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4-Year-Old In Critically Injured In Attack By Family's Dog
News4Jax ^ | 2.17.05

Posted on 02/17/2005 10:38:39 PM PST by ambrose

News4Jax.com

4-Year-Old In Critically Injured In Attack By Family's Dog

POSTED: 3:47 pm EST February 17,

2005

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A 4-year-old girl is in critical condition after she was attacked by her family's pit bull Wednesday.

KatlynKaylin Flowers' grandmother said she was playing with the dog in their yard when the the dog snapped, biting the girl on the head, neck and hand.

"She so small. The dog just grabbed her and bit her," Karen Flowers said Thursday. "He slung her and ... dragged her on the ground."

According to the police report, the attack lasted several minutes, the pit bull throwing Kaylin's tiny body around the back yard.

Kaylin was rushed to Shands-Jacksonville, where she had emergency surgery.

"There are no skull fractures at all, but there are teeth marks in the skull," Flowers' said. "She's doing better. She's a fighter."

Pit bullThe family said they don't know why the dog attacked as he had never showed signs of aggression before.

The dog was confiscated by Jacksonville Animal Care and Control, where he will remain for 10 days.

"They are brought here and held in a quarantine area to check temperament and health issues," Animal Control's David DeWitt told Channel 4's Jennifer Bauer.

While all dog breeds have the potential to attack, experts say rottweilers, pit bulls and German shepherds are the most common breeds for deadly attacks.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while almost half of all children are bitten by a dog at some point, kids aged 5 to 9 are most at risk for dog attacks. Statistics show that half those attacks occur at home or with a familiar dog.




TOPICS: Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: ambrosespam; doggieping; dogofpeace; pitbulls
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1 posted on 02/17/2005 10:38:39 PM PST by ambrose
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To: Shermy; martin_fierro; EggsAckley; sinkspur; Jeff Chandler

ping.


2 posted on 02/17/2005 10:39:09 PM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: HairOfTheDog

this is is it


3 posted on 02/17/2005 10:39:30 PM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: ambrose; feinswinesuksass; kanawa
The family said they don't know why the dog attacked as he had never showed signs of aggression before.

Ah, yes. The classical response of the pit bull owner.

4 posted on 02/17/2005 10:40:58 PM PST by sinkspur ("Preach the gospel. If necessary, use words.")
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To: sinkspur

Notice that's what people always say about serial killers,, "He was so quiet..."


5 posted on 02/17/2005 10:41:58 PM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: ambrose
Unsupervised 4yr old playing w/ a large breed canine...recipe for disaster.
6 posted on 02/17/2005 10:45:02 PM PST by endthematrix (Declare 2005 as the year the battle for freedom from tax slavery!)
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To: ambrose; feinswinesuksass; kanawa
"She so small. The dog just grabbed her and bit her," Karen Flowers said Thursday. "He slung her and ... dragged her on the ground."

Bichon Frises and Cairn Terriers cannot do this (not that they would, temperamentally).

But, "slinging" is part of the pit bull's reportoire, as is "dragging" and "biting."

The beat goes on, and on, and on, and on........

7 posted on 02/17/2005 10:47:01 PM PST by sinkspur ("Preach the gospel. If necessary, use words.")
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Pitt Bulls aren't bad dogs. It's the owners who refuse to properly socialize, train, and supervise their dogs. That goes for any breed.


8 posted on 02/17/2005 10:58:46 PM PST by oolatec
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To: ambrose

Think they will bring the dog around for the next family playtime? These owner's should get bi**slapped and dog should be put to sleep asap. Poor little girl..


9 posted on 02/17/2005 10:59:48 PM PST by 1FASTGLOCK45
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To: ambrose
The dog was confiscated by Jacksonville Animal Care and Control, where he will remain for 10 days. "They are brought here and held in a quarantine area to check temperament and health issues," Animal Control's David DeWitt told Channel 4's Jennifer Bauer.

Why is this dog not being put to sleep? Would YOU have this dog around your family members -- of any age? If they bring this dog back into their home, I hope the authorities yank the poor girl out of there and charge the parents with child endangerment.

10 posted on 02/17/2005 11:25:13 PM PST by Hetty_Fauxvert (http://sonoma-moderate.blogspot.com/)
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To: oolatec

Pit bulls are bred to be paranoid and aggressive. The breed is hopelessly contaminated. Pick up any dog fancier's magazine and look at the classifieds to see what the market is for these animals.


