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Weekly Roundup - Living On Nothing Edition [Survival Today - an On going Thread #3]
Frugal Dad .com ^ | July 23, 2009 | Frugal Dad

Posted on 07/24/2009 3:37:21 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny

Weekly Roundup - Living On Nothing Edition Category: Roundups | Comments(15)

Did you hear about the guy that lives on nothing? No seriously, he lives on zero dollars a day. Meet Daniel Suelo, who lives in a cave outside Moab, Utah. Suelo has no mortgage, no car payment, no debt of any kind. He also has no home, no car, no television, and absolutely no “creature comforts.” But he does have a lot of creatures, as in the mice and bugs that scurry about the cave floor he’s called home for the last three years.

To us, Suelo probably sounds a little extreme. Actually, he probably sounds very extreme. After all, I suspect most of you reading this are doing so under the protection of some sort of man-made shelter, and with some amount of money on your person, and probably a few needs for money, too. And who doesn’t need money unless they have completely unplugged from the grid? Still, it’s an amusing story about a guy who rejects all forms of consumerism as we know it.

The Frugal Roundup

How to Brew Your Own Beer and Maybe Save Some Money. A fantastic introduction to home brewing, something I’ve never done myself, but always been interested in trying. (@Generation X Finance)

Contentment: A Great Financial Principle. If I had to name one required emotion for living a frugal lifestyle it would be contentment. Once you are content with your belongings and your lot in life you can ignore forces attempting to separate you from your money. (@Personal Finance by the Book)

Use Energy Star Appliances to Save On Utility Costs. I enjoyed this post because it included actual numbers, and actual total savings, from someone who upgraded to new, energy star appliances. (@The Digerati Life)

Over-Saving for Retirement? Is it possible to “over-save” for retirement? Yes, I think so. At some point I like the idea of putting some money aside in taxable investments outside of retirement funds, to be accessed prior to traditional retirement age. (@The Simple Dollar)

40 Things to Teach My Kids Before They Leave Home. A great list of both practical and philosophical lessons to teach your kids before they reach the age where they know everything. I think that now happens around 13 years-old. (@My Supercharged Life)

Index Fund Investing Overview. If you are looking for a place to invest with high diversification and relatively low fees (for broader index funds with low turnover), index funds are a great place to start. (@Money Smart Life)

5 Reasons To Line Dry Your Laundry. My wife and I may soon be installing a clothesline in our backyard. In many neighborhoods they are frowned upon - one of the reasons I don’t like living in a neighborhood. I digress. One of our neighbors recently put up a clothesline, and we might just follow his lead. (@Simple Mom)

A Few Others I Enjoyed

* 4 Quick Tips for Getting Out of a Rut * Young and Cash Rich * Embracing Simple Style * First Trading Experience With OptionsHouse * The Exponential Power of Delayed Consumption * How Much Emergency Fund is Enough? * 50 Questions that Will Free Your Mind * Save Money On Car Insurance


TOPICS: Food; Gardening; Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: emergencypreparation; food; frugal; frugality; garden; gf; gluten; glutenfree; granny; hunger; jm; nwarizonagranny; prep; preppers; preps; starvation; stinkbait; survival; survivalists; wcgnascarthread
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To: All

Sugar Free Frosting

Great for diabetics or other sugar busters. This keeps well in
the refrigerator for quite a while.

1 cup milk
8 ounce package of cream cheese, softened
1 small box instant sugar free pudding mix, any flavor

Beat all ingredients together until smooth. Store in the refrigerator.

Submitted by: Darlene


Perpetual Cinnamon

To make perpetual cinnamon, place three or four cinnamon sticks in a
glass bottle and cover it with vodka.

After four weeks, the cinnamon flavor will be extracted out of the
cinnamon. Use the cinnamon extract just like you would cinnamon powder.
Each time you use the extract, simply refill with vodka.

Perpetual cinnamon lasts for three or more years.

Submitted by: Darlene


Lemon Extract

Thinly peel one lemon with a vegetable peeler. Be sure you do not include any of
the white part. Dice the peel and combine with 1/4 cup water and 1/2 cup vodka.
Pour lemon extract into a clean glass jar and set aside to steep for at least 3
days.

Store it anywhere, and it will keep for up to one year.

Submitted by: Teri


Decadent Chocolate Chips / Bar

The chocolate you buy today usually is a combination of cocoa powder,
cocoa butter or coconut oil, vanilla extract and sugars. Homemade candy
bars or chocolate chips are made with chocolate concentrate (powder), a
fat, sugar and flavoring. Not so daunting is it? You can substitute
cocoa butter with coconut oil but the chocolate will not melt as
quickly. Carob powder also can be substituted for the powdered cocoa.

This recipe makes a very large chocolate bar that can be enjoyed or
broken up into homemade chunky chocolate chips to use in your favorite
cookie recipe.

1 cup rich unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup sugar or equivalent sugar substitute (add more or less to your
taste)
1 1/4 cups fine grade coconut oil
1 1/2 Tbsp vanilla extract

Cover a cookie sheet with wax paper and set aside.

Place all the ingredients into a double boiler and heat until melted,
stirring well. Pour and spread the melted chocolate onto the wax paper,
smoothing it to about 1/2” thick.

Put in the refrigerator and cool until hardened. Break into desired size
pieces and you have chunky chocolate chips.

Store in tightly covered container labeled with name and date. Keep in
refrigerator as the coconut oil easily softens.

Makes: 1 1/2 cups chocolate chunks / chips - or an 11 to 12 oz chocolate bar

Shelf Life: 1 month in the refrigerator.

Submitted by: Darlene

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Make%20Your%20Own/Baking%20supplies/


9,551 posted on 05/08/2011 10:54:57 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

Sweet and Hot Curried Zucchini Pickle

3 lb zucchini, ends trimmed, cut into very thin rounds about 1/8” thick
2 red onions, about the size of baseballs, peeled and cut into thin slices
3 to 4 colorful chiles of your choice, cut into thin rounds
1/4 cup pickling salt
1 cup seedless red and / or green grapes, halved (or substitute golden
raisins)
2 3/4 cups distilled white vinegar
3/4 cup sherry
1 1/2 cups orange juice
2 cups sugar
2 Tbsp prepared curry powder
1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp whole allspice berries
1 tsp whole cloves
3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
Piece of fresh ginger size of your thumb, peeled and cut into thin disks

In a large nonreactive bowl, combine zucchini, onions, chiles and salt;
let stand 1 hour. Drain and rinse twice to remove salt, then add grapes
and set aside.

In a medium nonreactive saucepan, bring all remaining ingredients except
ginger to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer 3
minutes, stirring once or twice to dissolve sugar. Pour hot liquid over
squash mixture; squash should be amply covered or slightly afloat. Place
ginger slices inside a fold of plastic wrap and crush with a mallet
or other blunt instrument. Add to squash mixture, allow to cool to room
temperature, then cover and refrigerate.

These pickles develop great flavor after a couple of hours of
refrigeration and will keep well, covered and refrigerated, 3 to 4 weeks.

Makes: 8 cups

Submitted by: Darlene


Sweet and Hot Curried Squash Pickles

3 lb, about 3 medium summer squash and/or zucchini, cut into very thin rounds
2 medium red onions, peeled and cut into thin rounds
3 small colorful chili peppers, seeds removed and cut into thin rounds
1/4 cup sea salt
2 3/4 cups distilled white vinegar
3/4 cup sherry cooking wine
1 1/2 cups orange juice
2 cups sugar
2 Tbsp prepared curry powder
1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp whole allspice berries
1 tsp whole cloves
4 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1 inch of ginger, peeled and sliced into thin rounds

In a large plastic or ceramic mixing bowl, combine the zucchini, onions,
chilies, and salt, and let stand for an hour. Stir the bowl’s contents once or
twice during the hour. Drain and rinse thoroughly to remove the salt and set
aside.

In a large nonreactive saucepan (generally any pan with a nonstick coating will
work; be sure to avoid aluminum pots), bring all the remaining ingredients
except the ginger to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat and simmer for 3
minutes, stirring once or twice to be sure the sugar is dissolved. Pour the hot
liquid over the squash mixture, amply covering all the vegetables. Add the
ginger to the bowl and stir.

Allow to cool to room temperature, then place in air tight containers or jars.
Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours before serving. Pickles will keep
covered in refrigerator for up to a month.

Makes 2 quarts

Submitted by: Darlene


Quick Pickled Daikon with Lemon

1 1/2 lb daikon peeled and very thinly sliced (use a mandolin if you
have one)
1/4 cup kosher salt
1 tsp sesame oil
1 Tbsp honey
1 Tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, minced
3 - 2” pieces of lemon zest

Instructions: Toss the daikon with the salt and pour into a colander. Let it
rest for 15 minutes over a bowl or in the sink.

Meanwhile, whisk together sesame oil, honey, rice vinegar, lemon juice and
garlic in a large bowl.

Rinse the daikon well under running water, and then spread it out to dry in a
clean dish towel, rolling it up gently so as to extract as much moisture as
possible from the radish. Add the daikon to the brine along with the zest and coat
well, letting it marinate for one hour. Eat immediately or refrigerate for up to 1
month.

Makes 2 cups

Submitted by: Darlene


Pickled Swiss Chard Stems

Stems from 2 bunches Swiss chard
2 cups vegetable stock or water
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 tsp sugar
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Cut stems in pieces 1/2” wide and 2” long. Place in saucepan with stock
and bay leaf, and simmer 10 minutes, until tender. Drain, and place in
shallow glass or ceramic dish with bay leaf.

Mix oil and vinegar together, and pour over chard stems. Season with
sugar, salt and pepper. Refrigerate, and allow to marinate overnight and
up to four days before serving.

Makes: 6 or more servings as a condiment or in salad

Submitted by: Darlene


Mexican Pickled Vegetables

These spicy pickled vegetables are like a Mexican version of Italian
giardiniera and are delicious with tacos and as a condiment for any
sandwich or burger. The recipe makes a large batch but it keeps well in
the refrigerator. Packed into glass jars, it makes a nice gift.

1 Tbsp black peppercorns
2 tsp allspice berries
2 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp whole cloves
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
10 cloves garlic, peeled
1 large head cauliflower, broken into small florets
1 lb pearl fresh onions, peeled or frozen, thawed (NOTE)
3 medium carrots cut into 1/4” rounds
1 large red, yellow or orange bell pepper, cut lengthwise into 1/4” slices
1 small habanero chile, or 2 small jalapeno peppers, stemmed and
thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups distilled white vinegar
6 bay leaves
2 Tbsp dried oregano
1 Tbsp salt
1 tsp cumin seeds

Place peppercorns, allspice berries, coriander seeds and cloves on an 8”
square double layer of cheesecloth. Bring up the sides, making a bundle
that encloses the spices, and tie at the top with kitchen string (or put
the spices in a stainless steel tea ball).

Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat Add sliced onion and garlic
cloves and cook, stirring, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add cauliflower,
pearl onions, carrots, bell pepper and habanero (or jalapenos). Cook,
stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender crisp, 7 to 9
minutes. Stir in vinegar, bay leaves, oregano, salt, cumin seeds and the
spice bundle and cook 2 minutes more.

Let cool for 15 minutes before transferring everything to a large
nonreactive bowl (see Tip). Refrigerate, stirring occasionally, until
cool, about 2 hours. Serve using a slotted spoon to leave behind excess oil.

Makes about 8 cups

Make Ahead Tip: Refrigerate for up to 1 month (leave the spice bundle in
for flavor). The oil will solidify so let it come to room temperature
before serving.

NOTE: If using fresh pearl onions, bring a large pot of water to a
boil. Add onions and cook 1 minute to loosen the skins. Drain. When cool
enough to handle, trim both ends, leaving enough of the root end to keep
the onions whole while cooking. Peel off the skins.
A nonreactive bowl or pan is necessary when cooking with acidic foods,
such as vinegar, to prevent the food from reacting with it.

Per 1/4 cup Serving (excluding unknown items): 77 Calories; 7g Fat
(75.7% calories
from fat); 1g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;
238mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat; 0
Other Carbohydrates.

Submitted by: Darlene


9,552 posted on 05/08/2011 3:58:02 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

Lebanese Torshi (Pickled Turnips)

These are great favorites. They have a very distinctive taste which is
enjoyed by most people even when first encountered. The turnips are
traditionally colored pink by adding sliced raw beetroot. The rich,
cherry colored juices penetrate the white turnips, coloring them bright
red to soft pink, according to how much is used, and giving them a
delicious taste. Huge jars of these torshi adorn the streets and decorate
the widows and counters of most cafes and restaurants.

2 lb small white turnips
a few celery leaves
2 to 4 cloves garlic
1 raw beetroot, peeled and sliced or cut into medium-sized pieces
4 to 5 level Tbsp salt
1 1/2 pints water
1/2 pint white wine vinegar

Choose small white turnips. Peel and wash them, and cut them in halves or
quarters, depending on their size. Pack the pieces in a clean glass jar with
celery leaves and garlic cloves if liked, placing pieces of raw beetroot
between the layers at regular intervals.

Dissolve salt in water and stir in vinegar. Cover the vegetables with this
solution and seal the jar tightly with a glass top if possible.

Store in a warm place. The turnips should mellow and be ready in about 10
days. Then transfer the jar to a cool spot.

This pickle should be eaten within a month to six weeks of making.

Submitted by: Darlene


Grits Rounds

NOT canned but cooked in jars for refrigerator.

I will, however, share an idea for a grits treat with
you....*grin*...and before i say it (and have the canning moms jumping
up and down on my head) ...THIS IS NOT A RECIPE FOR ‘CANNED GRITS’...it
has NO LONG-TERM SHELF LIFE! ...it’s just a COOKING method...so be sure
you have fridge space available when you do this...and don’t make so
many that you can’t eat them within a couple of weeks at most...plus,
the last time i shared this on a canning group...i had several
Southerners tell me that there was NO WAY that i was a Southerner,
too...not if i could do this to their beloved grits...*chuckles* ...but
i beg to differ...i just took my deep-South roots on the road...and
upgraded them a little with some wider experience...while remaining true
to the real essence of grits/my roots :)

enough provisos?...*chuckles*...okay...

when i have extra jar room leftover in a pressure canner load...one
that’s going to process for at least 75 minutes...i either make myself
pints jars of canned boiled peanuts (already shelled!...i talked about
them here on my blog: http://www.afoodjourneytogo.com/2010/08/29/canned-
boiled-peanuts/

....or i make myself a couple of what i call “grits-cicles”...

they’re really easy to make...i take a wide-mouthed pint jar... fill it
approx. 1/3rd of the way (to 1” headspace) with regular grits...not the
quick cooking kind (i haven’t tried them)....so that’s just over 1 cup
of grits in total....then i add in just shy of 1/2 teaspoon of salt (i
don’t measure it...i’ve made it/tweaked it enough that i just eyeball it
these days...a process you’ll probably go through yourself)...and then i
top it off with boiling water, filled to 1” headspace...

clean the lip, add a two-part canning lid...and process for at least 75
minutes...i’ve also done them for as long as 90 minutes (in a canner
with some quarts of meat)...and they were almost exactly the same...

once they cool....if you don’t eat them that first day...STORE THEM IN
THE FRIDGE!...

to eat...i open the jar...slide a butter knife around between the inside
of the jar/outside of the grits-cicle to loosen it up...then i hold my
jar over a cutting board and start the tube of grits sliding out...when
i get about 1/2” of the grits-cicle sticking out of the mouth of the
jar...i use the jar lip as a cutting guide...to slice off a beautiful
little grits ‘round’....

repeat until you’ve sliced as much as you need...and—bonus points—if
you don’t eat it all in one sitting...just put the lid back on and put
it back in the fridge :)

drop a few grits rounds into some hot melted butter in a frying pan (or
on a griddle)...and brown them nicely on both sides...needless to
say...they’re going to crisp up/brown best if you put them down and just
leave them alone as they cook...only turning them once...after you see
them nicely browned around the edges...

top your grits rounds with things that interest you....personally, i
like a little shredded cheese and some bacon bits...so—when i flip it
the first time—i just pile my cheese/bacon bits on and let them get all
hot/melty while the other side is browning...i’ve also been known to
throw a fried egg on top, too...you could basically use any sort of
breakfasty topping in it ...salsa, scrambled eggs, a sausage patty, get
creative! :)

or....of course...you could fry both sides...put your crispy browned
grits rounds on a plate...and then spoon your shrimp gravy on top.....mmmmm :)


like i said...to fill up those leftover spaces in pressure canner
loads...i also make pints of cooked barley and farro (which i use to
make a no-potato, whole-grain version of hash browns...just mix them
with some bacon bits and onions...and fry in a small amount of butter or
oil)...and mixed-grain porridges...some that contain dried fruit...just
basically whatever i’m in the mood for...they all work well using that
same *COOKING* method....just remember, they have to be refrigerated
when they come out of the canner... and eaten within 2 weeks or so...

Submitted by: Lane Knox


Garlic Pickled Mustard Greens

Add flavor to your greens with this easy recipe.

2 cups mustard greens, washed, deveined and shredded
2 to 4 cloves garlic, sliced
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 cup cold water

Tightly pack greens and garlic in a 16 ounce clean glass jar until about
3/4 full.

Combine vinegar, salt and mustard seeds in a saucepan. Bring to a simmer
and gently stir until salt dissolves. Remove from heat.

Add cold water to this mixture and let cool. Pour cooled liquid in jar
to cover greens and garlic. Add more cold water if necessary. Leave room
at the top. Refrigerate for about an hour until chilled.

Makes 1 cup

To serve, gently rinse pickled greens in a colander and then toss with
a little light olive or canola oil. Feel free to substitute other sturdy
greens, such as kale.

Submitted by: Jennifer


Don’t Pour Out the Pickle Jar: There Are Plenty of Uses for the Juices!

Just picked the last pickle out of the jar? Don’t toss it out, save the liquid!
The refrigerated juice from pickles, pickled peppers and sauerkraut has dozens
of uses in everything from marinades and sauces to dips, soups and even drinks.

“Recycling” the juice also makes good economic sense. A good value to start
with, pickled vegetables and their juices are an easy and relatively inexpensive
way to pack extra flavor into foods. And with these ideas, you’ll be eager to
use every drop:

* Pickle and pickled pepper liquids make excellent marinades. They offer
lots of gutsy flavor when simply combined with a little olive oil and chopped
fresh herbs, or added to bottled Italian salad dressing.

* Sauerkraut juice is the basis for this zesty marinade for grilled pork and
other meats. Combine 1 cup sauerkraut juice, 1/2 cup white grape juice, 1/4 cup
oil and 1 clove chopped garlic with 1 tablespoon each of Dijon mustard, minced
shallots, chopped fresh rosemary and chopped fresh thyme. Add black pepper to
taste. The acid in the sauerkraut juice acts as a tenderizer, resulting in
super-succulent meats.

* Most any barbecue sauce is better when doctored with a little pickle,
pickled pepper or sauerkraut juice. The new and improved version will have a
delightful tanginess not found in any bottled brand.

* Add cut-up raw carrots, celery sticks, broccoli and cauliflower florets,
and red and green pepper strips directly to the jar of any type of leftover
pickle juice. Make sure to keep these tangy tidbits refrigerated. The marinated
veggies are great for snacking on straight from the jar or become an innovative
addition to a crudité platter.

* Slip sliced onions into a jar of sweet-hot bread and butter pickle juice.
The “pickled” onions liven up turkey, chicken or ham sandwiches, as well as
hamburgers.

* Pickle liquid mixed in with the mayo can give a new twist to your
time-honored potato salad. Or, try this Dilled Potato Salad: combine cooked red
skinned potatoes, cooked-till-crisp-tender green beans, sliced black olives and
chopped dill pickle. Toss with a dressing of 1/3 cup oil, and 1 Tablespoon each
of pickle liquid, country-style Dijon mustard, lemon juice and chopped fresh
dill.
* For a version of macaroni and cheese that’s definitely not like Grandma’s,
blend 1/2 cup milk, 1/4 cup heated pickled pepper juice and 1 teaspoon Dijon
mustard; pour over 4 cups cooked elbow macaroni in casserole dish. Stir in 2
cups shredded cheese, top with bread crumbs and bake until bubbly. Add chopped
pickled peppers for a colorful variation.

* Gazpacho, a cold summer soup that makes the most of garden veggies, is a
refreshing start to any meal. In a blender or food processor, puree tomatoes,
onions, green pepper, and cucumbers or zucchini. Thin with a little tomato juice
and add hot pickled pepper juice to taste for a tangy zip.

* Want to give some gusto to a Bloody Mary . . . add pickle juice! The
piquant elixir is a delicious complement to the tomato juice. Don’t forget to
garnish with a pickle spear instead of the usual celery stick! For a fiery
brunch treat, try a Hot Blooded Mary. It features a splash of hot pickled pepper
juice and a pickled cherry pepper garnish.

* You’ve heard of squeezing a wedge of lime into your beer. Now, adding some
dill pickle juice to your brew could be the next craze. Stir 1/8 cup dill pickle
liquid into 12 ounces of your favorite beer and garnish with a pickle spear or
baby dill.

Of course, some folks even drink pickle and sauerkraut juice straight as a
tonic! We’ve even heard of athletes who drink pickle juice as a way to replenish
the salt after their workouts.

While those libations may not be your cup of tea, with so many great uses for
the juices, pickled vegetables are certainly good to the last drop.

Submitted by: Carol Mix


Oil Preserved Zucchini

These are delicious and versatile: You can throw them into a cold,
creamy soup, or blanket a piece of fish with chopped preserved zucchini
and broil, or even make quick, tasty bruschetta. They’re great in pasta
with shrimp, chopped and spread over mozzarella to make a pizza… But
choosing the zucchini is important. You want them fresh, firm, and
market size (about 8 inches long). Avoid those baseball bat-sized
zucchinis, which are seedy and get mushy when you broil them.

3 lbs market size zucchini (about 8 zucchini), cut into planks (not
rounds, which seem to cook up wetter), about 1/4 inch thick
3 Tbsp minced fresh flat leafed parsley (optional)
4 garlic cloves, minced (about 2 Tbsp)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Olive oil to cover

Place the oven rack about 2/3 the way up, about 6 inches from the
broiler. (If the zucchini is broiled too close to the flame it will
burn. As it is, it will blister!) Heat the broiler in your oven.

Lightly oil a cookie tray. Place the zucchini planks on the tray. Broil
for 5 to 7 minutes, until browned, then turn the zucchini over and broil
for 2 to 3 minutes more, until browned. (You can also grill the zucchini.)

Remove the zucchini as it is done and let it rest on paper towels while
you finish broiling. (Some pieces will take longer than others, due to
your stove, or the thickness of the planks.) The zucchini will release
some juice. This is good - you want them to dry out a little.

When all the zucchini is done, lay one layer down in a small square
Tupperware dish or glass pan. Sprinkle parsley, garlic, and salt and
black pepper to taste between the layers. Once all the zucchini is in,
cover with oil, put on the top or cover with plastic wrap, and
refrigerate. Avoid letting the zucchini sit at room temperature covered
in oil or the vegetable will absorb too much oil. The oil should harden
quickly in the fridge.

To use, just peel off the strips of zucchini from the cold oil, as you
need them and re-cover the remaining zucchini with oil. I chop the
zucchini with the cold oil clinging to it. For other recipes, remove the
amount of zucchini you need and allow it to come to room temperature,
and re-cover the remaining zucchini with oil. If you find the zucchini
is very oily, dab it with paper towels before using.

Makes 1 1/2 lbs

Submitted by: Darlene


Herb Sugars And Crystallized Herbs

Preserve the flavors of some of the sweeter herbs in sugar. The flavors blend
and make lovely, subtle combinations to use instead of regular sugar in any
cold food. Rose and lemon-scented geraniums, lemon verbena, or orange and lemon
zest are particularly good to use in herb sugars.

You can pack fresh herb leaves in granulated white sugar in airtight containers.
Stir every day to prevent clumping. After the sugar stays dry and loose, remove
the leaves before they become crumbly, and use the finished ‘herb sugar’ in iced
teas or desserts.

Note: The aromatic oils bake off, so they don’t work well in baked or cooked dishes.

To make herbs into syrups to add to iced tea or lemonade or bake into custards
or other desserts, put a handful of herb branches in a simmering sugar syrup;
remove them when the herbs lose their color and the syrup is fragrant. The
syrup is ready to use right away.

American colonists, who couldn’t run to the store to buy candy when they had a
sweet tooth, made their own sweet treats out of herbs. They candied young
angelica stems and ginger, preserving the herb and bringing out its flavor
with a crystal sugar shell. Although these may not replace modern candies,
they are wonderful to use as dessert garnishes or edible decorations on cakes
and pastries.

Submitted by: Darlene

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Other%20forms%20of%20Preservation/


9,553 posted on 05/08/2011 4:09:33 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Other%20forms%20of%20Preservation/

Stuffed Cherry Peppers

12 to 16 cherry peppers(hot or mild or anything in between)
2 cups white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
1 cup water
1 3/4 cups fresh breadcrumbs
1 - 2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 Tbsp minced garlic
1 1/2 Tbsp minced flat leafed parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 to 2 Tbsp olive oil per jar

Getting ready to core: Try to get peppers that are uniform in size. If
you are preparing hot cherry peppers (versus mild) you may want to use
rubber gloves. Cut around the stem of the cherry pepper and core (I use
a grapefruit spoon to scrape out the veins and seeds). Rinse.

In a medium sized pot bring the vinegar and water to a boil. Drop in the
peppers and boil gently for about 5 minutes. Don’t let the peppers get
too soft. They should be pliable but firm. See the tong test, below.

If you can squeeze the peppers gently with your tongs without any
cracking or squashing, they are perfect. Drain the peppers and reserve
the vinegar.

Combine the breadcrumbs, 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil (the
breadcrumbs need to be damp, not wet), the garlic, parsley, salt and
pepper to taste.

When the peppers are cool enough to handle, stuff with the breadcrumb
mixture. I use a teaspoon to fill the pepper, then with my thumb, pack
in the breadcrumbs. The more packed the breadcrumbs, the better. But be
careful not to tear the peppers.

Have ready 3 sterilized half-pint jars (to sterilize, boil the jars for
10 minutes at sea level, with an additional 1 minute for every 1000 feet
above sea level). If you are just making these peppers for yourself,
consider putting them up in a pint jar, as they will use less oil and
take less space in the fridge! Pack the peppers into the jars with the
breadcrumbs facing the glass.

This holds the breadcrumbs in place. I usually fit four peppers in the
bottom of a wide mouthed half pint jar, and sometimes one on top, and
ten or so in a pint, depending on the size of the peppers. If you decide
to do a pint jar, pack the peppers in layers, again, with the
breadcrumbs pressed against the sides of the jar.

Carefully pour vinegar into the jars about two-thirds the way up the jar
and top with olive oil. The peppers must be covered in oil. Age in the
refrigerator for about 2 weeks before eating.

Makes 3 half pints

NOTE: Some of the breadcrumbs may come loose and float in the vinegar
solution: it’s okay. Just pack your peppers tighter next year. The oil
will probably become thick and white at refrigerator temperatures, it’s
okay. To use the peppers, scoop them out of the oil. Don’t let the jar
of peppers come to room temperature or be exposed to air as new spoilers
could get introduced. Best to scoop out the peppers you need, place them
in a bowl for service, and promptly re-cover the remaining peppers with
oil and refrigerate. It is important that they stay under the oil: oil
functions as a prophylactic between your food and any spoilers that may
be floating around in your fridge. If, after you finish the peppers, you
have the pepper-flavored marinade liquid left over - don’t throw it
away! It is a fabulous instant marinade for a brisket or other meat and
even veggie.

Submitted by: Darlene


Smoky Pickled Corn Circles with Coriander Seeds

Cilantro berries can be found on cilantro plants that are going to seed.
They are small green berries with a taste that is quite different from
their dried counterpart, known as coriander seeds. If you don’t have any
mature cilantro plants around, cracked coriander seeds are a fine
substitute.

Set these rounds out as an appetizer with corn bread or as part of an
antipasto, or serve them next to grilled pork or as a garnish with
sandwiches. When all the cobs are gone, save the liquid to use in a
salad dressing, as a fish marinade or even as a poaching liquid for dark
fleshed fish.

2 teaspoons vegetable oil
8 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
1/2 pound red, orange and yellow bell peppers, cut into thin rings and seeded
2 large onions, peeled and cut into thin rings
6 tomatillos, papery skins removed, halved (or substitute small green tomatoes, quartered)
4 tsp prepared Dijon mustard mixed with 2 tsp water
4 cups white wine vinegar
1 cup pineapple juice
2 cups water
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 Tbsp pickling salt
2 to 3 Tbsp cilantro berries, crushed, or substitute coriander seeds
1 Tbsp whole cloves
4 to 6 dried chipotle peppers, or substitute 3 to 5 fresh chiles of your
choice
6 ears corn, husked, silked and cut into rounds about 1/2 to 3/4” thick

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until hot but not
smoking. Add garlic, bell peppers, onions and tomatillos; reduce heat,
and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables ``sweat’’ and are
slightly softened and peppers have brightened in color, about 5 minutes.
Be careful not to overcook or brown; they should be crisp tender. Remove
from heat and set aside.

In a nonreactive pot, combine all remaining ingredients except corn and
bring to a boil over high heat.

Add corn rounds; there should be just enough liquid to cover them. Bring
back to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer 5 minutes. Add reserved
vegetables and bring back to a simmer. Turn off heat and allow to cool
to room temperature, uncovered.

Cover and refrigerate. The pickled corn rounds start tasting good by the
time they’ve cooled and will last 2 weeks, covered and refrigerated.
These are best served chilled.

Makes about 4 quarts

Submitted by: Darlene


Refrigerator Pickled Jalapenos

1 lb fresh jalapeno peppers, washed (see Note)
2 1/2 cups water
2 1/2 cups vinegar
3 Tbsp sugar
3 Tbsp coarse salt, such as kosher
2 bay leaves
2 Tbsp whole coriander seeds
3 cloves garlic, peeled
2 Tbsp black peppercorns

Stab each pepper three times with a sharp paring knife and place them in a
large glass preserving jar.

In a non reactive saucepan, bring the other ingredients to a boil, then
reduce the heat and simmer for five minutes.

Remove from heat and let cool for five minutes, then pour the brine over
the peppers. Place the lid on the jar and let cool. Once cool, refrigerate
for at least a week before using, if possible. (You can use them sooner, but
they’re worth the wait.)

Serve whole, with Mexican dishes, or remove the seeds then chop and use to
season any recipe that is improved by a little bit of sweet heat.

Storage: You can keep pickles like this for up to six months, under
refrigeration, without any problems.

Note: You can use another chile pepper in place of the jalapeños.

Submitted by: Darlene


Zucchini and Carrot Pickles

3 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp tamari or low-sodium soy sauce
1 tsp mustard seeds
1 dried red chili pepper
1 1/4 inch thick slice ginger
1 clove garlic
2 or 3 small zucchini, julienned
2 or 3 medium carrots, julienned

Combine the vinegar, tamari, mustard seeds, chili pepper, ginger, and garlic in a
small bowl. Place the zucchini and carrots in a shallow dish or bowl and pour the
marinade over them. Cover and chill at least overnight, stirring occasionally.

Yield: 2 cups

Submitted by: Connie


Turkish Long Green Pepper Pickle

2 1/4 lb long green peppers
2 red serrano chili peppers
4 garlic cloves
1 Tbsp coriander seeds
1 quart water
1 3/4 cups white wine vinegar
2 oz sea salt
1 cup mint leaves, washed and dried

Wash the peppers and chiles, then prick them all over with a thin skewer
or toothpick and set aside in a large ceramic bowl or dish.

