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Any Great Books?
July 25, 2008 | Stephanie32

Posted on 07/25/2008 3:01:11 PM PDT by Stephanie32

(My first thread, hope I'm doing this right!)


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: bookclub; bookreview; books; firstthread; godsgravesglyphs; readinglist
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Does anyone have any recommendations for any really great books that you've really enjoyed lately? Fiction or nonfiction. I would start but nothing I've read lately thrilled me that much.
1 posted on 07/25/2008 3:01:12 PM PDT by Stephanie32
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To: Stephanie32
The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
2 posted on 07/25/2008 3:02:21 PM PDT by Old Sarge (CTHULHU '08 - I won't settle for a lesser evil any longer!)
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To: Stephanie32

The one book I think every American should read is the Pulitzer Prize winning book, Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 by Steve Coll


3 posted on 07/25/2008 3:07:04 PM PDT by PajamaTruthMafia
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To: Stephanie32
The only book you'll ever need to read in your lifetime
4 posted on 07/25/2008 3:08:09 PM PDT by Daffynition
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To: Stephanie32

The Aubrey/Maturin series, by Richard O’Brian.
It will consume your life until you finish it. Seriously.


5 posted on 07/25/2008 3:08:09 PM PDT by LongElegantLegs (We are all humans, and humans poo.)
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To: Stephanie32

Gideon’s Spies- The secret history of the Mossad by Gordon Thomas

The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett

Time and Again by Jack Finney

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand


6 posted on 07/25/2008 3:09:32 PM PDT by Kimmers (Take all the sh** out Obama, and you are left with hairy shoes)
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To: Stephanie32
The Doorbell Rang or Some Buried Caesar-- Rex Stout

Pope Pius VII -- Robin Anderson (www.tanbooks.com)

The Omnivore's Dilemma -- Michael Pollan (yeah, he's a lib, but the book is well-written)

Why the Democrats are Blue -- Mark Stricherz (not a great read, but covers an underreported epoch)

Martin Chuzzlewit -- Charles Dickens (very underrated book)

My Grandfather's Son -- Clarence Thomas (a must read)


7 posted on 07/25/2008 3:10:21 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics)
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To: Stephanie32

The Living Lincoln, Angle & Miers


8 posted on 07/25/2008 3:10:41 PM PDT by mdittmar (May God watch over those who serve,and have served,to keep us free)
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To: Stephanie32

In keeping with the recent Canteen threads on the Berlin Airlift, I’ll recommend Armageddon, by Leon Uris.


9 posted on 07/25/2008 3:12:36 PM PDT by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: Stephanie32
The Diaries of Adam and Eve: As Interpreted by Mark Twain by Mark Twain.

It's a really fast read, but it's incredibly touching and laugh-out-loud funny. The notes in the back indicate it's Twain's love letter to his wife.

10 posted on 07/25/2008 3:14:51 PM PDT by Melpomene
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To: Stephanie32
War and Peace, Pride and Prejudice, Lord of the Flies, Moby Dick, Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War, a number of Shakespeare's plays and the sonnets, William Faulkner's Absalom! Absalom!, Les Miseables, The Brothers Karamazov--if anybody's missed these, you're in for a wonderful experience.
11 posted on 07/25/2008 3:15:17 PM PDT by Savage Beast ("Some people are born knowing, and some people will die searching." -Antonio Banderas)
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To: Stephanie32

If you want to feel better about yourself, read “My Life: In and Out of the Rough”... by golfer John Daly! :-)

Pillars of the Earth is excellent, as is the sequel, “World Without End”.... but, both books are also “without end”... clocking in at 1000 pages EACH!

If you want a thrill... try the series of books written by Vince Flynn that starts with, “Term Limits”. Now, THERE’s some good reading!

Have fun..


12 posted on 07/25/2008 3:16:37 PM PDT by SomeCallMeTim ( When you find yourself going through Hell, keep going!)
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To: Stephanie32

My Grandfather’s Son by Clarence Thomas was an excellent read.