11 posted on 02/17/2005 11:35:23 PM PST by SteamshipTime
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To: martin_fierro

12 posted on 02/18/2005 12:55:21 AM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: ambrose

Never leave a child unsupervised with an animal. Neither knows any better and he child usual does something painful to the animal who then replys with a bite.


13 posted on 02/18/2005 12:57:33 AM PST by A CA Guy (God Bless America, God bless and keep safe our fighting men and women.)
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14 posted on 02/18/2005 12:59:07 AM PST by ambrose (....)
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15 posted on 02/18/2005 12:59:58 AM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: All
Hehe, I like this one:


16 posted on 02/18/2005 1:04:40 AM PST by ambrose (....)
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To: sinkspur
The classic response of the owner of any dog that bites for the first time.

Prayers for the little girl.

Allowing a four year old to play unattended with any dog is the epitome of irresponsibility.

17 posted on 02/18/2005 2:54:10 AM PST by kanawa (A Free Man in Canannyda)
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To: ambrose; Flyer; technochick99; sinkspur; annyokie; Scott from the Left Coast; 88keys; DugwayDuke; ..
Prayers for the little girl.

Ping!


Other articles with keyword "DOGGIEPING" since 12/29/04

18 posted on 02/18/2005 2:56:48 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: ambrose
Hehe, I like this one:

You know, I read reports like this and it makes me sick to my stomach.

You seem to get some perverse glee out it.

19 posted on 02/18/2005 3:09:07 AM PST by kanawa (A Free Man in Canannyda)
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To: ambrose

There is no reason to own a pit bull other than wanting one. They have a reputation as a breed, so do golden retreivers.

Prayers for the girl, the opposite for her parents.


20 posted on 02/18/2005 3:13:45 AM PST by gortklattu (Check out Thotline dot com)
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To: SteamshipTime
Pit bulls are bred to be paranoid and aggressive.

Not by any breeders I know. Stable temperament is the top characteristic looked for when breeding.

The breed is hopelessly contaminated.

Your view of the breed is hopelessly contaminated.

Pick up any dog fancier's magazine and look at the classifieds to see what the market is for these animals

Examples please. If they're taking ads for dogs touted to be aggressive, I'd like to go after the publishers of those magazines.

21 posted on 02/18/2005 4:01:24 AM PST by kanawa (A Free Man in Canannyda)
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To: ambrose
This breaks my heart. Prayers for that little one. I hope she fully recovers.

I know the parents must be devastated. I will never understand how parents can feel comfortable having a dog with their children so young.
22 posted on 02/18/2005 4:05:11 AM PST by GodBlessUSA (No, just because my user-name was on that thread-I'm not a troll. 4 years of posting and 1+lurking.)
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To: ambrose

>The family said they don't know why the dog attacked as he had never showed signs of aggression before.<

Sure he hadn't. And I'm Queen of England.


23 posted on 02/18/2005 4:12:28 AM PST by Darnright
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To: sinkspur

>Bichon Frises and Cairn Terriers cannot do this (not that they would, temperamentally).

But, "slinging" is part of the pit bull's reportoire, as is "dragging" and "biting." <

Cairn Terriers most certainly will "sling" a smaller animal they attack (and they are TERRIERS). I've seen a Cairn grab a young kitten and kill it ferociously.

The same Cairn bit the neigbor kid (to whose family the nasty thing belonged) in the face.

They are not all cute little Totos.


24 posted on 02/18/2005 4:17:39 AM PST by Darnright
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To: Darnright

>neigbor

Spell check is our friend. That should be, "neighbor".


25 posted on 02/18/2005 4:19:17 AM PST by Darnright
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To: Darnright

Speaking of cute little Toto's, our next-door neighbors had a Toto-esque Yorkshire Terrier. That thing bit every ankle or hand that came in striking distance, including those of its owners, whose daughters cuddled and kissed the thing constantly. The good thing was, its mouth was too tiny to do any damage. But the desire to attack was definitely there in its beady little eyes.


26 posted on 02/18/2005 4:24:46 AM PST by shezza
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To: SteamshipTime
I am very sorry for this poor little girl. Small children should never be left alone with dogs.

Pit Bulls were bred to fight other dogs. They were bred to be dog aggressive, but in order to handle them in this "sport" they were people responsive and not people aggressive. Being dog aggressive is much different than people aggressive.

Much of the problem with Pit Bulls come from two things in my opinion -- bad owners and the fact that these are highly powerful animals pound for pound. They are not inherently bad dogs.