In a large, heavy based, nonreactive saucepan, combine the garlic,
coriander seeds, water, vinegar and salt. Bring to the boil and pour
over the peppers and chiles. Leave to macerate until cold.

Return everything to the saucepan and return to the boil. Divide the
mint between two sterilized 1 pint jars, then divide the pepper mixture
as well and pour in the liquid. Seal the jars and turn them upside down
a few times to distribute the ingredients evenly. Leave in a cool, dry
place for a week before using. The pickles will keep in the refrigerator
for up to a month after opening.

Makes 4 cups

NOTE: This pickle is made from long, mild green peppers - although it
works equally well with hot peppers. Pickled peppers and chiles are
often served at the start of a Turkish meal to stimulate the appetite.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 23 Calories; trace Fat (5.1%
calories from fat); 1g Protein; 6g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg
Cholesterol; 1338mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

Submitted by: Darlene


Tunisian Slice Turnip Pickles

2 lb turnips
4 cups white wine vinegar — to 5 cups
2 to 4 Tbsp sugar
2 small uncooked beets, washed well, dried and diced
2 fresh mild chili peppers
2 bay leaves
2 Tbsp coriander seeds

Wash, dry and peel the turnips. Slice them into 1/4” thick slices. In a
nonreactive saucepan, warm 2 cups vinegar with the sugar until the sugar
dissolves, using more or less sugar according to how acidic you like
your pickles. Pack the turnip slices into a 1 quart jar and a 3/4 quart
jar.

Divide the diced beets, chili peppers, bay leaves, coriander seeds, and
the warm vinegar / sugar mixture between the jars. Top with more vinegar
to cover the turnip slices if necessary. Cover and keep in a cool place.
Shake from time to time for the first 3 days. The pickles will be ready
to eat after 4 to 5 days.

Pickles will keep well for 3 months or more in a cool, dark place.

Makes 1 3/4 quarts (7 cups, 14 - 1/2 cup servings)

Note: Turnips are cooked with carrots, and in all kinds of North African
couscous dishes. In Tunisia, turnips are also served fresh, very thinly
sliced and marinated for a couple of hours in Seville orange juice (or a
combination of lemon and orange juice).

These simple turnip pickles from Tunisia are as lovely to look at as
they are delicious to eat. Beets are used here - as in many other
Mediterranean preserves - for color, to turn the white pulp slices pink.

Serve as would pickled cucumbers, as an accompaniment to cold and cheese
sandwiches.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 40 Calories; trace Fat (3.7%
calories from fat); 1g Protein; 11g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg
Cholesterol; 46mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

Submitted by: Darlene


Thai Refrigerator Mixed Pickles

2 field cucumbers
4 carrots, peeled

Cut cucumbers in half lengthwise and scoop out seeds; cut into 2 inch lengths,
then into 1/2 inch wide strips. Cut carrots and radish into same size pieces.
Seed, core and cut red pepper into same size strips. Slice onion. Cut hot
peppers (including seeds) into rings. Place in large heat proof bowl then add
lime juice and mix well. Top with garlic.

In saucepan, toast coriander seeds, peppercorns and cloves over medium heat,
shaking pan often, until fragrant, 3 minutes. Stir in sugar, vinegar, 3/4 cup
water, fish sauce, ginger and salt and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer
for 5 minutes.

Line sieve with cheesecloth and place over bowl of vegetables then pour vinegar
mixture through sieve. Tie cheesecloth around spices in sieve and bury bag among
vegetables. Let cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate for at least 24
hours before serving.

Make ahead: Refrigerate in airtight container for up to 1 week.

Submitted by: Darlene



9,554 posted on 05/08/2011 4:18:33 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All; betsyross60; DelaWhere; CottonBall; Velveeta; DAVEY CROCKETT; Rushmore Rocks; WestCoastGal

Happy Mother’s Day.

have posted a few interesting recipes,etc.

I still cannot type and breathe.

Love you all,
granny


9,555 posted on 05/08/2011 4:22:36 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Other%20forms%20of%20Preservation/

Nicaraguan Pickled Onions - Cebollita

1 large white onion (about 2 cups sliced)
1 fresh jalapeno chili pepper or to taste
1 cup distilled white vinegar
1/3 cup water
1/2 tsp salt or to taste
1/2 tsp sugar

Cut the onion top to bottom into 1/4 inch wedges. Slice the chili pepper
as thinly as possible.

Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and sugar in a large jar with a tight
fitting lid. Shake until the salt and sugar dissolve. Add the onion and
chili.

Let the onions pickle in this mixture at room temperature or in the
refrigerator for 2 to 3 days, stirring occasionally. Cebollita will keep
for several weeks in the refrigerator.

Makes 1 1/2 cups

Note: Cebollita, pickled onions, is one of the three table condiments
served with churrasco and other Nicaraguan beef dishes. You can make it
as spicy as you desire by increasing the amount of jalapeno chilies.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 15 Calories; trace Fat (2.0%
calories from fat); trace Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber;
0mg Cholesterol; 179mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates

Submitted by: Darlene


Mediterranean Herbs Preserved in Salt

3 oz fresh flat leaf parsley leaves, most stems cut off, washed and dried
3 oz celery leaves, most stems cut off, washed and dried
6 oz leeks, white part only, washed and dried, sliced
2 1/2 oz sea salt

Place the herbs and leeks in the bowl of a food processor and process,
starting and stopping the motor, to obtain a paste.

Empty the herb mixture into a nonreactive bowl, add the salt, and mix
very well. Pack in
a 1 pint glass jar.

Herbs will keep for up to 1 year in the refrigerator.

Makes: 2 cups

VARIATION: Substitute dill or fennel tops for the celery.

NOTE: Some years ago, a friend gave me a recipe for a mixture of chopped
herbs and salt that could be kept, almost indefinitely, in the
refrigerator. The original recipe called for 1/2 pound each of parsley,
celery, carrot and leek. I omitted the carrot, since it contributed
little in the way of flavor, and doubled the amount of leek. The
resulting paste, mixed with salt, lends flavor and aroma to sauces and
soups. As the mixture is very salty, it is unlikely that you will need
to add more salt to any dish in which you use it.

You will need kitchen scales to measure the ingredients for this recipe.
If not calculated exactly, the mixture will spoil.

Add about 1 Tbsp Herbs Preserved in Salt to every 4 cups soup (such as,
vegetable or legume), as well as to sauce you make with demi glace.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 3 Calories; trace Fat (8.8%
calories from fat); trace Protein; 1g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber;
0mg Cholesterol; 837mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Vegetable

Submitted by: Darlene


Salting Herbs

You can dry herbs in salt and use the flavored salt to season your foods. Salt
draws moisture from herbs and at the same time absorbs some of their essential
oils. It works best with thin-leaved herbs such as savory, rosemary, marjoram,
dill, tarragon, and thyme, but it can be satisfactory with most large leaved
herbs such as basil if you use fewer leaves and more salt. Here is how you dry
herbs in salt.

Harvest the herbs you want to use, either a single type or a blend of
complementary herbs. Wash them and dry them well with a thick towel. Then
remove any thick stems or inedible parts. Chop the herbs up finely if you
intend to use the salt and herb blend directly for seasoning. Now take a
container of non-iodized or kosher salt and an airtight container such as a
canning jar or freezer container. Put a 1/4-inch layer of salt in the bottom.
Then sprinkle on a thin layer of herbs. Cover the herbs with another layer of
salt, and continue in this manner until you have used up all your herbs or
reached the top of the container. Cover the top layer of herbs completely with
salt and seal the jar.

In about a week, the herbs will be dry. You can pull out individual sprigs and
crumble them into dishes as they are. Or you can brush off the extra salt
before you use them. If you want to use the herbed salt to sprinkle on a
variety of foods, blend the herbs together with the salt thoroughly. Then pour
into a smaller, airtight container that you can keep on your kitchen counter
or dining room table.

Submitted by: Darlene


Salted Herbs (Herbs Salees)

This recipe originated in Quebec. Store this in glass jars in the fridge
and they stay fresh for up to a year. Substitute for the salt called for
in your recipe.

1 cup chopped fresh chives
1 cup chopped fresh savory
1 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 cup chopped fresh chervil
1 cup grated carrots
1 cup chopped celery leaves
1 cup chopped green onions
1/4 to 1/2 cup coarse salt

In a large bowl, combine chives, savory, parsley, chervil, carrots,
celery leaves, and green onions.

Layer 1 inch of herb mixture in the bottom of a crock or glass bowl and
sprinkle with some of the salt. Repeat layers until all of the herb
mixture and salt is used. Cover and refrigerate for 2 weeks. Drain off
accumulated liquid and pack herb mixture into sterilized jars.

Refrigerate until ready to use.

Yield: 5 to 6 cups

Other Blends:

Caribbean : Mix of any – allspice, nutmeg, thyme, curry, mint, basil,
mace, annatto, lemon grass, cloves. Ground mustard, black/white pepper,
ginger, coconut, lime, hot pepper, garlic, oregano

Herbs de Provence: oregano leaves, thyme leaves, basil leaves, sage
leaf, savory, lavender flowers, rosemary

Fines Herbes: Tarragon, chervil, chives, parsley

Tuscan: Oregano, rosemary, marjoram, parsley, thyme, chives, garlic

Submitted by: Darlene


9,556 posted on 05/08/2011 4:31:33 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Other%20forms%20of%20Preservation/

Lemon Balm Syrup

Make a standard infusion (see below).

Strain and put into a pot on the stove. Reduce volume slowly by half. No
boiling or simmering here, just let it steam and evaporate. You’ll have between
1 1/2 and 2 cups of liquid left. Add between 3/4 and 1 cup of honey to hot
infusion. Stir well and put into a glass jar or bottle. Keep this in the fridge.

It’ll last about 3 months, if its not all used up first! This syrup is great to
take as is by the spoonful for stress or use in tea to sweeten(especially nice
in black tea or added to a glass of oat straw infusion) or to add to mineral or
seltzer water.

Making Herbal Infusions:

1 ounce of herb
1 quart Mason jar (or any heat proof container that will hold 1 quart)
metal lid for Mason jar (plastic lids made for Mason jars don’t work well in
this application)
something to boil 1 quart of water in
1 quart of water
chopstick or knife
scale to weigh herb
large mouth funnel (optional, but keeps the mess down)

1. Bring your water to a boil.

2. While the water is coming to a boil, weigh out 1 ounce of herb into the Mason jar. You may need to use the funnel here.

3. Pour boiling water over the herb until the water reaches about 1 inch from the top of the jar.

4. Stir with chopstick to release any trapped air.

5. Fill Mason jar the rest of the way.

6. Cap tightly with lid.

7. Let steep for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Straining the Infusion:

What you’ll need:

Jar of infusion
Large mouth funnel
Strainer or potato ricer
Tea towel, muslin, cheesecloth, etc.
Another container

1. Take lid of your finished infusion (you may need a bottle opener, since the lid will vacuum down).

2. Line your strainer or potato ricer.

3. Put wide mouth funnel into empty jar and put strainer on top of funnel.

4. Pour liquid into strainer to catch the hereby bits. You may need a spoon to get the herb out.

5. Press the remaining liquid out of the herb. If you’re using a regular strainer you can gather up the corners of the cloth and squeeze out the liquid or press with the back of a spoon.

6. Once you’ve all the liquid into the new jar, cap it & store it in the fridge. It’ll keep for about 36 - 48 hours. If it smells “sour”, its done. Don’t drink it, use it to water your plants or put it in the compost or dump it in the yard.

7. Compost the herb.

Submitted by: Darlene


Lebanese Pickled Mixed Vegetables

1 lb carrots, sliced
1 lb small zucchini
1 lb small green tomatoes
1 lb cauliflower, separated into florets
2 small green bell peppers
20 garlic cloves, peeled, and left whole
1/2 lb green beans, topped and tailed
2 hot chili peppers

Brine:

1 cup vinegar
5 cups water
2 Tbsp coarse rock salt

Place the ingredient in a large sterilized jar. Dissolve the salt in the water,
bring to the boil, cool and add the vinegar. Pour the brine over the mixed
vegetables in the jar, seal and store. To be eaten 20 days later.

Submitted by: Darlene


Green Tomato Refrigerator Pickles

6 cloves garlic
3 small hot peppers — seeded
3 small dill heads
3 tsp mixed pickling spices
3 onions
2 sweet red peppers
4 large carrots
5 green tomatoes
5 cups water
2 cups white vinegar

Peel and quarter the cloves of garlic, and divide them among sterilized
quart jars. Halve the hot peppers and put 1 pepper in each jar. Place
1 dill head and 1 teaspoon pickling spices in each jar. Cut the onions
into thin wedges. Then slice the sweet red peppers and carrots into
strips, and cut into 1 1/2 inch lengths. Core the tomatoes and cut each
tomato into 6 wedges. Distribute the vegetables in the jars.

Heat the water and vinegar to the boiling point. Put a spoon in each jar
to disperse the heat and prevent the jars from cracking, then pour the
hot water and vinegar mixture into the jars.

Cover the jars and refrigerate. Let sit for at least 2 weeks before eating.
The pickles keep for at least 1 month if refrigerated.

Makes: 3 quarts

Variation: Add 1 teaspoon hot pepper flakes to each jar.

Submitted by: Darlene


Cucumber Shiso Pickles (Kyuri Shiso Tsukemono)

Shiso adds a great kick of flavour to crunchy pickles. If you can’t find it,
the pickles are also fine without it.

2 lb small kirby cucumbers or pickling cucumbers, (3 1/2 inches long)
1 finger chili, thinly sliced
3 shiso leaves, thinly sliced (optional)
1 Tbsp sea salt
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 - 2” piece dried kombu, rinsed

With vegetable peeler, peel off strips of cucumber skin lengthwise to create
stripes. Cut into 1/4” thick rounds, discarding ends then place in bowl. Add
finger chili, shiso leaves (if using), salt and sugar.

With scissors, cut kombu into matchsticks. Add to bowl, mixing well.

Place plate onto mixture and weigh down with heavy can. Refrigerate until
crunchy and pickled, at least 5 hours or for up to 2 days. Drain.

Makes: 8 1/4 cups

Submitted by: Darlene


Chinese Mixed Pickles

Pickling Liquid:

3 cups sugar
3 cups white vinegar
1 1/2 cups water
1 1/2 tsp salt

Combine all ingredients in a 3 quart saucepan. Cook and stir over medium
heat
until liquid boils. Remove from heat and let cool.

Pickles:

3 large carrots
1 large Chinese white radish (about 1 lb. or 450 g)
1 large cucumber
4 stalks celery
8 green onions
4 oz fresh ginger root
1 large red pepper
1 large green pepper

Wash all vegetables. Pare carrots and radish. Cut cucumber lengthwise into
quarters and remove seeds. Cut carrots, radish, and cucumber into “match
stick” thin strips about 2” long. Cut celery into 1/2” diagonal slices. Cut
onions into 1/4” diagonal slices. Pare ginger root and cut into thin slices.
Remove seeds from peppers and cut peppers into 1/2” cubes

Fill a 5 quart pot with lid, half full of water. Cover and heat until water
boils. Uncover and add all vegetables. Remove from heat immediately. Let
vegetables stand uncovered for 2 minutes Drain vegetables in a large colander.
Spread vegetables out on a clean towel and allow to dry for 2 to 3 hours.

Pack vegetables firmly into clean jars with lids. Pour pickling liquid into
jars until vegetables are completely covered. Cover jars tightly. Store in
refrigerator for at least a week before using.

Makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts

Submitted by: Darlene


Aunt Fred’s Microwave Sweet Pickles

1/2 teasp salt
1/4 teasp turmeric
1/4 teasp celery seed
1/4 teasp mustard seed
1/2 Cup vinegar
1 Cup sugar
1-2 onions, sliced thin
Cucumbers sliced thin - unpeeled, about 2 cups

Mix salt, turmeric, celery seed, mustard seed, vinegar & sugar together.
Put cucumbers & onions in microwave safe bowl. Pour vinegar mixture
over cucumbers.

Microwave on HIGH 5 minutes, stir

Microwave 5 more minutes on HIGH.

Cool.

Will keep in refrigerator several weeks. Can be frozen.

Submitted by: Sharon


9,557 posted on 05/08/2011 4:38:36 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Welcome home, Granny. You’ve been missed.

Thanks for the recipes.

Continued prayers and God’s special blessings to you.


9,558 posted on 05/08/2011 4:52:59 PM PDT by Rushmore Rocks
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Thanks for the wonderful recipes. Happy Mother’s Day to you Granny. We are all still praying for you.

Hugs,

betsyross60


9,559 posted on 05/08/2011 5:41:37 PM PDT by betsyross60
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To: All

Gefulte Noodles
Posted by: “Virginia Butterfield”

another great Kitchen Project http://www.kitchenproject.com | Recipes
from a German Grandma |

Gefulte Noodles

This is a hearty cold-weather dish, consisting of large squares or
triangles of noodle dough, filled with a meat and parsley mixture,
folded over and sealed, then boiled in beef broth.

FILLING:
1 or 2 bunches fresh parsley, washed, drained, and heavy stems
removed. (Should have about 2 qts.)
1 large or 2 small onions
Chop parsley and onions (or put through a grinder or
food-processor.) Put into a large skillet with
2 Tbs. Oil
Simmer until heated through, stirring frequently. Remove into
a large bowl.
2 slices bread; put to soak in about ½ cup milk.
1 lb. lean ground beef ; Brown lightly in skillet.
Add to the green mixture in bowl; squeeze the milk out of the soaked
bread, crumble bread up and add to the mixture. (May add a little salt.)
1 egg Break into mixture and mix all together. If filling seems too
soft, add a few bread crumbs.

NOODLE DOUGH
5 eggs, plus ½ shell of water for each egg used.
Beat lightly with a fork.
1 tsp. Salt (Optional)
Flour Add, a little at a time, enough to make a moderately stiff dough.
Turn out onto well-floured board. Knead, working more flour into dough,
until it is smooth and elastic. (May use Kitchen-Aid mixer for this.)
Allow dough to “rest” for 10-15 minutes, while preparing broth.
Fill a large pot-—or two of them-—about 2/3 full of water; bring to a
boil. Add enough bouillon cubes or other beef base to make a good broth.
Keep simmering while getting noodles filled.

Keeping board well floured, cut off, with metal spatula, a piece about
the size of a large potato. Roll with floured rolling pin until about
1/8 in. thick. Cut into squares or rectangles about 3” or 4” on each
side. Put a spoonful (about 1 TB) of filling in center of each; fold
over and seal well. Drop a few at a time into boiling broth. Repeat
until dough is used up. If there is extra filling, put it into the
broth. Simmer at least an hour. (Two hours will be even better. If some
of the noodles break up and spill their filling into the broth, it’s
okay. These noodles are not things of beauty, but they are delicious!)
Grandma Block used to lift out a few nice filled noodles, dry them a
bit, and then keep them in the refrigerator to fry in butter for the
next day’s breakfast!

FOR SMALLER BATCH: Use 2 jumbo eggs + 2 half-shells of water. Add 1 ½ to
2 Cups flour; this will make about 12 noodles. Cut filling recipe and
broth about in half.

from
http://www.kitchenproject.com/german/recipes/GefulteNoodles/GefulteNoodlesPF.htm

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RecipesLostandFound/


9,560 posted on 05/09/2011 3:30:07 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

Hot and Sweet Pickles

1 gallon whole dill pickles
5 lb. granulated sugar (don’t know if your Whey Low would work here or not)
1 bottle Tabasco sauce (gear the size bottle to the level of heat you want —
I use the jumbo bottle but they’re really, really hot)

Drain the pickle juice (I save it for reuse) and cut pickles into spears or
chunks. Put them back into the empty gallon jar. Dump the sugar on top then
the Tabasco sauce. If you like, you can also put in the number of peeled
garlic cloves you want (I’ve done them with and without). Put the lid back on
the jar and close tightly. Place the jar on its side on the counter (I usually
put a folded towel under it) and turn several times a day. After about 4 days,
when the sugar is all dissolved and the Tabasco is well mixed in, they’re done.

I’ve done this recipe using the tiny dill gherkins but the results aren’t as
dependable. Some of the little ones seem to toughen up during the process.

Submitted by: Donna


Hot and Sweet Pickles

1 gallon whole dill pickles
5 lb. granulated sugar (don’t know if your Whey Low would work here or not)
1 bottle Tabasco sauce (gear the size bottle to the level of heat you want —
I use the jumbo bottle but they’re really, really hot)

Drain the pickle juice (I save it for reuse) and cut pickles into spears or
chunks. Put them back into the empty gallon jar. Dump the sugar on top then
the Tabasco sauce. If you like, you can also put in the number of peeled
garlic cloves you want (I’ve done them with and without). Put the lid back on
the jar and close tightly. Place the jar on its side on the counter (I usually
put a folded towel under it) and turn several times a day. After about 4 days,
when the sugar is all dissolved and the Tabasco is well mixed in, they’re done.

I’ve done this recipe using the tiny dill gherkins but the results aren’t as
dependable. Some of the little ones seem to toughen up during the process.

Submitted by: Donna


Persian Sugar Pickled Garlic

4 heads garlic
2 cup red wine vinegar
2 cup water
1 cup sugar
6 whole cloves
2 Tbsp black peppercorns

Separate garlic cloves, but do not peel. Place all ingredients in a
large heavy bottom saucepan. Bring to a boil; cook for 10 minutes,
stirring from time to time. Reduce heat to moderate and cook 5 minutes.
Cool to room temperature.

Transfer to a large glass or ceramic jar large enough to hold garlic and
the liquid. Tightly seal. Refrigerate at least 1 month before serving.
The garlic improves with age. Will last indefinitely.

Submitted by: Darlene


Pickled Japanese or Thai Eggplants

3 lb Japanese eggplants (small eggplants)
1 head of garlic clove (about 7 big cloves)
3 hot green peppers, or 1 red & 2 green
2 tsp salt
1/4 cup vinegar

1 tsp sugar
2 Tbsp oil
1 small beet root - cut in 4 slices.

Note *** Water.....+ 1 level tsp salt

Wash the eggplants and pull off its head. Fill In a big saucepan water,
bring to a boil. Add the eggplants and boil 1 to 2 minutes, or till the color
of eggplants turn brownish. Do not over cook, they should stay semi firm.
Let cool completely in a sieve.

Peel garlic, cut the pepper into thin circles and put it in the food processor.
Work the pulse till you get very very tiny pieces. Transfer to a small bowl
and add the salt. Mix well.

With a sharp knife cut to the length and make a pocket in each eggplant.
With a small teaspoon fill each eggplant with some of the mixer. Put in a
glass container and pile the eggplants on top of each other. On top of all
put the beet roots. (The beet roots give beautiful color to the eggplants).

If you have some left over mixture add it to the water. Mix the sugar &
salt with the vinegar add to the container with the eggplants.

Fill the container with water till it covers all the eggplants. Cover
air tight and put it out side in a warm place.

After one day taste it. Again... be careful with the salt before you
decide to add more salt. It will be ready in about 3 to 4 days.

After 2 days open the container to let the bubbles out and see if the water
are sour. Cover again with plastic wrap.

Keep airtight in the refrigerator when it is ready. This can keep in the
refrigerator for month.

Submitted by: Darlene


Pickled Ramps or Leeks

1 lb ramps, washed and outer layer peeled off, cut into 1 inch sections
1 cup white wine vinegar
1 cup water
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup salt
1 Tbsp peppercorn
2 bay leaves
1 tsp red chili flake
1 tsp whole coriander seed
1 tsp anise seed

Trim root end off of the raps and reserve in a large stainless steel or ceramic
bowl.

Combine all other ingredients in a non-reactive saucepan over medium high heat.
Once a boil is reached pour over ramps. Let stand a few minuets before cooling
over ice.

Store in an airtight container.

Submitted by: Darlene


Turkish Sweet Pickled Garlic

2 1/4 lb garlic
2 Tbsp coriander seeds
1 Tbsp white peppercorns
2 cups white wine vinegar or apple vinegar
1 quart water
2 Tbsp honey
2 Tbsp currants

Separate the garlic cloves and remove any excess papery skin.

Place in a large, non reactive saucepan with the remaining ingredients
except for the currants and bring to the boil. Lower the heat slightly
and simmer for 10 - 15 minutes, until the garlic is tender. Remove from
the heat and stir in the currants.

Divide the ingredients between two sterilized 1-pint jars, then seal and
turn them upside down a few times to distribute the ingredients evenly.
Leave in a cool, dry place for a month before using. The garlic will keep
in the refrigerator for up to a month after
opening.

Makes 4 cups (32 two-tablespoon servings).

This recipe was inspired by an eighteenth-century Ottoman recipe. The
strength of the garlic softens in the pickling liquor, and the cloves make
a wonderful accompaniment to cold cuts or salads.

Makes: 4 cups

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 52 Calories; trace Fat (2.5%
calories from fat); 2g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg
Cholesterol; 6mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 2 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Fat; 0 Other
Carbohydrates.

Submitted by: Darlene


Stuffed Cherry Peppers

12 to 16 cherry peppers(hot or mild or anything in between)
2 cups white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
1 cup water
1 3/4 cups fresh breadcrumbs
1 - 2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 Tbsp minced garlic
1 1/2 Tbsp minced flat leafed parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 to 2 Tbsp olive oil per jar

Getting ready to core: Try to get peppers that are uniform in size. If
you are preparing hot cherry peppers (versus mild) you may want to use
rubber gloves. Cut around the stem of the cherry pepper and core (I use
a grapefruit spoon to scrape out the veins and seeds). Rinse.

In a medium sized pot bring the vinegar and water to a boil. Drop in the
peppers and boil gently for about 5 minutes. Don’t let the peppers get
too soft. They should be pliable but firm. See the tong test, below.

If you can squeeze the peppers gently with your tongs without any
cracking or squashing, they are perfect. Drain the peppers and reserve
the vinegar.

Combine the breadcrumbs, 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil (the
breadcrumbs need to be damp, not wet), the garlic, parsley, salt and
pepper to taste.

When the peppers are cool enough to handle, stuff with the breadcrumb
mixture. I use a teaspoon to fill the pepper, then with my thumb, pack
in the breadcrumbs. The more packed the breadcrumbs, the better. But be
careful not to tear the peppers.

Have ready 3 sterilized half-pint jars (to sterilize, boil the jars for
10 minutes at sea level, with an additional 1 minute for every 1000 feet
above sea level). If you are just making these peppers for yourself,
consider putting them up in a pint jar, as they will use less oil and
take less space in the fridge! Pack the peppers into the jars with the
breadcrumbs facing the glass.

This holds the breadcrumbs in place. I usually fit four peppers in the
bottom of a wide mouthed half pint jar, and sometimes one on top, and
ten or so in a pint, depending on the size of the peppers. If you decide
to do a pint jar, pack the peppers in layers, again, with the
breadcrumbs pressed against the sides of the jar.

Carefully pour vinegar into the jars about two-thirds the way up the jar
and top with olive oil. The peppers must be covered in oil. Age in the
refrigerator for about 2 weeks before eating.

Makes 3 half pints

NOTE: Some of the breadcrumbs may come loose and float in the vinegar
solution: it’s okay. Just pack your peppers tighter next year. The oil
will probably become thick and white at refrigerator temperatures, it’s
okay. To use the peppers, scoop them out of the oil. Don’t let the jar
of peppers come to room temperature or be exposed to air as new spoilers
could get introduced. Best to scoop out the peppers you need, place them
in a bowl for service, and promptly re-cover the remaining peppers with
oil and refrigerate. It is important that they stay under the oil: oil
functions as a prophylactic between your food and any spoilers that may
be floating around in your fridge. If, after you finish the peppers, you
have the pepper-flavored marinade liquid left over - don’t throw it
away! It is a fabulous instant marinade for a brisket or other meat and
even veggie.

Submitted by: Darlene


Rosemary & Sage Quick Pickles

“These quick-pickled vegetables are great summer treats on leafy salads
or sandwiches.” The winning, flavorful combination of rosemary and sage
imbues a subtle taste to these unique pickles. Also works great with
green or yellow zucchini.

1 small red or white onion, thinly sliced OR 1 1/4 cup chives, chopped
2 cups cucumber, sliced
2 to 4 sprigs rosemary
4 to 8 sage leaves
1/3 cup cider vinegar
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 cup cold water

Slice cucumber into 1/4 inch rounds. Tightly pack sliced cucumber and herbs
in a 16 ounce clean glass jar until about 3/4 full.

Combine vinegar and salt in a saucepan. Bring to a simmer and gently stir
until salt dissolves. Remove from heat.

Add cold water to this mixture and let cool. Pour cooled liquid in jar to
cover cucumbers and herbs. Add more cold water if necessary. Leave room
at the top. Refrigerate for about an hour until chilled.

Makes 2 cups

Submitted by: Jennifer


Refrigerator Pickled Cherry Tomatoes

1 quart water
2 Tbsp coarse sea salt or kosher salt
1 lb FIRM (almost under ripe) cherry tomatoes (round and plum varieties of all
colors can be used)
2 cups cider vinegar
1/4 cup granulated sugar or more (to taste)
2 sprigs fresh summer savory or tarragon (or fresh herb of your choosing)
12 black peppercorns

In a large bowl, combine the water and salt, and stir to dissolve the salt.
Prick the bottom of each tomato once with a clean needle. Place the tomatoes in
the salt brine, cover and marinate for 24 hours at room temperature.

In a large saucepan, combine the vinegar and sugar. Stir to dissolve the sugar.
Bring just to a boil over high heat. Remove from the heat and cool thoroughly.

Remove the tomatoes from the salt brine and drain thoroughly. Discard the salt brine.

Carefully place the tomatoes in a 1 quart canning jar. Arrange the herbs and
peppercorns around the edges of the jar. Pour the vinegar sugar mixture over the
tomatoes. Secure the jar tightly. Let sit in the refrigerator for 3 weeks before
tasting.

Serve as a pickle, or as an appetizer, with toothpicks to spear.

Makes 1 quart

Submitted by: Darlene


9,561 posted on 05/09/2011 4:24:58 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

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Traditional Preserved Limes

These limes can be used as a condiment or as part of a relish tray,
salad or rice dish.

20 limes, divided
1/2 cup pickling salt, divided
4 jalapeno peppers, stemmed and sliced lengthwise into eighths (optional)
6 cloves garlic (optional)

Prepare jar, cap and band.

Wash 9 of the limes in warm water, scrubbing well to remove any dirt and
wax, and dry well. Cut a thin 1/8” slice off the stem end. From stem end
cut each lime into quarters, without cutting through the bottom end and
leaving it intact. Juice the remaining 11 limes to measure 1 1/2 cups juice.

Sprinkle 1 Tbsp pickling salt over the bottom of the quart jar. Working
over a bowl, pack 1 heaping tsp salt into each lime before placing in
the jar, stem end up. When 3 limes have been salted and packed, sprinkle
1 heaping Tbsp of salt over the top. Slip about 8 jalapeno slices, if
using, against sides of jar and add 2 cloves of garlic, if using. Repeat
twice with remaining limes, salt, jalapenos and garlic. Cover with
remaining salt.

Fill jars with lime juice to within 1/2” of tops. Check for air bubbles
and adjust headspace if needed. Place lid and band on to finger tip
tight. Place jar in a dark, cool cupboard for 2 weeks, shaking every day
to distribute salt. After 2 weeks, the limes are ready to use. Remove
pulp and membrane, using only the peel. Rinse under water to remove
excess salt and dry with paper towel. Store the preserved limes in the
refrigerator.

