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So Long Cursive Writing? A Critical Part of America’s Education
Clash Daily ^ | September 23, 2013 | R.G. Yoho

Posted on 09/23/2013 1:07:21 PM PDT by Clintons-B-Gone

When it comes to the matter of educating children, the state of Ohio and the federal government are run by a host of blithering idiots.

It was over a year ago that I learned the state of Ohio will no longer be teaching cursive writing in their classrooms.

Upon first learning of the announcement, I foolishly believed that the state’s educators might eventually return to their collective senses and re-institute the teaching of this critical skill.

(Excerpt) Read more at clashdaily.com ...


TOPICS: Education; Government; Politics
KEYWORDS: commoncore; cursive; cursivehandwriting; cursivewriting; education; liberalagenda; newspeak; publiceducation
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Cursive writing is just one more casualty of our public educational system.
1 posted on 09/23/2013 1:07:21 PM PDT by Clintons-B-Gone
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

Casualty? I beg to differ.

My penmanship was always so poor, that I couldn’t read my OWN handwriting. It was supposedly faster to write in cursive than it was to print, but I never found that to be the case.

Anything other than personal correspondence is typed anyway - or official forms are required to be PRINTED on.

Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.


2 posted on 09/23/2013 1:16:30 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

Sure, doing arithmetic, reading paper maps and using a physical compass will go by the wayside.

Only for those who dress using Garanimals and push buttons with pictures on the cash register at McDonald’s.


3 posted on 09/23/2013 1:17:06 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

People who read and write cursive will soon be able to communicate in what will look like “code” to many.


4 posted on 09/23/2013 1:17:47 PM PDT by Truth is a Weapon (Truth, it hurts so good.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

The military once sentenced me to live in Ohio. My experiences there made me wonder just how such a state allowed creative sorts such as Wilbur and Orville to actually do something productive. Dayton is presently only slightly behind Detroit as a has-been city.

Ohio is doomed, just as is Detroit, and all of Illinois and California.

Liberalism is a cancer that will consume itself. Let’s hope we can find some states strong enough to resist.


5 posted on 09/23/2013 1:18:31 PM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

My job requires me to write FAST! All day long. As a result my writing became illegible.

I can no longer write in cursive. I should say, it’s painfully slow and awkward to write in cursive.


6 posted on 09/23/2013 1:18:33 PM PDT by BunnySlippers (I LOVE BULL MARKETS . . .)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

That’s retarded, sir!


7 posted on 09/23/2013 1:18:55 PM PDT by Veggie Todd (Still crazy after all these beers.)
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To: Truth is a Weapon

A lady in front me in line at the grocery store was writing a check [that in itself odd as everyone uses a credit card] ... but her writing was so sloooooooow it was fascinating.

After watching, I finally took all of my stuff off the conveyor belt and went to another line.

The nerve!


8 posted on 09/23/2013 1:20:48 PM PDT by BunnySlippers (I LOVE BULL MARKETS . . .)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

“Perhaps the greatest example and most compelling reason to teach cursive writing to our students is the fact that it was the form used in so many of America’s Founding documents.”

Flimsy reasoning.

Those documents were mass-printed almost from day one, and they were not reproduced in cursive. Saying that if it isnt part of school, we wont be able to read them is silly. It’s like saying that the Bible not being in Hebrew means that we wont be able to read it. Or if we dont teach people to speak Renaissance English, we wont be able to read Shakespeare.

I know cursive very well, and I STILL can barley read Washington’s sometimes bad handwriting.


9 posted on 09/23/2013 1:20:49 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: Clintons-B-Gone
But...but...cursive is so hard to teach.

Especially when you have to teach all those other more important skills like how not to do math correctly, how not to read correctly, and how not to learn correct moral concepts so that kids can become a correct little commies.

So, how can we expect them to also learn cursive when there is no time left to teach it?

10 posted on 09/23/2013 1:23:47 PM PDT by Slyfox (Satan's goal is to rub out the image of God he sees in the face of every human.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone
What is interesting about getting rid of cursive instruction is that it is not replaced by instruction in typing/keyboarding.

