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Any haracter building poems??? (Vanity)
August 24, 2006 | self

Posted on 08/27/2006 9:21:02 AM PDT by Zechariah11

I have just spent two hours on line and combing through a Children's Poetry book for inspirational poems which could be used in the classroom. I have a list of ONE!!! Does anyone else have an idea for a poem other than "If" which can be used?

And PLEASE don't suggest those vapid, nonsense works from Shel Silverstein. Thanks to all who wish to make a contribution.


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Education; Poetry
KEYWORDS: billbennett; bookofvirtues; bookreview; childrensliterature; help

1 posted on 08/27/2006 9:21:02 AM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: Zechariah11

Suggest Bill Bennett, Book of Virtues


2 posted on 08/27/2006 9:22:46 AM PDT by ClaireSolt (.)
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To: Zechariah11; bentfeather
Ms Bentfeather do you have any suggest for Zech?
3 posted on 08/27/2006 9:29:41 AM PDT by MNJohnnie ( Elections are more important then the feelings of the POS Cons (Perpetually Offended Syndrome))
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To: Zechariah11
Any haracter building poems???

Moosebites build haracter.

4 posted on 08/27/2006 9:30:17 AM PDT by dirtboy (This tagline has been photoshopped)
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To: Zechariah11

Do you like heese? I love heese!


5 posted on 08/27/2006 9:32:15 AM PDT by JRios1968 (This kid knows how to wallop a baseball!!!!!!)
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To: Zechariah11

There once was a man from Nantucket...


Oh, wait...you said for the classroom...never mind.


6 posted on 08/27/2006 9:34:44 AM PDT by MineralMan (Non-evangelical Atheist)
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To: dirtboy
Moosebites build haracter.

So does installing a new muffler on a '67 Skylark.

7 posted on 08/27/2006 9:36:36 AM PDT by johnny7 (“And what's Fonzie like? Come on Yolanda... what's Fonzie like?!”)
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To: johnny7
So does installing a new muffler on a '67 Skylark.

Or installing a new muffler on a moose.

8 posted on 08/27/2006 9:41:36 AM PDT by dirtboy (This tagline has been photoshopped)
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To: Zechariah11

THE WORLDS NEED
Ella Wheeler Wilcox

O many gods, so many creeds,
So many paths that wind and wind,
While just the art of being kind
Is all the sad world needs.


9 posted on 08/27/2006 9:44:21 AM PDT by COUNTrecount
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To: Zechariah11

What's the age range of the kids you're teaching?


10 posted on 08/27/2006 9:54:33 AM PDT by Huntress (Proud owner of Norman/Norma, the transsexual cat.)
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To: dirtboy
Or installing a new muffler on a moose.

Just don't carve your initials on a moose.

11 posted on 08/27/2006 9:59:00 AM PDT by JRios1968 (This kid knows how to wallop a baseball!!!!!!)
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To: Zechariah11

One tried and true favorite is Horatio at the Bridge usually excerpted from Macauley's longer poem Horatius :

http://www.englishverse.com/poems/horatius

If this is too militant, there are many other poems from the same era positively presenting human virtues, before western civilization descended into multicultural indifference. Some of these are to be found by browsing the works of Arnold, Ruskin, Macauley, Tennyson, Browning, Emerson. Not to be overlooked are poems of an earier generation such as Donne , George Herbert and others.


12 posted on 08/27/2006 10:30:33 AM PDT by Cplus
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To: Zechariah11

Little Things Count

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean
And the pleasant land.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Help to make earth happy
Like the Heaven above.

-Ebenezer Cofham Brewer
The American Citizens Handbook 1968 p476


13 posted on 08/27/2006 10:35:31 AM PDT by syriacus (Worried about attacks from Iran or Korea? Daschle wanted to scuttle our missile defense program)
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To: syriacus

Golden Keys

A bunch of golden keys is mine
To make each day with gladness shine.

"God morning" is the golden key
That unlocks every day for me.

When at the table, "If you please"
I take off from my bunch of keys.

When friends give anything to me,
I use my little "Thank you" key.

"Excuse me"--"Beg your pardon" too
If by some mistake some harm I do.

When evening comes, "Goodnight" I say
And close the door of each glad day.

With a golden ring these keys I bind
This motto -- "Be ye kind."

I'll often use each golden key
And then a child polite I'll be.

Author unknown
American Citizens Handbook, 1968
p476


14 posted on 08/27/2006 10:43:31 AM PDT by syriacus (Worried about attacks from Iran or Korea? Daschle wanted to scuttle our missile defense program)
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To: syriacus

Kindness garden

Kind hearts are the garden,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits.