Variation: If you prefer, you can cut the limes into quarters. Combine
in a large bowl with the salt. Toss to mix. Half fill the jar, add
jalapeno slices and garlic, then continue until jar is filled, pushing
the limes well down to squeeze in as many as possible.

NOTE: Packed in an air tight container and stored in the refrigerator
for up to 6 months.

Submitted by: Darlene


Preserved Lemons

Paula Wolfert © 1973

Editor’s note: The recipe and introductory text below are excerpted from
Paula Wolfert’s book Couscous and Other Good Food From Morocco. Wolfert also
shared some helpful cooking tips exclusively with Epicurious, which we’ve
added at the bottom of the page.

Preserved lemons, sold loose in the soaks, are one of the indispensable
ingredients of Moroccan cooking, used in fragrant lamb and vegetable tagines,
recipes for chicken with lemons and olives, and salads. Their unique pickled
taste and special silken texture cannot be duplicated with fresh lemon or
lime juice, despite what some food writers have said. In Morocco they are
made with a mixture of fragrant-skinned doqq and tart boussera lemons, but I
have had excellent luck with American lemons from Florida and California.

Moroccan Jews have a slightly different procedure for pickling, which involves
the use of olive oil, but this recipe, which includes optional herbs (in the
manner of Safi), will produce a true Moroccan preserved-lemon taste.

The important thing in preserving lemons is to be certain they are completely
covered with salted lemon juice. With my recipe you can use the lemon juice
over and over again. (As a matter of fact, I keep a jar of used pickling juice
in the kitchen, and when I make Bloody Marys or salad dressings and have half
a lemon left over, I toss it into the jar and let it marinate with the rest.)
Use wooden utensils to remove the lemons as needed.

Sometimes you will see a sort of lacy, white substance clinging to preserved
lemons in their jar; it is perfectly harmless, but should be rinsed off for
aesthetic reasons just before the lemons are used. Preserved lemons are
rinsed, in any case, to rid them of their salty taste. Cook with both pulps
and rinds, if desired.

To make preserved lemons:

Serves 6; makes about 1 1/2 cups.

by Paula Wolfert

Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc.
ingredients
5 lemons
1/4 cup salt, more if desired

Optional Safi mixture:
1 cinnamon stick
3 cloves
5 to 6 coriander seeds
3 to 4 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
Freshly squeezed lemon juice, if necessary

EQUIPMENT
Shallow bowl
Sterile 1-pint mason jar
Sharp knife

1. If you wish to soften the peel, soak the lemons in lukewarm water for 3
days, changing the water daily.

2. Quarter the lemons from the top to within 1/2 inch of the bottom, sprinkle
salt on the exposed flesh, then reshape the fruit.

3. Place 1 tablespoon salt on the bottom of the mason jar. Pack in the lemons
and push them down, adding more salt, and the optional spices between layers.
Press the lemons down to release their juices and to make room for the
remaining lemons. (If the juice released from the squashed fruit does not
cover them, add freshly squeezed lemon juice — not chemically produced lemon
juice and not water.*) Leave some air space before sealing the jar.

4. Let the lemons ripen in a warm place, shaking the jar each day to
distribute the salt and juice. Let ripen for 30 days. To use, rinse the
lemons, as needed, under running water, removing and discarding the pulp, if
desired — and there is no need to refrigerate after opening. Preserved lemons
will keep up to a year, and the pickling juice can be used two or three times
over the course of a year.

* According to the late Michael Field, the best way to extract the maximum
amount of juice from a lemon is to boil it in water for 2 or 3 minutes and
allow it to cool before squeezing.

Paula Wolfert shares her tips with Epicurious:

• Located on Morocco’s Atlantic coast, south of Casablanca and north of
Essaouira, the city of Safi is known for its seafood specialties.

• To most closely approximate the flavor of Moroccan lemons, Wolfert
recommends Meyer lemons for this recipe. This lemon/mandarin orange hybrid,
in season in January and February, has yellow-orange flesh, a smooth rind,
and a sweeter flavor than other lemons.

• To sterilize a mason jar for the lemons, place it upside down in a steamer
and steam for 10 minutes. Using tongs (wrap the ends in rubber bands for a
better grip), remove the hot jar and dry it upside down on a paper towel-lined
baking sheet in a warm oven. To sterilize the jar’s top, boil it in water for
5 minutes, then remove with tongs. For more information on home canning, click
here.

• When you’re ready to use a lemon, remove it with clean utensils to avoid
contaminating the inside of the jar with bacteria. This way, the remaining
contents of the jar will not need to be refrigerated.

3 cloves
5 to 6 coriander seeds
3 to 4 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
Freshly squeezed lemon juice, if necessary

EQUIPMENT
Shallow bowl
Sterile 1-pint mason jar
Sharp knife

1. If you wish to soften the peel, soak the lemons in lukewarm water for 3
days, changing the water daily.

2. Quarter the lemons from the top to within 1/2 inch of the bottom, sprinkle
salt on the exposed flesh, then reshape the fruit.

3. Place 1 tablespoon salt on the bottom of the mason jar. Pack in the lemons
and push them down, adding more salt, and the optional spices between layers.
Press the lemons down to release their juices and to make room for the
remaining lemons. (If the juice released from the squashed fruit does not
cover them, add freshly squeezed lemon juice — not chemically produced lemon
juice and not water.*) Leave some air space before sealing the jar.

4. Let the lemons ripen in a warm place, shaking the jar each day to
distribute the salt and juice. Let ripen for 30 days. To use, rinse the lemons,
as needed, under running water, removing and discarding the pulp, if desired —
and there is no need to refrigerate after opening. Preserved lemons will keep
up to a year, and the pickling juice can be used two or three times over the
course of a year.

* According to the late Michael Field, the best way to extract the maximum
amount of juice from a lemon is to boil it in water for 2 or 3 minutes and
allow it to cool before squeezing.

Paula Wolfert shares her tips with Epicurious:

• Located on Morocco’s Atlantic coast, south of Casablanca and north of
Essaouira, the city of Safi is known for its seafood specialties.

• To most closely approximate the flavor of Moroccan lemons, Wolfert
recommends Meyer lemons for this recipe. This lemon/mandarin orange hybrid,
in season in January and February, has yellow-orange flesh, a smooth rind,
and a sweeter flavor than other lemons.

• To sterilize a mason jar for the lemons, place it upside down in a steamer
and steam for 10 minutes. Using tongs (wrap the ends in rubber bands for a
better grip), remove the hot jar and dry it upside down on a paper towel-lined
baking sheet in a warm oven. To sterilize the jar’s top, boil it in water for
5 minutes, then remove with tongs. For more information on home canning, click
here.

• When you’re ready to use a lemon, remove it with clean utensils to avoid
contaminating the inside of the jar with bacteria. This way, the remaining
contents of the jar will not need to be refrigerated.

Submitted by: JohnH


9,562 posted on 05/09/2011 4:30:12 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Fresh Figs in Honey Syrup

Although figs lose their vibrant color, turning greener if bottled,
being macerated in honey syrup with lemon zest e3nhances their flavor.
They are delicious served as a dessert with Greek yogurt or cream, but
also as a starter with cool, salty Feta cheese.

1 cup honey
2 thinly pared strips of washed lemon zest (about 1/2” wide)
juice of 1 lemon (2 Tbsp)
approximately 16 small figs (or 12 large ones)

Prepare jars, lids and bands.

Put the honey, 2 cups of cold water, lemon zest and juice in a saucepan.
Heat gently, stirring until the honey has dissolved. Bring to a boil and
boil for 3 minutes.

Meanwhile, wash and dry the figs. Add to the syrup and boil for 2
minutes. Using a slotted spoon, pack the figs tightly into the prepared
jars without squashing them too much. Lift the zest from the syrup and
discard.

Pour the hot syrup over the figs to cover them completely. Seal and
label with date and store
in refrigerator until used.

These will store in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.

Makes: 1 quart or 2 pints

Submitted by: Darlene


Dry Preserves Kiev Style

This is an old specialty of central Ukraine. It is a candied fruit used
as a confection.

Use firm, tart strawberries - try and have then all the same size, or as
close a possible. Wash and hull berries. Use a pound of sugar for each
pound of strawberries. Put the strawberries and sugar in alternate
layers into a kettle. Cover and let stand overnight.

In morning, heat the strawberries slowly, stirring as little as possible
until the sugar is dissolved. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes or until the
fruit is somewhat transparent. Stir carefully while boiling to avoid
crushing the fruit. Skim. Cover and let the fruit stand in kettle
overnight to absorb the syrup and become plump.

In the morning when the syrup is drained from the strawberries, add a
little more sugar to it, and bring to a boil. Cook the fruit in this
syrup for about 10 minutes. Cover and let stand overnight. Repeat this
procedure for concentrating the syrup with additional sugar and cooking
the fruit in it for a period of time of 5 to 6 days - or until the fruit
is so saturated with sugar that it cannot absorb any more.

When this stage is reached, spread the fruit on a clean wire screen to
drain. The fruit should retain its shape. Dip in confectioner’s sugar
and place on trays to dry. The fruit should be dry on the outside but
soft and moist inside. Press the fruit if no syrup comes out, it is
ready to be stored, dip in confectioners’ sugar again. Arrange in a
suitable container in layers with waxed
paper between them.

Submitted by: Darlene


Italian Preserved Fruits

2 cups water
2 cups sugar
1/4 cup whole yellow mustard seeds, finely ground
1/4 cup mustard powder
1 small apple, peeled, cored and cut into six pieces
1 small pear, peeled, cored and cut into quarters
2 round dried pineapple, cut into quarters
8 dried figs, stemmed and halved
2 firm apricots, pitted and quartered
1 tsp salt

Place water, sugar, mustard seeds and mustard powder in 10 quart
saucepan. Bring to boil over high heat, stirring frequently. Boil for 12
minutes or until liquid is thick and syrupy. Remove from heat.

Cook apple and pear in boiling water to cover for 4 minutes or until
tender. Drain well and add to syrup along with pineapple, figs, apricots
and salt. Mix well and cool to room temperature.

Transfer to container, cover and refrigerate for at least 2 weeks before
serving. Will keep for several months in the refrigerator.

Makes: 2 1/2 cups

Submitted by: Darlene


LEMON IN OIL

6 lemons, cleaned and either sliced or quartered
3 TBSP gray sea salt or mineralized sea salt (such as Redmond)
Olive Oil
1 bay leaf

Place the lemons in a bowl and sprinkle them with the sea salt. Toss and then
refrigerate fro 24 hours. Drain the juice from the lemons, then leave in a
colander for 2 hours, or press the lemon gently to remove as much juice as
possible. Wipe the salt off the lemons and place in a sealable pickling jar.
Cover the lemons with olive oil - press them dwon to make sure they are fully
covered - and add the bay leaf.

These lemons will keep for months as long as they remain covered in oil. Use them
in salads or with meat or fish dishes. The oil can be used in dressings and
marinades.

NOTE: I like to make this recipe using slices rather than quarters, then when I
steam broccoli or cauliflower, I put a layer of lemons on top of the veggies about
halfway through the steaming process. I only steam veggies until they are al
dente, then I turn off the heat and keep them covered and let the remaining steam
do it’s magic!

Submitted by: Deb


Algerian Lemon Slices in Olive Oil

3 to 4 lemons
4 to 6 Tbsp sea salt
1 cup virgin olive oil (approximately)

Wash and dry the lemons thoroughly. Cut them into 1/8” slices and layer
in a stainless steel colander. Sprinkle the lemon slices with plenty of
salt and repeat until you have used all the lemons and salt. Set aside
to drain for 24 hours.

Press the lemon slices carefully to extract most of the juice, then pack
the slices in a pint jar. Completely cover the lemons slices with olive oil.

The lemons slices will keep in the refrigerator for 3 to 6 months.

Makes: 2 cups (32 - 1 Tbsp servings)

Note: This is an Algerian variation of the preserved lemons found
through out North Africa. Use chopped skin and pith in salads and stews,
to season steamed potatoes, or other vegetables. The fragrant olive oil
from these preserve can be added in very small amounts to salad
dressings and marinades.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 61 Calories; 7g Fat (95.9%
calories from fat); trace Protein; 1g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber;
0mg Cholesterol; 705mg Sodium.

Exchanges: 0 Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

Submitted by: Darlene


9,563 posted on 05/09/2011 4:35:21 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All; upcountry miss

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FoodPreservationDryingCanningAndMore/files/Make%20Your%20Own/Baked%20Goods/

Corn Flakes

A large stainless steal, flat bottom frying pan

1 cup of finely ground or medium fine ground corn meal
1/4 cup of granulated sugar or powder sugar
2 fine small sifters (one for corn meal and one for sugar)
1 spray bottle for water

Place the frying pan in medium heat. Place some corn meal in the sifter
and powder the frying pan with corn meal, as thick or as thin as you
would like your corn flakes.

Next, fill out the spray bottle with water and spray the corn meal in
the pans until it is well moist, but not running.

Do not stir. You never touch it.

Let it cook slowly until the water is halfway evaporated, and
immediately sift sugar to taste on top. If you prefer, you can make it
plain. Let it cook until the water dries out and the flakes begin
releasing from the bottom of the pan. Don’t let it burn. If necessary,
scrape the flakes out with a metal spatula.

The flakes will be large. Store in air tight container.

Submitted by: Darlene


Coconut Granola Bars

These quick to fix bars are wholesome and delicious.

3/4 cup packed brown sugar
2/3 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup corn syrup
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups old fashioned oats
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup flaked coconut
1/2 cup sunflower kernels
1/3 cup wheat germ
2 tsp sesame seeds

In a large bowl, combine brown sugar, peanut butter, corn syrup,
butter and vanilla.

In another bowl combine remaining ingredients then add to the
peanut butter mixture and stir to coat.

Press into two greased 13 x 9 x 2 inch baking pans. Bake at 350
degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Cool on wire racks. Cut into bars.

Makes: 3 dozen

Submitted by: Darlene


Chickpea Crackers

Put away those soda crackers! The next time you want to serve crackers with your
soup, reach for these instead. Light and crisp, with a hint of sweetness. If
you’ve ever made pie crust, you won’t have any trouble with these; even if
you’re not a pastry expert (or even novice), just remember to use a light hand
and they’ll turn out fine. A complementary addition to bean soups especially,
because of the chickpea flour they contain, crackers like these are also a
perfect base for your homemade hummus.

1 1/2 cups Unbleached All Purpose Flour
1/2 cup chickpea flour
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1/2 tsp dried red pepper flakes
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
1 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/3 cup vegetable shortening
6 to 7 Tbsp water
1 tsp salt, for topping

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Combine the flours, sugar, spices and salt in
a food processor or medium mixing bowl. Cut in the shortening with a pastry
blender, two knives or the food processor until the mixture resembles coarse
crumbs.

Mix in the water gradually, until the dough holds together in a ball but isn’t
sticky. Divide the dough in half and roll each piece out separately on a lightly
floured surface to a 12 x 12 inch square, 1/8 inch thick. Yes, it is important
to roll the dough this thinly, so be gentle but firm when you do it. If the
dough seems unusually resistant, just cover it with a towel and give it a 15
minute rest; it should prove more placid once the gluten relaxes.

Use a sharp knife or a rolling pizza wheel to cut the dough into 1 1/2 inch
squares, and transfer as many as you can at a time (a giant spatula works well
here) to ungreased or parchment-lined baking sheets. Or, transfer each sheet of
dough directly to the baking sheet with your spatula, rolling pin or hands, and
then cut it into squares, separating the squares.

Bake for 10 minutes. Remove the baking sheets from the oven, spray the tops of
the crackers lightly with nonstick cooking spray and sprinkle with salt (or some
dried granulated garlic, which is also good). Return the crackers to the oven
and bake for 5 to 10 minutes more, until nicely golden brown. Transfer to a
cooling rack.

Yield: approximately 120 small crackers.

Nutrition information per serving (10 crackers, 30g): 111 cal, 6g fat, 2g
protein, 12g complex carbohydrates, 1g sugar, 1g dietary fiber, 223g sodium,
35mg potassium, 4RE vitamin A, 1mg iron, 29mg calcium, 22mg phosphorus.

Submitted by: Darlene


Cheddar Mustard Seed Crackers

All Seasons Bistro & Catering - Napa Valley, Ca

2 cups all purpose flour
4 Tbsp cornmeal
2 tsp salt
2 oz cold butter, cut into small pieces
1 cup good white cheddar, such as Vermont, grated
1 cup finely grated Parmesan
2 Tbsp whole mustard seeds
1/2 cup half and half
1/2 tsp. nutmeg, freshly grated if possible
Small dash of cayenne pepper, approximately 1/8 tsp or substitute a
few grinds of black pepper

Briefly blend flour, cornmeal, salt, nutmeg and cayenne together in
food processor, then sprinkle butter over the ingredients.

Blend briefly, then continue pulsing just until combined and mixture
has a sandy pebbly texture. Don’t over mix. Combine cheddar, parmesan,
half and half, nutmeg and mustard seed in bowl, then slowly add this
to the dough, just until nicely combined. Dough should be fairly firm
and easy to form into a ball. Divide the dough and shape into two
neat, even logs.

Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and chill in refrigerator at least three
hours. Turn oven to 350 degrees F. Slice logs into thin rounds and
place on parchment covered baking sheet. Bake for around 10 minutes,
check for even browning and rotate the pan if necessary. Bake for
approximately another 5 minutes.

Let cool completely on baking sheet, then place crackers in airtight
container. If not used within a few days, you may have to “refresh”
them in the oven at moderate temperature for 2 to 3 minutes to ensure
crispness.

Submitted by: Darlene


Buckwheat Pepper Crisps

3/4 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup buckwheat flour
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
1 large egg, at room temperature for 30 minutes
1 cup whole milk at room temperature
Vegetable oil cooking spray, (or use nonstick baking sheets)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Whisk together flours, sugar, baking powder, salt, and pepper in a bowl.

Blend butter, egg, and milk in a blender until combined. Add flour mixture and
blend just until smooth.

Drop level teaspoons of batter 4 inches apart (about 9 mounds) on a large baking
sheet sprayed lightly with cooking spray. Spread each mound into a 3 1/2 to
4 inch round with back of a spoon.

Bake first batch in middle of oven until golden in spots, 8 to 10 minutes.
Immediately transfer crisps with a thin metal spatula to a rack to cool. Form
more rounds on another sprayed baking sheet while first batch is baking, then
continue to make crisps, baking 1 sheet at a time. (Cool baking sheets between
batches.)

Makes about 5 dozen crackers

NOTE: Crisps keep, layered between sheets of wax paper, in an airtight container
at room temperature 2 weeks.

Submitted by: Darlene


Big River Apricot Granola

1/4 cup canola oil
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
1 Tbsp nutritional yeast
1 cup wheat germ
1/2 cups rolled oats
1 cup rolled rye
1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1 cup dried cranberries
1 cup chopped dried apricots
1/2 cup chopped dates
1/3 cup chopped almonds
1/2 cup unsalted sunflower seeds

Heat oil, honey and syrup until thin. Add vanilla, yeast, wheat germ,
oats, wheat and rye, stirring well after each addition. Spread on cookie
sheet and bake at 250 degrees F. for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Stir periodically.

Cool, then mix in fruits, nuts and seeds. Store in airtight containers
in a cool, dry place until used.

Submitted by: Darlene


Applesauce Granola

Group A

12 cups old fashion oats
1/2 cup sesame seeds
1 cup wheat germ
1 cup shredded coconut
1 cup sunflower seeds
2 Tbsp cinnamon

Group B

1 cup honey
2 cups applesauce
2 tsp vanilla
2 cups safflower oil

Combine the ingredients from Group A and mix well.

In a separate bowl, blend ingredients from Group B.

Mix wet and dry ingredients and stir thoroughly. Spread on cookie sheets and
bake in a preheated 200 degrees F. oven for two hours.

Makes about 3 lb

Submitted by: Darlene



9,564 posted on 05/09/2011 4:47:31 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

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Lemon Fire Crisps

I requested a batch of these made for our get together tonight. Tim made
them this morning while I was at work. Outstanding. I got this recipe from
pepperfool.com. The heat is great along with the nice lemon zing of the
cookie.

2 sticks butter or margarine, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons grated lemon peel
1 egg
2 1/4 cups flour
1 teaspoon cayenne powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cream the butter and sugar until light and
fluffy. Add the lemon juice, lemon peel, and egg and beat well. Sift the
dry ingredients together. Beat into the butter mixture. Place the mixture
into a cookie press, and force the dough onto an ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake for 8 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned.

Yield: 6 dozen

Submitted by: Sue


Homemade Old Fashioned Fig Newtons

Dough:

3 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 tsp baking powder
3/8 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp cinnamon
3/4 cup unsalted butter at room temperature, cut into pieces
4 eggs, divided (1 egg is for egg wash)

Filling:

2 cups figs, chopped (You can use dried See NOTE)
1 cup orange juice
1 cup apple juice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
4 Tbsp sugar
zest of 1 orange

DOUGH: Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Using a pastry blender,
cut in the butter pieces until the dough is sandy looking.

Whisk 3 eggs together and add them to the dough and mix to combine. Form the
dough into a ball, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 2 hours.

FILLING: (For dried figs read note first) Combine all the filling ingredients
in a saucepan and cook over medium heat until all the liquid is absorbed by
the figs and the mixture is thick. Stir during cooking.

Let the filling cool slightly, then puree in a food processor until smooth.
(You need 2 cups of filling). Keep refrigerated until ready to use.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. and make an egg wash with the remaining
egg and 2 tsp of water.

Divide the dough into 3 equal parts. On a lightly floured surface, roll out
each portion of dough into a rectangle, about 1/8 inch thick. Work with 1
portion of dough at a time. Cut the dough lengthwise into strips, about 3
inches wide. Paint the edge (down the length of each strip) with egg wash.
Spoon the fig filling down the center of the strip and then fold the dough
edges over to enclose the filling making a long tube.

Place the tubes, seam side down, on the greased or parchment paper lined
cookie sheet. Press down lightly to flatten. Repeat with remaining dough and
filling.

Brush the newtons with the egg wash and bake until light golden brown, about
15 minutes. Let cool, then cut with a sharp knife into pieces.

Makes about 30 depending on size you make

NOTE: If you used dried figs you will have to add a little more liquid and let
it sit for a bit to rehydrate a little then add the remaining ingredients and
proceed with recipe instructions.

You could also substitute the figs for 2 cups of fig preserves to make this
easier and faster to make.

Submitted by: Darlene


Hiking Crackers

1 1/2 cups oat flour (grind oats in blender)
1/4 cup ground almonds (or other nut)
1 cup buckwheat (grind in blender)
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 to 1 cup water, as needed
1/4 cup almond butter (or non hydrogenated margarine)

Combine water and almond butter well. Mix all ingredients thoroughly.

Roll out until very thin (1/16”) on a cookie sheet.

Cut into squares and bake at 375 degrees F. for 8 to 12 min or until
golden brown.

Submitted by: Darlene


Grape Nuts

3 cups graham flour
1/2 cup wheat germ
1 cup brown sugar
2 cups buttermilk
1 tsp baking soda
1 pinch salt

Combine all ingredients in large mixing bowl. Beat until smooth. Spread dough
onto 2 large greased baking sheets. Bake 30 minutes in a 250 degrees F oven.

When still warm, break into chunks and whirl briefly in blender, about 1 cup at
a time.

Return to the baking sheet and crisp in a 250 degrees F. oven for 20 minutes.
Store in airtight container.

Submitted by: Darlene


Granola Snack Crackers

2 cups rolled oats
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup slivered almonds
1/4 cup wheat germ
1/4 cup sesame seeds
1 Tbsp honey
1/2 tsp oregano
1 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp onion powder
3 eggs
3/4 cup oil

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl stir together oats, flour, almonds, wheat germ, sesame
seeds, honey, oregano, thyme and onion powder.

With a fork beat together eggs and oil and then stir into oat mixture.

Press dough evenly into a 10 x 15” jelly roll pan. Bake in the preheated
oven for approximately 20 minutes, until golden brown. Remove and cut
immediately. Let cool and then store in an airtight container.

Makes: 3 dozen crackers

Submitted by: Darlene


Glazed Raisinola

Granola at its best!

2 cups quick or old fashioned oats, uncooked
1 cup shredded coconut
1/2 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup sunflower kernels
1/4 cup slivered almonds
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/4 cup honey
1/2 tsp salt
2 cups California raisins

In a large bowl, combine oats, coconut, wheat germ, sunflower kernels
and slivered almonds. In a small saucepan, melt together butter, honey
and salt; pour over the dry ingredients, mixing well. Spread a greased
15 1/2 x 10 1/2 inch jelly roll pan. Bake at 300 degrees F. for 30
minutes or until golden brown, stirring several times. Remove from oven
and add raisins while still hot. Cool. Store in tightly covered
container in refrigerator.

Yields: 7 cups

Nutrition Facts (per serving): Calories 560 (43% from fat); Total Fat 28g (sat
13g, mono 7g, poly 5g); Cholesterol 35mg; Protein 9g; Carbohydrates 74g; Fiber
8g; Iron 4mg; Sodium 410mg; Calcium 59mg;

Submitted by: Darlene


Girl Guide Thin Mints

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and
softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and
add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour,
cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The
recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had
no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an
episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies
did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round
cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about
12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or
about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or
on the stove top. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on
wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

Makes about 4 dozen cookies

Submitted by: Darlene


Fruit Newton

3/4 cup dried figs, chopped
3/4 cup dried pears, chopped
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
5 tablespoons margarine, softened
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
3 egg whites
1 teaspoon vanilla
1-3/4 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons milk

Heat figs, pears, water, and brown sugar to boiling in small saucepan.
Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until fruit is softened and mixture
is thick, about 20 minutes. Process
mixture in food processor or blender until smooth.

Beat margarine and granulated sugar in medium bowl until fluffy; beat in
egg whites and vanilla. Mix in combined flour, baking soda, and salt.
Shape dough into 4 logs, each about 5x2x1/2 inches. Wrap each in plastic
wrap and refrigerate about 1 hour.

Roll 1 log on floured surface into 12 x 5 inch rectangle. Spread 1/4 of
the fruit mixture in a 1 inch strip down center of dough. Fold sides of
dough over the filling, pressing edges to seal. Cut log in half and
place, seam side down, on greased cookie sheet. Repeat with remaining
dough logs and filling. Brush top of logs with milk.

Bake at 400 degrees until lightly browned, about 12 minutes. Cool on
wire racks; cut into 1 1/2 inch bars.

Makes: 2 1/2 dozen bars

Submitted by: Darlene


Crispy Sweet Pecan Granola

Make and store the cereal in an air tight container.

3 cups old fashioned rolled oats
1 cup pecan halves, roughly chopped
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
2 Tbsp canola oil
1 Tbsp vanilla extract

Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and heat the
oven to 300 degrees F. Spray 2 rimmed baking sheets with cooking spray
(or lightly grease).

In a large bowl mix the oats, pecans, cinnamon and salt.

In a small saucepan, combine the brown sugar and 1/4 cup water. bring to
a simmer over medium heat, stirring until sugar is melted. Stir in oil
and vanilla.

Remove from heat and pour over the oat mixture. Stir with a spoon until
well mixed.

Divide between the 2 baking sheets and spread in an even layer. Bake for
15 minutes, stir the granola, and switch the positions of the baking sheets.

Bake until the oats are golden brown and the nuts look toasted, another
10 to 15 minutes. The oats may feel soft but they will crisp as they cool.

Makes: 4 to 5 cups

Submitted by: Darlene


Cream Crackers

These crackers are closely related to several kinds of venerable British
crackers of the type called “water biscuits” (even when they are made
with cream or milk, as here), these are considerably more flavorful than
most commercial versions. Sprinkle a dew grains of salt on top is
optional. The crackers maybe made thick or thin, as you prefer. The
yield will depend on that.

2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup clarified butter, chilled (unsalted butter that has not been clarified
may be substituted)
1/4 cup chilled heavy cream
2 to 4 Tbsp cold water, as needed

Topping (optional):

a little coarse salt

Sift or whisk together thoroughly the flour, baking powder and salt.
Work in the butter as if you were making a pie crust, using your
fingers, a pastry blender, 2 knives or a food processor. Don’t make the
mixture too fine, it should be mealy. Mix in the cream and 2 Tbsp of the
cold water, if necessary add enough more water to make a medium soft
dough (the amount of liquid will depend on the moisture content of the
flour). Mix the dough very thoroughly. If you use a processor, run the
motor until the dough forms a ball atop the blade, if you mix it by
hand, finish by kneading a few strokes in the bowl. Wrap the dough in
plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F., with rack in the center. Grease and
flour 2 or more cookie sheets, preferably using clarified butter as the fat.

Divide the dough into quarters or thirds and roll out one piece at a
time between 21 sheets of plastic wrap until it is 1/8” thick (for thin
crackers) 1/4” thick for puffier ones. As you roll, the plastic will
cling to the dough and both plastic and dough will wrinkle, as this
happens, lift the top sheet, smooth it, turn the whole business over,
and repeat the smoothing of the plastic, then continue rolling.

When rolling is complete, lift the top plastic and cut out rounds, using
a 2 1/2” or 3” biscuit cutter. Lift the rounds onto the prepared cookie
sheet, stretching them en route into ovals with the fingers. Place them
about 1/2” apart on the sheet. When the sheet is filled prick the
crackers closely all over with a fork. If you wish sprinkle a few grains
of coarse salt on them. (Do not over do the salt). Repeat the rolling
and shaping with remaining dough.

Bake one sheet of crackers at a time until they are firm and pale gold,
8 to 10 minutes for thin and 10 or more minutes for the thicker ones.
Remove crackers to a rack and cool completely. Store in an airtight
container at room temperature, or double bag them and freeze for longer
storage.

However they have been stored, the crackers benefit from a brief
freshening in a warm 250 degrees F. oven for 3 to 5 minutes then cooled
before serving.

Submitted by: Darlene


9,565 posted on 05/09/2011 4:59:00 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

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Soda Crackers

Crackers and milk. Crackers and soup. Cheese and crackers. Crackers and peanut
butter. We may not give much thought to these crisp, bite-sized bits of baked
dough we eat in so many different guises, but they truly are a staple of every
nibbler’s pantry.

While it’s easy enough to go to the store and buy crackers, it’s really quite
simple, and an interesting process, to make your own. The basic dough can be
augmented with herbs or spices, sprinkled with seeds, or brushed with butter as
you make your own customized crackers.

This recipe is based on one from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Bread.
The dough gains flavor by resting overnight, so it’s a long process, but not
really very involved. This recipe makes lots of crackers — enough to fill two
half-sheet (13 x 18-inch) pans.

1 1/2 cups Unbleached All Purpose Flour
1 tablespoon active dry yeast
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
2/3 cup hot water (120°F to 130°F)
1/2 teaspoon barley malt extract or 1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons vegetable shortening
2 tablespoons butter, melted

In a large mixing bowl, combine 1 cup flour, yeast, salt, baking soda and cream
of tartar. Stir in hot water, malt extract (or sugar) and shortening. Mix well
to combine.

Add remaining 1/2 cup flour to form a workable dough. Transfer dough to lightly
floured work surface and knead till soft and elastic — about 5 minutes by hand,
3 to 4 minutes in an electric mixer equipped with dough hook, or 30 seconds in a
food processor. Form dough into ball and place in a large, clean, well-greased
bowl, turning to coat all sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate
overnight or up to 18 hours (the longer the better).

Punch dough down and transfer to a lightly floured work surface. Using a rolling
pin, roll dough into a large rectangle about 1/16-inch thick. If dough seems too
elastic and fights being rolled thin, let it rest for 5 minutes, then start
again; it should be easier going after the gluten has relaxed.