The poor kids have to poke around a keyboard with two fingers having no idea that there is a vastly more efficient way to use it.
11 posted on 09/23/2013 1:25:45 PM PDT by chrisser (Senseless legislation does nothing to solve senseless violence.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone
According to these authors, the core of the problem is that the cursive style we're trying to teach is derived from copperplate, and is simply inappropriate for handwriting. They advocate an italic script, which is cleaner, easier, faster, and more legible:


12 posted on 09/23/2013 1:26:21 PM PDT by jdege
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To: Vendome

Civics, spelling, sentence structure, etc. The list goes on.

Revisionist history, diversity, inclusiveness, and self-esteem are the sacred cows of today’s “education”. Oh, and of course, human sexuality.

I’m glad most of my old teachers aren’t alive to see what has happened. It would surely kill them.


13 posted on 09/23/2013 1:27:04 PM PDT by beelzepug (if any alphabets are watchin', I'll be coming home right after the meetin')
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

My 5th grade teacher had to get the 4th grade teacher to grade my papers.

heh.


14 posted on 09/23/2013 1:27:14 PM PDT by GeronL
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To: clee1
Half the current curriculum is a waste of valuable school time
15 posted on 09/23/2013 1:27:38 PM PDT by GeronL
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

So it cursive is gone, along with the time and effort it takes to learn it, what will replace it? It seems the curriculum for our children gets smaller and smaller. They learn less and less. They are becoming functionally illiterate, unable to do simple math without a calculator, and can’t tell you the century of the Civil War. What do they do all day?


16 posted on 09/23/2013 1:28:54 PM PDT by Old North State
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To: clee1
My penmanship was always so poor, that I couldn’t read my OWN handwriting.
Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.

That's like saying my singing is so bad, we should ban singing altogether.

17 posted on 09/23/2013 1:29:06 PM PDT by Standing Wolf (No tyrant should ever be allowed to die of natural causes.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

Have you ever witnessed a kid these days trying to tell time on a good old-fashioned clock? It’s painful. If it isn’t digital, they’re lost.

Their printing is atrocious, which is why their cursive is so difficult. They removed the instruction for proper printing years ago.

I tutored in reading, spelling, grammar and math for years - it was amusing to watch them print. So glad I home-schooled.


18 posted on 09/23/2013 1:29:20 PM PDT by JudyinCanada
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To: Clintons-B-Gone
Cursive writing is just one more casualty of our public educational system.

I think in a way, it has gone by the wayside. Cursive is really just a way to write faster. It is more flowing, more legato than the staccato method of hand printing; and is therefore, faster. However, most people can type or text faster than they can write. I still use cursive on Post-It notes and such; but mainly, I type.

19 posted on 09/23/2013 1:29:31 PM PDT by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

Good riddance. Can anyone read cursive? So many people write unreadable scribbling. Teach printing.


20 posted on 09/23/2013 1:30:05 PM PDT by I want the USA back
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To: clee1
Rather than expounding on how wrong that is, I will let at least one educational institution (the collective of which you seem to revere above the Maker of all) dispute that . . .

5 Reasons Cursive Writing Should be Taught in School – Concordia University
21 posted on 09/23/2013 1:30:12 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: chrisser

-— poor kids have to poke around a keyboard with two fingers having no idea that there is a vastly more efficient way to use it. -—

I think that’s generally true, but my youngest types faster with two fingers than the rest of the family. She taught herself on the computer before we could train her in keyboarding. It’s amazing to watch.


22 posted on 09/23/2013 1:30:49 PM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: clee1
Casualty? I beg to differ.

My penmanship was always so poor, that I couldn’t read my OWN handwriting. It was supposedly faster to write in cursive than it was to print, but I never found that to be the case.

Anything other than personal correspondence is typed anyway - or official forms are required to be PRINTED on

. Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.

Does your bank accept a PRINTED signature on checks??Drivers License?Voter Registration ? Library card? Social Security card? etc.

Don't think so.