27 posted on 02/18/2005 4:56:57 AM PST by dervish (Europe should pay for NATO)
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To: ambrose

Stupid f'ing parents. Anyone who has one of these dogs around kids is a moron.


28 posted on 02/18/2005 5:07:49 AM PST by Rodney King (No, we can't all just get along.)
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To: dervish
The problem is that dogs do not always recognize young children as humans. They see them as another animal because their little faces are right down on the dogs level. That little piece of info comes right from vets and dog trainers. Even a dog who would never attack an adult will see nothing wrong with attacking a small child.
29 posted on 02/18/2005 5:16:45 AM PST by Ditter
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To: ambrose
If you're going to use that lady's picture it might be proper to credit her site....

Pitbulls on the Web

Please note that Pit Bull dogs are not the breed of choice for multiple dog households. It requires a lot of precautions, a good understanding of the breed, and quite a bit of vigilance to be able to live with several dogs created and bred to fight other dogs. There is no room for mistakes and we do not take our dogs for granted, even the ones who "appear" to get along.

All our dogs are strictly supervised and separate when no one is home. Some of them don't get along at all and cannot be in the same room together. We use extra-large wire crates, kennels, strong baby gates, and we live on a rotation routine.

We realize that our lifestyle is unusual but we are rescuers, not regular pet owners. We made an informed and well thought through decision when we began rescuing Pit Bulls. We never expected all those dogs to get along and we knew that Pit Bulls often did not do well in pack. We believed those dogs needed help anyway and we decided to jump in fully aware of the sacrifices it would require.

Our dogs constantly prove us they are worth the precautions and efforts. We don't think this lifestyle is for everyone however, and we do not encourage people to have more than one or two Pit Bulls.


30 posted on 02/18/2005 5:19:45 AM PST by kanawa (A Free Man in Canannyda)
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To: dervish; All

I really don't understand why people think it's black & white why breeds/types/species(?) are like they are.


All the nonsense out now and spouted alot here is that it's ALL the owners' fault - or SOME1 in the dog's past.

BS.

Genetics is at least half of it, people. Get real. If it weren't, there would be NO different breeds at all. Part of genetics is temperament/character/personality. Be serious.

Stop automatically blaming some human, and glibly accusing them of "abuse" or "neglect", or even just "poor socialization". I'm sick of this BS. Yes it's all part of it, but ONLY part.

A basically good dog is hard to make bad. A basically bad dog is hard to make good.

That's the truth!


31 posted on 02/18/2005 5:53:38 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
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To: Ditter

>The problem is that dogs do not always recognize young children as humans. They see them as another animal because their little faces are right down on the dogs level. That little piece of info comes right from vets and dog trainers. Even a dog who would never attack an adult will see nothing wrong with attacking a small child.<

There are other dog experts who use the analogy that dogs recognize the adults in the home as alpha, and see themselves as alpha to young children in the home. If a subordinate to the dog gets "out of line", the dog sees nothing wrong with biting the subordinate.

Basically the same idea, expressed in a different way.


32 posted on 02/18/2005 5:58:02 AM PST by Darnright
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To: shezza; dervish; Ditter; Darnright; the OlLine Rebel
our next-door neighbors had a Toto-esque Yorkshire Terrier. That thing bit every ankle or hand that came in striking distance, including those of its owners, whose daughters cuddled and kissed the thing constantly. The good thing was, its mouth was too tiny to do any damage. But the desire to attack was definitely there in its beady little eyes.

Some people have nasty little dogs (and awful big ones) but the point not to be understated is that kids need to be supervised around dogs for two reasons, one, to make sure the dog behaves... but just as important, to make sure the CHILD behaves. Little kids are mean to dogs. Some intentionally, some just lacking in awareness.

Two of the dogs I've had in my adult life have snapped at children, both times in self defense. One was a cocker mix, and the child visiting had chased her around the house with determination, after being told by me repeatedly to stop. I got no support from the parents at all. When we heard my dog yelp and turned, the kid had fistfulls of hair and was pulling the dog out from under a chair. Zulu snapped and gave the kid a red mark right on her nose. Thinking she was in trouble, Zulu then ran away, while the child started wailing.

My large dog Gidget also bit a child who I found out had been chasing her around the yard with a whiffle bat, had grabbed her collar, and when she rolled over submissively, the kid fell on her. She bit the source of her pain, the kid's knee on her leg. Neither of my dogs left a mark on the children that lasted more than a few minutes.