Fold the dough in from the short ends to make three layers (like folding a
letter). Roll out again, no more than 1/16-inch thick. Make sure surface under
dough is well floured, as otherwise crackers will be hard to transfer to baking
sheet.

Prick the dough all over with a fork. Cut into squares, circles, or whatever
shape you’d like. A rolling pizza cutter and yardstick makes short work of this
part. Transfer the crackers to lightly greased or parchment -lined baking
sheets; don’t allow them to touch one another, but you don’t have to leave much
room between one cracker and the next, either. Sprinkle crackers lightly with
salt, and seeds (sesame, poppy, caraway...) if desired. Press salt/seeds lightly
into dough with your fingers.

Bake crackers in a preheated 425°F oven for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the
thickness of the crackers. Crackers will be lightly browned. Remove crackers
from oven and brush with melted butter. Remove from baking sheet and allow to
cool completely on a wire rack. Store in an airtight container.

Submitted by: Darlene


Rice Krispies

1 cup basmati rice
2 cups ginger ale

Place the rice in a saucepan. Add the gingerale, stir well and bring to
a boil. Cover and turn the heat to low. Cook for about 15 minutes or
until done.

Place the cooked rice on a baking sheet and spread to a thin layer on
the sheet.

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, or until crisp.

Submitted by: Darlene


Peppery Parmesan Cheese Crisps

8 oz Parmesan cheese, finely grated.
1/4 tsp coarsely ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Place oven rack in the middle of the oven.

Mix together the grated cheese and pepper. Line several cookie sheets
with either parchment paper or a nonstick silicone baking pad. Using a
tablespoon measurement, drop even mounds of Parmesan cheese on the
baking sheet. Use your fingers to pat the cheese into a thin circle
about 2 inches across in size. Make sure none of the circles are
touching. Approximately 12 per tray.

Bake approximately 4 to 5 minutes or until cheese is melted and any
bubbles that form turn into a crunchy light golden crust. Your wafers
should be golden in color.

Remove tray from oven and cool crisps completely on baking sheet. Remove
crisps carefully with thin metal spatula.

Store between layers of wax paper in an airtight container at room
temperature for up to one week.

Makes about 36

NOTE: If you make your crisps too thick they will be chewy rather than
crispy, and if you brown them too much they will
taste bitter.

Submitted by: Darlene


Onion Herb Crackers

These are different and delicious.

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup all purpose flour
6 Tbsp any mixed fresh herbs (thyme, parsley, basil, oregano), minced or
3 Tbsp dried
3 scallions, minced
2 Tbsp packed brown sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp slat
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup chilled butter
1/2 cup cold water
1 Tbsp celery, seeds

In a bowl, mix together flours, herbs, scallions, brown sugar, baking
powder, salt and pepper.

Cut in butter then stir in water. Knead briefly then turn the dough out
onto a floured board. Roll the dough as thin as possible.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Oil two large baking sheets.

Sprinkle celery seed over the dough then roll the seed into the dough.

Using a knife, slice the dough into 1 x 2 1/2” rectangles, they do not
need to be even. Prick them all over with a fork to prevent buckling.

Place crackers onto oiled baking sheets. Bake for 5 to 10 minutes, or
until lightly browned on the bottoms. Let cool completely on wire racks
before storing.

Makes 7 servings of 15 crackers

Submitted by: Darlene


Nutri Grain Bars

1 package yellow cake mix
3/4 cup butter. melted
2 1/2 cups quick oats
12 oz preserves or jam
1 Tbsp water

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Combine cake mix and oats in a large bowl then stir in the melted butter
until the mixture is crumbly.

Measure half of this mixture (about 3 cups) into a greased 13 x 9 x 2
inch pan. Press firmly into pan to cover the bottom.

Combine the preserves (or jam) with the water and spoon over crumb
mixture in the pan, and spread evenly.

Cover with the remaining crumb mixture. Pat firmly to make top even.

Bake at 375 for 20 minutes or until the top is a very light brown. Cool
completely before cutting into bars.

Submitted by: Darlene


9,566 posted on 05/09/2011 5:04:30 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Thank you sweet lady :)

Happy Mothers Day to you also.

Thanks for all your recipes, thoughts and survival ideas.

I imagine it was a great day to see BL finally captured. I do wonder where his side-kick is though. there were rumors that they had a falling out and AZ wanted to take over AQ.

I hope you have some help and are as comfortable as possible.

Many prayers have and are being sent your way.

Love you Ruth...


9,567 posted on 05/09/2011 5:13:30 AM PDT by WestCoastGal (SL I believe hes a remarkable race-car driver, I think some people in the world have forgotten that)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Love you, Granny.


9,568 posted on 05/09/2011 6:01:24 AM PDT by Velveeta
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To: nw_arizona_granny

This recipe for Gefulte Noodles sounds awesome!

Thanks for the recipes, granny.

I hope you are able to breathe easier today.

Hugs and Prayers.


9,569 posted on 05/09/2011 2:44:31 PM PDT by CottonBall
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To: nw_arizona_granny
Thanks for the ping, granny. Been offline for a couple days, so a belated Happy Mothers Day to you. Made corn bread tonight to go with my fish chowder (not a favorite of yours, I'm sure.) Ran out of corn meal. Was certain I had loads in my pantry, but none to be found. I will have to restock before I can try the cornflake recipe.Sounds interesting.

Take care granny. Don't try to type when out of breath.

9,570 posted on 05/09/2011 4:31:22 PM PDT by upcountry miss
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To: All

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 10, 2011
Release #11-219

Firm’s Recall Hotline: (888) 828-1680
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

Telstar Recalls Energy-Saving Light Bulbs Due to Fire Hazard

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Light Bulbs

Units: About 317,000

Manufacturer: Telstar Products d/b/a Sprint International Inc., of Brooklyn, N.Y.

Hazard: The light bulbs can overheat, posing a fire hazard to consumers.

Incidents/Injuries: Telstar Products has received two reports of fires. In one incident, the fire was contained to the light fixture. The other reported incident resulted in a residential fire.

Description: This recall involves energy-saving light bulbs sold under the Telstar and Electra brand names. The bulbs were sold in two styles: spiral and the “3-Us” shape. The Telstar bulbs were sold in 20 and 23 watts with model number LB-1020 and LB-1023 printed on the packaging. The Electra bulbs were sold in 18, 20, 23, 26, 28, 30, 34, 36, 38 and 40 watts with model numbers LB-18, LB-20, LB-23, LB-26, LB-28, LB-30, LB-1018, LB-1020, LB-1023, LB-1026, LB-1134, LB-1136, LB-1138 and LB-1140 printed on the packaging. “CE 110V,” “China” and the wattage number are printed on the bulb.

Sold at: Discount stores throughout New York and New Jersey from August 2010 through March 2011 for between $1 and $1.50

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the light bulbs and return it to the store where purchased for a full refund.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Telstar Products toll-free at (888) 828-1680 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s website at www.telstarpro.com


9,571 posted on 05/11/2011 11:37:30 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Congressional Briefing Held in Washington - “Bringing Urban Agriculture to Life”

The American Society for Nutrition (ASN), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA),
and the Council on Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics (C-FARE) sponsored Bringing
Urban Agriculture to Life, on Monday, May 9.

The briefing highlighted the role of urban agriculture and community gardening in
addressing urban food security and human health issues. The panel of experts included:

Urban Farming In Shanghai
Scares about food safety and the high cost of organics in Shanghai are prompting
some city residents to grow their own veggies that are clean, safe, cheap and fresh.

Yao Minji visits balcony farmers.

Kevin Liu will have stir-fried green onions with scrambled eggs for dinner tonight,
since the leeks he planted last spring on his windowsill are ready to be harvested.
“Using Polydome, even New York City could provide the majority of its own food supply
using available roof space.”

“Polydome is a revolutionary approach to commercial agriculture that offers the
possibility of net-zero-impact greenhouse food production. It produces high yields
of over 50 different crops, while also sustainably incorporating chicken, bees,
and fish. The increased variety and productivity of the system means that even a
small Polydome greenhouse can provide a diverse food supply for a large population.

Using Polydome, even New York City could provide the majority of its own food supply
using available roof space.

Chicago’s urban agriculture as seen by Michael Ableman

In the shadow of Cabrini-Green, two 1-acre plots of land are protected with 10-foot-high
chain-link-and-concertina fences. A closer look reveals that one of the plots boasts
forty varieties of heirloom tomatoes. Striped German, Green Zebra, Black Russian,
and the rest of Ken Dunn’s tomato plants grow in the composted remains of apple-
and cherry-pie filling, and the uneaten arugula salads and filet mignon from local
high-end restaurants.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read Stories here:
City Farmer News [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=fclqmpbab&et=1105490155974&s=1304&e=001p4Amtux7PAerVn4lm-zzTEWc1EvfsVZc3be79pULLXTS0nAZ8yyCo8rzz53waGLWCoK1BKU7ZcUS2xGyWvPK2YQr-RD5zpKkaGD93FD3lBCZgtG4eLUjLw==]
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michael Levenston
City Farmer - Canada’s Office of Urban Agriculture


9,572 posted on 05/11/2011 11:42:30 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Sustainable Agriculture News Briefs - May 11, 2011

Weekly sustainable agriculture news and resources gleaned from the Internet by NCAT staff for the ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service website. The Weekly Harvest Newsletter is also available online.
http://attra.ncat.org/newsletter/archives.html#wh

Our sustainable agriculture information service, ATTRA, was cut from the federal budget as part of deficit reduction efforts. We cannot maintain this project unless we can find a way to raise operating funds. You can help as we explore our options. First, make your tax-deductible donation today. You can access our online donation form at https://attra.ncat.org/donate.html. For more information, visit NCAT’s website to read the most current postings about our efforts to keep this service open.
http://www.ncat.org/news/#tenacity

News & Resources
* Expert Panel Calls for “Transforming U.S. Agriculture”
* Food and Agriculture Policy Initiative Launched
* NOP Invites Comments on Proposed Amendments to National List
* USDA Project Designates Areas in Missouri and Kansas for Bioenergy Feedstock Production
* Georgia Codifies Sustainable Agriculture
* New Farmstay Manual Online

Funding Opportunities
* North Central Region SARE Research and Education Grant Program
* Massachusetts Agricultural Energy Grant Program
* Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program

Coming Events
* OEFFA Farm Tours
* Heartland Festival: A Celebration of Food, Farming, & Healthy Living in
the Central Valley
* Strolling of the Heifers Weekend

__________________________________________________

News & Resources

Expert Panel Calls for “Transforming U.S. Agriculture”
Authors of the National Research Council’s 2010 report, Toward Sustainable Agricultural Systems in the 21st Century, are calling for a broad shift in federal policies to speed the development of farm practices that are more economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable.
http://wsunews.wsu.edu/pages/publications.asp?Action=Detail&PublicationID=26019&TypeID=25

Food and Agriculture Policy Initiative Launched
Ford Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation and The Walton Family Foundation have launched AGree, a new initiative that will tackle long-term food and agriculture policy issues confronting the nation and the world as the population continues to grow and resources become ever-more constrained.
http://www.foodandagpolicy.org/news/story/pr/new-initiative-provide-path-forward-transforming-food-and-ag-policy

NOP Invites Comments on Proposed Amendments to National List
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has published a proposed rule that would establish exemptions for use of two synthetic substances in organic livestock production: fenbendazole and moxidectin as parasiticides.
http://1.usa.gov/kOmzOy

USDA Project Designates Areas in Missouri and Kansas for Bioenergy Feedstock Production
The first Biomass Crop Assistance Program Project Area proposes the enrollment of up to 50,000 acres in Missouri and Kansas for establishing a dedicated energy crop of native grasses and herbaceous plants for energy purposes. If selected, crop producers will be eligible for reimbursements of up to 75 percent of the cost of establishing a bioenergy perennial crop, and can receive up to five years of annual payments for grassy crops.
http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentid=2011/05/0201.xml&contentidonly=true

Georgia Codifies Sustainable Agriculture
Georgia Governor Nathan Deal has signed legislation that creates a strong working definition for “sustainable agriculture”, and that provides that it is the policy of the state to promote sustainable agriculture.
http://gov.georgia.gov/00/press/detail/0,2668,165937316_165937374_171141228,00.html

New Farmstay Manual Online
The Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture has released Farmstay, a how-to manual available for download as a series of PDF files. The manual contains information about what a farmstay is, developing a marketing strategy, applicable regulations, and creating a business plan.
http://www.misa.umn.edu/Publications/FarmstayManual/index.htm

>> More Breaking News (http://attra.ncat.org/news/)

__________________________________________________

Funding Opportunities

North Central Region SARE Research and Education Grant Program
The North Central Region SARE Research and Education Grant Program provides funds of up to $200,000 to collaborative teams of scientists, farmers, institutions, organizations, and educators who are exploring sustainable agriculture through research projects or education/demonstration projects.
Pre-proposals are due June 9, 2011.
http://www.northcentralsare.org/Grants/Types-of-Grants/Research-and-Education

Massachusetts Agricultural Energy Grant Program
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources Agricultural Energy Grant Program is a competitive program that funds up to $30,000 of agricultural energy projects in an effort to improve energy efficiency and to facilitate adoption of alternative clean energy technologies by Massachusetts farms.
Applications are due June 30, 2011.
http://www.mass.gov/agr/programs/aegp/index.htm

Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program
Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program provides cost share funds for long term investments in livestock and farming operations. Program opportunities include cattle genetics, livestock equipment, hay storage, livestock feed storage, grain storage, and producer diversification.
The application period is June 1-7, 2011.
http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/enhancement/

>> More Funding Opportunities (http://attra.ncat.org/funding/)

__________________________________________________

Coming Events

OEFFA Farm Tours
June 4 - November 8, 2011
Ohio
The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) has announced its 2011 series of free public tours of some of Ohio’s finest sustainable and organic farms. Twenty tours and two workshops between June and November feature: organic dairy farms and artisan cheese production; a canning facility, grain production; a poultry hatchery; farms using season extension; heirloom vegetable and flower production; diversified livestock farmers; farm markets and retail locations; fiber and fabric production; and farmers using a wide range of direct-to-consumer marketing strategies.
http://www.oeffa.org/

Heartland Festival: A Celebration of Food, Farming, & Healthy Living in the Central Valley
May 28-29, 2011
Stevinson, California
This fun-filled weekend with entertainment, food, and farm tours features a series of workshops focused on water resources management on farm, and agritourism information.
http://www.eco-farm.org/

Strolling of the Heifers Weekend
June 3-5, 2011
Brattleboro, Vermont
Strolling of the Heifers shows support and appreciation for family farmers, and features regional food producers, as well as vendors and exhibitors of sustainable goods and services. The event includes a parade, expo, bicycle tours, and Slow Living Summit.
http://www.strollingoftheheifers.com/

>> More Events (http://attra.ncat.org/calendar/)

__________________________________________________

New & Updated Publications

Agroforestry: An Overview
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=62

Organic and Grass-finished Beef Cattle Production
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=193

Farmer Profiles: Two Organic Grain Farm Case Studies
http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=355

Question of the Week
What information can you give me on developing chicken breeding stock?
http://bit.ly/mgVtSo

ATTRA Webinars
The latest webinars are available for viewing in ATTRA’s Sustainable Agriculture Video Archive
http://attra.ncat.org/video/index.php

ATTRA Spanish Newsletter
Subscribe to Cosecha Mensual (Monthly Harvest), ATTRA’s Spanish-language e-newsletter
http://attra.ncat.org/espanol/boletin.php

ATTRA is on Facebook!
We feature breaking news on sustainable agriculture topics several times a week. Add us to your FaceBook friends list today!
http://attra.ncat.org/facebook/

Follow us on Twitter
http://twitter.com/#!/attrasustainag

Make a tax-deductible donation
https://www.thedatabank.com/dpg/427/donate.asp?formid=support

Subscribe to the Weekly Harvest
https://www.thedatabank.com/dpg/427/personal2.asp?formid=signup

Comments? Questions? Contact us
http://attra.ncat.org/management/contact.html

Weekly Harvest and ATTRAnews Archives
Digital versions of recent and archived Weekly Harvest and ATTRAnews newsletters are available online. ATTRAnews is the newsletter of ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service.
http://attra.ncat.org/management/contact.html

The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service - ATTRA - was developed and is managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT). The project is funded through a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Business-Cooperative Service (http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/index.html).

Visit the NCAT website for more information on our other sustainable agriculture and energy projects.
http://www.ncat.org/sarc_current.php

copyright 2011 NCAT


9,573 posted on 05/12/2011 1:34:23 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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This message contains the following:

1. Meijer Recalls Infant Slipper Socks Due to Choking Hazard

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11220.html

2. UJ Trading Recalls Knight Hawk Toy Helicopters Due to Fire Hazard

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11221.html


9,574 posted on 05/12/2011 1:37:48 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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NEWS from CPSC

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
Office of Information and Public Affairs
Washington, DC 20207

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 12, 2011
Release #11-222

Firm’s Recall Hotline: (877) 688-2326
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

Additional Fingertip Amputations and Lacerations Prompt Reannouncement of November 2009 Recall of Strollers by Maclaren USA

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today reannounced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers who have not yet obtained the repair should do so immediately. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Maclaren strollers (sold prior to November 2009)

Units: About one million (this product was recalled in November 2009)

Distributor: Maclaren USA, Inc., of South Norwalk, Conn.

Hazard: The stroller’s hinge mechanism poses a fingertip amputation and laceration hazard to the child when the consumer is unfolding/opening the stroller.

Incidents/Injuries: Maclaren has received a total of 149 reported incidents with the strollers, including 37 reported injuries that occurred after the stroller was recalled in November 2009. These reported injuries include five additional fingertip amputations, 16 additional lacerations and 16 additional fingertip entrapments/bruising. At the time of the original recall, there were 15 incidents, including 12 reports of fingertip amputations in the United States.

Description: This reannouncement involves all Maclaren single and double umbrella strollers sold prior to November 2009. The word “Maclaren” is printed on the stroller. Maclaren strollers sold after May 2010 have a different hinge design and are not affected by this announcement.

Sold at: Juvenile product and mass merchandise retailers nationwide from 1999 through November 2009 for between $100 and $360.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers who have not installed the hinge covers should immediately contact Maclaren USA to receive the free repair kit.

Consumer Contact: Consumers who have not received or installed the hinge covers should contact Maclaren USA at hingecovers@maclaren-usa.com to obtain the free repair kit. Consumers also can call Maclaren toll-free at (877) 688-2326 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday.

To see this recall on CPSC’s web site, including pictures of the recalled products, please go to: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11222.html


9,575 posted on 05/13/2011 12:02:05 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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American Health

EatingWell May 12, 2011

EatingWell For Health - Where Good Taste Meets Good Health
Recipes & Menus | Healthy Cooking | Nutrition & Health | Food News & Origins | Shop | Subscribe | Forward to a Friend

Asparagus and Salmon Spring Rolls Greek Iced Coffee
Peach, Rhubarb & Ginger Crisp Sesame-Ginger Pork Patty with Grilled Pineapple

Recipes for Foods That Fight Pain

Some people swear by home remedies, but can you really fight aches and pains naturally instead of popping a pill? While some medications definitely serve a purpose, science shows certain foods, such as ginger, sour cheries, salmon, coffee and sage, may give you an extra edge in relieving pain.

Try these healthy recipes featuring pain-fighting ingredients.
Recipes with Pain-Fighting
Ingredients

Asparagus & Salmon Spring Rolls Haymaker’s Ginger Punch
Chicken-Apple Sausage Peach, Rhubarb & Ginger Crisp
Coffee-Streusel Bundt Cake Salmon Chowder
Greek Iced Coffee Sesame-Ginger Pork Patty with Grilled Pineapple
Grilled Shrimp Skewers over White Bean Salad Sour Cherry Cobbler
More Healing Foods:

* Boost Your Memory with Rosemary & More Surprising Health Benefits of Herbs
* 6 More Natural Home Remedies to Try
* Really? Chocolate Cake for Hot Flashes?

Healthy Favorites on EatingWell.com

5 Foods to Boost Your Vision The top 5 reader favorites this week on EatingWell.com:

1. 5 Foods for Better Vision
2. A Healthy Quinoa Breakfast to Start Your Day
3. Is the Dukan Diet a Healthy Way to Lose Weight?
4. 12 Foods You Should Buy Organic
5. 6 Tips to Keep Your Blood Sugar in Check

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This Week in EatingWell’s Community

Tilapia: A Healthy Friend or Foe?
Follow EatingWell on Facebook

Follow EatingWell on Twitter Tilapia: A Healthy Choice or Health Foe? The New York Times recently published an article on the environmental and nutritional drawbacks of tilapia, a popular, mild-tasting, low-fat white fish. What do you think: even though it’s not as healthy as some other fish choices, will you still eat tilapia?

What’s New:

* This Week’s Giveaway: Have a classic recipe you’ve made meatless? Tell us about it for a chance to win a copy of the EatingWell Fast & Flavorful Meatless Meals cookbook.
* Video: What Does a Healthy Vegetarian Diet Look Like?
* Beyoncé and Michelle Obama’s New Workout: Would You Try It?

Health & Wellness Tip

5 Golden Rules for Living a Longer, Healthier Life 6 Golden Rules for Living a Longer, Healthier Life: Every five years, the government updates the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which tell us what we should (and shouldn’t) be eating. The new guidelines were released this year, but what does that mean for you? Here’s your simple guide to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for a healthier you.

More Health & Wellness Tips:

* 7 Anti-Aging Foods You Should Be Eating
* Dr. Oz’s 3 Secrets to Longer Life

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The Simple Art of EatingWell
400 Easy Recipes, Tips and Techniques for Delicious, Healthy Meals
Simple Art of EatingWell

By Jessie Price & the EatingWell Test Kitchen | Photography by Ken Burris

Great news! The Simple Art of EatingWell just won a James Beard Book Award! Described as “the Oscars of the food world” by Time magazine, the James Beard Awards are one of the highest honors that chefs, food professionals and writers can achieve!

Try this award-winning cookbook in your home kitchen today:

* Our biggest book ever: 512 pages!
* 400+ recipes not in other EatingWell books
* At least half the recipes are ready in 45 minutes or less
* Dozens of tips and step-by-step techniques
* 200+ color photographs

Hardcover • 512 pages • 8” x 10”

Order today from the EatingWell Bookstore!

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Current Issue of EatingWell Magazine

From our current issue Look inside the current issue:

* 40 Fast & Fresh Healthy Recipes
* Easy Seafood Suppers
* Eat Better, Life Longer: The 6 New Food Rules
* Plus: Potluck Salads; Mexican Meals; and More

Even better… click here to subscribe to EatingWell Magazine today!

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American Health

Subscribe to EatingWell Magazine

EatingWell mobile
Recipes & Menus | Healthy Cooking | Nutrition & Health | Food News & Origins | Shop | Subscribe | Forward to a Friend
EatingWell, 823A Ferry Rd., PO Box 1010, Charlotte, VT 05445, USA

http://www.eatingwell.com

Tel. (802) 425-5700


9,576 posted on 05/13/2011 12:09:08 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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jelly
Posted by: “Blu Eyes”

Made Jelly tonight from fruit juice

3 1/2 sugar
2cups juice
pkg liquid pectin.

Turned out great! Jelled great! everything sealed But now I have a concern about the juice I used and will it be ok thats I WB it.
I used Oasis juice, turned out a crystal clear jelly,

here are the ingredients in the two kinds I made,

http://alassonde.com/en/products/formats.aspx?prod=oasis&prod2=oasis_fruitsetc&pid=SNC16071&s=343

1. Deliciously Purple
IngredientsFruit
and vegetable juice from concentrate (water, concentrated apple and/or
grape, beet, eldeberry, red bell pepper, purple carrot juices), plum
purée, natural flavor.

2. Deliciously red

IngredientsFruit
and vegetable juice from concentrate (water, concentrated apple and/or
grape, beet, carrot, lemon, yumberry, red bell pepper juices), (cherry
and plum) purées, natural flavor.

Join our sister group for access to all the recipes and files for Home canning, this is a file access only group:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/

To change mail setting visit the website:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning/


9,577 posted on 05/13/2011 2:42:01 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Mesquite/

Harvesting, Cleaning, and Storing Mesquite Pods

HARVESTING
Taste a pod from a tree. If you like the flavor,
pick pods from the tree (each tree has its own
distinct flavor). Pick pods from the trees when
they are mature enough to come off with only the
gentlest of tugs. Pods can sometimes be collected
from the ground if they have not been rained on,
but care should be taken to avoid any that have
black areas, which indicate mold. If you have
trouble finding pods to pick in Tucson take a trip
to Sahuarita, Sonoita, or Patagonia where there
has been more rain and cooler temperatures. Ripe
pods virtually fall off the branch or at most
require only a slight pull. Hard pulling indicates
that pods are unripe. Avoid pods that appear to
have fungal growth on the outside. This is easier
to do if you gather pods from the tree rather than
off the ground.

CLEANING
Rinse your pods, if desired, by dunking them in a
pail of water, swishing them around and then
drying them in the sun (or in your oven at low
heat) for several days or until they are dry enough
to snap in two when bent.

STORING
Store pods in a cool, dry place. Clean garbage cans,
buckets, cloth, and paper bags all work well to
hold the pods. A shed will work if it’s rodent-free.
Dry outdoor storage, such as a shed, is better than
inside a house, as long as the area is rodent-free.
Over time, you may see insects hatching out. If
you wish to completely avoid bugs, pods should
be stored in the freezer. Otherwise expect bugs,
which we handle by shaking most of them to the
bottom of the storage container before milling,
and letting the rest fly away. You may also wish
to wash and dry your pods again a few days before
milling, which eliminates most of the bugs. Before
milling, your pods should be dry enough that you
can snap them between your fingers.

Bisbee Farmers’ Market, Mesquite Milling,
and Mesquite Pancakes with Prickly Pear Syrup
Saturday, October 20, 2007
8am to noon
Bisbee Farmers’ Market at Vista Park in Warren
Section of Bisbee
Contact: Valerie McCaffrey - (520) 378-2973 or vallimac@cox.net .


Mesquite Flour

Pioneers used this flour as a stretcher when “real” flour began to run out. For the
original people, of course, it was flour.

Use only tree-ripened beans, tan to reddish brown, (Important! Green
Beans Don’t Work and always check for bugs!) Sun dry or oven dry; or
parch carefully. Rough-grind pieces (1-2 inches) in a muddle or on a similar
stone surface. Mortar and pestle will do for small amounts. Regrind until a rough
but uniform meal is produced. Sun dry or oven dry again
(Important Step)
Fine -grind to produce a flour roughly the consistency of cornmeal. Do not sift.
Use as a substitute for flour or half and half in any recipe.
Useful in flour tortillas, biscuits, bread, or mush.

One may shape into small cakes and sun bake or oven bake, using only water
(or milk if available) and a little oil or fat.

Mesquite Flour
by Philippe Faucon

The pods freshly raked from the lawn

This is the season when the mesquite pods are falling from the trees. In my backyard, they fall on the grass, and I generally don’t rake them. The lawn mower picks some, breaks many. The pieces left in the lawn are hard for a while and are a nuisance if you go barefoot. Fortunately, in a couple of weeks, they soften and decompose.

Alternatively you can pick them up and and use them for baking. The mesquite flour will give a delicate and distinctive flavor to your cakes. This article will explain you how to produce some.

The first thing you need to know to prepare mesquite flour, is that all mesquite trees are not the same. Some are much sweeter and some are even bitter. You can break a pod and put a small piece in your mouth. It should taste sweet, with that very distinct mesquite flavor. If you have several mesquites, do a taste check to pick up the best one.

I use a rake to pick the pods from the lawn, dump a heap on the garden table and separate them from the dead leaves and other debris. After doing this, you could wash them, but make sure that they are very dry before grinding them. This is easier accomplished by letting them dry in the sun for a couple of day.

The most convenient way to grind the pods in small quantity is with a blender. Blenders have the added advantage that the grinding compartment is generally air tight. Food processors tend to let a lot of flour floating in the air wherever you did the grinding. In any case, it is probably better to do the grinding outside, because whatever you do, some mesquite dust will end up flying around.

The seed compartments and seeds are much tougher than the rest of the pods, and that is good since they are not really edible. After 5-10 seconds of blending, the softer part has been transformed in flour and can be poured in a sifter.

A blender is perfect to grind the pods

It is better to process a little at a time to keep better control of the process. The third picture shows the darker seeds. It is better to stop before the seeds are exposed.

A full grocery bag of pods will eventually yield 2 cups of mesquite flour.

This flour is added to white or wheat flour and used for baking. The ratio is generally one part of mesquite flour for 2 or 3 part of white flour. When using more mesquite flour, the cake feels coarser, and might crumble more. You can use the resulting mix as a replacement for flour in your preferred recipe. Since the mesquite flour is sweet, you might want to cut down slightly on the amount of sugar in the recipe..

As an example I give the recipe for a basic yellow cake using this flour.

Good cooking!

This is how I make Misquite flour.
Harvest the beans at the end of the season. They should be dry and not green.
Put them on a cookie sheet and bake them in the oven on the lowest setting, until you can take one and it will snap in two.
If there are any bugs they will get out of the beans with the heat. Don’t be squimish. After they’re dry, you can follow what it says above. I put them in a blender and blend it to a powder then sift.
As for the bugs that may or may not have been in the pods, if you eat honey what have you got to complain about? Do you know how honey is made?
V


Sonoran Mesquite Flour

The nutritious seeds and pods (‘’pechita”) of the mesquite
tree have been the ‘staff of life’ for humans and other
creatures for eight millennia, and are the nutritional
foundation of Sonoran Desert cultures. Mesquite
combined with other flours ( 1part mesquite flour:3 parts
regular flour ) makes delicious pancakes, muffins,
cookies, pie crusts and tortillas. Dissolve it in ice water
and you have a cool mesquite “chai “ tea. Mesquite pods
and flour are loaded with protein, minerals and complex
carbohydrates. The natural sweetness of mesquite is from
galactomannins, gum-based natural sugars that eliminate
the need to add simple sugars. They are especially good
for people with diabetes or other sugar metabolism disorders
because the mesquite is slowly digested, and helps maintain
normal blood sugar levels. Mesquite flour contains no gluten.
The mesquite pods ripen during a brief 3 week period just
before the summer rains that renew the Sonoran Desert.
Seri families set up camps in mesquite bosques and hand
harvest the pods during the early morning hours to avoid the
blazing hot desert sun. Traditionally they toast the pods
over hot coals at mid day. Seri artisans grind the pods into
fine flour with a pestal or grinding stick on a grinding stone.
Today they use a hammermill to grind the seeds and pods
into a fine flour after hand roasting and drying.



9,578 posted on 05/13/2011 2:57:03 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Mesquite/Meals/

Mesquite Stuffing

(serves 12)
Recipe by Gary Nabhan and Patty West

10 cups Dry bread cubes
1 cup Mesquite flour
1 lb Elk sausage (optional)
Half cup Butter
4 cups Chopped onions or leeks
3 teaspoons Poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon Sonoran oregano (you can substitute any oregano if needed)
2 cups Chopped celery
2 Chopped apples
1 cup dried cranberries
2 teaspoons dried, crushed rosemary
1 1/3 cup stock (chicken or vegetable)
salt and pepper to taste

If using sausage, sauté in a large skillet for about 10 minutes. Remove sausage from
heat and remove oil. Melt butter and sauté leeks or onions, apples, and celery until
soft. Add spices and cranberries (and cooked sausage if you are using it). Mix all
with the bread cubes and mesquite meal, then add the stock (add more than suggested
until stuffing is moist). Bake inside or outside turkey.