23 posted on 09/23/2013 1:31:09 PM PDT by Don Corleone ("Oil the gun..eat the cannoli. Take it to the Mattress.")
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

How many historic texts will be like a foreign language? Even ancestry census records?


24 posted on 09/23/2013 1:31:18 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to thoe tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: VanDeKoik
Those documents were mass-printed almost from day one, and they were not reproduced in cursive.

True, but there are massive amount of documents in archives and courthouse record rooms that were never reproduced, and were written in cursive. Think letters, wills, deeds, land grants, birth certificates, baptismal records, etc. Any serious genealogy investigation or historical research requires being able to read original documents.

25 posted on 09/23/2013 1:32:41 PM PDT by RightField (one of the obstreperous citizens insisting on incorrect thinking - C. Krauthamer)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

The public school curriculum is dumbing down at an astonishing rate. We have not come to grips with the fact that there are children who will not or cannot master certain areas or levels of difficulty of learning.

We have told parents that all children are equal, and they are — in the sight of God, but NOT in scholastic abilities. We are still trying to find a way to educate all children so that the outcomes are the same, and that CAN be done. However, equality of outcomes depends on teaching at an exceptionally low level, so that none can fail. It would be far better to encourage each child to conquer basic skills: reading, writing, and arithmetic. Add all the other wonderful subjects and increase the difficulty until the children show clearly that they have reached their maximum: geography, history, government, physics, languages, arts, etc.

As it stands now, we soon will have two Americas (if I may borrow a phrase) consisting of those who have diplomas and those who have diplomas AND an education. Educated children, by the way, WILL be able to read and write cursive. One day you will be able to tell who went to public school by whether or not he can read and write cursive; the private and religious schools do not feel the same pressures to dumb down.

In our city, property taxes are soaring as we build one palatial public school campus after another. The children, though, spend their days preparing to live in their parents’ basements — with little preparation for entry into the world of commerce.


26 posted on 09/23/2013 1:33:25 PM PDT by July4
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To: Truth is a Weapon

“will look like code to many”

I had gotten off watch, my ship in a San Francisco shipyard, and I hiked a couple blocks to the trolley line.
Sat down next to a Chinese gentlman who was reading from a small piece of white parchment. The gentlman turned the note away from me so I could not read it, but not quickly enough for me to notice it was written in Chinese characters. I chuckled to myself. When he was done reading it, he ate it:)


27 posted on 09/23/2013 1:34:06 PM PDT by Cold Heart
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To: autumnraine
Never mind the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
28 posted on 09/23/2013 1:35:44 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: jdege
The problem isn't in the hand writing used it's in the thoughts expressed. Today most communication is typed, like this. Twitter limits communication to 140 characters which seems appropriate for a population with an attention span measured in seconds not hours. Dressing up what goes for serious conversations these days in a beautiful cursive style is like the proverbial lipstick on a pig. I don't miss cursive at all. Sorry Ms. Libberman, I know you taught me well in the third grade but that was a long time ago.
And thank the Lord for spell check. I never was good at spelling.
29 posted on 09/23/2013 1:36:10 PM PDT by dblshot (I am John Galt.)
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To: clee1
Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.

Many of the things we learn in school are not explicitly or directly used in day to day life, though learning them is not a waste of time. For me, chemistry was the hated subject that I rarely employ directly, but learning it was no waste of time.

Getting past having a proper signature, which requires rudimentary skill in cursive, the actual act of learning it and using it has been shown to develop the brain and coordination. Also, the more ways you learn to communicate: printing, speaking, cursive writing, typing, morse code keying, learning other languages, etc. the more your overall communication skills develop.

At very least, is there no value in being able to read the documents of the 18th and 19th centuries in their original form? Must the body of the Declaration of Independence look like a complete garble?

If the classrooms could be trusted to replace the newly available time with proper literature, instruction in diction, physics, properly done European history, or Latin, I'd concede there might be some value to the trade-off.