Love is sweet sunshine
That warms into life,
For only in darkness
Grow darkness and strife

Author unknown
AC Handbook p 482

Other short poems - page 486

If wisdom's ways you'd wisely seek
Five things observe with care:
Of whom you speak,
To whom you speak,
And how and when and where.
Author unknown
-----
Little loving thoughts
Are tiny little seeds
From which bud and blossom
Little loving deeds.
-------
The Never-Old

They who can smile when others hate
Nor bind the heart with fruits of fate,
Their feet will go with laughter bold
The green roads of the Never-Old,

They who can let the spirit shine
And keep the heart a lighted shrine,
Their feet will glide with fire-of-gold
The bright roads of the Never-Old.

They who can put the self aside
And in Love's saddle leap and ride,
Their eyes will see the gates unfold
To glad roads of the Never-Old.

Edwin Markham
AC Handbook p495


15 posted on 08/27/2006 10:56:20 AM PDT by syriacus (Worried about attacks from Iran or Korea? Daschle wanted to scuttle our missile defense program)
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To: Zechariah11

Excerpts from The Master

[about Abraham Lincoln...supposedly written shortly after the Civil War; shows that true leaders are often mocked, until time proves they were right.]

A flying word from there and there
Had sown the name at which we sneered,
But soon the name was everywhere,
To be reviled and then revered:
A presence to be loved and feared,
We cannot hide it, or deny
That we, the gentlemen who jeered,
May be forgotten by and by.

He came when days were perilous
And hearts of men were sore beguiled:
And having made his note of us,
He pondered and was reconciled.
Was ever master yet so mild
As he, and so untamable?
We doubted, even when he smiled,
Not knowing what he knew so well.

He knew that undeceiving fate
Would shame us whom he served unsought;
He knew that he must wince and wait--
The jest of those for whom he fought;
He knew devoutly what he thought
Of us and of our ridicule;
He knew that we must all be taught
Like little children in a school.

We gave a glamour to the task
That he encountered and saw through,
But little of us did he ask,
And little did we ever do.
And what appears if we review
The season when we railed and chaffed?
It is the face of one who knew
That we were learning while we laughed.
[end of excerpt]

by Edwin Arlington Robinson

From F.T. Palgrave's --The Golden Treasury of the best songs and lyrical poems --Centennial Edition c. 1961, p. 459


16 posted on 08/27/2006 11:13:17 AM PDT by syriacus (Worried about attacks from Iran or Korea? Daschle wanted to scuttle our missile defense program)
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To: syriacus

I made an error in this poem, up above.
The word "hatre" should appear in the last line.

Kindness garden

Kind hearts are the garden,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits.

Love is sweet sunshine
That warms into life,
For only in darkness
Grow hatred and strife


17 posted on 08/27/2006 11:18:11 AM PDT by syriacus (Worried about attacks from Iran or Korea? Daschle wanted to scuttle our missile defense program)
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To: Zechariah11; MNJohnnie

Don't know if this is what you're looking for.

Robert Louis Stevenson



http://www.emule.com/poetry/?page=overview&author=55


18 posted on 08/27/2006 12:36:28 PM PDT by Soaring Feather
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To: Zechariah11

No man survives when freedom fails,
the best men rot in filthy jails,
and those who cry appease, appease
are hanged by those they tried to please.'

Hiram Mann


19 posted on 08/27/2006 12:59:04 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
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To: Huntress
What's the age range of the kids you're teaching?

Sixth grade. I would like them to learn a familiar quotation from Shakespeare and at least a four line stanza from a poem per week.

20 posted on 08/27/2006 6:07:11 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: Cplus

Thanks. I'll be teaching in one of the most liberal cities in California so I've got to be careful.. I'd love to use "The Charge of the Light Brigade" but am a bit hesitant to ruffle the feathers of peacenik parents.


21 posted on 08/27/2006 6:12:09 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: syriacus

FANTASTIC!!! That's a keeper which I'll use. Thanks very much.


22 posted on 08/27/2006 6:13:40 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: syriacus

Beautiful. That's a third one I can use. Thanks so much.


23 posted on 08/27/2006 6:15:02 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: Zechariah11
Bullets
Bang.
Bang.
Bang.
Guns are noisy.
So get some earmuffs.
My aunt lives in Boise.
24 posted on 08/27/2006 6:16:27 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am a big fan of urban sprawl but I wish there were more sidewalks)
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To: syriacus

Terrific!


25 posted on 08/27/2006 6:17:26 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: syriacus; All
Thanks so much for these contributions. As I said in another post, I want my sixth graders to memorize some insightful quotations from Shakespeare and some inspirational poetry each week. I think adolescence is that time of development when youngsters are starving for an idealized look at life; to learn that life is far more than what is depicted in the mass media..

Unfortunately, these kids know only Langston Hughes and Shel Silversten.