Mesquite-Grilled Pizza

Yields: one 14-inch pizza
Ingredients:

* 1 envelope dry yeast
* 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water (105 deg. F. to 115 deg. F.)
* 2 tablespoons olive oil
* 2 cups (or more) bread flour
* 1/2 cups (or more) Mesquite flour
* 1 teaspoon salt
* Olive oil
* 1 cup prepared pizza sauce
* 3/4 cup pitted black olives, halved
* 1/4 cup pitted green olives, halved
* 12 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded (about 3 1/2 cups)
* 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
* 1/3 pound mushrooms, sliced
* 1/2 green bell pepper, cut julienne
* 1/2 red bell pepper, cut julienne
* 1 tablespoon olive oil
* Minced fresh herbs such as oregano, basil and rosemary (optional)
* 1/2 cup mesquite chips soaked in water 30 minutes and drained

Sprinkle yeast over warm water in small bowl; stir to dissolve. Let stand 5 minutes. Stir in 2
tablespoons oil. Mix 2 1/2 cups flour and salt in processor using on/off turns. With machine
running, pour yeast mixture through feed tube and process until combined, about 10 seconds.
Knead dough on lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic, adding more flour to dough
if sticky, about 5 minutes.

Brush large bowl with olive oil. Add dough, turning to coat entire surface. Cover and let rise
in warm draft-free area until doubled in volume, about 1 1/2 hours. (Can be prepared 1 day
ahead. Punch dough down; cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before continuing
with recipe.)

Prepare covered barbecue grill (medium-high heat). Brush 14-inch pizza pan with 1-inch-high
sides with olive oil. Punch dough down and knead 2 minutes. Roll dough out on lightly floured
surface to 16-inch round. Transfer to prepared pan. Spread sauce over dough; sprinkle with
black and green olives. Top with both cheeses, then mushrooms and bell peppers. Drizzle with
1 tablespoon oil. Sprinkle with minced herbs if desired.

Add mesquite chips to fire. Open bottom barbecue vent. Place pizza on rack on lowest rung.
Cover, leaving top vent half open. Bake until crust is golden brown, checking occasionally,
about 15 minutes. Serve immediately.


Shake It and Bake It Coating

Categories: Poultry
Yield: 4 Servings

3/4 c All-purpose flour
1/4 c Mesquite flour
2 ts Salt
1 ts Pepper
1/2 c Cracker crumbs
1 ts Paprika
1/2 ts Basil or Oregano, crushed
1/2 ts Powdered Thyme
1/2 ts Garlic powder

This mixture is sufficient to coat six pounds of chicken. In a large jar, shake together
the flour, salt, pepper, crumbs, paprika, basil, thyme and garlic powder until evenly
mixed. Place mixture in a plastic bag. If using only 3 pounds of chicken, place half
of the mixture in a tightly sealed jar and reserved for later use. Moisten the
chicken pieces with milk or water. Place chicken pieces, one at a time, in the
bag and shake until evenly coated. Bake coated chicken pieces in a greased
shallow pan at 350 degrees F for 45 - 60 minutes.

-

Mesquite Meatball Mix

Serving Size : 1

Amount Measure Ingredient
2 pds lean ground beef
1 eggs slightly beaten
1/2 cup Mesquite meal
1/4 cup onion — finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt — or to taste
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 cups milk

— Preparation Method
Preheat oven to 375°. Combine all ingredients; blend well. Shape mixture in to 1 1/2” balls.
Place meatballs on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until browned.

Remove meatballs from baking sheets and drain well on paper towels. Cool completely.
Divide meatballs into two portions. Place each portion in a1-quart freezer container,
leaving 1/2” space at the top. Seal; label with date and contents. Freeze.
Use within 3 months.

Makes approximately 40 meatballs.


JACK LEMMON’S STEAK MARINADE
Serving Size : 1
Amount Measure Ingredient — Preparation Method
———— —————— ————————————————
1 cup Beef broth
1/2 cup Soy sauce
3 ounces Bourbon
1 Clove pressed garlic
1/2 tsp. Ground ginger
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons Mesquite honey

Combine ingredients in a glass jar, shake, pour over a 3 to 4-pound,
2-inch thick sirloin and let marinate several hours, at room temperature, turning
several times. Broil over mesquite beans, or charcoal with mesquite chips.
From: Texas on the Halfshell by Phil Brittin and Joseph Daniel

This traditional Native American food is produced by gathering ripened seed pods from
the mesquite tree and grinding them into a high protein flour. Desert dwellers have used
mesquite pods as a staple food for centuries and bartered with them to neighboring tribes.
Mesquite meal is great for flavoring steaks, chicken, pork and fish. It can be added to
vegetable stir-fries, scrambled eggs, biscuits, breads, soups, even ice cream. The list is endless.

Mesquite meal can be used as either flour or a spice. As flour, it is generally used in
combination with other flours using about 30% mesquite. As a spice, sprinkle generously
then grill, fry, broil or add it to almost anything for a great mesquite flavor. It won’t take
long to adjust the amount to use for your personal taste.


Homemade Crispy Coating Mix

Serving Size : 1
Category Condiments & Seasonings

Amount Measure Ingredient
3 cups cornflakes
1 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup sesame seeds
4 teaspoons dried parsley — crushed
1 tablespoon paprika
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon celery salt
1 teaspoon onion salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

Preparation Method
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir with a wire whisk until evenly
distributed. Pour into a 5-cup container with a tight fitting lid. Seal
container. Label with date and contents. Store in a cool, dry place.
Use within 2 months.

Makes about 4 1/2 cups of Homemade Crispy Coating Mix.


Mesquite BBQ Ribs:

Ingredients
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons Mesquite seasoning rub
2 teaspoons chili powder
4 pounds pork loin back ribs or pork spareribs
1/4 cup yellow mustard
4 cups Mesquite bean chips or a handful of dried Mesquite beans
1/4 cup bottled barbecue sauce
Bottled barbecue sauce

Directions
1. In a small bowl combine brown sugar, Mesquite seasoning rub, and chili powder. Brush ribs
with mustard. Sprinkle brown sugar mixture onto ribs. Cover and refrigerate for 6 to 24 hours.

2. At least 15 minutes before grilling, soak Mesquite chips or beans in enough water to cover.
Drain.

3. In a grill with a cover arrange preheated coals around a drip pan. Test for medium heat
above the pan. Sprinkle some of the drained Mesquite chips or beans over the coals. Pour
1 inch of water into the drip pan. Place ribs, meaty side up, on grill rack over drip pan but not
over coals, or use a rib rack placed over the drip pan. Cover and grill for 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 hours
or until ribs are tender, adding more coals and Mesquite as necessary.

4. Brush with the 1/4 cup barbecue sauce. Grill ribs for 5 minutes more. Serve with additional
bottled barbecue sauce. Makes 6 servings.


TEPARY BEAN HUMMUS
BARBARA ROSE
Cook tepary beans till real soft
(can cook plain or with onions and
garlic. Mash them or blend them.
Add lemon juice and olive oil. You
could also choose to add from the
following...salt water to taste, brine
from home pickled olives, alyosia
wrightii leaves (just for taste), chopped
up onion, chile and/or chipotle, tahini
to make things creamy (just add more
olive oil if you don’t want to use tahini).
Garnish with Tohono O’odham I’itoi
onions and olive oil.


Chicken Mole

(6 servings)
1 Lbs. chicken breasts
1 c Chile powder, mild
1/4 c oil
2 oz chocolate, unsweetened
1 onion, medium
1 tsp. honey (or brown sugar)
1 garlic clove
1/4 tsp. wine vinegar
2 tsp. Sesame seeds
1 tsp. cumin (comino)
1/3 c chopped almonds
1/4 c mesquite meal
1 c chicken broth

Heat oven to 350F
Brown chicken breasts in oil
Toast sesame seeds and almonds in a dry pan and set aside
Sauté onion and garlic
Mix mesquite meal with 1/3 cup chicken broth,
Add sesame, almonds, Chile, chocolate, honey, vinegar, and cumin stirring
to blend
Add remaining broth to achieve a paste-like consistency
Place chicken in an ovenproof dish, cover with the Chile mixture
Bake at 350F for one hour

Option: Peanut butter may be substituted for almonds


9,579 posted on 05/13/2011 3:08:53 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Multi-Grain Tortillas
These are modern-day corn and four tortillas,
updated with some flavorful specialty flour added.
Amaranth flour melds exceptionally well with the
flavor of corn flour. Wild amaranth grain was widely
used by the Apache and norther Mexico bakers. The
tortillas bake up thick and are a good substitute for
bread with a calabacitas or posole stew.
Makes twelve 4-inch tortillas

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour or bread flour
1-1/2 cups blue corn masa harina para tortillas or
harinilla
1/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup amaranth flour or mesquite flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 cups warm water
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) cold butter, cut into pieces

1) In a medium mixing bowl using your hands or a
wooden spoon or in the bowl of a heavy-duty electric
mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the
unbleached flour, the blue cornmeal, the whole wheat
and amaranth flours, baking powder, and salt. Cut in
the butter until crumbly, using a fork or pastry blender
if making by hand. Gradually add the hot water to the
flour mixture, stirring just until the dough sticks
together, clears the sides of the bowl, and a soft firm
ball is formed, adding a tablespoon of water at a time
if the dough seems too dry. Cover the dough with plastic
wrap and let rest for 45 minutes.

2) To shape the tortillas, divide the dough into 12 equal
portions. Shape each into a ball and place on a baking
sheet or marble slab. Drape each ball around your
forefinger, making a depression on the underside, which
makes a mushroom shape and creates an air bubble to
help it roll out into an even round. On a very lightly
floured work surface, flatten the ball with your palm.
(The flattened balls can rest on a greased baking sheet,
covered tightly, for 30 minutes longer, if necessary.)
Place one of the portions of the dough between 2 pieces
of plastic wrap or wax paper. Press in a tortilla press,
turning at regular intervals, until the desired thickness.
Or roll out with a rolling pin to a 4-inch round, 1/4 inch
thick. Stack between layers of plastic wrap to prevent
drying out while pressing out the remaining dough.
Bake as soon as possible.

3) To bake the tortillas, heat a large ungreased heavy
cast-iron skillet or comal over medium-high heat until
a drop of water dances across the surface. Place the
tortillas, one at a time, in the pan, and bake for about
2-1/2 minutes. When the dough looks dry and brown
spots are formed, turn over to the other side and bake
for 2 to 3 minutes. Keep flipping back and forth until
the tortilla is soft, not crisp; it will puff up to l/2 inch
thick. It is very easy to overbake, so pay close attention
to the timing. Remove each tortilla to a clean towel.
Cover until serving.

Once you get a rhythm going, you can roll out a tortilla,
put it on to cook and, while it cooks, roll out your next
tortilla. Seems like an arduous process but, with this
method, I could produce 8 tortillas in about 10
action-packed minutes. Be sure to rewrap your fresh
tortillas each time you add another to the stack.

If you like, you can substitute one cup of whole wheat
flour for one cup of the all-purpose flour.

My personal preference is for plain tortillas but, if
desired, you can spice up this recipe by adding

A tablespoon of chopped fresh herbs (like oregano or
rosemary)
A teaspoon or so of dried herbs
Freshly ground black pepper
A tablespoon of minced jalapeños
A little garlic powder (or substitute garlic salt for
the salt)
If you choose to experiment with seasonings, mix
dry spices with the flour mixture and fresh or “wet”
seasonings with the milk.

My results with the above recipe were outstanding
— chewy, delicious, irresistible.

Sonoran cooks have turned tortilla making practically
into an art form. Their tortillas are large (some are
pizza-sized), thin and delicate. I followed this fairly
standard recipe:


Mesquite Crackers II
This recipe is from Foods of the
Superstitutions by Don Wells and Jean Groen.
All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission.

1/4 cup mesquite flour
1 3/4 cups flour
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup milk
1 large egg

Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl. Cut in the butter
until very fine. Add the milk & egg and mix to make
a stiff dough. Knead thoroughly and then roll the
dough very thin. Cut into squares or rounds and place
on lightly buttered cookie sheers. Prick the crackers
with a fork and then bake in a 400-degree oven for
10 minutes, or until very lightly browned. If desired,
crackers may be sprinkled with coarse salt. (I dipped
the small balls of dough into corn meal and then pressed
them between two pieces of parchment paper in a tortilla
press and then rolled them thinner with a rolling pin.)


Mesquite Biscuits

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
1/4 cup Corn Meal
1/4 cup Mesquite Meal
2 tablespoons Baking Powder
1/2 teaspoon Black Pepper
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoon Granulated Garlic
2 ea. Jalapeno Peppers, Medium
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil, Extra Virgin
1 ea. Large Egg
2/3 cup Milk

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Mix dry ingredients together thoroughly.
Mix liquid ingredients together thoroughly adding jalapenos (diced).
Mix liquid and dry ingredients together folding just enough to mix so dough is smooth.
Do not over mix or biscuits will not rise properly.

Bake about 20 minutes.


GLUTEN-FREE BAKING MIX:

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Breads Mixes

Amount Measure Ingredient — Preparation Method
———— —————— ————————————————
3 c Rice flour — finely ground
1 c Mesquite Flour
1 1/2 c Potato starch flour
2/3 c Tapioca starch


Flour Tortillas Con Mesquite

1/2 cup mesquite meal
1 tablespoon baking powder
3-1/2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1-3/4 cup warm milk
3 tablespoons lard, olive oil may be substituted

Mix all dry ingredients together well. Mix in lard then add warm milk
gradually kneading until smooth. Make 1’ balls and set aside. Flour rolling
surface and with your palm press one 1” ball into a 4” to 5” circle. Then us
rolling pin to press into an 8” circle. Place into a hot, dry cast-iron skillet
for about 30 seconds on each side, just until tortilla begins to brown and spot.


BAKING POWDER BISCUITS

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Mesquite Flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter or margarine
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup milk or cream

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, mix all dry ingredients. Cut in butter with a knife until the mixture resembles
coarse meal. Add eggs and milk, stirring with a fork and blending until the dry ingredients are
just moistened. Either drop tablespoon full of batter onto a well-greased cookie sheet or place
the entire mixture into a well-greased 8- or 9-inch square cake pan and spread it evenly. Bake
for about 15 to 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.
Serve with butter, hot from the oven.

Variations
Add 1/2 cup raisins or currants to batter.

Add 1/4 teaspoon almond extract or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract with the liquid ingredients.

Add 1/4 cup shredded cheese.


9,580 posted on 05/13/2011 3:15:29 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Sweet Pinyon Misquite Muffins

1 cup Pinyon nuts, ground
½ cup water
2 tsp. baking powder
1/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/8 cup Mesquite flour
3 tbs. mesquite honey
Combine dry ingredients. Add water and honey. Mix well. Pour into greased
muffin tins and bake for 30 minutes at 350.


Prickly Pear Mesquite Mini Muffins - Gluten Free

While in my semi-lost state this past week, I wanted to
create a muffin that would celebrate all the desert
products I have in my pantry. I decided on creating
Prickly Pear Mesquite Mini Muffins. Filled with prickly
pear nectar, agave syrup, mesquite flour, pine nuts and
chia seeds, the muffins are fragrant with a delicate
sweetness and the tender crunch of pine nuts.

I discovered the first time I tested my recipe, that
something was going on with my ingredient list that
I hadn’t known. The muffins baked up beautiful on the
outside, but the insides were another story. They had
an airy yet firm gelatinous texture. As it turns out,
prickly pears have quite a bit of natural pectin in their
skin and flesh. Interestingly prickly pears are good for
lowering cholesterol, blood glucose levels, and has a
future as a cancer chemopreventative food. Prickly pear
fruit has fiber, calcium, magnesium, Vitamin C, Vitamin A,
Vitamin B-6 and potassium.

So, the chia seeds I had used as my binder weren’t needed
to hold the muffins together, the prickly pear nectar had
enough pectin to do the job alone. However, I did want to
use the chia seeds for the extra nutrition they would add to
the muffins, although I had to be careful when I added them
to the recipe to keep them from creating a binding gel. To
keep the chia seeds from gelling much I added them to the
recipe last. Then quickly poured the batter into the muffin
cups and baked the mini muffins.

Recipe

2/3 cup brown rice flour
2/3 cup sweet rice flour
2/3 cup arrowroot starch
3 Tb mesquite flour*
1 Tb baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup pine nuts
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup prickly pear nectar*
1/4 cup gluten free oat milk**
1/4 cup melted vegetable shortening
1/4 cup agave syrup*
1 tsp chia seed, saved till last*

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit and place
out 36 mini muffin papers on a cookie sheet. Do not raise
the temperature to cook the muffins faster, as the mesquite
flour cooks quickly and can over cook causing a slightly
burnt caramel flavor.

2. In a medium bowl, dump in the first seven dry
ingredients and stir together.

3. In a medium bowl, dump in the egg, water, prickly
pear nectar oat milk, melted shortening, and agave nectar.
Stir together.

4. Pour the liquid ingredients into the bowl of dry
ingredients and quickly blend together. Sprinkle the chia
seeds over the top and fold the seeds into the mixture.

5. Spoon the muffin batter into the muffin cups and cook
for 25 minutes. Allow to cool before removing them from
the muffin cups.

What did my family think of my prickly pear mesquite
mini muffins? They were a hit with all of us. Although
my husband and I liked them most when served warm.
This one is a keeper.

* I purchased my prickly pear nectar from
Native Seeds/SEARCH, but you can also find it at the
Arizona Cactus Ranch. I purchased my chia seeds, agave
nectar and mesquite flour from Native Seeds/SEARCH.
My pine nuts came from Trader Joe’s.

** To make oat milk: 1/2 cup of cooked gluten free
oatmeal (rolled gluten free oats, water, salt) and
2 cups water, 2 Tb agave nectar placed into a food
processor. Process until blended and refrigerate.
Posted by Sheltie Girl at 8:15 AM
Labels: agave syrup, chia seed, gluten free, mesquite flour,
pine nuts, prickly pear nectar


MESQUITE MUFFINS

Try this recipe without spices once to taste the true peanut-buttery flavor of mesquite flour,
but add cinnamon or nutmeg to another batch, if desired.

2/3 cup mesquite bean flour
1 1/3 cup sifted self-rising flour
1 beaten egg
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3/4 cup milk

Mix flours. Combine egg, salad oil and milk; whip with a fork until frothy. Add liquid
mixture to dry flours and stir just until moistened. Fill 12 well-greased muffin cups with
batter two-thirds full. Bake for 25 minutes at 400 degrees F. Cool slightly before
removing from pan.


Recipe: Mesquite apple muffins with streusel topping

March 12, 2008

Total time: About 1 hour

Servings: 12

Note: From test kitchen manager Noelle Carter.
Mesquite flour can be found online at
www.casadefruta.com, www.desertusa.com
and www.amazon.com, as well as at select
health-food stores.

2 1/4 cups flour, divided
1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon mesquite flour, divided
1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons sugar, divided
1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons brown sugar, divided
1/2 cup butter plus 1 tablespoon, divided
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1/4 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup peeled and chopped tart apple, such as Granny Smith
1. Grease 12 muffin tins and heat the oven to 375 degrees.
2. In a medium bowl, sift together one-half cup flour with
1 teaspoon mesquite flour and 3 tablespoons each sugar and
brown sugar. Using your fingers, mix one-fourth cup plus
1 tablespoon of the butter into the dry ingredients, until
the mixture is combined and resembles small peas. Set aside.
3. In a large bowl, sift together the remaining flours, sugars,
baking powder, baking soda and salt.
4. Melt the remaining one-fourth cup butter in a small bowl.
In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs. Whisk in the sour
cream, then the milk, vanilla and melted butter.
5. Whisk the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients just
until smooth. Fold in the apple. Drop the batter into the pan
to fill each tin three-fourths full. Sprinkle the streusel topping
evenly over each of the tins; you will use all of the topping.
6. Place the muffins in the oven, and bake until the topping is
golden and a toothpick inserted comes out clean, about 30
minutes. Allow the muffins to cool on a rack for 15 minutes
before unmolding. The muffins will keep for 3 to 5 days.

Each muffin: 293 calories; 5 grams protein;
38 grams carbohydrates; 2 grams fiber; 14 grams fat;
8 grams saturated fat; 67 mg. cholesterol; 237 mg. sodium.


Apple Nut Misquite Muffins

(12 muffins)
1/4 c mesquite meal
1 c chopped whole apple ( core removed )
1/2 c whole wheat flour
2 eggs + 1 egg yolk
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp. vanilla
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 c evaporated milk
21/4 tsp. salt
1/3 c oil
5 Tbl. sugar
1/4 c chopped nuts

Preheat oven to 350 0F
Lightly grease 12 muffin cups
Combine mesquite meal, flours, baking powder, salt, sugar and apple in a
large bowl Beat eggs and yolk in separate bowl, add vanilla, evaporated
milk and oil -mix. Add one-half of liquid to dry mix and combine; add
remaining liquid and mix until just blended; do not beat.
Pour into muffin cups and bake for 25 minutes or until toothpick inserted
into muffin removes clean


9,581 posted on 05/13/2011 3:22:18 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Mojave Mesquite Bread

1/2 c Finely ground and sifted mesquite meal
1 1/2 c Whole wheat flour
1 Tsp. Baking powder
1 Tsp. Baking soda
2 Tlb. Oil
3/4 c Water

Combine dry ingredients. Add oil and water and mix until dough
forms a ball and cleans the sides of the bowl. (Because
mesquite beans and meal have a tendency to pick up any
moisture from the atmosphere, the amount of water needed will
vary with the weather). Lightly grease a cookie sheet or flat pan.
Form the dough into a half-sphere loaf on the pan. Bake for 30
minutes at 350 degrees.

Generally, mesquite meal may substitute up to 1/3 flour content in breads. The
advantages to mesquite meal are high soluble fiber content, protein and fructose
sugar. The result is a food which tends to stabilize the blood sugar level.


Mesquite Zucchini Bread
Recipe by Gary Nabhan and Patty West

1 cup Mesquite flour
1 cup All purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Half teaspoon Baking soda
Half teaspoon Salt
Half teaspoon Nutmeg
1 cup Sugar
1 cup Grated zucchini
1 teaspoon Vanilla
1/3 cup Olive oil
Half teaspoon Orange zest
2 Eggs

Combine flours, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and nutmeg. In a different bowl combine
remaining ingredients. Add flour mixture half cup at a time and mix well. Pour into
greased 8 by 4 in pan. Bake at 350° for 55-60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted
in the center comes out clean. Cool, remove from pan, and enjoy.


MESQUITE ZUCCHINI BREAD
from Martha Darancou
Aguirre of Rancho la Inmaculada

1 C Mesquite meal (Sonoran)
1 C All purpose flour
1 tsp Ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp Baking soda
1/4 tsp Salt
1/4 tsp Ground nutmeg
1C Sugar
1C Finely shredded unpeeled zucchini
1/4C Chopped walnuts
3 eggs
1 C Corn Oil

Mix flour, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder,
salt, and nutmeg. In another bowl, mix sugar,
zucchini, oil, egg and lemon peel. Mix well. Add
flour mixture and stir until combined. Stir in nuts.
Pour into greased 8x4x2 inch loaf pan.
Bake in a 350 degree oven for 55 to 60 minutes
or until toothpick inserted near center comes out
clean. Cool for 10 minutes. Remove from pan.
Cool thoroughly before wrapping.


Mesquite Pocket Bread

Course : Dehydrator
Serves: 8
Amount Measure Ingredient — Preparation Method
———— —————— ————————————————
Dried mesquite beans
1 package - yeast granules
2 cups warm water
1 teaspoon pure honey
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon safflower oil
4 cups whole wheat flour

Preparation:

Gather all the good quality dried mesquite beans available. Rinse
them lightly and spread on cookie sheets. Dry very well in a 200
degrees oven or food dehydrator. Grind enough dried beans to make
2 cups of flour. Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add honey and let set
to rise for 20 minutes. Stir down the foam and add salt and oil; mix
well. Gradually add whole wheat flour and the mesquite bean flour.
Mix well and knead on floured board until light and spongy. Shape
into a large ball and oil lightly on all sides. Place in a large bowl to
rise and cover with a damp towel. Keep warm and out of drafts.
When double in size, punch down and knead well again on floured
board. Separate into 18 small balls and roll out very thin to about
6-inches across. Do not allow to rise but bake immediately on oiled
cookie sheets at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes or until edges are
crisp. Flattened balls will puff up and form pockets. Cut in half or use
whole.


MESQUITE CORNBREAD
from Native Peoples Magazine

3/4 C. each of cornmeal and flour
3/8 C. mesquite meal
2 tsp. Baking powder
1/2 tsp. Each baking soda and salt
1 C. yogurt
1 egg
3 Tbs. Honey
3 Tbs. Oil

Combine dry ingredients in medium sized bowl.
Combine the wet ingredients and stir into the dry
ingredients just until combined. Spread into
greased 8 inch by 8 inch pan. Bake 20 - 25 minutes at 350 degrees.
For a unique Southwestern kick, add 1 tablespoon
chipotle (dried, smoked jalapeno) flakes and
3/4 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels.


Mesquite Bread

1 cup mesquite meal, finely ground
1 tsp. baking powder
2 Tbs. peanut oil
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp. baking soda
¾ cup water
Combine dry ingredients. Add oil and water, and mix well until dough forms a ball
and clears side of bowl. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and form bread into half-sphere
on pan Bake 30 minutes at 350.


Mesquite Bread
Yield: 1 7-inch round loaf

1 cup finely ground and sifted mesquite meal flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons oil
3/4 cup water

“Combine dry ingredients. Add oil and water and mix until dough forms a ball and
cleans the sides of the bowl. (Because mesquite beans and meal have a tendency to
pick up any moisture from the atmosphere, the amount of water needed will vary with
the weather.) Lightly grease a cookie sheet or flat pan. Form the dough into a half-sphere
loaf on the pan. Bake for 30 minutes at 350°”


MESQUITE BANANA BREAD
from Martha Darancou
Aguirre of Rancho la Inmaculada

3/4C Mesquite meal
1C All purpose flour
2/3 C Sugar
2 tsp Baking powder
1/2 tsp Baking soda
1/4 tsp Salt
1C Mashed banana
1/3 C Shortening, margarine or butter (preferred)
1/2 C Milk
2 Eggs
1/4C Chopped nuts

Mix mesquite meal, sugar, baking powder,
baking soda, and salt. Add mashed banana,
shortening, margarine, or butter, and milk.
Beat on low speed until blended then on high
for 2 minutes. Add remaining flour. Beat until
blended. Sir in nuts. Pour into greased 8x4x2
inch loaf pan. Bake in a 350 degree oven for
55 to 60 minutes until toothpick inserted comes
out clean. Cool for 10 minutes. Remove from
pan. Cool thoroughly.


ADOBE BREAD
Source: Kokopelli Cook Book by James and Carol Cunkle

Ingredients:

1 pkg. (1/4 oz.) active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
1 1/2 cups hot water
3 Tablespoons lard or vegetable shortening
2 Tablespoons honey
1/4 cup mesquite meal
1/4 cup wheat flour
4 cups all-purpose or enriched white flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
2 Tablespoons mesquite meal

In a small bowl dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup of warm water. Set aside. In a small
saucepan place 1 1/2 cups of water, shortening and honey. Heat until shortening is
melted. Cool to lukewarm. Place honey mixture in a large mixing bowl and stir in
dissolved yeast. Sift together the 1/4 cup mesquite meal, flours and salt. Add 1 cup of
the flour mixture to the honey mixture. Beat well. Gradually stir in the remaining flour
a little at a time, beating well after each addition. The final cup will have to be kneaded
in. Knead for ten minutes on a lightly floured surface. Dough should be smooth, stiff, bit
pliable.

Place dough back in bowl and brush with 1 tablespoon oil. Cover with a cloth and allow
to rise in a draft-free place until dough doubles in bulk, usually about one hour. Punch
down the dough on a lightly floured surface and knead again for five minutes. Divide the
dough in half and place in 2 greased baking bowls, or shape into 2 round loaves and
place on a greased baking sheet. Brush tops with remaining oil and sprinkle each with
one tablespoon of mesquite meal. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until the tops are lightly
browned and loaves sound hollow when tapped.

Note: This recipe works well with bread machines. Follow manufacturer’s directions.


9,582 posted on 05/13/2011 3:32:59 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

Roman Chamomile is soothing and will also promote a good nights

sleep. Put 1 drop on the pillow at bedtime. Used in the bath it can be

blended with liquid soap to help it disperse. Use a lower dosage, 50% or

1/2 the recommended amount if pregnant or breastfeeding, with children or

the elderly. The number of drops of essential oils used should vary in

direct proportion to body weight, taking into account the age of the person

as well as mental and physical health. The very old should use the same

number of drops as children and babies half the amount of children.

Win our Scent of the Month Club Package

If you have trouble entering the contest please let me know.

http://www.aromathyme.com/contest. html

Oils on Sale


9,583 posted on 05/13/2011 6:15:46 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All; Joya; DelaWhere

Off Grid Solar and Wind Installation Part Two (video)
Posted by: “solarman”
Date: Thu May 12, 2011 11:41 am ((PDT))

In this video I demonstrate the different components of a solar electric system including panel, mppt power controller, sine wave inverter and deep cycle batteries.

If you have not watched part one I suggest watching that first.

http://www.youtube.com/solarcabin

LaMar
http://www.simplesolarhomesteading


Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/preplinks/


9,584 posted on 05/13/2011 6:25:06 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Flowers/

Growing and Harvesting Rose Hips

by Jackie Carroll of The Chamomile Times and Herbal News

Rose Hips Roses can do more than grace our landscapes and floral designs. Like its cousins the
apple, pear, peach and cherry, roses produce a fruit. Rose Hips are a valuable source of vitamin C,
containing as much as 20 times more vitamin C than oranges. They are also an excellent antioxidant.
Growing Roses for Hips
When growing roses for hips, you’ll want to select a variety that produces a reasonably large fruit that
is high in vitamin C. Look for disease and insect resistant roses that won’t require the use of chemical sprays.

Rugosas are an excellent choice for quality hips, and they are also a beautiful addition to the landscape,
whether used as a dense hedge or a specimen plant. The flowers have a delightful fragrance and you’ll
be tempted to cut armloads to bring indoors, but try to resist the temptation. Remember, the more flowers
you cut, the fewer hips you will have.

Harvesting and Preparing Rose Hips
Rose hips ripen after they are touched by the first fall frost. The color of rose hips varies, but in general,
orange hips are not quite ripe, and deep red hips are overripe. Overripe hips are sweet, but have lost much
of their vitamin C.

Rose hips will have the most nutritional value when used immediately after harvesting. To prepare rose hips
for tea, cut off the bloom stem, cut the hip in half, and scrape out the seeds and hairy pith. This can be very
tedious with tiny hips, so you may want to save the smallest hips for jellies. Rose hips used for jellies don’t
need to be seeded or scraped. A half and half mixture of rose hip juice and apple juice makes a tasty jelly.

Rose Hip Marmalade
Use a glass or enamel pan for this recipe.
Clean rose hips as described above for tea, and soak in cold water for two hours.
Simmer in water for two hours.
Strain and reserve liquid for jellies or other recipes.
Measure the mash, and add 1 cup of brown sugar for each cup of mash.
Boil down to a thick consistency.
Pour into sterilized jars and seal.


Drying Rose Hips and Rose Hips Puree

Instructions
Just after a frost is the best time to gather rose hips. Snap off the tails as you pick,or later when you reach home.
Spread the hips out on a clean surface and allow to dry partially. When the skins begin to feel dried and shriveled,
split the hips and take out the large seeds — all of them. If you let the hips dry too much, it will be difficult to remove
the seeds. If not dry enough, the inside pulp will be sticky and cling to the seeds. After the seeds are removed, allow
the hips to dry completely before storing or they will not keep well. Store in small, sealed plastic bags. These will keep
indefinitely in the freezer or for several months in the refrigerator. They are packed with vitamin C and are good to munch
on anytime you need extra energy...or a moderately sweet nutlike “candy.”

