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'Etruscan Treasures' On View At Dallas's Meadows Museum
Antiques and the Arts ^ | February 24th, 2009 | unattributed

Posted on 02/25/2009 6:17:39 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Dallas, Texas: The Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University [5900 Bishop Boulevard, 214-768-2516] presents "From the Temple and the Tomb: Etruscan Treasures from Tuscany," a comprehensive exhibition of Etruscan art, on view through May 17. More than 400 objects spanning the Ninth through Second Centuries BC are featured, drawn primarily from the renowned Florence Archaeological Museum, as well as from several smaller Italian museums and private collections. Many of the objects have never before traveled here. A complementary exhibition, "New Light on the Etruscans: Fifteen Years of Excavation at Poggio Colla," presents for the first time in North America the findings from an interdisciplinary archaeological research project, the SMU-led excavations at the Etruscan site of Poggio Colla, near Florence, Italy. Nearly 100 objects from the site are displayed, along with new scientific evidence relating to Etruscan daily life and religious rituals... The Florence Archaeological Museum holds one of the finest collections of Etruscan art in the world, and some of its choicest objects will be shown here, illustrating every aspect of Etruscan life and afterlife over almost 1,000 years. The quality of Etruscan craftsmanship and range of artistic techniques is represented with examples of stone carving, elaborate polychrome terracotta sarcophaguses and funerary urns, sophisticated bronzes, and delicate gold and silver jewelry.

(Excerpt) Read more at antiquesandthearts.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: dallas; etruscans; godsgravesglyphs; texas
Etruscan, Mater Matuta, third quarter of the Fifth Century BC.
Etruscan Treasures On View At Dallas Meadows Museum
Etruscan helmet dating to the middle of the Seventh Century BC.
Etruscan Treasures On View At Dallas Meadows Museum

1 posted on 02/25/2009 6:17:40 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; ...

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2 posted on 02/25/2009 6:18:13 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: SunkenCiv

Wasn’t like the last King of Rome an Estruscan?


3 posted on 02/25/2009 6:18:37 PM PST by exist
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To: SunkenCiv

Interesting helmet, never seen one shaped quite that way.


4 posted on 02/25/2009 6:19:40 PM PST by txnativegop (God Bless America! (NRA-Endowment))
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To: exist

Pretty much all the Kings of Rome were Etruscans.


5 posted on 02/25/2009 6:24:29 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: SunkenCiv

Wasn’t the Republic model that Rome adopted created to ensure that nothing like the Etruscan Kings could ever rise up among them again?

Well, at least until they got around to reinventing the king thing via emperors and such.


6 posted on 02/25/2009 6:29:15 PM PST by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: txnativegop

To adapt and misappropriate a line from the Doobie Bros, “they just kept on lookin’ to the east”. :’) In particular, look at the helmets from Corinth:

http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/war/Armor.htm

This one came up as an image search hit (which yielded a link to the above page), but doesn’t seem to be used in the ‘blog which hosts it:

http://bmonday.com/images/35/r_DSC00115.jpg


7 posted on 02/25/2009 6:33:04 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: Grimmy

The Republic was a fascist oligarchy in which a fairly small number of families owned all the land and held all the power. They went on increasing their holdings through suckering the citizens into fighting wars of conquest, then through usury, other financial bullying, and outright thuggery, confiscating lands from the commoner families while the dads and such were off fighting. By the time of the crisis which led to the creation of their version of a chief executive, much of the population was either enslaved (privately or “corporately” by the state) or indigent and landless — and most of the rest were in the armed forces.


8 posted on 02/25/2009 6:37:49 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: txnativegop; AdmSmith; Berosus; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Fred Nerks; ...

Holy kaka, this is GREAT (found it on the main page of that ‘blog):

http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2009-02-25/


9 posted on 02/25/2009 6:38:46 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: SunkenCiv

I like the King of Rome who invited their allies over for a party, and then stole all their women.


10 posted on 02/25/2009 6:40:02 PM PST by exist
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To: SunkenCiv

Ha! Wasn’t that great? I am thinking of sending it to Senator Dodd and Congressman Franks.


