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Just trying to do a little planning for the future.
1 posted on 03/16/2013 11:13:02 AM PDT by savedbygrace
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To: savedbygrace

I believe it would be $25,000....


2 posted on 03/16/2013 11:15:35 AM PDT by illiac (If we don't change directions soon, we'll get where we're going)
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To: savedbygrace

After you reach your full retirement age, there is no limit on other earnings.


4 posted on 03/16/2013 11:24:40 AM PDT by DugwayDuke
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To: savedbygrace

From the social security website:

You will have to pay federal taxes on your Social Security benefits if you file a federal tax return as an individual and your total income is more than $25,000. If you file a joint return, you will have to pay taxes if you and your spouse have a total income of more than $32,000.

Use the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Notice 703 shown on the back of the Social Security Benefit Statement, SSA Form 1099, to determine if any of your benefits may be taxable.

Social Security has no authority to withhold state or local taxes from your benefit. Many states and local authorities do not tax Social Security benefits. However, you should contact your state or local taxing authority for more information.


5 posted on 03/16/2013 11:26:59 AM PDT by illiac (If we don't change directions soon, we'll get where we're going)
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To: savedbygrace

I recommend you check with the Social Security office. If you start drawing ss before you are 66&1/2, your ss benefits will be permanently capped at the amount you can draw now.
Can you live with that? If you wait until full retirement age your benefits will be based on your earnings when you retire or reach whatever they are calling full retirement age these days. And if you wait, there is no limit to what you can earn with no penalty.


6 posted on 03/16/2013 11:27:02 AM PDT by Wiser now (Socialism does not eliminate poverty, it guarantees it.)
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To: savedbygrace

Your gross income would be $25,000. However your Adjusted Gross Income (the income you are taxed on) would be $13000 less exemptions and deductions...


7 posted on 03/16/2013 11:27:20 AM PDT by montanajoe
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To: savedbygrace

Unless you have $500,000 or more in savings, SS numbers don’t add up.

You did not mention key factors:

a) are you married, does your spouse earn/collect SS ? (upon death, the survivor can select the higher check, but can only collect 1 check - not both.

b) illiac was correct:

“You will have to pay federal taxes on your Social Security benefits if you file a federal tax return as an individual and your total income is more than $25,000. If you file a joint return, you will have to pay taxes if you and your spouse have a total income of more than $32,000.”

c) your living expenses - including future medical

You’ll be collecting a retirement check - but you will be paying Federal income tax - and SS/MC deductions !

Once you start collecting a check - that caps the amount. Every year you wait to collect, the check amount goes higher. If you continue working after you start collecting, your check will go higher every year. The longer you wait to collect SS, the larger check you’ll have. If you start collecting sooner, you are stuck with a small check that is capped, you’ll have more years to collect, but it will be more difficult to survive on the small check. You need to enroll for MC when eligible, however, whether working or not - in order to ensure that you do not get excluded from the program.

Bear in mind - as inflation rises your living expenses will go up VERY MUCH in the next 10-20 years. Think double.

Most people living mostly on SS can afford any two of 1) a place to live 2) food 3) medical costs.

Not pretty.

d) your investment assets

If you have at least $500,000 saved, you could begin to think about using a few thousand of the income from your own investments to supplement your living expenses without seeing your ‘nest egg’ depleted too quickly.


8 posted on 03/16/2013 11:43:59 AM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: savedbygrace

depends in which country you live- if Philippines= zero taxes


9 posted on 03/16/2013 11:45:58 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits on firepower"-NY State Senator Marchione.)
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To: savedbygrace

You’re gonna have to pay taxes on the total income. You can have them deduct from each check but it’s all taxable.


10 posted on 03/16/2013 11:54:08 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: savedbygrace
Using a 2013 Form 1040

Line 7 Wages, Salaries Tips 13000

Line 20a SS Benefits 12000 Taxable amount 0

Line 22 Total Income 13000

12 posted on 03/16/2013 12:19:04 PM PDT by montanajoe
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To: savedbygrace

There are a lot of subtleties and quirks in the tax code. My suggestion: use TurboTax or whatever tax software you (or a friend) prefer, and put in the hypotheticals, tailored for your situation. You’ll get your answer.


13 posted on 03/16/2013 12:41:42 PM PDT by Pollster1
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To: savedbygrace

You really need to address the question to Barack Obama as he holds the key to whether or not Social Security goes face down in the pond in 2016 or not.


14 posted on 03/16/2013 12:44:09 PM PDT by MIchaelTArchangel (Have a wonderful day!)
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To: savedbygrace

SS is fully taxable as regular income. In the example you gave, gross income would be $25K


15 posted on 03/16/2013 12:47:12 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (Don't fire until you see the blue of their helmets)
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To: savedbygrace

Just go to Home Depot and stand out there with spanish speaking folk.

Be a day laborer and get paid cash. No 1099 or W4 reporting...


16 posted on 03/16/2013 1:45:22 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: savedbygrace
If your wage income is $13,000 and your Social Security income is $12,000, none of your Social Security would be taxable - unless your filing status is Married Filing Separate.

The rule: take half of your Social Security and add it to your other income. If this amount exceeds $25000 ($32,000 Married Filing Joint) some of your Social Security will be taxable and included in AGI, but you'll never pay tax on more than 85% of your benefits. In your case, 1/2 Social Security + other income = $19,000 which is less than $25,000, hence none of the Social Security is taxable.

See http://www.irs.gov/uac/Are-Your-Social-Security-Benefits-Taxable%3F

17 posted on 03/16/2013 1:55:38 PM PDT by notfornothing
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To: savedbygrace
Caution: none of the benefits would be taxable unless your filing status is Married Filing Separate and you lived with your spouse at any time during the tax year. In that case 85% of your benefits would be taxable - in your case your AGI would be $23,200 and your taxable income would be $13,450(assuming the standard deduction and your spouse doesn't itemize, one personal exemption, and no other income, adjustments, or deductions.)
19 posted on 03/16/2013 2:13:59 PM PDT by notfornothing
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To: savedbygrace

I thank everyone who posted here. I appreciate it.


23 posted on 03/16/2013 3:14:56 PM PDT by savedbygrace (But God.)
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To: savedbygrace

I wouldn’t worry about it - if you are eligible for SS, apply for it. Statistics show that waiting until 65 (or older) for higher amounts doesn’t usually pay as much in the long run as taking it early. Even if part of it is taxed, you still net more than if you’re not taking it.


25 posted on 03/17/2013 4:39:26 AM PDT by trebb (Where in the the hell has my country gone?)
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