A child also did something cruel to my Labrador, grabbed his [balls] and proceded to twist them around and around. Now, my Labrador, like most Labradors, had the patience and constitution of a saint. He cryed and scrambled to get away, but he didn't bite her. I don't think it'd be in him to bite anyone any time for any reason.

I think most family dog bite situations involve culpability, if not real blame, in the child's behavior. They need to be taught how to treat dogs, and most family dogs who snap are trying to do just that, in the same way they'd discipline rowdy pups in the pack.

It's silly, Ditter, to say they 'don't recognize young children as humans". We can't know what a dog's sense of self and family really are, but stable normal dogs most certainly understand babies. They know exactly what children are, I believe, and most have great patience with them. But dogs, particularly little dogs, are very vulnerable to being hurt by kids, and they will quite naturally snap at them if no other relief is offered by parents who should be stopping them from being "innocently mean".

Why do pit bulls snap in such a radical and lethal way? Well, personally, I think it's because Nitro is volitile by nature. I do not buy the premise that the aggressive nature is so finely tuned that they can be called 'only' dog aggressive.... Aggression is not that finely tuned by breeding, only perhaps by training. A pit bull has in him an ancestry that fought to the death, I don't think hoodlums in back alleys that are breeding these dogs are as sophisticated as you give them credit for.

33 posted on 02/18/2005 6:04:29 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: Darnright
Either way it makes sense. Dogs bred for aggression against anything are going to revert to that. If it is a big powerful breed bred to fight to the death, they are going to hurt and kill things. My Jack Russels are in the back yard right now chasing small rodents and digging holes. Doing what they were bred to do. Why should it surprise me?
34 posted on 02/18/2005 6:07:05 AM PST by Ditter
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To: A CA Guy

Sound advice, but it doesn't delineate between a dog who simply replies to irritation and 1 who won't let it go.

Many good dogs who are irritated by something will simply "snap" (literally) and let it go at that. Kind of like we mite yell "stop it now!", or maybe slap a kid. Then it's over.

The problem dogs are those that, even if replying to simple pain (and sometimes, let's be honest, not), won't "let it go". They won't stop the "discipline" - it's not merely a snap, but anything from a series of snaps all the way up to latching onto the offender. In essence, it is a fight rather than just discipline.


35 posted on 02/18/2005 6:14:28 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
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To: Darnright
OK. Name another Cairn that did the same thing. I can go out to Google and drag up examples of fifteen pit bull attacks in the last two weeks.

And that's just those that were bad enough to make the paper.

36 posted on 02/18/2005 6:16:01 AM PST by sinkspur ("Preach the gospel. If necessary, use words.")
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To: HairOfTheDog
You think it is silly to say dogs often recognize small children as another animal? Go tell that to the vets in my brothers vet clinic. A discussion of 4 vets with a combined total of aprox. 120 years of experience said that. I have heard professional dog trainers say the same thing.
37 posted on 02/18/2005 6:16:40 AM PST by Ditter
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To: the OlLine Rebel

There may be something in the wiring of the fighting dogs, that they don't stop when it should be over. Normal dog fights between rival males don't go to the death. It's not about death, it's about dominance, and stops when the lesser dog lays down.

Pit bulls take it further. They don't/can't stop.


38 posted on 02/18/2005 6:20:15 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: sinkspur

Part of the "problem" is that only big dogs generally cause much damage that is *reported*.

I can't tell you how many times the Napolean complex has shown thru on little dogs. Not all - I've known of many nice 1s. Also known quite a few unstable 1s.

Including the "cock-a-poo" of neighbor-friends I once cared for while they were gone (I was maybe 11 or 12). I sat down while she ate, she came up on my lap, stiff and sort of looking at me, and when I moved a bit - vicious angry growling snap at me. Now this too could be spoiling the dog and not nipping those tendencies in the bud - she died some time later and was never a "problem" per se. But I knew however it came about she was unstable and not totally trust-worthy.


39 posted on 02/18/2005 6:24:35 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
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To: Ditter

Yes, I do think it's silly, because we aren't in their heads. I don't know what my dog thinks I am, besides Food-God and Door-God, and "she who we must obey". Pack animals, and herd animals, understand the concept of young, and normal well-balanced dog brains do not go after children as prey, but rather see them as small, sometimes annoying parts of the family, that they either see as something to protect, or as competition for affection, depending on their temperament.


