To: ImJustAnotherOkie

“After the cat is done with you you can sew yourself up.”

Here’s one for giving a cat a pill:

1. Pick cat up and cradle it in the crook of your left arm as if holding a baby. Position right forefinger and thumb on either side of cat’s mouth and gently apply pressure to cheeks while holding pill in right hand. As cat opens mouth, pop pill into mouth. Allow cat to close mouth and swallow.

2. Retrieve pill from floor and cat from behind sofa. Cradle cat in left arm and repeat process.

3. Retrieve cat from bedroom, and throw soggy pill away.

4. Take new pill from foil wrap, cradle cat in left arm holding rear paws tightly with left hand. Force jaws open and push pill to back of mouth with right forefinger. Hold mouth shut for a count of 10.

5. Retrieve pill from goldfish bowl and cat from top of wardrobe. Call spouse from garden.

6. Kneel on floor with cat wedged firmly between knees, holding front and rear paws. Ignore low growls emitted by cat. Get spouse to hold cat’s head firmly with one hand while forcing wooden ruler into mouth. Drop pill down ruler and rub cat’s throat vigorously.

7. Retrieve cat from curtain rail, get another pill from foil wrap. Make note to buy new ruler and repair curtains. Carefully sweep shattered figurines from hearth and set to one side for gluing later.

8. Wrap cat in large towel and get spouse to lie on cat with its head just visible from below spouse’s armpit. Put pill in end of drinking straw, force cat’s mouth open with pencil and blow down drinking straw.

9. Check label to make sure pill not harmful to humans, drink glass of water to take taste away. Apply Band-Aid to spouse’s forearm and remove blood from carpet with cold water and soap.

10. Retrieve cat from neighbor’s shed. Get another pill. Place cat in cupboard and close door onto neck to leave head showing. Force mouth open with dessert spoon. Flick pill down throat with elastic band.

11. Fetch screwdriver from garage and put door back on hinges. Apply cold compress to cheek and check records for date of last tetanus shot. Throw T-shirt away and fetch new one from bedroom.

12. Ring fire brigade to retrieve cat from tree across the road. Apologize to neighbor who crashed into fence while swerving to avoid cat. Take last pill from foil wrap.

13. Tie cat’s front paws to rear paws with garden twine and bind tightly to leg of dining table. Find heavy duty runing gloves from shed. Force cat’s mouth open with small spanner. Push pill into mouth followed by large piece of fillet steak. Hold head vertically and pour pint of water down throat to wash pill down.

14. Get spouse to drive you to emergency room; sit quietly while doctor stitches fingers and forearm and removes pill remnants from right eye. Stop by furniture shop on way home to order new table.

15. Arrange for vet to make a house call.


9 posted on 04/11/2012 6:54:54 PM PDT by carriage_hill (I'd vote for a "orange juice can", before 0bummer&HisRegimeFromHell, gets another 4yrs. Can-> later.)
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To: Kartographer

Duct Tape


10 posted on 04/11/2012 6:55:21 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: djf

” I have an emergency med kit that came with 5 sutures. “

Murphy’s law says that things like that will never be around when we need them - flexibility to improvise with ‘found’ materials is paramount...

In my wrench-turning days, I treated an endless number of busted knuckles (okay - I was kinda clumsy) by cleaning the open, bleeding, wound with cold water, and then packing it with good ‘ol axle grease — elapsed time from “OUCH, damn it!!” to back-to-work usually less than 5 minutes... Every single one of them healed cleanly, with minimal scarring and no loss of function....


11 posted on 04/11/2012 6:57:01 PM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: Kartographer

Practice on a hunk of beef or pork.. chicken doesn’t work as well because the skin slides around.


12 posted on 04/11/2012 7:00:28 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (We kneel to no prince but the Prince of Peace)
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To: carriage_hill

LOL That is so funny!!


13 posted on 04/11/2012 7:07:45 PM PDT by mojo114 (Pray for our military)
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To: Kartographer

As an ancillary note for “now” - make sure your tetanus vaccination is current.

I’ve heard dying of tetanus is particularly unpleasant.


14 posted on 04/11/2012 7:14:05 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: carriage_hill

I can personally vouch for adding #14b, which is to sit quietly for your tetanus shot before beginning your 10-day regimen of antibiotics.


15 posted on 04/11/2012 7:14:41 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam
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To: mojo114

It is funny. I haven’t read it in years and by the time I got to #6, I was laughing so hard I had tears running down on to the keyboard. My 3 cats are sitting here with heads tilted, wondering what crazy stuff I’m doing now. LOL. They’re having fun talking amongst themselves about me.

“Dogs have masters; cats have staff.”


16 posted on 04/11/2012 7:14:41 PM PDT by carriage_hill (I'd vote for a "orange juice can", before 0bummer&HisRegimeFromHell, gets another 4yrs. Can-> later.)
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To: Kartographer

I’ve found amazon to be a decent place to buy basic medical supplies. You can find suture kits and other basics for wound closure cheaper than walmart.


17 posted on 04/11/2012 7:18:46 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: MayflowerMadam

THAT’s funny, MfM! I’m going to steal that one and add it in, with proper attribution, of course. I can’t remember which cat site I found that on, but if I do, your #14b will be famous. Thanks.


18 posted on 04/11/2012 7:19:56 PM PDT by carriage_hill (I'd vote for a "orange juice can", before 0bummer&HisRegimeFromHell, gets another 4yrs. Can-> later.)
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To: MayflowerMadam

14. Get spouse to drive you to emergency room; sit quietly while doctor stitches fingers and forearm, and removes pill remnants from right eye. Also, be quite still for your tetanus shot before beginning your 10-day regimen of antibiotics (MfM). Stop by furniture shop on way home to order new table.