Making Puree:
Use soft ripe rose hips (the riper they are, the sweeter they are). It takes about 4 cups (1 Litre) of rose hips to make
2 cups (480 ml) of puree. Remove stalks and blossom ends. Rinse berries in cold water. Put them into a pan and add
enough water to almost cover. Bring to a boil and simmer 10 to 15 minutes. Press through a sieve or strainer. All that
does not go through the sieve is placed in the pan again. Add a little water, enough to almost cover, if you want a thicker
puree, add slightly less. This time heat but do not boil so vigorously. This will dissolve a little more of the fruit so that it
will go through the sieve. Press again and then repeat the process one more time. By now, most of the fruit should have
gone through the sieve leaving only seeds and skin to discard.

Drying Puree:
Line a cookie sheet, 12 by 17 inches (30 by 42 cm), with plastic wrap. This size cookie sheet holds approximately
2 cups (480ml) of puree. Spread puree or fruit leather evenly over the plastic but do not push it completely to the sides.
Leave a bit of plastic showing for easy removal. Place on a card table or picnic table in the hot sun to dry. If the plastic
is bigger than the cookie sheet and extends up the sides, anchor it with clothes pins so it will not flop down and cover the
edges of the leather. Puree should dry in the sun six to eight hours.



9,585 posted on 05/13/2011 6:48:35 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Flowers/

Edible Flowers History

From Peggy Trowbridge,
Your Guide to Home Cooking.

The eating of flowers dates back thousands of years
Edible flower history

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years
with the first recorded mention being in 140 B.C. Many
different cultures have incorporated flowers into their
traditional foods.

Oriental dishes make use of day lily buds and the Romans
used mallow, rose and violets. Italian and Hispanic
cultures gave us stuffed squash blossoms and Asian Indians
use rose petals in many recipes.

Chartreuse, a classic green liqueur developed in France in
the seventeenth century, boasts carnation petals as one of
its secret ingredients.

And, dandelions were one of the bitter herbs referred to
in the Old Testament of the Bible.


http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/blflowers.htm

Edible Flowers

This chart is a collaborative research project by Amy Barclay de Tolly
and Home Cooking Guide Peggy Trowbridge. The links will take you to full
color photos of the specific flowers to help with identification, but
please don’t depend solely on these photos.(To use the links you will need
to go to the above site.) Be sure you know exactly what you choose to consume. hIf you are allergy-prone, it’s probably best to forgo consumption of flowers.
For more information, refer to the article on Incredible Edible Flowers and Poisonous Plants and Flowers Chart.

Edible Flowers
Common Name Botanical Name Comments

Angelica Angelica archangelica May be skin allergen to some
individuals. Good with fish and
the stems are especially popular
candied.Tastes like:Celery-flavored.

Anise Hyssop Agastache foeniculum Tastes like: sweet, anise-like,
licorice

Apple Malus species Eat in moderation; may contain
cyanide precursors. Tastes like:
delicate floral flavor

Arugula Eruca vesicaria Tastes like: nutty, spicy, peppery
flavor

Basil Ocimum basilicum Tastes like: different varieties
have different milder flavors
of the corresponding leaves. Tastes
like: lemon, mint. More info here.

Bee Balm Monarda species Used in place of bergamot to make a
tea with a flavor similar to Earl
Grey Tea.

Borage Borago officinalis Taste like: light cucumber flavor.

Burnet Sanguisorba minor Tastes like: faint cucumber flavor,
very mild.

Calendula* Calendula officinalis Tastes like: poor man’s saffron,
spicy, tangy, peppery,adds a golden
hue to foods

Carnation Dianthus caryophyllus Tastes like: spicy, peppery,
(aka Dianthus) clove-like

Chamomile* Chamaemelum nobile Tastes like: faint apple flavor,
good as a tea

Chicory* Cichorium intybus Buds can be pickled.

Chives: Garden Allium schoenoprasum Tastes like: mild onion flavor.
More info here.

Chives: Garlic Allium tuberosum Tastes like: garlicky flavor

Chrysanthemum: Chrysanthemum Tastes like: slight to bitter flavor,
Garland* coronarium pungent

Citrus: Lemon Citrus limon Tastes like: waxy, pronounced flavor,
use sparingly as an edible garnish,
good for making citrus waters

Clover Trifolium species Raw flowerheads can be difficult
to digest.

Coriander Coriander sativum Pungent. A prime ingredient in salsa
and many Latino and Oriental dishes.
Tastes like: Some palates detect a
disagreeable soapy flavor while
others adore it.

Cornflower* Centaurea cynaus Tastes like: sweet to spicy,
(aka Bachelor’s Buttons) clove-like

Dandelion* Taraxacum officinalis Tastes like: very young buds fried
in butter taste similar to
mushrooms. Makes a potent wine.

Day Lily Hemerocallis species Many Lilies (Lillium species) contain
alkaloids and are NOT edible.
Daylillies may act as a laxative.
Tastes like: sweet, crunchy, like a
crisp lettuce leaf, faintly like
chestnuts or beans Many Lilies
(Lillium species) contain alkaloids
and are NOT edible.

Dill Anthum graveolens Dill weed was mentioned in ancient
Egyptian medical texts To most of us,
dill weed is invariably paired with
pickles. It is no wonder since Americans alone consume more than nine pounds of pickles per person each year. In Europe and Asia, dill has long been a staple herb. Where would seafood be without the crisp flavor of dill?

English Daisy* Bellis perennis Tastes like: tangy, leafy

Fennel Foeniculum vulgare Tastes like: sweet, licorice
flavor. More info here.

Fuchsia Fuchsia X hybrida Tastes like: slightly acidic

Gardenia Gardenia jasminoides Tastes like: light, sweet flavor

Gladiolus* Gladiolus spp Tastes like: similar to lettuce

Hibiscus Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Tastes like: slightly acidic, boiled
makes a nice beverage

Hollyhock Alcea rosea Tastes like: very bland,
nondescript flavor
Honeysuckle:
: Japanese Lonicera japonica Berries are highly poisonous.
Do not eat them!

Hyssop Hyssopus officinalis Should be avoided by pregnant
women and by those with
hypertension and epilepsy.

Impatiens Impatiens wallerana Tastes like: very bland, nondescript
flavor

Jasmine:Arabian Jasminum sambac Tastes like: delicate sweet flavor,
used for teas.

Johnny-Jump-Up Viola tricolor Contains saponins and may be toxic
in large amounts. Tastes like: sweet
to bland flavor

Lavender Lavendula species Lavender oil may be poisenous. More
Info. Tastes like: floral, slightly
perfumey flavor

Lemon Verbena Aloysia triphylla Tastes like: lemony flavor, usually
steeped for tea

Lilac Syringa vulgaris Tastes like: lemony, floral, pungent

Mallow: Common Malva sylrestris Tastes like: sweet, delicate flavor

Marigold:Signet Tagetes tenuifolia Tastes like: spicy to bitter
(aka T. signata)

Marjoram Origanum majorana all marjorams are oreganos, since
the genus name for both is origanum,
but not all oreganos are marjorams.

Mint Mentha species One characteristic shared by all
mints is the square stem, a trait
of the Labiatea family of which marjoram, catnip and basil are also members. Another is the volatile oil menthol, which gives mint that characteristic cooling, cleansing feel to varying degrees in the different varieties.

Mustard Brassica species Eating in large amounts may cause
red skin blotches. More info here.

Nasturium Tropaeolum majus Buds are often pickled and used like
capers. Tastes like: sweet, mildly
pungent, peppery flavor

Okra Abelmoschus aesculentus Tastes like: similar to squash
(Hibiscus esculentus) blossoms

Pansy Viola X wittrockiana Tastes like: very mild sweet to tart
flavor

Pea Pisum species Flowering ornamental sweet peas are
poisonous.

Pineapple Guava Feijoa sellowiana Tastes like: similar to the ripe
fruit of the plant, flavorful

Primrose Primula vulgaris Birdseye Primrose (P. farinosa)
causes contact dermatitis. Tastes
like: bland to sweet flavor

Radish Raphanus sativus Tastes like: milder, sweeter
version of the more familiar
radish heat

Redbud Cercis canadensis Tastes like: mildly sweet

Rose Rosa rugosa or R. Tastes like: sweet, aromatic
gallica officinalis flavor, stronger fragrance produces
a stronger flavor. Be sure to
remove the bitter white portion of the petals. Rose hips are also edible (see Rose Hips Recipes).

Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis Tastes like: pine-like, sweet,
savory.

Runner Bean Phaseolus coccineus Tastes like: nectar, bean-like

Safflower* Carthamus tinctorius Another “poor man’s saffron”
without the pungent aroma or
strong flavor of the real thing

Sage Salvia officinalis Sage should not be eaten in large
amounts over a long period of time.
Tastes like: varies by type. More info here.

Savory:Summer Satureja hortensis so bold and peppery in its flavor
that since the time of the Saxons
it has come to denote not only the
herb itself, but also a whole segment of cooking.

Scented Geranium Pelargonium species Citronella variety may not be edible.
Tastes like: varies with differing
varieties from lemon to mint.

Snapdragon Antirrhinum majus Tastes like: bland to bitter flavor

Society Garlic Tulbaghia violacea Tastes like: a very mild garlic flavor

Squash Blossom Cucurbita pepo species Tastes like: sweet, nectar flavor.
(aka Zucchini Blossom)

Sunflower* Helianthus annus Tastes like: leafy, slightly bitter.
Lightly steam petals to lessen
bitterness. Unopened flower buds can be steamed like artichokes.

Thyme Thymus vulgaris Tastes like: lemon, adds a nice light
scent.

Tuberous
Begonia Begonia X tuberosa ONLY HYBRIDs are edible. The flowers
and stems contain oxalic acid and
should not be consumed by individuals
suffering from gout, kidney stones, or rheumatism. Further, the flower should be eaten in strict moderation. Tastes like: crisp, sour, lemony

Violet Viola species Tastes like: sweet, nectar

Yucca Yucca species Only the petals are edible. Other
parts contain saponin, which is
poisonous. Large amounts may be
harmful. Tastes like: crunchy,
fresh flavor

Flowers to Avoid Some flowers in particular to be avoided (but not a
complete list) are: azalea, crocus, daffodil, foxglove,
oleander, rhododendron, jack-in-the-pulpit, lily of the
valley, and wisteria.
See a more complete list goto,

http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/blflowersnot.htm

*Only the petals of these composite flowers are edible. The pollen of composite flowers is highly allergenic and may cause reactions in sensitive individuals. Sufferers of asthma, ragweed, and hayfever should not consume composite flowers, and may have extreme allergies to ingesting any flowers at all.

Disclaimer: The author and Home Cooking Guide have thoroughly researched all the aforementioned edible flowers. However, individuals consuming the flowers, plants, or derivatives listed here do so entirely at their own risk. Neither the authors or Home Cooking can be held responsible for any adverse reaction to the flowers.

-


9,586 posted on 05/13/2011 6:51:33 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Flowers/

Violet Syrup

This recipe is not our creation, it was posted
online at the Soapdish Forum, and the lady that
posted it wasn’t sure where she had originally
found it either. :) It sure is amazing though!

4c Violets
2c Boiling water

6c Sugar
1 Lemon; juice of, strained
2c Water

Place violet petal in a deep bowl and pour the
boiling water over them. Weigh down with a
heavy dish to keep them submerged. Place the
bowl in a draft-free place at room temperature
for 24 hours. Strain violet infusion into a
non-reactive bowl or pot, squeezing out juice
from the violets; discard the violets.

Place sugar, lemon juice and water in a saucepan
and boil into a very thick syrup, near the candy
stage. Add violet infusion and bring to a rolling
boil. Boil 10 minutes or until thickened. Pour into
sterile bottles.

Allow to cool, then seal and refrigerate. Serve
with club soda.

VARIATION: Substitute 4 cups fragrant rose petals
and add 1 cinnamon stick per bottle of syrup.

Process 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner.


Rose Petal Jam 2

1 cup fresh rose petals (must never have been sprayed
with any chemicals)
3/4 cup water
Juice of 1 lemon

Puree in blender until smooth. Slowly add 2 1/2 cups
sugar, blend till all sugar has dissolved; (leave in
blender). Stir 1 package pectin (ie. Sure Jell) into
3/4 cup water, bring to a boil, and boil hard for 1
minute.

Pour mixture into blender with rose petal mixture
until well blended. Do this very quickly - it sets up
FAST!! Pour into baby food jars. Let set for 6 hours,
till firm. Will keep one month in refrigerator.
Freezes well.

Rose Petal Jam Search Related Coupons

Categories: Preserves, Flowers Conversion Calculator

Yield: 1 servings
Rating: not rated
Description:

30 lg Red cabbage roses
3 lb Sugar
2 pt Water
1/2 Lemon

Take the roses and cut off the white ends. Make a
syrup with the sugar and
water. Then add the juice of the half a lemon and
the rose petals. Boil
until the roses crystallize, stirring frequently
with a wooden spoon.
Turkish cooks keep this for years.

Total time 1 hour
Cooking time 40 minutes
Processing 20 minutes

12 cups rose petals
4 cups sugar
2 tbsp. lemon juice

Fragrant red and pink old-fashioned double roses
(rugosas, floribundas, Old English, damask, and so on)
make the tastiest jam. Pick roses in the late morning,
after the dew has dried, and before the sun has
reached its height. Grasp the entire flower by the
tips of the petals and pull it completely off its
base. Using scissors, trim off the white section at
the base of the petals. (Doing this immediately upon
picking the rose allows you to trim a whole flower’s
worth of petals all at once.) Place the petals in a
deep bowl. As soon as you have finished gathering
petals, pick over them carefully to remove any
insects. Cover them with cold water and drain them;
repeat this process several times, until you have
removed all dirt, pollen and other debris from the
petals. Chop the petals coarsely and place them in a
wide, deep pot.
Pour sugar and lemon juice over the chopped rose
petals and stir well. Stirring frequently, bring the
mixture to a boil over medium heat. Clip a jelly
thermometer to the side of the pan; make sure that the
bulb does not quite touch the bottom of the pan, but
is well immersed in the mixture. Continue to cook and
stir until the jam reaches 221°F, or until a spoonful
dropped onto a cold plate jells and holds its shape.
Ladle the jam into 4 oz., 8 oz. or 12 oz. canning jars
sterilized in boiling water, cap with sterilized
canning lids and rings, and refrigerate. If you wish
to store the jam without refrigeration, process the
jars in a boiling water bath. Put filled, covered jars
in a large kettle with a rack on the bottom, covered
by at least 1” of boiling water; once the water
returns to a boil, continue to boil for 10 minutes.
Remove the jars from water and, without tightening the
lids, allow them to cool and to form a vacuum seal,
signaled by a popping sound as hot air escapes and the
lids snap down.

back
from Serving the Guest: A Sufi Cookbook
Copyright © 1999, 2000
Kathleen Seidel All Rights Reserved
Permission is explicitly granted for educational and
non-profit purposes. Please use the credit: Serving
the Guest. Copyright 1999, 2000 Kathleen Seidel.
Copyright information for previously published
material by other authors used by permission, and
print sources for images, may be found at
http://www.superluminal.com/cookbook.

Sun, 19 Nov 2006 - “Gwen Dandridge” - Message #24796


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly/butters in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size 0 - 1,000 ft 1,001 - 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Hot Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15


From Terry in Georgia
I have made rose jelly - it taste a little like cherry
- very nice. An interesting side in the history of
rose hips, During the War the kids in Europe were
getting scabies - lack of Vitamin C - the scientist
tested flower to see which could help and found rose
hips to be full of Vit C. So they made teas, and
jellies out of them to help.
In the same vein, my great aunt sent package over to
Amsterdam to a family. They would send lard - it was
easy to get here and in Amsterdam since they had no
butter, they used it to put on their bread. And they
were thankful for that. My great aunt talked about
how little things made a big difference back then.

Terry in Ga.

To dry
Wash, cut open and remove seeds. Spread the hips in a
single layer on trays and heat in a 150 degree oven
till completely dry. Put though a food grinder and
then a sieve to make a powder for use in breads.

To make Jelly;
2 qts rose hips
6 semi tart apples
Red, and yellow food coloring
1/2 bottle liquid pectin.
Wash and stem rose hips, place in a kettle with water
to cover, and boil till soft. Wash and stem apples,
cut into pieces, and boil till soft in another kettle.
Extract juice from both Fruits. Combine 2 cups rose
hip juice, 3 cups apple juice, and the sugar in a
large kettle. Add a few drops of the food colorings.
Then make jelly by the standard procedure using liquid
pectin.

Powdered pectin, Measure sugar into a bowl to be added
later. Measure the fruit juice into a kettle and mix
in one box of pectin. Place over high heat and bring
to a hard boil, stirring constantly. Stir in the
sugar at once, and bring to a full rolling boil again
(a rolling boil is on which cannot be stirred down).
Boil hard for 1 or 2 minutes, depending on the pectin
manufacturer’s directions. Use a clock or timer with
a sweep second hand so that you can time the boiling
accurately. Stir constantly. Then immediately remove
the kettle from the burner, skim off the foam, and
pour the jelly into hot, sterilized glasses.
Liquid pectin, Measure the fruit juice, and sugar into
a kettle and mix well. Place over high heat and bring
to a full boil. Stir constantly. Immediately pour in
pectin according to directions. Bring back to a
rolling boil and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring
constantly. Then remove the kettle from the range,
skim off the foam and pour the jelly into glasses.
Follow sealing procedures.

Syrups
Extract juice from rose hips as in making jelly. Then
make into syrup according to directions in Chapter 9.

Chapter 9
Making Syrup
These directions are for making strawberry,
blackberry, raspberry, and grape syrup come from the
Oregon Agricultural Extension Service.
Use fully ripe fruit, but make sure-by judicious
tasting-that at least half of it is tart. Extract the
juice by heating the fruit according to the preceding
directions. To make the syrup, combine 1 1/2 cups
fruit juice (before pasteurization) with 1 3/4 cups
sugar in a large kettle; bring to a rolling boil and
boil for 1 minute. Remove from the range, skim, and
pour into clean, hot mason jars. Seal, place in a
canning kettle and cover with 1 inch of hot water.
Bring to a boil and process for 10 minutes. Then cool,
label, and store in a cool, dark place.
Thickness of fruit syrup depends on the kind of fruit
and its condition, so it is wise to make a test batch
and allow it to cool before putting up all your juice.
If the test batch is too thick, let the rest of the
juice stand overnight in the refrigerator so that some
of the natural pectin will be destroyed. If the test
batch is too thin, substitute 1/4 cup white corn syrup
and 1 1/2 cups sugar for the sugar called for in the
basic recipe. To make a more tart syrup, add 1
tablespoon lemon juice to the basic recipe.

As for the preceding directions mentioned earlier
their a bit odd.

How to put up juice

Most-but not all fruits are heated to improve juice
extraction and inactivate the enzymes that would lower
the quality of the juice. The method used sounds
ridiculous, but you will be surprised at how well it
works.
(I don’t imagine you want to do this if you want to
use the pulp for anything, but it is an interesting
procedure.)

First, drop into 2 quarts of boiling water, 10
unscented, white facial tissues. Let these stand for a
minute, and beat them into small pieces with a fork.
Pour into a strainer and shake out excess water, but
do not press.
Now while the tissues continue to drain, place the
fruit in a stainless steel or glass kettle and crush
it. (Don’t use aluminum or galvanized steel
equipment, because acid fruit juices pit the former
and dissolve the zinc in the latter) For every 3 parts
of fruit add 1 part of the tissue pulp and stir well.
Heat no higher then 180 degrees, stirring constantly,
until the fruit is soft – no longer. Overheating
destroys the fruit flavor.
Pour the fruit and pulp into a jelly bag, set in a
colander over a large bowl, and let it drain. The
pulp acts as a filter and not only helps to clarify
the juice but also prevents clogging of the bag. When
the mixture is cool enough to handle, twist the bag to
squeeze out the rest of the juice.
If the collected juice is not perfectly clear, strain
it though four thickness’ of clean, washed cheesecloth
(cheesecloth that has not been washed gives the juice
an undesirable flavor). Then mix sugar as desired with
the juice until it is completely dissolved. If you
are making a blend of two or more juices, this is also
the time to mix them together.
Juice is extracted from unheated fruits by a variety
of means. Citrus fruits, for example, are squeezed on
a reamer. Apples are put through a cider press or
electric juice extractor. White grapes are simply
crushed and dripped through a jelly bag.
Whether fruits are or are not heated before juice
extraction, all except those that are sometimes frozen
must not be pasteurized so that they will keep. The
best way to do this is in the double boiler, because
heating directly over a burner gives juice a cooked
taste.
Bring water in the bottom part of the double boiler to
a rolling boil. Put the juice, in the upper part of
the utensil, over this and bring it up to 190 degrees.
Use a jelly or candy thermometer. Stir constantly.
Then remove the double boiler from the range.
The Juice is packaged in hot, washed and sterilized
canning jars or bottles. If using jars, scald the
caps according to the maker’s directions. If using
bottles, seal them with new, clean, dry crown-type
bottle caps.
Fill the jars or bottles, to the brim with the hot
juice. Work fast, because the temperature of the juice
should not drop below 185 degrees. If it does, return
the double boiler tot he range and heat the juice to
190 degrees again.
Cap the jars or bottles immediately, and turn the jars
upside down for3 minutes, the bottles for 5 minutes.
Then immerse them in a large kettle filled with
120-degree water. After 5 minutes, pour off the third
of the water and replace it with cold water from the
faucet. Again after 5 minutes, poor off a third of
the water and replace it with cold water. Then, after
another 5 minutes, run cold water steadily into the
kettle for 5 minutes. By this process you will lower
the temperature of the juice to that of the cold water
in roughly half and hour.
Finally, dry the containers, label them, and store
them in a cool dry, dark place. The ideal storage
temperature is between 32degrees and 40 degrees. The
juice will not spoil at higher temperatures, but it
will gradually decline in quality.
The alternative to preserving juice in jars and
bottles is to transfer it immediately from the range
to your refrigerator. Leave it in the upper part of
the double boiler. As soon as juice is cold, pour it
into rigid plastic or glass freezer containers. Leave
headspace of ½ inch in pint containers; 1 inch in
quart containers. Seal tightly and put the containers
in the freezer. The juice will keep in excellent
condition for a year.
How to make frozen juice concentrates
After extracting and pasteurizing juice in the manner
described above, chill it thoroughly in the
refrigerator and pour 3 quarts into a gallon jug. Deal
and freeze solid. Then remove the jug from the
freezer, open it and place it upside down on top of a
narrow stainless steel, glass, or pottery container
inside your refrigerator.
As the concentrated juice thaws, it will drain into
the bottom container. As soon as it loses its sweet
taste, remove the jug from the container, let the
remaining ice thaw and empty it.
Then pour the concentrated juice back into the jug,
freeze it again and let it drain off a second time.
Then repeat the process once more saving the
concentrate, and discarding the ice. Finally, pour
the concentrate into small freezer cartons and store
them in your freezer.
When ready to use a concentrate, dilute it with 3
parts water before serving.


ROSE GERANIUM JELLY

Rose geranium jelly is made by flavoring apple jelly.
Wash the apples but do not peel or core.
Quarter the apples and barely cover with water.
Simmer until tender. Get the juice and put it through a jelly bag,
measure apple juice and return it to the stove. When it is boiling
add 3/4 cup sugar per cup juice. Boil on to a jelly stage.
When almost done put a few rose geranium leaves into the boiling jelly.
They quickly give off their flavor. Dip them up and down until you have the
desired taste and fragrant smell. Use 2 or 3 leaves for each pint.
Tint a rose color with food coloring. Remove the leaves.
Pour the jelly into your jars and seal.


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly/butters in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size 0 - 1,000 ft 1,001 - 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Hot Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15

Mon, 7 May 2007 - V - Message #26101


9,587 posted on 05/13/2011 7:05:02 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8814 | View Replies]

To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Flowers/Dandelions/

Dandelion Jelly 1

Ingredients

(6 servings)

1 qt Dandelion blossoms
2 qt Water
2 tb Fresh lemon juice
1 3/4 oz Powdered fruit pectin
5 1/2 c Sugar

Instructions

Pick bright, fresh dandelion blossoms and pack the quart container pretty tightly. This is going to require
a lot of dandelion blossoms! Rinse quickly in cold water to remove any insects/dirt on the petals. Don’t
leave the blossoms in the water for very long though, as they will be a little the worse for wear.
Next, pull up a chair somewhere comfortable, as this part is going to take awhile...Snip off the stem and
green collar under each blossom, so that only the petals are left. This takes about four hours!
In an enamel saucepan, boil the dandelion petals in water for 3 minutes, or a little longer, until the water
takes on their color. (I boiled the petals for 4 minutes until I liked the color better.)
Cool and strain, pressing against the petals with your fingers to extract all of the dandelion juice.
(Or you can cheat and line a sieve with moistened cheesecloth and strain it that way.)
Measure out 3 cups of dandelion liquid. Add the lemon juice and fruit pectin. Stir to combine.
Bring to a boil, using a large kettle. Add the sugar, stirring to mix well. Continue stirring and boil
the mixture for 2 and 1/2 minutes.
Pour into hot sterilized jelly jars and seal. Process for five minutes in a boiling water bath.
Yield: Five 1/2 pint jars.


Dandelion Honey

Ingredients
1 Liter dandelion petals
1 Liter water
3 slices lemon - 1Ž2 cm thick
1/4 vanilla bean, cut in half

1 kg sugar

Instructions
Pick the dandelions in full sunshine. Pull off all the dandelion petals and put them in a pot with the water,
lemon slices and vanilla bean. Simmer for about 30 minutes.

Let the mixture sit by the side of the stove for 5 to 6 hours.

Strain to separate the petals from the juice. Return the juice to the pot and bring to a simmer. Slowly
add the sugar and simmer until desired thickness (takes about 4 hours).

Serve on toast, muffins or danish

Yield: about 1 liter

Credits
From: Author Unknown
Shared by Peggy, Home Cooking Guide


Dandelion Wines
Special Recipe Collection

“Dandelion wine is fermented sunshine.” Jack Keller

Dandelion wine is one of my favorite white wines, bar none. Dandelion is from the Old French dens leonis, or lion’s tooth (from the sharply indented leaves) and Middle English dent de lion. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t recognize the bright yellow, many rayed flowers of Taraxacum officinale at first glance. Most think of it as a weed, but others look upon them differently. My wife actually planteddandelions in one of our flower beds, and the result was quite stunning when they bloomed en mass. Others look upon their leaves as salad or greens, and indeed they are quite edible raw or steamed until the flower appears, at which time its greenery becomes bitter. But for the winemaker, the dandelion simply makes the best flower wine there is.

Thought by some to have been brought to America from Europe, at least two sources report that several North American Indian tribes have traditionally used the dandelion for food and medicine. Thus, it seems likely that the dandelion inhabited both the old world and the new before Columbus ever sailed.

The approach to making dandelion wine differs enormously, as the collection of recipes below will demonstrate. Some us the whole flower heads trimmed only of the stalks. Still others use the flowerheads trimmed of all greenery. Others will use only the petals. Personally, I use the petals only, but have made several batches where the calyx (the green cuplike sepals enclosing the lower portion of the flower) is left on some of the flowers. My own recipes are the last three on this page and they are the only recipes presented here that I will vouch for. Pick the flower heads mid- to late-morning and then wash your hands (they get sticky while picking the flowers), sit in the shade and pull the petals off the flowers.

However, in truth it is the stalks that are bitter and a little greenery from the calyx (”calyces” is the plural) actually adds a little je ne sais quoi to the wine if not overdone. This little something is actually engineered into the wine in recipe 30, below, and wines made this way will keep for many, many years.

The recipes below call for as little as a half-pint to two gallons of flowers per gallon of wine. I personally think ½ pint is way too few while 2 gallons is overkill by two orders of magnitude. If you want another way of measuring your dandelion harvest, Layk Thomas of Angola, Indiana reports that one quart of loosely packed dandelion petals weighs 80 grams, while one quart of tightly packed petals weighs 100 grams. Whole blossoms weigh 110-120 grams per quart.

Dandelion wine is typically a light wine lacking body. Thus many recipes use raisins, sultanas or white grape juice (or concentrate) as body-builders, but you could use dates or figs or rhubarb instead. Whatever you use will affect the color, so white or golden raisins or sultanas, or golden figs, are usually used with dandelions (some of these are usually available in bulk at Sun Harvest, Giant Foods, or many other stores).

Many of these recipes call for 3 lbs granulated sugar per gallon of wine — some even call for 4. Personally, this is too much for me. Whether this much sugar will produce a dry, semi-sweet or sweet wine will depend on whether you attempt to stabilize the wine and on the yeast you use, as those which are tolerant of higher concentrations of alcohol will still result in drier wine unless even more sugar is added. People should make what they like. If you like dry wine with a reasonable (12% alcohol level), use only enough sugar to achieve a starting specific gravity of 1.088. If you like sweet wine, many of the recipes below will produce it providing you don’t use a high-alcohol tolerant yeast. Personally, I prefer my dandelion wines dry to semi-sec, with a finished specific gravity of 1.002 to 1.006.

If you omit the body-building ingredient, dandelion wine is light and invigorating and suited perfectly for tossed salad and baked fish (especially trout). If you ferment with a body-enhancer but shave the sugar, the wine will serve well with white-sauced pastas, heavier salads, fish, or fowl. Sweetened, it goes well before or after dinner.