11 posted on 02/25/2009 6:42:48 PM PST by Miss Marple
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To: SunkenCiv

I didn’t say they did it well, but the basis behind the republic form in it’s origin was an attempt to ensure no more tyrant kings. At least, that’s what I recall from the long ago days when I read about such things.


12 posted on 02/25/2009 6:51:30 PM PST by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: SunkenCiv

This is hilarious! Also true about the Dems being hypocrites.


13 posted on 02/25/2009 6:53:16 PM PST by txnativegop (God Bless America! (NRA-Endowment))
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To: SunkenCiv
Ok, was it fascist? Or an Oligarchy?

I doubt it was both. Or at least not the Fascism of 20th century Europe. So what features of 1st Century Rome do you consider fascist?

14 posted on 02/25/2009 6:55:51 PM PST by slowhandluke (It's hard work to be cynical enough in this age)
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To: slowhandluke

It was both. I’m not getting into some dead-end semantic nitpicking with anyone, I’m going to bed.


15 posted on 02/25/2009 7:41:17 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: Grimmy

:’) Our Framers studied past attempts (all of which were unsuccessful) to establish a system of gov’t with things like checks and balances, limits to power, separation of powers, and subservience to the will of the people. The Roman Republic was a classical period city-state with various kinds of pre-existing affiliations such as tribes, clans, and families, along with the concept of citizenship. Politicians from the period following the overthrow of the last of the Kings, through the next phase of the republic — when the emperor became a permanent part of the political system — had to know about and deal with these older affiliations, as well as yet another permanent affiliation, that of the Roman armies.

The Romans didn’t come up with a regularized or stable system for succession, or even for selection, of its emperors, until (after a couple of centuries, which included a long period of regional “caesars”) Diocletian tried it. To test his system after setting it up, he retired (to a fortified, nearly self-sufficient manor in the now-former Yugoslavia — the building still stands) so his designated successor would take power, and compelled his eastern counterpart (Diocletian also divided the empire into e and w) to do the same. Splitting the empire may have been the one aspect that was pretty much stupid.

Eventually this broke down and Constantine conquered the whole works.


16 posted on 02/25/2009 7:52:57 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: SunkenCiv
The Republic was a fascist oligarchy in which a fairly small number of families owned all the land and held all the power. They went on increasing their holdings through suckering the citizens into fighting wars of conquest, then through usury, other financial bullying, and outright thuggery, confiscating lands from the commoner families while the dads and such were off fighting. By the time of the crisis which led to the creation of their version of a chief executive, much of the population was either enslaved (privately or “corporately” by the state) or indigent and landless — and most of the rest were in the armed forces.

Admit it, you are on 0bama's planning commission.
17 posted on 02/25/2009 7:53:12 PM PST by Islander7 (If you want to anger conservatives, lie to them. If you want to anger liberals, tell them the truth.)
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To: exist

Yeah, they were stealin’ boys not long after that. ;’)


18 posted on 02/25/2009 7:53:42 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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Check Out Dilbert Today !
Dilbert.com | Feb 25, 2009 | Scott Adams
Posted on 02/25/2009 5:14:21 AM PST by ml/nj
Edited on 02/25/2009 5:33:12 AM PST by Admin Moderator. [history]
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2193576/posts


19 posted on 02/25/2009 7:55:40 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: SunkenCiv
I wasn't trying to just nitpick. I was genuinely curious about how you might differentiate Roman fascism from the general thuggishness of all governments back then.

The enforced civil uniformity of German and Italian forms of fascism in the 20th century wasn't there in the 1st century that I'm aware of.

20 posted on 02/26/2009 6:36:39 AM PST by slowhandluke (It's hard work to be cynical enough in this age)
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To: SunkenCiv

In the photo of the helmet, what do you think the holes in the cut out for the face were for? A leather liner, perhaps?


21 posted on 02/26/2009 1:53:30 PM PST by Sawdring
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To: Sawdring

It seems like they’d almost have had to have a liner of some sort, good catch!


22 posted on 02/26/2009 7:57:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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