13 posted on 07/25/2008 3:18:56 PM PDT by ConservaTexan (February 6, 1911)
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To: Stephanie32
Oh, and Ghost Soldiers by Hampton Sides. It's about the Army Ranger's first mission -- to rescue the POWs from the Bataan Death March. I'm not a non-fiction reader, but I could not put this book down. It's a great story. It was a pretty good movie, too; but the book was fantastic.
14 posted on 07/25/2008 3:19:42 PM PDT by Melpomene
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To: Stephanie32

You’re doing well. ‘Great’ is in the mind of the reader.

If you like baseball. Just finished an oldie Summer of ‘49 about the Yankee - Red Sox rivalry. If you are a young ‘un the names will not be familiar!

You will probably get a lot of suggestions. We are very good here at giving advice here. {;-) PS It will be good.


15 posted on 07/25/2008 3:20:29 PM PDT by ex-snook ("Above all things, truth beareth away the victory.")
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To: Stephanie32
Atlas Shrugged - The first 50 or so pages are boring, but it gets better. If you've paid attention to what you have read, you can skip over most of John Galt's VERY LONG rambling monologue. You'll know it when you get to it. Here is a small excerpt ;

Men who have no courage, pride or self-esteem, men who have no moral sense of their right to their money and are not willing to defend it defend their life, men who apologize for being rich -- will not remain rich for long. They are the natural bait for the swarms of looters who stay under the rocks for centuries, but come crawling out at the first smell of a man who begs to be forgiven for the guilt of owning wealth. They will hasten to relieve him of the guilt - and of his life, as he deserves.”

“Then you will see the rise of the men of the double standard - the men who live by force, yet count on those who live by trade to create the value of their looted money -- the men who are the hitchhikers of virtue. In a moral society, these are the criminals, and the statutes are written to protect you against them. But when a society establishes criminals-by-right and looters-by-law --men who use force to seize the wealth of disarmed victims -- then money becomes its creators’ avenger. Such looters believe it is safe to rob defenseless men, once they have passed a law to disarm them. But their loot becomes the magnet for other looters, who get it from them as they got it. Then the race goes on, not to the ablest at production, but to those most ruthless at brutality. When force is the standard, the murderer wins over the pickpocket. And then that society vanishes, in a spread of ruins and slaughter.”

“Do you wish to know whether that day is coming? Watch money. Money is the barometer of a society’s virtue. When you see that trading is done, not by consent, but by compulsion - when you see that in order to produce, you need permission from men who produce nothing - when you see that money is flowing to those who deal, not in goods, but in favors -when you see that men get richer by graft and pull than by work, and your laws don’t protect you against them, but protect them against you - when you see corruption being rewarded and honest becoming self sacrifice - you may know that your society is doomed. “
By the character Francisco d’ Anaconia in Ayn Rand’s book Atlas Shrugged


16 posted on 07/25/2008 3:21:11 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (G-d is not a Republican. But Satan is definitely a Democrat.)
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To: Stephanie32; Amelia
Oh yeah! 1984 and Animal Farm! (Thanks, Amelia!)
17 posted on 07/25/2008 3:21:26 PM PDT by Savage Beast ("Some people are born knowing, and some people will die searching." -Antonio Banderas)
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To: Stephanie32
PhotobucketPhotobucket

PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket

18 posted on 07/25/2008 3:22:36 PM PDT by martin_fierro (FREE LAZZY, YOU BASTARDS!)
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To: Dr. Sivana

From a conservative perspective the must read book is “America Alone” by Mark Steyn. Does an excellent job of desribing the nature of the Isamic threat and the unique and civilization saving role of the USA.


19 posted on 07/25/2008 3:23:45 PM PDT by Maneesh
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To: Stephanie32
The Federalist Papers, by A. Hamilton, John Jay, and John Adams, under the pseudonym “Publius”.

They were written to sell the Constitution to the public. They argued a strong central government was good for trade and national defense.

They're part of our national history and used in Supreme Court decisions.