Dandelion Wine (1)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 lb white raisins
* 1 gallon water
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons
* 1 orange
* yeast and nutrient

Pick the flowers just before starting, so they’re fresh. You do not need to pick the petals off the flower heads, but the heads should be trimmed of any stalk. Put the flowers in a large bowl. Set aside 1 pint of water and bring the remainder to a boil. Pour the boiling water over the dandelion flowers and cover tightly with cloth or plastic wrap. Leave for two days, stirring twice daily. Do not exceed this time. Pour flowers and water in large pot and bring to a low boil. Add the sugar and the peels (peel thinly and avoid any of the white pith) of the lemons and orange. Boil for one hour, then pour into a crock or plastic pail. Add the juice and pulp of the lemons and orange. Allow to stand until cool (70-75 degrees F.). Add yeast and yeast nutrient, cover, and put in a warm place for three days. Strain and pour into a secondary fermentation vessel (bottle or jug). Add the raisins and fit a fermentation trap to the vessel. Leave until fermentation ceases completely, then rack and add the reserved pint of water and whatever else is required to top up. Refit the airlock and set aside until clear. Rack and bottle. This wine must age six months in the bottle before tasting, but will improve remarkably if allowed a year. [Adapted recipe from C.J.J. Berry’s First Steps in Winemaking]

Dandelion Wine (2)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 2 lbs 11 ozs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges
* 1 gallon water
* yeast and nutrient

This is the traditional “Midday Dandelion Wine” of old, named because the flowers must be picked at midday when they are fully open. Pick the flowers and bring into the kitchen. Set one gallon of water to boil. While it heats up to a boil, remove as much of the green material from the flower heads as possible (the original recipe calls for two quarts of petals only, but this will work as long as you end up with two quarts of prepared flowers). Pour the boiling water over the flowers, cover with cloth, and leave to seep for two days. Do not exceed two days. Pour the mixture back into a pot and bring to a boil. Add the peelings from the four oranges (again, no white pith) and boil for ten minutes. Strain through a muslin cloth or bag onto acrock or plastic pail containing the sugar, stirring to dissolve. When cool, add the juice of the oranges, the yeast and yeast nutrient. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit fermentation trap, and allow to ferment completely. Rack and bottle when wine clears. Again, allow it to age six months in the bottle before tasting, but a year will improve it vastly. This wine has less body than the first recipe produces, but every bit as much flavor (some say more!). [Adapted recipe from C.J.J. Berry’s First Steps in Winemaking]

Dandelion Wine (3)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 2½ lbs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges (juice only)
* 1 gallon water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* Chablis wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Stir in sugar until completely dissolved. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim away all greenery. Put flowers, juice of oranges and yeast nutrient in primary and add boiling water. Stir and cover primary. Allow to cool to room temperature and add activated yeast. After 48 hours, strain off and discard flowers. Transfer to secondary and fit airlock. Ferment to dryness. Rack, top up and refit airlock. Repeat every 60 days until no further sediment is deposited during 60 day period. Stabilize, wait two weeks and rack into bottles. Set aside 6 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from Leo Zanelli’s Home Winemaking from A to Z]

Dandelion Wine (4)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 2 lbs 6 ozs granulated sugar
* 1 lemon (juice and zest)
* 7 pts water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* Champagne wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim away all greenery. Best wine uses only the petals. Put flowers, juice and zest of lemon in primary and add boiling water. Stir and cover primary and set aside for 7 days. Slowly pour contents through nylon straining bag and squeeze to extract all liquid. Combine one quart of the liguid and the sugar in pot and stir while bringing to a boil. Add half of this back to strained liquid, stir in yeast nutrient and pour into secondary to cool. Store remaining half of sugar liquid in capped bottle in refrigerator. When liquid in secondary is at room temperature, add activated yeast and fit airlock. After seven days, rack and add reserved sugar liquid and stir. Refit airlock and ferment to dryness. Rack, top up and refit airlock. Repeat every 60 days until no further sediment is deposited during 60 day period. Stabilize, wait two weeks and rack into bottles. Set aside 6 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from George Leonard Herter’s How to Make the Finest Wines at Home]

Dandelion Wine (5)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 lb golden raisins
* 2 lbs 7 ozs granulated sugar
* 2 lemon (juice and zest)
* 1 orange (juice and zest)
* 7 pts water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* all-purpose wine yeast

Set aside 1 pint of water and put the remainder on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim away all stalk. Put flowers in primary and add boiling water. Stir and cover primary and set aside for no more than 3 days, stirring daily. Slowly pour contents through nylon straining bag into 1-gallon boiler and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Add the sugar and zest of citrus and bring to low boil, holding for one hour. Return to primary, add citrus juice and recover. When cooled to room temperature, stir in yeast nutrient and add yeast. Recover and ferment 3 days. Strain into secondary, add raisins and fit airlock. After wine clears, rack, add reserved pint of water and any additional required top up and refit airlock. This wine should be racked every 2 months and bottled after 6-8 months and cellared another 6 months before drinking. [Adapted recipe from C.J.J. Berry’s 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

Dandelion Wine (6)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 2/3 cup (150 ml) white grape concentrate
* 2 lbs 7 ozs granulated sugar
* 2 lemon (juice and zest)
* 1 orange (juice and zest)
* 7 pts water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* all-purpose wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim away all stalk. Put flowers in primary and add boiling water. Stir and cover primary and set aside for no more than 3 days, stirring daily. Slowly pour contents through nylon straining bag into 1-gallon boiler and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Add the sugar and zest of citrus and bring to low boil, holding for one hour. Return to primary, add citrus juice and recover. When cooled to room temperature, stir in yeast nutrient and add yeast. Recover and ferment 3 days. Strain into secondary, add white grape concentrate and fit airlock. After wine clears, rack, top up and refit airlock. This wine should be racked and bottled after 6-8 months and cellared another 6 months before drinking. [Adapted recipe from C.J.J. Berry’s 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

Dandelion Wine (7)

* 4 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 cup white raisins
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 4 lemons
* 4 oranges
* 1 gallon water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* all-purpose wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim away all stalk. Put flowers in primary and add boiling water. Stir and cover primary and set aside 7 days, stirring twice daily. Slowly pour contents through nylon straining bag into clean primary and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Add the sugar, lemons and oranges cut into ¼-inch slices (peel and all) and raisins. Stir well to dissolve sugar and add yeast. Stir daily for 10 days, then strain into secondary. Fit airlock and set aside until wine clears. Rack and set aside another two months. rack again and set aside to age 4 months. Rack into bottles and cellar 6 months before drinking. [Adapted recipe from Mettja C. Roate’s How to Make Wine in Your Own Kitchen]

Dandelion Wine (8)

* 6 cups dandelion petals
* 1 lb white or golden raisins (chopped)
* 2 lbs granulated sugar
* 3 level tsp acid blends
* ½ tsp yeast energizer
* 1 gallon water
* ¼ tsp tannin
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Put flower petals and all ingredients except yeast into primary and add boiling water. Stir well to dissolve sugar and cover primary with plastic sheet. When cooled to room temperature, add yeast. Stir daily for 3 days. Strain into secondary and fit airlock. Rack in 3 weeks, top up and refit airlock. Rack again in 3 months. When clear and stable, rack into bottles. Age 6 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from Stanley F. Anderson and Raymond Hull’s The Art of Making Wine]

Dandelion Wine (9)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 23 oz Welch’s 100% White Grape Juice Frozen Concentrate
* sugar to starting S.G. of 1.090
* 6½ pts water
* wine yeast

In primary, mix grape concentrate and water and use a hydrometer to determine how much sugar to add. Stir well to dissolve sugar and then add yeast. Cover and allow to proceed through violent, initial fermentation. When fermentation settles down, wash and trim flowers of all stalks. Leave calyces (the green cuplike outer covering of the flower) on ¼ to ½ the flowers. Put flowers in nylon straining bag with a dozen sterilized glass marbles and tie closed. Immerse bag in fermenting primary and cover. Squeeze bag twice daily for 5 days and then remove bag and squeeze lightly. Discard flowers and transfer wine to secondary and fit airlock. Rack after 4 weeks, being careful not to splash wine, and top up and refit airlock. Rack again when wine clears and again 3 months later. Stabilize wine, wait 30 days and rack into bottles. Age at least on year before tasting. If kept for 3-4 years, the wine takes on a remarkable whiskey flavor. [Adapted recipe from W.H.T. Tayleur’s The Penguin Book of Home Brewing & Wine-Making]

Dandelion Wine (10)

* 4 cups dandelion petals
* ¾ lb white or golden raisins (chopped)
* 5-2/3 cups granulated sugar
* 3 level tsp acid blends
* 2 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 Campden tablet, crushed
* water to make 1 gallon
* Rhine wine yeast

Put flower petals and all ingredients except yeast into primary and stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover primary and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast and stir twice daily until specific gravity drops to 1.030 (about 7 days). Strain into secondary and fit airlock. Rack when wine clears, top up and refit airlock. Rack again every 2 months until no more sediments appear. Stablize, wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. Age 6-12 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from Robert and Eileen Frishman’s Enjoy Home Winemaking]

Dandelion Wine (11)

* 7 cups dandelion petals
* 1 lb white raisins (chopped)
* 2 lbs granulated sugar
* 3 level tsp acid blends
* ½ tsp yeast energizer
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 Campden tablet, crushed
* 1 gallon hot water
* wine yeast

Wash flowers and use petals only. Put petals and chopped raisins into nylon straining bag, tie closed and put in primary. Pour hot water over petals, stir in sugar until completely dissolved, and add all remaining ingredients except yeast. Cover primary and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast and stir twice daily until specific gravity drops to 1.040 (about 5-6 days). Strain and siphon wine off sediments into secondary and fit airlock. Rack when wine clears, top up and refit airlock. Rack again every 2 months until no more sediments appear. Stablize, wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. Age 6-12 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from Robert Massaccesi’s Winemaker’s Recipe Handbook]

Dandelion Wine (12)

* 6 qts dandelion petals
* 1 lb white raisins (chopped)
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons
* 2 oranges
* 1 gallon water
* Montrachet wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers trim off all greenery, leaving petals only. Put 4 quarts of petals in primary and thinly slice lemons and oranges onto petals. Pour in boiling water and cover. Stir daily for 10 days, then strain off pulp and squeeze to extract all liquid. Bring this liquid to boil and add 2½ pounds sugar, stirring to dissolve. Return to primary, add chopped raisins and cover. When cooled to room temperature, add wine yeast and recover. When fermentation is vigorous, add remaining two quarts of petals and recover primary. Ferment 7-10 days, stirring daily, and then strain wine into secondary and fit airlock without topping up. After two weeks, add ¼ cup of sugar-water (remaining ½ pound sugar dissolved in 1 cup water) every other day until secondary is full. Then ferment to completion. Rack and age 3 months, then again in additional 3 months. Stabilize, wait 2-3 weeks, and rack into bottles. Age another 6 months minimum. If bulk aged in oak cask for 6 months before bottling, this wine will improve for over 20 years with outstanding results. [Adapted recipe from Steven A. Krause’s Wines from the Wilds]

Dandelion Wine (13)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers, trimmed
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges, peeled
* ½ pectic enzyme
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 gallon water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all greenery. Put petals in primary and pour boiling water over petals. Cover and stir twice daily for two days. Pour into pot, add half the sugar and bring to simmer for 10 minutes, stirring well to dissolve sugar. Strain back into primary and recover. When cooled to room temperature, add activated yeast. Recover primary and stir daily for 5 days. Stir in remaining half of sugar and stir well to completely dissolve. Let settle overnight, rack into secondary, and attach airlock. When wine clears, rack every two months through three rackings. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks and bottle. Age 6-12 months before tasting. [Adapted recipe from Dorothy Alatorre’s Home Wines of North America]

Dandelion Wine (14)

* 6-8 cups dandelion flowers, trimmed
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 1 gallon water
* 3 tsps acid blend
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* Champagne or Montrachet wine yeast

Wash flowers and trim off all greenery, using petals only. Put petals in 1½-quart pan and cover with 1 quart water. Bring to simmer for 10 minutes, then put lid on pan and turn off heat. Let steep for 1-6 hours, depending on how strong you want the flavor to be. Meanwhile, boil remaining water and dissolve sugar, acid blend, yeast nutrient, and tannin. Strain dandelion petals through nylon straining bag and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Combine dandelion-water and remaining ingredients (except yeast) in primary and cover. When cooled to room temperature, add activated yeast. Ferment 3-5 days (until specific gravity is 1.020), then rack to secondary and attach airlock. After 30 additional days, rack, top up and reattach airlock. Set aside 3 months, then rack, top up and reattach airlock. Repeat after additional 3 months and add stabilizer. Wait 30 days and bottle. Cellar this wine for a year before drinking. Best served chilled. [Adapted recipe from Terry Garey’s The Joy of Home Winemaking]

Dandelion Wine (15)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 1½ lbs sultanas, chopped or minced
* 2½ lbs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 3 qts water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all stems. Combine flower heads, sultanas, sugar, and juice from oranges in primary and cover with boiling water. Stir well to dissolve sugar, then cover and wait until cooled to room temperature. Add tannin and yeast nutrient and stir well, then add activated yeast. After 7 days, strain and squeeze pulp before discarding. Transfer to secondary (do not top up) and attach airlock. After 2 weeks, top up and reattach airlock. After additional 2 weeks, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack every 2 months for 6 months. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks, and rack into bottles. Hide this wine a year before drinking. [Adapted recipe from Brian Leverett’s Winemaking Month by Month]

Dandelion Wine (16)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 qts unsulfited white grape juice
* 2¼ lbs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 5 pts water
* wine yeast

Put 1 quart water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all stems and greenery. Place flower heads in nylon straining bag, tie closed and put in primary. Pour boiling water over bag and cover. Meanwhile, put another quart of water on to boil and dissolve sugar in it. Add it, remaining pint of water and juice of oranges to primary. Stir in yeast nutrient and tannin, recover and set aside to cool. Add activated yeast. Squeeze bag 2-3 times daily for 3 days, then remove bad, squeeze to extract liquid, and recover primary. After wine has settled overnight, rack into secondary (do not top up) and attach airlock. After 2 weeks, top up and reattach airlock. After additional 2 weeks, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack every 2 months for 6 months. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks, and rack into bottles. Age one year before drinking. [Adapted recipe from Brian Leverett’s Winemaking Month by Month]

Dandelion Wine (17)

* 2 qts dandelion flowers
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 1 lemon
* 1 orange
* 1 gallon water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all stems and slice lemon and orange thinly. Combine flower heads and sliced citrus in primary and pour boiling water over them. Cover and leave for 10 days. Strain off all solids and add sugar and yeast nutrient, stirring well to completely dissolve. Add activated yeast and cover primary. After 3 days rack to secondary and fit airlock. Rack and stabilize after 2 months. Wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. Improves with age. [Adapted recipe from Mrs. Gennery-Taylor’s Easy to Make Wine]

Dandelion Wine (18)

* 1 gallon dandelion flowers
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 1 gallon water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all stems. Put flower heads in primary and pour boiling water over them. Cover and leave for 5 days. Strain off all solids and add sugar, stirring well to completely dissolve. Add activated yeast and cover primary. After 14 days rack to secondary and fit airlock. Rack and stabilize after 2 months. Wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. [Adapted recipe from H.E. Bravery’s Home Wine Making Without Failures]

Dandelion Wine (19)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 lb white raisins, finely chopped
* 2½ lbs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons (juice only)
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 gallon water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trim off all stems and greenery. Combine flowers and raisins in primary. Dissolve sugar in boiling water and add lemon juice and yeast nutrient. Pour over dandelions and raisins. When cooled to room temperature, add activated yeast and cover primary. Stir daily for 3 days. Strain through jelly bag, pour into secondary and fit airlock. Rack after 1 month, top up and reattach airlock. Rack and stabilize after 3 months. Wait another month and rack into bottles. Age 6 months. [Adapted recipe from Annabelle McIlnay’s Making Wine at Home]

Dandelion Wine (20)

* 9 cups dandelion petals
* 1 lb white or golden raisins, finely chopped or minced
* 2 lbs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons (juice and zest)
* 3 oranges (juice and zest)
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 7 pts water
* Côtes-du-Rhône or Hock wine yeast

Prepare flower petals beforehand. Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, prepare zest from citrus and set aside. Combine flowers and zest in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling water over it. Cover primary and squeeze bag several times a day for 3 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Pour liquid into pot and bring to boil. Stir in sugar until completely dissolved. Stir in chopped or minced raisins, cover pot and remove from heat, letting sit 45-60 minutes. In primary, combine juice of citrus fruit, tannin, yeast nutrient, and heated liquid. Cover and allow to cool to room temperature. Add pectic enzyme, cover and set aside 10-12 hours. Add activated yeast and cover. Stir twice daily for 5 days. Strain through nylon straining bag into secondary and discard raisins. Fit airlock and set aside. Rack after wine falls clear, adding crushed Campden tablet and topping up and reattaching airlock. Rack again every 2 months for 6 months, , adding another crushed Campden tablet during middle racking and stabilizing at last racking. Wait another month and rack into bottles. Cellar 6 months and enjoy a bottle. Cellar another 6 months and enjoy it all. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion Wine (21)

* 2 qts dandelion heads
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 4 oranges
* 1 gal water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and cut off the yellow heads, discarding the green parts. Put in primary and pour the boiling water over the flowers. Cover primary and leave for two days. Pour back into pot. Thinly peel the oranges and add peelings (no pith) to pot. Bring to boil and hold 10 minutes. Strain through double layer of muslin back into primary. Discard trappings and add sugar to liquor, stirring well to dissolve. When cool add the juice from the oranges and the yeast. Cover with cloth and set aside for 14 days. Rack into secondary and attach airlock. After wine clears and fermentation ceases, rack again, top up and refit airlock. Set aside to age 6 monthsand carefully rack into bottles. Allow bottles to age another 6 months and enjoy. [Adapted recipe from The National Federation of Women’s Institutes’ Home Made Wines, Syrups and Cordials]

Dandelion Wine (22)

* 1 gal dandelion heads
* ½ lb chopped golden raisins
* 4 lbs demerara sugar
* 1 lemon
* 1 orange
* ¼ oz ginger root
* 1 gal water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash dandelion heads and trim off stalks. Pour flowers in primary and then pour boiling water over flowers. Cover and leave 3 days, stirring frequently daily. Strain into a pot and add sugar, citrus rind (no pith) and bruised ginger. Bring to boil and simmer 30 minutes, stirring to disslve sugar. Strain again into primary and cover while cooling to room temperature. When cooled, add citrus juice, chopped raisins and wine yeast. Cover primary and stir daily until violent fermentation subsides. Strain into secondary and attach airlock. When wine clears, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack after 3 months and again 3 months later. Stabilize, set aside a month, and carefully rack into bottles. Keep a year before drinking. [Adapted recipe from The National Federation of Women’s Institutes’ Home Made Wines, Syrups and Cordials]

Dandelion Wine (23)

* 4 pts dandelion flowers
* 3½ lbs granulated sugar
* ½ oz acid blend
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 gal water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash dandelion heads and trim off stalks. Pour flowers in primary and then pour boiling water over flowers. Add sugar, acid blend and yeast nutrient. Stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover and let stand overnight. Drain, strain and lightly press pulp. Discard pulp and return to primary. Add activated yeast, cover, and leave until vigorous fermentation dies down. Rack into secondary and attach airlock. When wine clears and all signs of fermentation cease, wait on week and rack into clean secondary. Top up if necessary and reattach airlock. Allow 2 months for yeast lees to form. Rack again, top up and reattach airlock. Rack every 2 months until no new lees have formed, then stabilize, top up, and return the airlock. Wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. This wine improves with age for about 2 years. [Adapted recipe from Julius H. Fessler’s Guidelines to Practical Winemaking]

Dandelion Wine (24)

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 lb chopped white or golden raisins
* 3 lbs demerara sugar
* 2 lemons
* 1 orange
* 1 gal water
* wine yeast

Bring the water to the boil. Meanwhile, wash dandelion heads and trim off stalks. Pour flowers in primary and then pour boiling water over flowers. Cover and leave to steep 3 days, stirring several times daily. Transfer to a pot and add sugar and thinly pared rind (no pith) of the lemons and orange. Bring to boil for 1 hour. Put it all back in the primary and add the thinly sliced lemons and oranges, all pith removed. Cover and let cool to room temperature. Add yeast and cover again. Stir daily for 3 days, then strain into secondary. Add chopped raisins and attach airlock. After 2 months strain off raisins and allow the wine to settle overnight. Rack, top up and refit airlock. When wine clears, rack again, top up and refit airlock. Rack after additional 2 months and stabilize wine. Refit airlock, wait 2 weeks and carefully rack into bottles. Age at least 6 months. [Adapted recipe from Mrs. L. Kent’s Farmhouse Fare]

Dandelion Wine (25)

* 1/2 pint dandelion petals, tightly packed
* 1½ lbs white or golden sultanas, minced or blanched and pureed
* 1½ lbs granulated sugar
* 3 oranges, juiced, with zest of one
* 1 tsp malic acid
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 5 pts water
* wine yeast

Add all ingredients except dandelion petals and sugar to primary. When fermentation starts vigorously, add dandelion petals and ferment 3 days. Strain, stir in sugar well to dissolve, and transfer to secondary. Fit airlock and ferment to dryness, racking as needed. Bulk age under airlock 6-8 months. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks and rack into bottles. This is a light, dry wine with a distinctive flavor. [Adapted recipe from Betty Sampson’s The Art of Making Wine]

Dandelion Wine (26)

* 4 pts dandelion flowers in calyx
* 4 lbs demerara sugar
* 2-3 lemons, peeled and thinly sliced
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 gal spring water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trin off any stalk. When water boils, add flowers to it and return to boil for 20 minutes. Strain boiling liquor onto the sugar and stir well to dissolve sugar. Add sliced lemon, cover and wait until cooled to room temperature. Add activated yeast. When fermentation changes from vigorous to slow, strain liquor into secondary and squeeze lemon juice into wine. Attach airlock and set aside to clear. Rack into sanitized secondary, top up and reattach airlock. Bulk age under airlock 6-8 months, then rack into bottles. Age to taste. [Adapted recipe from Cindy Renfrow’s A Sip Through Time: A Collection of Old Brewing Recipes]

Dandelion Wine (27)

* 2 gals dandelion flower heads
* 3 lbs granulated sugar
* 3 lemons, peeled and thinly sliced
* 3 oranges, peeled and thinly sliced
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 gal water
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash flowers and trin off all greenery. Pour water over flowers, cover and leve to steep for 3 days. Strain and return liquor to primary. Peel citrus thinly and add peel to primary. Remove pith from peeled fruit and slice into primary. Add sugar and yeast nutrient and stir well to dissolve. Add yeast and cover primary. Let ferment 3 weeks. Strain, allow to settle overnight, then rack into secondary. Attach airlock and set aside to age. Rack every 3 months until wine is clear, inactive and no longer drops sediment. Rack into bottles and store for 6-12 months. [Adapted recipe from Jan Phillips’ Wild Edibles from Missouri]

Dandelion Wine (28)

* 1 qt dandelion petals
* ¾ lb chopped or minced golden raisins
* 2 lbs finely granulated sugar
* 3 lemons, juice and zest
* 3 oranges, juice and zest
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 7½ pts water
* wine yeast

Prepare flower petals beforehand. Put water on to boil and pour over dandelion petals in primary. After 2 hours, strain, press and discard petals. Return water to heat and bring to low boil. Stir in citrus juice and sugar, stirring well to dissolve. Add citrus zest and chopped raisins. Remove from heat and set aside to cool. When room temperature, stir in yeast nutrient and activated yeast and recover. Stir 3 times daily for 10-14 days. Strain into secondary and fit airlock. After 3 weeks, rack into sanitized seconary, top up and reattach airlock. When wine clears, wait 30 days and rack, top up and refit airlock. Repeat racking procedure every 3 months for 9 months. Rack into bottles and age 6-12 months longer. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion Wine (29)

* 9 cups dandelion petals
* 1 11-oz can Welch’s 100% White Grape Juice frozen concentrate
* 1 lb 10 ozs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons (juice and zest)
* 2 oranges (juice and zest)
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 6¼ pts water
* Côtes-du-Rhône or Hock wine yeast

Prepare flower petals beforehand. Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, prepare zest from citrus and set aside. Combine flowers and zest in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and pour boiling water over it. Cover primary and squeeze bag several times a day for 3 days. Drain and squeeze bag to extract all liquid. Pour liquid into primary and stir in sugar until completely dissolved. Stir in remaining ingredients except yeast, cover and set aside 10-12 hours. Add activated yeast and cover. Stir twice daily for 5 days. Transfer to secondary and fit airlock. Rack after wine falls clear, adding crushed Campden tablet and topping up and reattaching airlock. Rack again every 2 months for 6 months, adding another crushed Campden tablet during middle racking and stabilizing at last racking. Wait another month and rack into bottles. Cellar 6 months and enjoy a bottle. Cellar another 6 months and enjoy it all. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion Wine (30)

* 9 cups dandelion flowers (6 cups dandelion petals and 3 cups dandelion flower heads, trimmed)
* 1 11-oz can Welch’s 100% White Grape Juice frozen concentrate
* 1 lb 10 ozs granulated sugar
* 2 lemons (juice only)
* 2 oranges (juice only)
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 6¼ pts water
* White Burgundy wine yeast

In primary, combine all ingredients except dandelions and yeast. Stir well to completely dissolve sugar. Stir in dandelions, over primary and set aside 10-12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. Stir twice daily until violent fermentation subsides. Pick and prepare flower petals and heads. For dandelion flower heads, wash and trim off stems only. Put dandelion petals and heads in nylon straining bag with 1 dozen sterilized glass marbles for weight. Tie bag and submerge in liquid in primary. Gently squeeze and dunk bag several times a day for 5 days. Drain bag, squeezing lightly only, and transfer liquid to secondary. Fit airlock and rack after 2 weeks, topping up and refitting airlock afterward. After wine falls clear, wait 2 weeks and rack after adding 1 crushed Campden tablet to clean secondary. Thereafter, rack every 2 months for 6 months, adding another crushed Campden tablet during middle racking and stabilizing at last racking. Wait another month and rack into bottles. This wine is for the long term and for winning competitions, so cellar it for 2 years before tasting. [Author’s own recipe]


Dandelion-Based Wines

“Don’t overwhelm the delicate flavor of the dandelions....” Jack Keller

Dandlion-based wines are wines made from dandelion flowers and at least one other major ingredient other than a body-builder such as raisins, sultanas or white grape (juice or concentrate).

I’ve made wine with dandelions and numerous other ingredients—most recently with strawberries—and have included twelve of these combinations below. Because many ingredients ripen much later than dandelion season, one can use frozen ingredients or can freeze the dandelion petals for later use. However, strawberries, peaches, watermelon, cantaloupe, and many other fruit ripen while dandelions are still in bloom so both can be fresh.

The recipes listed below are not inclusive. I can think of perhaps dozens of other ingredients that will probably work well with dandlions. I just haven’t tried them yet. When I do, you can be sure I’ll add them here.
Dandelion and Apricot Wine

* 3 qts dandelion petals
* 16 apricots
* 1/4 cup chopped or minced golden raisins
* juice and zest of 2 lemons and 1 orange
* 5 cups sugar
* 7¼ pts water
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, juice the citrus fruit and remove zest. Destone the apricots and chop them and raisins. Combine all ingredients except water, pectic enzyme and yeast in primary. Pour boiling water over ingredients in primary and stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover and set aside until cooled to room temperature. Add pectic enzyme, recover and set aside 10 hours. Add activated yeast and recover. Stir daily and, after 5 days of active fermentation, strain off solids and transfer liquid to secondary. Do not top up. Attach airlock and set aside additional 5 days. Top up and reattach airlock. When wine clears, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack, top up and reattach airlock at 3-month intervals until no sediments form during 3-month period. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks and carefully rack into bottles. Allow 6 months before tasting, but improves with age. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion, Banana and Persimmon Wine

* 3 pts dandelion petals
* 2 ripe bananas
* 2 ripe persimmons
* 1/4 cup chopped or minced golden raisins
* 3/4 tsp acid blend
* 5 cups sugar
* 7 pts water
* ¾ tsp pectic enzyme
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Peel and thinly slice two very ripe bananas into 2 cups water. Bring water to boil, reduce heat and simmer 15 minutes. Turn off heat, skim off scum and strain water into primary. Add pulp of two very ripe persimmons and all dandelion petals to primary, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to cool. Add chopped (or minced) raisins, sugar, acid blend, pectic enzyme, yeast nutrient and remaining water. Stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover primary, wait 12 hours and add yeast. Stir daily for 7-10 days and strain off solids. Let stand additional 24 hours and rack. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and set aside for 4 weeks. Rack, top up and set aside another 4 weeks, then rack again. Age under airlock 4-6 months. Stabilize, wait 10 days, rack final time, sweeten if desired, and bottle. This wine must age an additional 6 months, but will be worth the time invested. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Blackberry Wine

* 2 quarts dandelions petals
* 2 cups fresh or frozen blackberries
* 2-1/4 lbs finely granulated sugar
* 1 large lemon
* 1 large orange
* 5-1/2 pts water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1/4 tsp tannin
* wine yeast

Pick dandelion and remove and save only the petals, discarding the remainder. Put water on to boil. While water is heating, thinly peel the lemon and orange. Remove and discard pith from the lemon and orange and slice their fruit thinly. Put lemon and orange slices, peelings, flower petals, and blackberries in nylon straining bag, tie closed and put in primary. Add sugar to primary and pour boiling water over straining bag. Stir well to thoroughly dissolve sugar. Cover primary and set aside to cool. When room temperature, stir in tannin, yeast nutrient and activated wine yeast. Recover primary. Squeeze bag daily to liberate flavors and then stir liquid. After 5th day, drip drain bag over primary, squeezing gently, and discard petals and fruit pulp. Dissolve crushed Campden tablet in 1/2 cup warm water and stir into primary. Recover and ferment to specific gravity of 1.010 (14-21 days). Rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days for 90 days. After racking, stabilize, allow to settle 2 weeks, and rack into bottles. Allow to age at least one year. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Black Raspberry Wine

* 2 quarts dandelions blossoms
* 1 cup fresh or frozen black raspberries
* 5 cups honey
* 1 lemon
* 1 orange
* 4-inch cinnamon stick
* 5-1/2 pts water
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1/4 tsp tannin
* wine yeast

Pick the dandelion flowers and then remove and save only the petals, discarding the remainder. Put water on to boil. While water is heating, thinly peel the lemon and orange. Remove and discard pith from the lemon and orange and slice their fruit thinly. Put lemon and orange slices, peeling, flower petals, cinnamon stick, and raspberries in nylon straining bag, tie closed and put in primary. Add honey to primary and pour boiling water over straining bag. Stir to mix honey and water and continue until honey is disolved. Cover primary and as water cools stir in tannin and yeast nutrient. When room temperature, sprinkle yeast over liquid and recover. Fermentation should start within hours. Squeeze bag daily to liberate flavors and then stir liquid. After 5th day, drip drain bag over primary, squeezing gently, and discard petals and fruit pulp. Dissolve crushed Campden tablet in 1/2 cup warm water and stir into primary. Recover and ferment to specific gravity of 1.010 (14-21 days). Rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days for 90 days. After racking, stabilize, allow to settle 2 weeks, and rack into bottles. Allow to age at least one year. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Elderflower Wine

* 2 qts dandelion petals
* 4 ozs dried elderflowers
* juice of 2 lemons, 1 orange
* 5-2/3 cups granulated sugar
* 7½ pts water
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Wash dandelions and depetal them, discarding all else. Juice the citrus and combine all ingredients except yeast in primary, stirring well to dissolve sugar. Cover and set in cool place for 4 days or cold place (refrigerator) for one week. Add activated yeast and stir daily during vigorous fermentation (5-7 days). Strain off and discard solids after pressing lightly to extract most liquid. Transfer to secondary but do not top up. Attach airlock and ferment 30 days. Rack, top up and reattach airlock. Repeat every 2 months until wine clears and no additional sediment falls out between rackings. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks, sweeten if desired, and bottle. Allow to age at least 6 months in bottles, but improves with additional age. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Kiwi Wine

* 3 qts dandelion petals
* 12-16 kiwis
* 1/4 cup chopped or minced golden raisins
* juice and zest of 2 lemons and 1 orange
* 5 cups sugar
* 7¼ pts water
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, juice the citrus fruit and remove zest. Chop the raisins and slice kiwi fruit thinly (no need to peel). Combine dandelion petals, chopped raisins, zest of citrus fruit, and yeast nutrient in primary. Pour boiling water over ingredients in primary and stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover and set aside until cooled to room temperature. Add sliced kiwi, citrus juice and crushed Campden tablet. Cover and set aside 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, recover and set aside additional 10 hours. Add activated yeast and recover. Stir daily and, after 5 days of active fermentation, strain off solids and transfer liquid to secondary. Do not top up. Attach airlock and set aside additional 5 days. Top up and reattach airlock. When wine clears, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack, top up and reattach airlock at 3-month intervals until no sediments form during 3-month period. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks and carefully rack into bottles. Allow 6 months before tasting, but improves with age. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Peach Wine