40 posted on 02/18/2005 6:26:11 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: HairOfTheDog
The most important thing in this article, in my opinion, is not the breed of the dog, except to say that it is a large, strong breed.

The message here is that no child who is under the age at which they can understand NOT to play with a dog in open, fenced areas should be allowed to do so. Dogs in fenced areas that have enough room to run, but feel protective of the fenceline boundary are not safe for children. Period. Even a dog that would never bite a child could easily run over or into the child. My mother got her leg broken by our Belgian Sheepdog that way. And she had no teeth, so she might gum you to death, but the force of a charging dog on your body can do some damage.

41 posted on 02/18/2005 6:33:28 AM PST by sandalwood (The sky was yellow and the sun was blue)
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To: ambrose
I know those doggies! From left to right:

Treasure, Peaches (in the back), the Hersh-man in the front, good ole Jim (with the grey muzzle) and Boss in the back in his kennel!! Where'd you get that picture?

42 posted on 02/18/2005 6:47:21 AM PST by Dooderbutt
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To: sandalwood

No, the breed of dog is important too, in this story, the kid was critically injured and there is a type of dog that routinely does this kind of damage, and it ain't Labradors, and it ain't Yorkies.

Most kids grow up with a family dog. My point was, no matter the size of the dog, they need to learn how to play with dogs. I am not following you that a dog that barks at the garbage man and other boundary threats in the life of a dog is a threat to children ~inside~ the boundary who venture towards the fence. Kids and dogs play in back yards every day, and most don't get mauled. Really territorial dogs are a threat to intruding children, yes.


43 posted on 02/18/2005 6:47:36 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: Dooderbutt

See post #30


44 posted on 02/18/2005 7:01:23 AM PST by kanawa (A Free Man in Canannyda)
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To: kanawa
Allowing a four year old to play unattended with any dog is the epitome of irresponsibility.

Amen to that.

I was bitten several times, in the face, by a psychotic Yorkshire terrier when I was a baby. Do we need breed bans on Yorkies? Oh wait... they're little harmless toy breeds...

45 posted on 02/18/2005 7:15:42 AM PST by RepoGirl (Rottweilers are republican; all cats vote nader.)
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To: HairOfTheDog
I don't think you are correct, to be honest. A four-year-old kid who is running around the backyard with a large-breed dog isn't safe from injury. I agree it isn't Yorkies, but a large Lab (80 to 100lbs or more), in a playful mood could run right over your child. In my opinion, you should never let that happen unless you are standing by your child.

Just because you don't own a Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Mastiff, Doberman Pincher, or Pit Bull doesn't mean you should let your toddler or small child run around the back yard with a dog double his/her weight.

As a mother, I'd always err on the side of caution. If you have a big dog, let them outside to play. Then, let your toddler outside to play, and put your dog in.

46 posted on 02/18/2005 7:19:52 AM PST by sandalwood (The sky was yellow and the sun was blue)
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To: HairOfTheDog
Whoever said we were talking about normal well balanced dogs? I watched my Jack Russel Terrier stalk and bite my 2 year old grandaughter in the neck because the child went over and looked into his food dish and then walked away. I could not believe that he was going to do it. He went on to prove that he was not well balanced a few more times. He was trained and watched carefully but he was unbalanced and continued his evil ways until I put him down. You and I will have to agree to disagree on this one.
47 posted on 02/18/2005 7:20:16 AM PST by Ditter
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To: sandalwood
I don't think you are correct, to be honest.

You made a very specific point about dogs being protective of their fenceline and that kids should never be in a fenced area or go near their own fence in their own yard. That's the point I differed on. If you've had that experience, that was a really strange dog.

I didn't say kids should be unsupervised with a romping large dog. I know they can be knocked over. Little kids and dogs should always be supervised, and kids not allowed to play active games unless and until they are old enough, stable enough, and the dog is gentle enough.

I'm glad you closely watch your kids and your dogs. Especially if they may or may not be part pit ;~D

I don't have kids, only large dogs at the moment, and they are required to behave just a little better than the kids who visit ;~D

48 posted on 02/18/2005 7:30:37 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: Ditter

If you had a whacked out aggressive little dog, we don't disagree at all about anything that matters. Your dog was a threat. What name your dog had for the child is really an obtuse point.


49 posted on 02/18/2005 7:35:41 AM PST by HairOfTheDog (It is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!)
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To: HairOfTheDog

You certainly seem to be tightly wound this morning. If I may make an observation.


50 posted on 02/18/2005 7:39:10 AM PST by Ditter
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