19 posted on 04/11/2012 7:24:30 PM PDT by carriage_hill (I'd vote for a "orange juice can", before 0bummer&HisRegimeFromHell, gets another 4yrs. Can-> later.)
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To: SkyDancer

Our oldest grandson is living with us while serving his MD internship at our local hospital. Saturday night, our youngest grandson (four years old) spent the night with us. We were watching a movie and eating popcorn. I asked a question of him. He said he couldn’t hear me. I asked “why not?” His response was, “It might be because of the popcorn in my ear.” (Who can possibly understand a four-year old mindset?) Eldest grandson(who just returned from a long shift in ER) got a Q-Tip from my bathroom, put some “Gorilla Glue” on the end of it, put it in his cousin’s ear, and popped the kernel right out.

It’s really handy having a Dr. in house....and thank God for Gorilla Glue.


20 posted on 04/11/2012 7:31:03 PM PDT by Rushmore Rocks
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To: Kartographer
I carry band aids and butterfly stitches in my wallet at all
times.
21 posted on 04/11/2012 8:09:25 PM PDT by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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To: Kartographer

I recently had open heart surgery that went as planned. They wired my breast bone back together, sutured the chest wound and “super glued” my skin back together. But two days later, while lying in my bed in the ICU, I stopped breathing and my heart stopped beating.

They had to cut my chest back open, snip the wires holding my sternum together and the surgeon hand-massaged my heart back to beating again. After leaving my chest open for the whole day to make sure I didn’t arrest again, they wired me back together the next day but couldn’t close the chest wound up because of the possibility of infection from being opened up in the unsterile ward instead of the sterile operating room.

They put me on what is called a foam vacuum dressing where a piece of foam is cut to the shape of the wound and placed down into the open wound, covered with a special tape and then hooked up to a vacuum pump that seals the whole dressing down tight. It had to be changed every other day. The idea was to bring the edges of the wound together over time and to allow for fluid drainage from the wound into a container attached to the pump. I went two months with this type of dressing until the wound finally closed up enough and I was switched to a wet/dry gauze dressing for several weeks. Eventually, after almost three months, my chest wound is closed and healing up into a scar.

But the wound was inspected closely every time the dressing was changed to make sure no infection was present. I am lucky to be alive and lucky I didn’t succumb to an bad infection in my chest.


22 posted on 04/11/2012 8:44:22 PM PDT by HotHunt
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To: DuncanWaring
You bring up a great point. It would be wise to make sure all your vacitionation are current.

Tetanus is one, TB is another. Yes, we don't have to worry about TB now but it wasn't that long ago when it was a real problem. In a survival situation it is likely to become a problem again. Hep A&B are also a good idea. Not a problem now but in a survival situation it could be good to know you won't catch those diseases from the blood that sprayed on your face

23 posted on 04/11/2012 8:47:39 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Would you sing if someone sucked YOU up the vacuum cleaner hose?)
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To: Kartographer
SUPER GLUE

Was Super Glue invented to seal battle wounds in Vietnam?

24 posted on 04/11/2012 9:20:36 PM PDT by blam
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To: carriage_hill

I am not a cat lover, but from my experience raising many dogs can relate, and that is very funny!


25 posted on 04/11/2012 9:22:42 PM PDT by expat1000
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To: blam

Interesting article.


26 posted on 04/11/2012 9:35:42 PM PDT by metmom ( For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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To: blam

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2187/was-super-glue-invented-to-seal-battle-wounds-in-vietnam

This is a fascinating web site!


27 posted on 04/11/2012 9:36:15 PM PDT by expat1000
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To: TASMANIANRED
Practice on a hunk of beef or pork.. chicken doesn’t work as well because the skin slides around.

When I went through MedLab, we used anesthetized goats as our live tissue donors.

Using meat is a good idea. In practical applications, I found that suturing actual human wounds was problematic because of thickened skin and callus's.

28 posted on 04/12/2012 1:43:11 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: Kartographer

29 posted on 04/12/2012 1:48:33 PM PDT by Wizdum (My job is to get you to shoot soda out your nose)
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To: Kartographer

One technique the author of the article forgot to write in is the application of Benzoin Tincture around the wound before applying Steri-strips (butterfly bandage). The strips will stay on the skin longer instead of detaching when the patient sweats.


30 posted on 04/12/2012 1:49:19 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: HotHunt

Wow... That’s quite a story...

I hope your recovery continues well.


31 posted on 04/12/2012 2:00:41 PM PDT by Ramius (Personally, I give us one chance in three. More tea anyone?)
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To: Sarajevo

Druged goats are a little difficult to come by.

Human skin is a bit thin...

Something extensively calloused is not a great idea.. It won’t heal.

Deep wounds and shallow wounds are totally different animals..And the stress on a wound can be a problem too.

Deep wounds frequently require some “Stay Sutures’..Simple skin suturing will just tear out unless you relieve the stress on it.


32 posted on 04/12/2012 2:02:43 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (We kneel to no prince but the Prince of Peace)
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To: Rushmore Rocks

“His response was, ‘It might be because of the popcorn in my ear.’”

That’s really funny. Four-year-old logic.

My friend’s son, about five years old, was beginning to behave badly, ignoring people, etc., and because of that was diagnosed as gradually becoming deaf. Turns out he had beans in his ears, coated with wax. Nobody knows for how long. Remove beans. Instand miracle!


33 posted on 04/12/2012 5:59:23 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam
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To: HotHunt

Whew! You are lucky. Glad you made it through all that.


34 posted on 04/13/2012 7:16:52 PM PDT by bgill
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