20 posted on 07/25/2008 3:24:38 PM PDT by Forgiven_Sinner (For God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son that whosoever believes in Him should not die)
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To: Stephanie32

“Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” by William Shirer. Many eerie parallels to today’s events.


21 posted on 07/25/2008 3:24:56 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine (Is /sarc really necessary?)
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To: Stephanie32
Any of the books by Jeff and Michael Shaara.

I enjoyed the two about the American Revolution (The Glorious Cause and Rise to Rebellion), the Mexican American War (Gone for Soldiers)and the the three about the Civil War (Gods and Generals, Killer Angels, Last Full Measure)

I have yet to read the WWI or II books he has written, but they are on my list.

22 posted on 07/25/2008 3:26:23 PM PDT by kalee
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To: Stephanie32
If you are looking for light, no brainer, LOL read check out the Stephanie Plumb series by Janet Evanovich...

Start with One For the Money....

23 posted on 07/25/2008 3:27:08 PM PDT by Kimmers (Take all the sh** out Obama, and you are left with hairy shoes)
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To: Daffynition

Are you KIDDING me? Are you on the write forum? This is FR, not the Church of Oprah.


24 posted on 07/25/2008 3:31:17 PM PDT by DeLaVerdad
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To: Stephanie32
I like to read historical novels and mysteries. I've also got an interest in Egyptology. I realize that everyone's taste in books is different, but these are some of the book series I've read, or am presently reading.

One set of historical novels/mysteries I enjoyed was the Benjamin January series by Barbara Hambly. These books take place in antebellum New Orleans. January, a free black man, was trained as a doctor in Paris, but can only earn a living as a musician in N.O. He plays a role in solving murders with the local police chief.

Next is the Amelia Peabody mystery series by Elizabeth Peters (aka Barbara Michaels). Peabody, her archaeologist husband, and young son travel to Egypt each season to conduct digs. On their travels they are involved in solving antiquities thefts, murders, etc. The series starts in the 1880's and runs through WWI. There's quite a few books in this series.

I'm also enjoying reading Tony HIllerman's Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mystery series. They're Navajo tribal policemen. I just started reading the Charlie Moon mystery series by James D. Doss. Charlie Moon is a Ute police officer in Grant Creek, Colorado.

The last mystery series I've been reading is The Knights Templar Series by Michael Jecks.

25 posted on 07/25/2008 3:33:35 PM PDT by mass55th
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To: Stephanie32
Non-Fiction:

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" by William L. Shirer
Dreadnought by Robert K. Massey
Castles of Steel by Robert K. Massey
Peter the Great by Robert K. Massey
Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose
Nothing Like it in the World by Stephen Ambrose
Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose
The Arms of Krupp by William Manchester
A World Lit Only by Fire by William Manchester
Destructive Generation by David Horowitz and Peter Collier
Radical Son by David Horowitz

Fiction:

Time Enough for Love Robert A. Heinlein
Starship Troopers Robert A. Heinlein
I, Robot Isaac Asimov
Red Sky at Morning Richard Bradford
Les Miserable Victor Hugo
A Drink Before the War Dennis Lehane
Gone Baby, Gone Dennis Lehane
Prayers for Rain Dennis Lehane

Off the top of my head.
26 posted on 07/25/2008 3:39:03 PM PDT by stylin_geek (Liberalism: comparable to a chicken with its head cut off, but with more spastic motions)
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To: Stephanie32

Psalms - read daily

Les Miserables - Victor Hugo (get the old english unabridged edition if you can)

When I don’t Desire God - Fighting for Joy - John Piper


27 posted on 07/25/2008 3:49:30 PM PDT by free_life (If you ask Jesus to forgive you and to save you, He will.)
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To: tacticalogic
I’ll recommend Armageddon, by Leon Uris.

I second that recommendation.

28 posted on 07/25/2008 3:52:21 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin
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To: Pearls Before Swine
“Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” by William Shirer. Many eerie parallels to today’s events.

I found his Berlin Diary on sale and read it this spring. Very interesting reading, but it would help to know some of the players beforehand.

29 posted on 07/25/2008 3:54:59 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin
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To: Stephanie32

The Prize, a Pulitzer Prize awarded, is a history of the petroleum industry from the Drake Well to the development of Prudhoe.

Biographical sketches of the main characters (many are characters, indeed), and how oil has affected the players in the world.


30 posted on 07/25/2008 3:58:48 PM PDT by RightWhale (I will veto each and every beer)
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To: Stephanie32

Try Crytonomicon by Neal Stephenson. I read it 5-6 years ago and just started to reread it.


31 posted on 07/25/2008 4:01:16 PM PDT by Vermonter
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To: Stephanie32

Any of the Nero Wolfe books by Rex Stout. They are older but very entertaining. I have read them all about five times. Never get boring.


32 posted on 07/25/2008 4:02:21 PM PDT by raybbr (You think it's bad now - wait till the anchor babies start to vote!)
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To: Stephanie32
Or, how about "Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett. A true epic.

Read the first chapter here.

33 posted on 07/25/2008 4:06:03 PM PDT by raybbr (You think it's bad now - wait till the anchor babies start to vote!)
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To: LongElegantLegs

“Lobscouse and Spotted Dog”

‘Which it is a gastronomical companion to the Aubrey/ Maturin Novels’

by Anne Chotzinoff Grossman and Lisa Grossman Thomas

“Preserved Killick, none so pretty”


34 posted on 07/25/2008 4:06:16 PM PDT by dynachrome (Henry Bowman is right)
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To: 506trooper; aberaussie; Alberta's Child; AQGeiger; arbee4bush; Ax; Brasil; Burn24; ...
Book Club Ping

Stephanie32 would like to know if anyone's read any great books lately.

35 posted on 07/25/2008 4:06:37 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Teachers open the door. It's up to you to enter.)
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To: Stephanie32
What I've Been Reading: http://www.geocities.com/tanniker

Sorry 'bout the ads on the side of the page, but it's a free page, so I can't do anything about it.

By the way, it isn't up to date. I finished Ender's Game; gave up on Triplanetary; moved on to Legend and The King Beyond the Gate.

36 posted on 07/25/2008 4:09:16 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Teachers open the door. It's up to you to enter.)
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To: Tanniker Smith
I am looking for a book from the forties.
It was named something like “The First Fast Gun”.
It took place when people used flintlocks.
37 posted on 07/25/2008 4:14:43 PM PDT by HuntsvilleTxVeteran (Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto!)
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To: dynachrome; LongElegantLegs; Stephanie32

Yes, nothing like Patrick O’Brian.
Best to start with Master and Commander, but any will do.

If you’re in the mood for something darkish, the epitomy of fine pulpfiction and noir, go for Jim Thompson. Books that punch you in the plexus. “Pop. 1280” - a good start. Short but intense.


38 posted on 07/25/2008 4:14:45 PM PDT by swarthyguy (Osama Freedom Day: 2500 or so since September 11 2001! That's SIX +years, Dubya.)
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To: Stephanie32
Witness by Whitaker Chambers. The autobiography and confessional of a former Communist activist turned patriot "witness" to the Soviet invasion of our government in the 1930's to 1950's.
39 posted on 07/25/2008 4:19:05 PM PDT by ReleaseTheHounds ("The demagogue is one who preaches doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots.")
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To: Stephanie32

I am listening to Clive Cussler’s ‘Plague Ship’. I have started reading a series of mysteries by Valerie Wolzien.


40 posted on 07/25/2008 4:21:47 PM PDT by mathluv
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To: Stephanie32
3 fiction novels I have read and enjoyed this year.

"Some Danger Involved" by Will Thomas
Private investigator in London, late 1800s. Kind of Sherlock Holmesian with a bit more violence and humor.

"Dissolution" by CJ Sansom
Henry VIII is confiscating the land, churches and valuables of the Catholic church. Murder is afoot. The best hunchbacked dwarf lawyer in England, Matthew Shardlake, (who works for Oliver Cromwell) is sent to investigate.

"The Religion" by Tim Willocks.
The siege of Malta, 1575 ad., The Knights Templar v. Suleiman the Magnificent. Very violent and bloody. Had that "wow" factor for me.

41 posted on 07/25/2008 4:21:53 PM PDT by dynachrome (Henry Bowman is right)
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To: swarthyguy
Any Jim Thomson will do (as would any early Hammett or Leonard, including his noir-westerns like HOMBRE).

A friend of mine started a small imprint called Hard Case Fiction. He recycles forties-fifties lurid crime novellae and mixes them with new writers. Pretty good stuff.

A really good long read is the Berlin Noir trilogy by Phillip Kerr (March Violets, The Pale Criminal & German Requim). They are available in one volume. The series covers a Berlin detective pre-war, war years and post war in a dirty, dangerous Berlin. It's his best work by far. I take it off the shelf every four years or so and am constantly surprised by it still.

42 posted on 07/25/2008 4:22:51 PM PDT by wtc911 ("How you gonna get back down that hill?")
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To: Dr. Sivana
'My Grandfather's Son -- Clarence Thomas (a must read)'

I got that for my grandson. We drove to Dallas to see/hear Justice Thomas. My grandson was thrilled, and loved the book. He wore his Gitmo t-shirt under another shirt and jacket.

43 posted on 07/25/2008 4:24:19 PM PDT by mathluv
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To: mathluv

I think Plague Ship was written by Jack DuBrul....just using Cussler’s characters. I read it last month.


44 posted on 07/25/2008 4:26:25 PM PDT by BurbankKarl
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To: Stephanie32

Lonesome Dove.
Shogun.


45 posted on 07/25/2008 4:29:22 PM PDT by gate2wire
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To: Stephanie32
I've been reading Patrick Robinson and Stuart Woods

By Robinson I really Liked Shark Mutiny, Barrcuda 945 and Scimitar SL-2 they are about Terrorism, Iran, China, Oil they are similar to Clancy but not so technical.

By Stuart Woods

I liked The Short Forever, Two Dollar Bill, Dark Harbor which revolve around a former cop Stone Barrington they are kind of like James Bonds meets Robert Parkers Spenser

and also by Woods a book called Beverly Hills Dead which I liked because it takes place in the late 40's and mixes in fiction and old hollywood so the detective might be out to dinner and at the next table was like Errol Flynn or some other actual person that was alive at that time although it is still fiction.

46 posted on 07/25/2008 4:29:27 PM PDT by edzo4
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To: Stephanie32

Fiction:

The “Flashman” series by George Macdonald Frasier;

The “Polesotechnic League” series by Poul Anderson;

Anything written by Robert E. Howard;

“Dune” by Frank Herbert;

The “Eric John Stark” stories and novels by Leigh Brackett; and

“Dorsai” by Gordon R. Dickson.

Nonfiction:

“Foreign Devils on the Silk Road” by Hopkirk, Peter.


47 posted on 07/25/2008 4:30:32 PM PDT by dominic flandry
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To: Stephanie32

“Jesus of Nazareth” by Pope Benedict XVI. One of the best books of all time, and the best book on Jesus that I’ve ever read, and I’m not Catholic.


48 posted on 07/25/2008 4:31:21 PM PDT by Boagenes (I'm your huckleberry, that's just my game.)
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To: BurbankKarl

DuBrul is listed as co-author. I like his books, too.


49 posted on 07/25/2008 4:32:10 PM PDT by mathluv
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To: Stephanie32

Since you’re a woman, if you’re tired of the leftist indoctrination in most fiction today, you’ll enjoy some classics in women’s fiction by Mary Stewart, 1960’s, especially “Airs Above the Ground.” There’s also an Arthurian trilogy.

And there’s always “Rebecca” by Daphne DuMaurier. She was a great writer.

You’ve probably read “The Shell Seekers” by Rosamunde Pilcher. If not, DO.

I wish more women would respond to your question because I’m just about read out on the good books.


50 posted on 07/25/2008 4:38:18 PM PDT by kitkat (EX DEO LIBERTAS (From God, liberty))
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