Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

History of Daylight Saving Time Ending
BillPetro ^ | October 28, 2013 | BILL PETRO

Posted on 10/28/2013 3:43:12 PM PDT by NYer

Daylight Saving Time, or DST, is a brilliant campaign to convince us that we’re getting more daylight each day, when in reality we’ve simply changed our clocks and then forgotten about it within two weeks. DST begins each year at 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March in most of the United States and its territories, however there are some places that have not bought into this campaign: it is not observed in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the city of South Bend, Indiana nor the state of Arizona except for the Navajo Indian Reservation, which does observe DST.

Standard Time begins each year at 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday of November. This is the time in the Fall to “Fall” back by moving your clocks back one hour at the resumption of Standard Time. In the Spring, we “Spring” forward an hour, losing an hour of sleep, and finally realizing where we get the names for half of the seasons of the year. However, with DST for Summer now occurring before the vernal equinox which brings Spring, shall we say “March forward”? What about the Southern Hemisphere which has the opposite seasons?

Why so many changes? Is this campaign on a roll, is it gaining energy? Indeed, it is all about energy… and of course, money.

Back in August 8, 2005, President Bush signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Prior to 2007, DST began at 2:00 a.m. (local time) on the first Sunday in April, and ended at 2:00 a.m. (local time) on the last Sunday in October. The new rules for DST beginning in 2007 mean an extra four or five weeks of DST each year. There will now be a total of 238 days of DST, compared to a total of 210 days of DST in 2006 under the previous rules, and the U. S. will remain on DST for about 65% of the year. So think about it, DST will be in effect for most of the year.

daylight_savings_time_world.pgn It has spread to other countries as well, but cloaked under other names. In the European Union (EU) it goes by the name Summer Time Period and will happen from the last Sunday in March through the first Sunday in November (next year.) Most of Canada uses DST, except the majority of Saskatchewan and parts of northeastern British Columbia, but Manitoba and Ontario follow the US model to maintain “competitive advantage” with its major trading partner. In Russia though, they can’t get enough: they add an extra hour. During the Summer, Russia’s clocks are two hours ahead of standard time. During the winter, all 11 of the Russian time zones are an hour ahead of standard time. China and other parts of Asia and Africa ignore it completely. Closer to the equator, where the hours of daylight are similar throughout the seasons, they can see things better and are not fooled by the need for this “daylight saving” campaign.

You’re probably asking, “Bill… Petro… dot com, where did this all begin?” and well you might ask. Blame it on the trains… at least in Canada. Back before 1883, major cities used to set their clocks according to local astronomical conditions, but the advent of the railroads necessitated a way of standardizing schedules, hence the introduction of “time zones.” Canada’s Sir Sandford Flemming advocated this time zone and hourly variation, which was adopted at the International Prime Meridian Conference in Washington the following year.

But it did not yet see universal use. Various parts of the world experienced controversy concerning the impact on agriculture, outdoor activities, and business.

Many credit American Benjamin Franklin with convincing the modern idea in 1784 while envoy to France as a way of economizing on candles by rising earlier. Englishman William Willett sponsored DST throughout his life in the early 20th century. Germany and its territories used it throughout World War I and Britain and many of its allies later did the same. America standardized on it during WWI to save on coal usage. It was standardized upon again, year-round during WWII and again for two years during the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo, both as means of saving energy.

Where does money come in? While we continued the use of DST following WWI, it fell into disuse in America between WWI and WWII. New York City bankers and brokers made efforts to reinstate it, so they could capitalize on the extra hour of arbitrage that DST permitted with the London markets. The New York Board of Aldermen lobbied for it and saw it made law in 1920.

Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.

-Benjamin Franklin



TOPICS: Agriculture; Gardening; Government; Society
KEYWORDS: dst
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-75 next last

1 posted on 10/28/2013 3:43:12 PM PDT by NYer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: GreyFriar

2 posted on 10/28/2013 3:43:36 PM PDT by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I love daylight savings time.


3 posted on 10/28/2013 3:44:51 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: trisham

Let’s just pick one and stay with it year round! I hate the adjustment!


4 posted on 10/28/2013 3:46:56 PM PDT by demkicker (My passion for freedom is stronger than that of Democrats whose obsession is to enslave me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: demkicker

I’m looking to write a Ballot initiative here in California...to put “Daylight Savings Time”... on the Ballot.

The frustration of weeks of adjustment...alone make it a hindrance.


5 posted on 10/28/2013 3:49:52 PM PDT by MeshugeMikey ( Visit http://icantenroll.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: demkicker

I’d be happy to stay with DST year round.


6 posted on 10/28/2013 3:49:58 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: NYer

My vote is pick a time and stick with it. I hate the time change.

In WWII Stalin put the Soviet Union on DST. He forgot to take them off it and they stayed on it until long after his death. (Food for thought. For those of you who pray for immortality, imagine what life would be like if Stalin, FDR, any Kennedy or Obama lived forever. If you think you’re tired of hearing from Jimmy Carter now, wait 50 years. You’ll really be tired of him by then.)


7 posted on 10/28/2013 3:51:39 PM PDT by Gen.Blather
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: demkicker
"Let’s just pick one and stay with it year round! I hate the adjustment! "

Move to the equator.

12 hr day/night. 365.25.

8 posted on 10/28/2013 3:51:52 PM PDT by Paladin2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: trisham

Me too. Here in AZ it means the west coast ballgames start on time and games from the east are at 5 or 5:30.


9 posted on 10/28/2013 3:51:58 PM PDT by Luke21
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: NYer

That’s right if I want a longer blanket all I have to do is cut 12 inches off one end and sew it back onto the other.

Stooopidest thing from the 70s ever


10 posted on 10/28/2013 3:52:19 PM PDT by Nifster
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: trisham

you live in massachutes.....we don’t expect much from you


11 posted on 10/28/2013 3:53:20 PM PDT by Nifster
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I hate the extra hour of daylight. Burns the grass.


12 posted on 10/28/2013 3:55:07 PM PDT by Libloather (The epitome of civility.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I’m gonna invent a clock that automatically adjusts itself so you can have 40 hours in a day. You’ll still have to work eight hours but through creative adjustments this will only take about 15 minutes.


13 posted on 10/28/2013 3:57:06 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (If global warming exists I hope it is strong enough to reverse the Big Government snowball)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nifster
you live in massachutes.....we don’t expect much from you

**************************

Thanks. At least we have some excellent private schools here where we learn, among other subjects, spelling and grammar.

14 posted on 10/28/2013 3:58:51 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Luke21

Yes, the time zone difference can be quite an inconvenience.


15 posted on 10/28/2013 4:02:24 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: demkicker
Let’s just pick one and stay with it year round! I hate the adjustment!

Hear! Hear!

FMCDH(BITS)

16 posted on 10/28/2013 4:03:57 PM PDT by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: nothingnew

smart phones, computers and cable TV boxes all reset themselves

the old microwave TV.... I have no idea how it knew


17 posted on 10/28/2013 4:07:07 PM PDT by GeronL
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: NYer

Out here in West Texas being in the central time zone, DST makes the afternoons extra long.


18 posted on 10/28/2013 4:07:56 PM PDT by razorback-bert (I'm in shape. Round is a shape isn't it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: trisham

*snicker*


19 posted on 10/28/2013 4:08:00 PM PDT by Flycatcher (God speaks to us, through the supernal lightness of birds, in a special type of poetry.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Flycatcher

:)


20 posted on 10/28/2013 4:10:21 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-75 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Bloggers & Personal
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson