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Who are today's Asimov, Clarke, and Heinlein?
Tech Republic ^ | July 26, 2007, 10:17 AM PDT | Jay Garmon

Posted on 02/09/2013 4:41:00 PM PST by narses

TechRepublic member lcallander asked me for some suggested reading material, with a rather intriguing sci-fi stipulation:

“I was rereading an old post, where guys were reminiscing about reading ‘Heinlein, Asimov, and Clark,’ my personal favorites. I got out of reading SF in the ’80s and am bewildered by the variety today. What do guys who liked H, A, and C read today?”

Well, that’s a really interesting question. I’m really only able to answer the Heinlein part of it, since I’ve read very, very little Clarke or Asimov (blasphemy, I know). John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War, The Ghost Brigades, and The Last Colony are openly admitted Heinlein pastiches, the first of which won the Campbell Award and was nominated for the Hugo.

Scalzi’s style is breezy and easy to pick up, so I’d start there. I’m also told (though haven’t read) that John Varley’s Red Thunder and Red Lightning ably pick up the Rocket Ship Galileo torch. That’s about the extent of my advice.

Thankfully, Amazon.com can actually help some here. (Shocking, I know.) See, Amazon has a nice bit of collaborative filtering that lets you view items that Amazon customers bought before and after buying a product that you’re interested in. That’s a fancy way of saying: These people bought X and also bought Y, so if you like X, odds are you’ll also like Y.

So, let’s take Stranger in a Strange Land (my favorite Heinlein novel) and check out its extended list of Customers Also Bought items, scrolling until we find some modern stuff not written by Uncle Bob himself. Filtering out the usual suspects of Hugo winners who get bought out of sheer notoriety, we find: Hyperion by Dan Simmons. Now, let’s do the same thing with Clarke’s Rendezvous with Rama, and we get: Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson. For Asimov’s Foundation we get: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.

Do this for a number of books by Asimov, Clarke, and Heinlein, and you’ll begin to get a picture of where adherents of the Old Masters go to sate their sci-fi thirst today. Do the same for Hyperion, Red Mars, and Ender’s Game, and you’ll link into a web of recommendations that open whole new doors of possibility.

Of course, for all of Amazon’s tech, there’s nothing like a good old-fashioned reader recommendation. So, how about it Geekenders — what modern writer (published since 1990) would most satisfy a fan of Asimov, Clarke, and/or Heinlein? Post your recommendations in the comments sections. With any luck, we can help a fellow member out (and maybe even attract some SFSignal attention).

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TOPICS: Books/Literature
KEYWORDS: scifi
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To: Ransomed

Story and art, Gasaraki. Hands down. It was 23 episodes. Real deep military/politics and some Japanese mythology. The art was good/high quality but the story carried it overall.

People love it or hate it.

The AD police spinoff was midlin on art but the stories (3 about 20 min each) was not kid stuff. Hard Cyborg/police drama.

Gunparade March was another love or hate it with a solid story.

Fullmetal Panic split hard sci fi with Japanese teen comedy but was a lot more deep/good than the previews let on by far. Very philosophical.

If you can find any of them, especially Gasaraki, you will not likely be disappointed.

Bedtime for Bonzo ;)


151 posted on 02/09/2013 10:50:50 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: Norm Lenhart

Thanks, my string’s run out too.

Freegards


152 posted on 02/09/2013 11:04:31 PM PST by Ransomed
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To: Ransomed

Vance is great..Green Majic got me hooked

Free speculative fiction has tons of great

books for free


153 posted on 02/09/2013 11:07:32 PM PST by Harold Shea (RVN `70 - `71)
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To: narses

bflr


154 posted on 02/10/2013 12:22:19 AM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: narses

My novel “Sirat: Through the Fires of Hell” is inspired by Heinlein.


155 posted on 02/10/2013 3:41:58 AM PST by tbw2
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To: GeronL

And ChocolateChipCookie, who wrote Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios


156 posted on 02/10/2013 3:50:14 AM PST by tbw2
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To: Ransomed

I agree. His story was great. Here’s a direct link to it for those interested.
http://www.dansimmons.com/news/message/2006_04.htm


157 posted on 02/10/2013 3:55:01 AM PST by tbw2
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To: beebuster2000

Farmer had a few good ones. Niven 9Ringworld/Hammner’s Hammer, etc.) had some good ones.


158 posted on 02/10/2013 5:14:35 AM PST by trebb (Allies no longer trust us. Enemies no longer fear us.)
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To: Vince Ferrer

Orwell was trying to warn us about people like Obama.


159 posted on 02/10/2013 6:08:28 AM PST by jmcenanly ("The more corrupt the state, the more laws." Tacitus, Publius Cornelius)
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To: Harold Shea

Vance has to be my favourite. It’s a shame he isn’t generally mentioned with Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke or Bradbury. For my money he is better than any of those, Heinlein and Bradbury being the best of that bunch and Clarke the most influential in the ‘real world.’

Here’s his new website, lots of cool pictures in the photo album part.

http://www.jackvance.com/

Freegards


160 posted on 02/10/2013 6:08:28 AM PST by Ransomed
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To: Vince Ferrer

Orwell was trying to warn us about people like Obama.


161 posted on 02/10/2013 6:08:43 AM PST by jmcenanly ("The more corrupt the state, the more laws." Tacitus, Publius Cornelius)
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To: tbw2

Simmons is still taking heat from folks over that, to some he will always be a frothing racist. To a certain set of sci-fi fans, really good writers who express any type of conservative/libertarian leanings is called being ‘brain eaten.’ Like they have a disease that has to be overlooked.

I think he has some lefty type political leanings as well on the social side of things, but I think he is a great writer. In the age of internet and instant info, you are going to at times know too much about writers and artists.

Freegards


162 posted on 02/10/2013 6:24:56 AM PST by Ransomed
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To: narses

great thread


163 posted on 02/10/2013 6:55:19 AM PST by lack-of-trust
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To: narses
A few new ones for your list... Scott Sigler writes great SF with tech, horror and general violence laced all through. His 4 book series about a 'galactic football league' set 600 years in the future is damn good work.

J.C. Hutchins has "The Seventh Son Trilogy" definitely worth checking out.

And Phil Rossi very, very dark.

164 posted on 02/10/2013 5:09:41 PM PST by perfect stranger (Nobama)
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To: RikaStrom

I’m current on it. Its an ongoing series with, I think, six big novels done.

Weber’s fault is that he is involved in so many projects that it takes him forever to get back to a series. He’s not as bad as George RR Martin though. Latest word is that there’s a HH “OBS” movie in pre-production.

No one here has mentioned Pournelle and Niven’s “Mote” book...truly some of the most epic hard science fiction written.


165 posted on 02/12/2013 6:43:40 PM PST by FreeperinRATcage (I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for every thing I do. - R. A. Heinlein)
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To: Malsua

Can’t mention Ringo without the Legacy of the Aldenata” series. Hell..I read the one with the She-Va Bun-Bun (Hells Faire I think) and had to go start reading Sluggy Freelance.


166 posted on 02/12/2013 6:51:15 PM PST by FreeperinRATcage (I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for every thing I do. - R. A. Heinlein)
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To: FreeperinRATcage
Can’t mention Ringo without the Legacy of the Aldenata” series.

I liked most of them, the weaker ones were by Julie Cochrane...Cally's war and two others.

167 posted on 02/13/2013 4:56:09 AM PST by Malsua
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To: dangerdoc

bump for later


168 posted on 04/22/2013 11:38:35 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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