The children of yesteryear, even those who took the typing courses that would be the rough equivalent of a word processing/typing course today could taking a few months in 3rd grade to learn cursive, without missing out on anything useful; our children can as well.
30 posted on 09/23/2013 1:36:21 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
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To: Olog-hai

Thank you for an exceptional link.


31 posted on 09/23/2013 1:37:54 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
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To: clee1

Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.”

I suppose you are one of those people who do e-cards, e-invites, don’t write thank you notes and text everything rather than place a personal phone call.

Not teaching cursive or how to write a thank you note in longhand is yet another nail in the coffin of discarding all things related to good manners.

Learning to write in longhand is all about shape, spacing, relationship issues and demonstrating manners which will ensure that Grannies may very well send you another gift in the future.


32 posted on 09/23/2013 1:38:06 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
I think that’s generally true, but my youngest types faster with two fingers than the rest of the family. She taught herself on the computer before we could train her in keyboarding. It’s amazing to watch.

Good for her.

How well do you think that will work when writing something like a 10 page paper? Of course, for all I know that isn't required of children any more.

I took typing in college and I can't imagine not knowing how to do so in this digital age (I graduated from HS in '85), especially since I'm in IT. Being able to input accurately without having to look at my fingers saves me a heckuva lot of time.
33 posted on 09/23/2013 1:38:45 PM PDT by chrisser (Senseless legislation does nothing to solve senseless violence.)
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To: All

I have no doubt that cursive is important.....but....I am guessing kids in school today can type a lot faster than kids 30 years ago. I would also hazard to guess that typing is more important for most jobs today than proper cursive.

I used to be able to write cursive fairly well but I probably haven’t used it (outside signing something) in 20 years.


34 posted on 09/23/2013 1:39:47 PM PDT by escapefromboston (manny ortez: mvp)
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To: dblshot
Dressing up what goes for serious conversations these days in a beautiful cursive style is like the proverbial lipstick on a pig.

Maybe we should consider ditching the pig, or at least providing some attractive side dishes, rather than catering to the pig.

Once in a while, I will write a letter in cursive to an old friend for whom I have an e-mail address. It never fails to please.
35 posted on 09/23/2013 1:40:19 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone
This is a bit silly.

Cursive writing developed as a response to the inherent limitations of a technology.

For thousands of years before cursive was briefly the norm, writing individual letters was the standard.

There is a reason why printers immediately reverted to individual letters once the technology was available.

36 posted on 09/23/2013 1:41:54 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

bkmk


37 posted on 09/23/2013 1:44:06 PM PDT by Sergio (An object at rest cannot be stopped! - The Evil Midnight Bomber What Bombs at Midnight)
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To: Truth is a Weapon; Yehuda; Jeremiah Jr; MeneMeneTekelUpharsin
People who read and write cursive will soon be able to communicate in what will look like “code” to many.

Nothing new under the sun!


38 posted on 09/23/2013 1:44:12 PM PDT by Ezekiel (The Obama-nation began with the Inauguration of Desolation.)
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To: autumnraine
How many historic texts will be like a foreign language? Even ancestry census records?

Most historic texts, by definition, are written in foreign languages.

For 99% of English speakers, Shakespeare, Chaucer and Milton are effectively written in a foreign language - whether presented in cursive or Times New Roman.

39 posted on 09/23/2013 1:44:47 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: GeronL

Agree completely.


40 posted on 09/23/2013 1:46:30 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
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To: JudyinCanada
Have you ever witnessed a kid these days trying to tell time on a good old-fashioned clock? It’s painful. If it isn’t digital, they’re lost.

I insisted on having analogue clocks in our home for our children's benefit for that reason. It isn't just for aesthetic reasons, either. An analogue clock demonstrates the continuity of time, rather than treating it as a series of monads. For many children, it is the first chance to really understand fractions. Try describing "Quarter of five" to a child that has only seen digital clocks. If he knows it, it is only because he memorized that :45 equals "quarter of" the next number, no real understanding. Inability to learn the analogue clock has also been linked with early diagnosis of genuine learning disabilities.
41 posted on 09/23/2013 1:46:43 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

My husband is a PhD scientist; he only uses printing, mostly in all caps, except when he is on the computer, which is most of the time. We talk about this a lot, as I tutor Middle School boys. Husband says he HATES cursive, and my male students concur. It is a fine motor skill, difficult for the boys to master. They are forced to write reports in it and across the board they struggle with it.