I was about to abandon the poetry aspect of this approach to my teaching until your valuable contributions.

Again, thanks friends at Free Republic and especially you, syriacus.

26 posted on 08/27/2006 6:34:08 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: bentfeather

Stevenson is just the ticket.. I've found at least one on that site and will be going back to check for others.


27 posted on 08/27/2006 6:40:23 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: Zechariah11
Oh the Places You'll Go
--Theodor Seuss Geisel

I suggest finding a better text. The one above seems a little crude.

28 posted on 08/27/2006 6:43:27 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: Zechariah11; leda

Leda, your turn.


29 posted on 08/27/2006 6:45:43 PM PDT by patton (Sanctimony frequently reaps its own reward.)
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To: Zechariah11

I would highly recommend the Robert Service poems.


30 posted on 08/27/2006 6:46:51 PM PDT by PJ-Comix (Join the DUmmie FUnnies PING List for the FUNNIEST Blog on the Web)
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To: Zechariah11

Good glad you found what you were looking for.


Rudyard Kipling is another excellent choice.





31 posted on 08/27/2006 6:46:54 PM PDT by Soaring Feather
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To: 1rudeboy

Not bad for Dr. Seuss.


32 posted on 08/27/2006 6:48:56 PM PDT by Zechariah11
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To: Zechariah11

Just thought of another one, Joyce Kilmer's "Trees."


33 posted on 08/27/2006 6:48:57 PM PDT by Soaring Feather
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To: Zechariah11

One of my favorites, and I'm middle-aged.


34 posted on 08/27/2006 6:49:26 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: Zechariah11; patton

i think the things i've written are too young for 6th gr ...


35 posted on 08/27/2006 6:56:25 PM PDT by leda (Life is always what you make it!)
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To: Zechariah11
Daffodils

We memorized it when I was about 13.

You might remember it ..it starts with

I wander'd lonely as a cloud  
  That floats on high o'er vales and hills,  
When all at once I saw a crowd,  
  A host, of golden daffodils;  
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,    
      Fluttering and dancing in the breeze
It has 3 more stanzas. It's not exactly a character-building poem, but it does encourage treasuring things that money does not buy.
36 posted on 08/28/2006 12:59:15 PM PDT by syriacus (Why wasn't each home in New Orleans required to have an inflatable life boat?)
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To: Zechariah11
The heights by great men
Reached and kept
Were not attained by sudden flight
But they, while their companions slept
Were toiling upward in the night.
--Longfellow (I think)

"Before the gates of excellence the High gods have placed sweat. Long and rough is the road thereto, but once it has been reached, then there is ease; then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning."--Hesiod, Works and Days

"The quest of the Inner Ring will break your hearts unless you break it. But if you break it, a surprising result will follow. If in your working hours you make the work your end, you will presently find yourself all unawares inside the only circle in your profession that really matters. You will be one of the sound craftsmen, and other sound craftsmen will know it. "--C.S. Lewis, The Inner Ring

37 posted on 09/07/2006 10:36:57 AM PDT by boris (The deadliest weapon of mass destruction in history is a leftist with a word processor.)
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To: Zechariah11

probably best for early teen males:
"If"
by Rudyard Kipling
http://www.swarthmore.edu/~apreset1/docs/if.html


and on the issue of paying attention to details (and the disasters that
follow ignoring them)
the old saw about "for the want of a nail, the shoe was lost..."
http://www.quotedb.com/quotes/464
(I think it's a saw from earlier than Franklin)


38 posted on 09/07/2006 10:48:13 AM PDT by VOA
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To: Zechariah11

The Village Blacksmith
UNDER a spreading chestnut-tree
The village smithy stands;
The smith, a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands.
His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
His face is like the tan;
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
He earns whate'er he can,
And looks the whole world in the face,
For he owes not any man.
Week in, week out, from morn till night,
You can hear his bellows blow;
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge,
With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell,
When the evening sun is low.
And children coming home from school
Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows roar,
And catch the burning sparks that fly
Like chaff from a threshing-floor.
He goes on Sunday to the church,
And sits among his boys;
He hears the parson pray and preach,
He hears his daughter's voice,
Singing in the village choir,
And it makes his heart rejoice.
It sounds to him like her mother's voice,
Singing in Paradise!
He needs must think of her once more,
How in the grave she lies;
And with his hard, rough hand he wipes
A tear out of his eyes.
Toiling,---rejoicing,---sorrowing,
Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
Each evening sees it close;
Something attempted, something done,
Has earned a night's repose.
Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
For the lesson thou hast taught!
Thus at the flaming forge of life
Our fortunes must be wrought;
Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
Each burning deed and thought.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


39 posted on 09/07/2006 12:09:41 PM PDT by spiffy
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