To me cursive seems anachronistic. I cannot write cursive fast enough to get all my thoughts down, and most of my students cannot either. What do they do? They write less. Their answers are short and sweet when they really have so much more to say. But, when they dictate and I type - and/or, as soon as they learn to type — then they have a lot to say. Why not just learn the keyboard?

When we homeschooled, I saw immediately that our son could not do cursive that year. There were eraser holes in the paper, he couldn’t get letters right, tears and frustration. I decided just to drop it. I thought long and hard about leaving it for another time, and finally figured that the only reason he would need it was for thank you letters to Grandma.


42 posted on 09/23/2013 1:47:08 PM PDT by bboop (does not suffer fools gladly)
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To: chrisser

Yes, they definitely should be teaching keyboard skills, and early.


43 posted on 09/23/2013 1:47:51 PM PDT by bboop (does not suffer fools gladly)
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To: Standing Wolf

Didn’t say a word about banning...

My point is that beautiful, flowing cursive writing is difficult to achieve, and these days, about as useful as teats on a boar hog.


44 posted on 09/23/2013 1:48:14 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
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To: Don Corleone

Actually, marks of almost any sort are accepted. Xs have sufficed for illiterates historically and are still in regular use on democrat registration forms.

My signature, in perfectly illegible cursive, was questioned when I was in basic training—a young admin troop told me I couldn’t sign a form if it weren’t legible! I had to inform her that a legible signature would not be my own. I have had many folks accuse me of being a Doctor due to my scrawlings. LOL


45 posted on 09/23/2013 1:49:03 PM PDT by antidisestablishment (Mahound delenda est)
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To: Dr. Sivana
Once in a while, I will write a letter in cursive to an old friend for whom I have an e-mail address. It never fails to please.
Writing letters is a lost art. Our parents wrote a letter and if they got a reply in two weeks they were happy. E-mail we expect a reply in a day or so. Twitter - in minutes. It's a nano second world but that requires nano sized thoughts. No more "letters dated 1962, he had underlined in red every I love you". Heck, getting kids to read a book is tough enough. For those who can write a coherent thought the world is waiting.
46 posted on 09/23/2013 1:49:45 PM PDT by dblshot (I am John Galt.)
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To: clee1

Sorry - cursive writing is a waste of valuable school time.

Do you print when endorsing checks or mortgage documents?


47 posted on 09/23/2013 1:52:51 PM PDT by jimmyo57
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To: wideawake
“For 99% of English speakers, Shakespeare, Chaucer and Milton are effectively written in a foreign language - whether presented in cursive or Times New Roman.”

Expose your children to the joy of Chaucer and Shakespeare
and Milton! Don't let their heritage slip away into the cesspool of hip-hop and multiculturalism. I read my kids the original versions of works by these people. At first, they were pretty much “lullabies,” but gradually they realized what a treasure was available to them.

For Pete's sake, cursive writing is not that hard, and it would make my poor ancestors weep to know that I purposefully gave it up. Some of them couldn't write; their only signatures were X's.

48 posted on 09/23/2013 1:54:10 PM PDT by July4
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

My 10 y.o. granddaughter asked me last weekend to teach her cursive.
I said I’d love to, then started thinking how some of my letters are not the true cursive character. My capital T, F, G, S, in particular.

Gonna have to brush up on the king’s cursive.


49 posted on 09/23/2013 2:03:11 PM PDT by Vinnie
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To: Clintons-B-Gone

I surmise herein that the preponderance of opinion regarding cursive writing schooling is that such it will be limited to that required to properly form an X. President Camacho will be so proud yes he will.


50 posted on 09/23/2013 2:07:18 PM PDT by Recompennation (Constitutional protection for all not just selectively for Democrats.)
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