* 3 qts dandelion petals
* 3 lbs ripe, flavorful peaches
* 1/4 cup chopped or minced golden raisins
* juice and zest of 2 lemons and 1 orange
* 5 cups sugar
* 6¾ pts water
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* 1 tsp pectic enzyme
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, juice the citrus fruit and remove zest. Destone the peaches and chop them and raisins. Combine all ingredients except water, pectic enzyme and yeast in primary. Pour boiling water over ingredients in primary and stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover and set aside until cooled to room temperature. Add pectic enzyme, recover and set aside 10 hours. Add activated yeast and recover. Stir daily and, after 5 days of active fermentation, strain off solids and transfer liquid to secondary. Do not top up. Attach airlock and set aside additional 5 days. Top up and reattach airlock. When wine clears, rack, top up and refit airlock. Rack, top up and reattach airlock at 3-month intervals until no sediments form during 3-month period. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks and carefully rack into bottles. Allow 6 months before tasting, but improves with age. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Pineapple Dessert Wine

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 1 very ripe pineapple
* 7 pts water
* juice and zest of 2 lemons
* 4 lbs granulated sugar
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* high alcohol wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash dandelion flowers and trim off all greenery. In primary, pour boiling water over dandelion petals. Cover and set aside 5 days. Strain through nylon straining bag and squeeze well to extract all flavor. Remove stem and top from pinapple. Do not peel or core, but slice crossways into ½-inch slices. Cut slices into pieces ½-¾-inch square, saving juice that issues from cutting operation. Combine half the sugar and all remaining ingredients except yeast. Cover and set aside 12 hours. Add activated yeast, recover and stir daily until specific gravity drops to 1.010. Stir in remaining sugar until completely dissolved, recover and set aside until specific gravity again drops to 1.010. Strain through nylon staining bag and transfer liquor into secondary. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days until wine clears. After additional 60 days, rack, top up, and stabilize. Wait 10 days, rack, sweeten to s.g. 1.020 and bottle. Allow to age in bottles one year. This wine may be served on hot afternoon chilled or over cracked ice, or after meal as a dessert wine. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Rhubarb Wine

* 3 qts dandelion flowers
* 4 qts rhubarb stalks, chopped
* 2¼ lbs finely granulated sugar
* ½ tsp pectic enzyme
* ¼ tsp tannin
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Put water on to boil. Meanwhile, wash dandelion flowers and trim off all greenery. In primary, pour boiling water over dandelion petals. Cover and set aside overnight. Cut rhubarb stalks into ½-inch pieces and add to primary with crushed Campden tablet. Recover and wait 12 hours. Stir in remaining ingredients except yeast, recover and wait 10 hours. Add activated yeast and recover. Stir and mash rhubarb pieces daily for 10 days. Strain through nylon straining bag, squeezing well to extract liquid and flavor. Transfer to secondary and attach airlock. Rack after 2 weeks, top up and refit airlock. Rack, top up and reattach airlock every 2 months until wine clears and deposits no new sediments between rackings. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks, sweeten if desired, and rack into bottles. Allow to age in bottles 6 months to one year. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Strawberry Wine

* 2 qts dandelion petals
* 2 lb fresh or frozen strawberries
* juice of 1 lemon and 2 oranges
* 2 lbs granulated sugar
* ¾ tsp pectic enzyme
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Wash dandelions and depetal them, discarding all else. Trim stems off strawberries and chop coarsely. Juice the citrus and combine all ingredients except yeast and pectic enzyme in primary, stirring well to dissolve sugar. Cover and set in cool place for 12 hours. Stir in pectic enzyme, recover and set aside additional 12 hours. Add activated yeast and stir daily during vigorous fermentation (5-7 days). Strain off and discard solids after pressing lightly to extract most liquid. Transfer to secondary but do not top up. Attach airlock and ferment 30 days. Rack, top up and reattach airlock. Repeat every 2 months until wine clears and no additional sediment falls out between rackings. Stabilize, wait 2 weeks, sweeten if desired, and bottle. Allow to age at least 6 months before tasting. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Watermelon Wine

* 3 cups dandelion petals
* 1/2 large watermelon
* 3 cups dandelion petals
* 1/4 cup chopped or minced golden raisins
* juice of 1 lemon, 1 orange
* 5 cups sugar
* 3 qts water
* 1 tsp acid blend
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* Champagne or Sauterne wine yeast

Put petals in crock or bowl and pour 1 quart boiling water over them. Cover and allow to seep 3 days. Strain through nylon straining bag and set liquid aside. Extract the juice from watermelon. In primary, mix watermelon juice, dandelion flower-water, citrus juice, and enough water to raise total to 1 gallon. Add all other ingredients except yeast to primary fermentation vessel and stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover with cloth and set aside 24 hours. Add yeast, stir daily for 7-10 days and strain off raisins. Let stand additional 24 hours and rack. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and set aside for 4 weeks. Rack and set aside another 4 weeks, then rack again. Allow to clear, then rack final time and bottle. This is for a dry wine, but you may stabilize and sweeten to taste before bottling if you must. Allow to age one year. This is a delicate yet refreshing dry wine you’ll want to save for very special occasions. It will store well for about 3 years, then slowly deteriorate due to the absence of tannin. [Author’s own recipe]

Dandelion and Yellow Rose Petal Wine

* 3 pts dandelion petals
* 3 pts fragrant yellow rose petals
* ½ pt white grape concentrate
* 7¼ pts water
* juice and zest of 2 lemons, 1 orange
* 2½ lbs granulated sugar
* 1 crushed Campden tablet
* ¼ tsp pectic enzyme
* 1 tsp yeast nutrient
* wine yeast

Wash and depetal flowers. Place in primary, add crushed Campden tablet and water. Cover and set aside 3 days. Add remaining ingredients except yeast. Recover, set aside 12 hours and add wine yeast. Cover and ferment 5-7 days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon straining bag, squeezing petals lightly to extract additional flavor. Fit airlock and ferment 30 days. Rack, top up, refit airlock, and repeat 30 days later. After additional 60 days, rack, top up, and stabilize. Wait 2 weeks, sweeten to taste and bottle. Allow to age in bottles one year. [Author’s own recipe]


Dandelion Wine
Recipe file created November 14, 1999.
When we moved into our new house, I was amazed at the number of dandelions growing in the front lawn. So, I harvested them. The neighbours were wondering about me....

Ingredients
Age all wines one year or more.

* 1 gallon dandelion flowers, fresh
* 5 1/2 cups granulated sugar
* 1 teaspoon yeast nutrient
* 2 oranges, juice and rind
* 2 lemons, juice and rind
* 2 campden tablets
* 1 package wine yeast
* 1 gallon water, boiling

* 4 cups dandelion flowers, fresh
* 1 pound raisins
* 1 - 4 inch cinnamon stick
* 5 1/2 cups granulated sugar
* 1 teaspoon yeast nutrient
* 2 oranges, juice and rind
* 2 lemons, juice and rind
* 2 campden tablets
* 1 package wine yeast
* 1 gallon water, boiling

Pinch off any green calyces. Place in primary fermentor. Add water, and let cool. Add crushed campden tablets. Add raisins and cinnamon stick, if using. Let sit for three days, stirring frequently.

Strain and discard flowers. Add orange and lemon juice and grated rind. Stir in sugar and nutrients. Specific gravity should be between 1.100 and 1.110. Sprinkle yeast over the mixture and stir. Stir daily for three or four days, until frothing stops.

Strain. Siphon into secondary fermentor and place airlock.

For a dry wine, rack in three weeks, and every three months for one year. Bottle.

For a sweet wine, rack at three weeks. Add 1/2 cup sugar dissolved in 1 cup wine. Stir gently, and place back into secondary fermentor. Repeat process every six weeks until fermentation does not restart with the addition of sugar. Rack every three months until one year old. Bottle.

This wine is best if you can refrain from drinking it for two full years from the date it was started. It will definitely improve with age.


9,588 posted on 05/13/2011 7:14:04 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All; DelaWhere

World Naked Gardening Day - Saturday May 14, 2011

It was a perfect morning in Pat Brown’s back yard - temperature in the low 70s,
no rain, sunny. She was itching to take off her clothes and start gardening.
You heard right.

“I do garden in the nude, and I enjoy it,” admitted Brown, 69, a master gardener
living near Eugene, Ore.


City digging in Halifax, Nova Scotia

It’s not every day a high school gets turned into a farm. But that’s what’s going
on at the corner of Bell Road and Robie Street, where Queen Elizabeth High School
once stood. Partners for Care, a registered not-for-profit charity that ventures
to raise money for the city’s hospitals, had the idea to reclaim the school site,
to be called the Common Roots Urban Farm.


“Dog Gone Farm” in Vancouver

My son gave me a sign he had hand-carved for Christmas. “Dog Gone Farm”, it reads,
in jaunty red letters (inspired by our fence jumping dog). With the sign hung proudly
on the front door, it was official. We were farmers. We grow fruits and vegetables,
build soil, and raise chickens, which wouldn’t be unusual if it weren’t for the
fact that we do all this in the middle of the city.


Area’s first urban farm takes root in Valencia

There’s more than just okra, peas and squash growing at the Valencia Park Community
Center in Shreveport. Young minds are growing the skills needed to nurture a dream
that began with a small plot of land and will hopefully end up a source for fresh
food.


Phones That Make Your Garden Grow

The hardware-known as Plant Factories-are computer-controlled boxes that provide
lighting, water temperature, air temperature, nutrients and oxygen gas to your
plants. Each plant box has a blue LED light as well as red LED light, which, according
to Farmbox, can be used to control the taste or the growth rate of your plant!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read stories here:
City Farmer News [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=fclqmpbab&et=1105520999043&s=1304&e=001KwDlu8XwhVGHgfCR1-potJWg5wDNgL-iTR6AXRdMcxpfX4UsLmkcf1dqV0KyIMUJ_RJZeHkMN6OCVSvlVuUvgWZtKhVm7p3zjE1Mi4N5ySh1UyBITba4Gg==]
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michael Levenston
City Farmer - Canada’s Office of Urban Agriculture
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


9,589 posted on 05/13/2011 8:40:12 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8814 | View Replies]

To: All

http://www.desertusa.com/magdec97/eating/nopales.html

Prickly Pear Cactus Pads

Desert Lil’s Delicacies A Monthly Food Feature

Nopales is the Spanish name for Prickly Pear Cactus pads.
Prickly Pear Cactus are members of the Opuntia genus,
and produce both nopales, a vegetable, and tuna, a fruit.

Native Americans used Nopales to poultice bruises and
dress wounds. They also boiled and crushed the pads,
then added the sticky juice to mortar or whitewash to
increase adhesiveness.

Nopales have been more popular as a food source in Mexico
for hundreds of years. Recently, they have gained increasing
popularity in the United States as well.

As a vegetable, Nopales can be used in salads, casseroles,
soups, grilled and prepared in a variety of other ways. Nopales
are somewhat tart and have a green bean- or asparagus -like flavor.

Nopales are often compared to Okra, because of the sticky
substance they release when cooked. This should be rinsed
off before serving or before further preparation as an ingredient.

Nopales can be purchased year-round in Mexican markets and
some grocery stores in the U.S. They can also easily be harvested
from your own Prickly Pear Cactus growing on your property.
Selection & Preparation

Select small or medium sized, firm pads. Make sure the pads you
select are not wrinkled, soggy or too soft. These pads (or paddles)
are modified branches, which range in color from pale to dark green.
They also contain sharp, thorny needles, which are modified leaves.

These, thorny needles must be removed with a knife or vegetable
peeler before cooking. Remove any nodules, the thick stem, and
trim the edges off of the pads as well. Make sure you wear rubber
or leather gloves when handling Nopales to avoid injury from the
thorny needles.

Wash thoroughly and follow the recipe instructions below. Nopales
can be tightly wrapped and stored in a refrigerator for one to two weeks.

Nutritional Facts
Serving Size 1 cup raw (142g)
Calories 60 Calories from Fat 10
Amount Per Serving % daily value
Total Fat 1g 1%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 5mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 14g 5%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars NA
Protein 1g
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 32%
Calcium 8%
Iron 2%
Recipes

Nopales on The Grill

Prepare the cactus pads as described in the preparation
section above. Once you have removed the needles,
nodules and thoroughly washed the pads, they are ready
for the grill. Cook each pad for approximately 10 to 12
minutes on each side. While grilling, brush each side of
the cactus pad with olive oil or a flavored oil of your choice.
Pepper or garlic-flavored oil are often used on grilled Nopales.

Scrambled Nopales

* 1 or 2 cactus pads
* 8 Eggs
* 1/4 lb. of cheese (your choice)
* salt & pepper to taste

Prepare the cactus pads as described in the preparation
section above. Once you have removed the needles,
nodules and thoroughly washed the pads, slice into
bite-size pieces. Sauté the sliced pads in a small amount
of butter for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Beat the eggs in a mixing bowl; add shredded cheese and
the sautéed cactus pieces. Pour the egg mixture into a skillet
and scramble. Serve warm with salt and pepper to taste.

Nopales Rellenos (Stuffed Cactus Pads)

* 12 tender cactus pads
* 3 cups of water
* 6 slices of Machego or Panela cheese
* 1/4 onion, thinly sliced lengthwise
* 1 clove of garlic
* Salt to taste
* 1/2 cup of flour
* 4 eggs, separated
* 1 1/2 cups vegetable or olive oil
* 1 can of tomato sauce (12 ounces)

Prepare the cactus pads as described in the preparation
section above. Once you have removed the needles,
nodules and thoroughly washed the ads, boil in 3 cups
of water with the garlic, onion, and salt. Drain.

On each of 6 cactus pads place a slice of cheese and 3 to
4 pieces of onion. Top with another cactus pad, secure
with wooden toothpicks and coat with flour.

Beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form, then add the
yolks and beat for 1 to 2 minutes more to create a batter.

Heat the oil in a frying pan, dip the stuffed cactus pads
into the egg batter and fry until golden on both sides.
Drain on paper towels.

Serve drenched with cooked tomato sauce.

Nopales Salsa

* 1 lb. cleaned cactus pads
* 1/2 lb. tomatillos
* 1 small white onion
* 2 garlic cloves
* 2 poblano peppers
* 1/2 tsp. of salt
* 2 tsp.of fresh lime juice
* 1/2 tsp.of cumin
* 2 Tbs. cilantro

Prepare the cactus pads as described in the preparation
section above. Once you have removed the needles,
nodules and thoroughly washed the pads, grill for about
7 minutes on each side. Slice the grilled pads into strips.
Place tomatillos, cubed onions and garlic in a baking dish,
then cook in a 450-degree oven for 20-25 minutes. Roast
poblanos on grill or under the broiler, then peel them and
remove the seeds. Place all ingredients in a blender and
mix until well chopped. A little water may be needed to
moisten the salsa. Serve chilled with chips or use to
season tacos, burritos or other Mexican dishes.

Nopales Salad

* 2.2 lbs. Nopales (cactus pads)
* 1 onion, halved
* 4 cups water
* 2 Tbs. salt
* 2 large tomatoes, chopped
* 1 large onion, chopped
* 4 green chiles - serrano or jalapeno - chopped

Prepare the cactus pads as described in the preparation
section above. Once you have removed the needles,
nodules and thoroughly washed the pads, chop into
bite-size pieces. Place the chopped Nopales into a pan
with the 4 cups of water, halved onion and salt. Bring to
a boil, reduce heat and simmer 30-45 minutes or until
tender. Drain Nopales and combine with remaining
ingredients. Taste and adjust seasoning, adding more
salt if necessary. This dish gets better if you let is sit a
few hours in the refrigerator before serving. Serves 4
or more.


Prickly Pear Puree

Wash and Boil for a few minutes till the spines drop
off. Kind of like when you dip a peach in boiling
water to slip the skin, only you have to leave this in
a little longer. Peel the prickly pears. Cut in half
with a knife and scoop out the seeds with a melon
baller. Force the raw pulp through a medium to fine
strainer or a mill. Freeze either fruit pulp or the
puree. Simply pack into freezer containers and seal.
Thaw before using.
Prickly Pear Salad Dressing

1/2 cup prickly pear puree
1/3 cup salad oil (not olive oil)
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. sugar
3 to 4 Tbs. tarragon white wine vinegar
Shake all ingredients together in a covered jar. Makes
about 1 cup . This pretty pink dressing is thin like
an oil and vinegar dressing, but lower in calories.
Good on fruit salads and tossed green salads.


Harvesting Prickly Pears, PP
Watch the flowers. After the bloom falls off or wilts,
a little pear called a tuna, will start to form from
the base of the flower. It starts off green and will
start to turn pink. Now depending on the type of
PP you have, it will go orange or purple red. You
are now ready to pick your prickly pears. Some of
the pears should still be green, or partially green.
To pick the pears, well it doesn’t hurt to wear gloves
but if your careful you don’t need them. You use
kitchen tongs (the metal ones with the triangle end)
to pick the pears, some people even wrap them with
duct tape at the ends. You will also need plastic
grocery bags to put them in.
You need to pick some with only a little bit of color
to go with the ripe ones for added pectin. You’ll
need about 3 quarts of fruit. I usually pick two bags
full.
Pour them out of the bags into your kitchen sink and
rinse them. Just run some water over them.
You can use a steam juicer with them but to tell you
truth I’ve never used one so your on your own with
that.
Now the tools you’ll need is a big pot like a BWB pot.
Have you seen those whisks that open up so you can use
them for frying? It’s hinged and has three loops of wire
coming out of each end. This is real good for handling
the pears, but you can use tongs if you don’t have them.
Next you need a Mellon ball-er.
A potato masher.
knife
A Juicing bag or a pillow case.
One you don’t mind turning pink.
Blender, Don’t really need one but I use one.
Next step, put the pears in your pot and cover with
water. Have your water level just above the pear
level. Bring to a boil. Just boil for five minutes.
This is to loosen those annoying little stickers.
Now poor it all into the sink again and rinse with
cold water. Rinse those little buggers down the drain.
The stickers not the pears. Now comes the fun part.
Ha, ha. Using your tongs or the hinged whisk, pick up
the pears one at a time and slice them in half.
Now pick up on half at a time and use the Mellon
ball-er to scoop out the pocket of seeds in fat part of
the pear. Now if you want to harvest the pulp you need
cut away the outside and discard it. If you want to
harvest the juice throw those sliced, seeded pears back
into the rinsed out pot. Add water on level with the
pears. Some should poke out at the water level. Boil
again and after about 10 minutes, mash those suckers
with your potato masher. Or you could ladle out the
pears and put them in your blender and puree them.
Then add them back to the pot and boil them for another
ten minutes.
I use a juicing bag, but I’ve used a pillow case when I
couldn’t find my juicing bag tripod.
If you have the tripod suspend it over a bowl and ladle
the pp mess in the pot into the bag. Let me warn you,
this stuff stains. Have on old clothes or an apron. You
know what an apron is, right? Leave it to Beaver’s
mother wore one on almost every episode. I’ve to two
and the only time they come off the hook is when it’s
time to juice PP’s. When the juice has dropped into the
bowl, about 15 to 20 minutes, the pulp can be put in a
compost heap or down the garbage disposal.
Just empty the bag of the pulp and fill it up again till
all the pulp is juiced.
Now if you want to use a bigger bag, like the pillow case
you can put all the pulp in it, suspended over a large
bowl and leave it there till morning.
Either way you’ve got juice.


http://www.fbnr.com/ecguide/ecghtml/67115.htm

Cactus

Cactus refers to two very different and distinct parts of a
cactus plant: the cactus pear and cactus pad. The cactus
pear, also called prickly pear, is the large, egg-shaped
berry of the cactus plant. Its prickly skin ranges in color
from green to deep magenta, and its pulp, dotted with
black seeds, is yellow-green to gold. It has a melonlike
aroma and mild, sweet flavor. Erroneously referred to as
leaves, the cactus pads, or nopales, are succulent but
crunchy, with a flavor that resembles both asparagus
and bell peppers.

Uses

* Prickly pears are most often eaten raw, or they can
be cut up for fruit salads.
* Prickly pear pulp may be used for beverages and jams.
* Cactus pads, or nopales, mix well in vegetable side
dishes, may be battered and deep fried, and combine
especially well with scrambled eggs.

Availability

Prickly pears are available in large supermarkets and produce
markets from autumn through spring. Cactus pads are available
year-round, but they are more tender and juicy in the spring.
Canned nopalitos, which are cactus pads chopped or cut into
strips, are available pickled or packed in water.

Buying Tips

Prickly pears should have a deep, even color and yield slightly
to pressure. Cactus pads should be small, firm and green with
no signs of wrinkling.

Storage

Ripen prickly pears at room temperature until soft and then
store in the refrigerator up to one week. Refrigerate cactus
pads, tightly wrapped in plastic, for up to a week.

Basic Preparation

The sharp spines of prickly pears are removed before shipping,
but the fibrous spines remain in the skin. If these spines become
embedded in your skin, they are difficult to remove so it’s best
to hold the fruit by the ends or wear protective gloves.
Cut a slice from each end with a sharp knife. Peel prickly pears
using a paring knife or a vegetable peeler. Some cooks suggest
scoring the skin from end to end, gripping the skin between the
blade of the paring knife and your thumb, and carefully pulling
it off. Cut the pulp into slices and remove the seeds. Serve
prickly pears chilled.

Use a paring knife or a vegetable peeler to remove the spines
and “eyes” from the nopales and to trim the outside edges. Chop
or cut them into strips. Although they can be eaten raw, cactus
pads are best if steamed or simmered until tender.


http://www.succulent-plant.com/crecipe.html
Cactus Recipes

I have not tried these recipes personally, as cactus (Opuntia sp.)
pads are not generally available in U.K. supermarkets. However,
Opuntia species have been introduced and grow in many countries.
Do be careful to remove the spines and glochids completely before
eating any Opuntia pads. These recipes are only for Opuntia pads
and should not be adapted for other species of cacti, some of
which are poisonous. Some of these recipes were sent by
Dr. Andreas Laras.
Cactus Pads - also called: Nopalitos and Cactus Leaves

All opuntia species are edible (non-toxic) but some species are
easier to use than others. Two parts of the plant are edible, the
pads (nopalitos) and the pear (tuna). The pads are vegetable
and the pear is fruit. The State of Texas named the prickly pear
cactus as the state fruit/vegetable in 1995. Texas A&M in
Kingsville, TX has done extensive work on a cultivar designated
as the 1308 which is spineless, resists cold weather and contains
less mucilage. While young opuntia pads contain less mucillage,
some work has been done on cactus mucilage as a possible
dietary supplement to increase soluble fiber intake which has
various health benefits.

About 40,000 pounds of pads come into Texas each day from
Mexico where the are available in any large grocery. They are
spineless varieties and are available already washed and diced
or as whole pads. The fruits are often made into tuna jelly.
Cactus Pads contain large amounts of Vitamin A and C, and
also a fair amount of B vitamins and iron.

You used to have to go “South of the border, down Mexico
way...” as the old song says , to enjoy Nopales or Cactus Pads.
Burritos have found their way into our kitchens; so have tamales,
refried beans, tacos , and hot peppers. Now we can also enjoy
the soft but crunchy, tangy, and silky textured Nopales right here
at home. If you do not like the slippery taste of Okra, Nopales
may not be for you. If you are willing to sample this interesting
vegetable which is often served in Mexico, choose medium sized,
firm pads. Avoid purchasing limp dry , or soggy pads. Wrapped
in plastic they should keep in the refrigerator for several weeks.

But, where ever you are, if you want to try a pad off your Opuntia,
just chose a new tender pad of new growth. To clean Cactus Pads,
take an ordinary kitchen peeler and remove spines and eyes. Wash
well. Trim edge to remove bruised and dry parts and wash well again,
washing off some of the sticky liquid the plant exudes, and put it
into your favorite recipe. If you just want to taste it, you can dice it
up to about the size of small green beans, and simmer in water or
saute in butter for a few minutes. Salt to taste and enjoy.

Nopales can be eaten raw but are preferred cooked by most people.
They can be steamed over boiling water for a few minutes and then
combined with other foods. Favorites are Nopales with eggs, added
to soups or chili, mixed into tortilla fillings, or even stuffed with
cheese and deep fried. Experiment with them and learn to enjoy
their unusual texture and taste.

Cactus recipes I
* Grilled Cactus Pads
* 1 pound cactus leaves
* olive oil

This is an interesting treat for a cookout.
Scrub cactus leaves well with a vegetable
scrubber to remove any spines that may be
on them. With the end of a potato peeler cut
around the spiney nodules and remove them.
Make sure that all are removed. Grill the leaves
over charcoal or wood fire for 10 to 12 minutes
on each side. Thicker leaves may take slightly
longer to grill. Brush leaves with oil occasionally
while grilling. Serve hot.


* Scrambled Eggs Arizona Style
* 1 or 2 cactus leaves
* 8 eggs
* 1/4 pound cheese
* Salt and pepper to taste

Scrub cactus leaves and remove spines.
Use a potato peeler to cut around spiney
nodules and remove. Slice cactus leaves into
bite-size pieces. Saute cactus leaves in a
small amount of butter for 5 minutes. Remove.
Beat eggs in a mixing bowl and add shredded
cheese and cooked cactus leaves. Pour in
heated skillet and scramble. Serve warm.


* Pork Stew with Nopales
* 1 or 2 nopales pads
* 2 pounds lean pork roast, cut into cubes 2 cups water
* 3 fresh jalapeno peppers
* 1 clove minced garlic
* 1 pound tomatoes
* 2 cups chicken stock
* Salt and pepper to taste

Simmer pork in salted water for 2 hours or until
cooked and tender. About 30 minutes before
pork is finished add prepared nopales sliced
into bite-size pieces. Meanwhile, in a blender
combine the garlic, jalapenos and some water.
Puree until smooth. Peel the tomatoes, remove
seeds and chop. In a large pot place the tomatoes,
puree, pork and nopales. Add chicken stock and
simmer for about 1 1/2 or 2 hours until tender.
Salt and peper to taste.


* Sopa de Hongos y Nopales
(Mushroom-Cactus Soup with Roasted Tomatillos)
* 1 lb. nopales (cactus paddles)
* 1/2 lb. fresh tomatillos (about 6 medium), husked & washed
* 1/2 lb. ripe plum tomatoes (2 medium)
* 8 cloves garlic, unpeeled
* 2 small, fresh, hot green chiles (such as
stems removed
* 1 onion, cut in to 1/2” thick slices
* 8 cups defatted reduced-sodium chicken stock
* 8 large sprigs cilantro (oh no!)
* 2 small sprigs epazote (optional)
* 1/2 small hoja santa or 1/4 tsp. ground aniseed 1/2 tb.
plus 1/2 tsp. vegetable oil
* 1 lb. fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and
caps sliced salt to taste
* 2 dried chiles pasillas, stemmed, seeded and cut
into 1/4” rings

Preheat the broiler. Carefully trim edges and cut the spines
from cactus paddles; brush the paddles with 1/2 tsp. oil.
Broil the paddles, 4” from the heat source, turning occasionally,
until limp, 10-15 minutes. Cool, cut in half lengthwise, then
cut each half into 1/4” wide slices. Set aside.
Place tomatillos and tomatoes on a baking sheet and broil,
4” below the heat source, until soft and blackened in spots,
about 4 minutes. Turn and broil on the other side. Cool; peel
the tomatoes.

Meanwhile, on an ungreased griddle or heavy skillet set over
medium heat, roast garlic cloves and fresh green chiles,
turning regularly, until soft and blackened in spots, about
15 minutes. Let the garlic cloves cool, then peel. Lay the
onion slices on a piece of foil set on the griddle or in the
skillet and roast until browned and softened, about
5 minutes per side.

Combine the roasted tomatoes, tomatillos, garlic, green
chiles and onions in a blender or food processor
(in batches, if necessary) with 2 cups of the chicken stock,
cilantro, epazote, if using, and hoja santa or aniseed; blend
to a smooth puree. In a large saucepan, heat 1/2 tb. oil over
medium-high heat. When hot enough to make a drop of the
puree sizzle, add puree all at once. Stir continually until
darker and noticeably thicker, 5-7 minutes. Add the
remaining 6 cups stock and mushrooms; simmer over
medium-low heat, partially covered, for 30 minutes.
Season with salt. (The soup can be made ahead to this
point and stored, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.)

While the soup is simmering, preheat over to 350 degrees F.
Spread the chiles pasillas on a small baking sheet and toast
until fragrant and crispy, about 8 minutes. (The toasted chiles
can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.)

Just before serving, add the reserved cactus slices to the
soup and bring to a boil. Ladle into warm soup plates and
sprinkle with the toasted chiles pasillas. Serve immediately.

Makes about 8 cups, serves 8.

For an extra-hot soup, use four to six Habanero Chile’s
instead of ordinary chile’s.


Jalea De Cacto (Cactus Jelly)
This is the best recipe that I have been able to find for
cactus jelly / jam. However, it does not appear to be
wholly satisfactory and some notes on possible
improvements are appended.

Yield: 6 half-pints
Processing Time: 5 minutes
Temperature: High, Medium-high

* Prickly pears*
* 3 cups sugar
* 1/2 cup lemon juice**
* 6 ounces liquid fruit pectin***
* Boiling water
* Cheesecloth

1. Place prickly pears in a large saucepan or kettle.
Cover prickly pears with boiling water, allow to stand
for 2-3 minutes, and pour off water. (This aids in
softening stickers of prickly pears.)
2. Peel prickly pears, cut into pieces, and place in
a medium-sized saucepan. Cover prickly pears with
water and boil at high heat for 5 minutes.
3. Pour boiled mixture through cheesecloth. Drain
as much juice as possible and discard seeds.
4. Measure juice. Combine 3 cups of cactus juice,
sugar, and lemon juice in a large saucepan or kettle.
5. Bring mixture to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to
medium-high, add liquid pectin, and cook mixture for
8-12 minutes, or until the mixture begins to thicken.
Skim off any foam that may have formed.
6. Pour mixture into hot, sterilized, half-pint canning
jars and seal according to manufacturer’s directions.
7. Process jars immersed in a Boiling Water Bath for
five minutes to seal the lids. Test seal when cooled.****


* Prickly pears are fruit from the prickly pear cactus (Opuntia sp.)
and may range in color from yellow-green to deep purple-red
and in colour in size from that of an apricot to 6-inches long.
For this reason, there is no accurate way of judging how many
pears it may take to obtain a given amount.

**The acidity of the lemon juice is needed to promote setting
of the pectin which combines with the sugar to set when cold.

***Liquid pectin is added because, presumably cactus fruit
does not contain sufficient pectin to set. Even so, cactus
jelly made in this way may “jell” soon after processing or
can take as long as 2 to 3 weeks. Clearly native American
people making cactus jam did not traditionally have access
to liquid pectin and probably sufficient pectin was obtained
either by stewing the peel of the fruit which in this recipe
is discarded, for a longer time with the fruit pulp before
straining , or from another type of fruit containing pectin .
A modern equivalent could be to use green cooking apples,
and as a starting point I suggest about an equal weight of
cooking apples to the weight of cactus fruit.

To test for pectin, put 1 teaspoon of juice into a small glass,
allow to cool and add 3 teaspoons of methylated spirit. Shake
gently and leave for 1 minute. A jelly like lump indicates that
plenty of pectin is present. Lots of small lumps indicate that
little pectin is present and that the jelly is unlikely to set unless
more pectin or another high pectin fruit is added.

****This step should not really be necessary as a well-made
jam / jelly should keep well for months without further sterilization.


http://www.foodreference.com/html/cactus-pickles-recipe.html

Cactus Pickle

2 quarts prickly pears fruit
2 cups sugar
2/3 cup vinegar
3oz red cinnamon candies
whole cloves (Opt)

Measure the 2 quarts prickly pears whole.
Remove the skins, cut each fruit in half
lengthwise and remove the seeds.

Prepare a syrup by mixing the sugar, vinegar, and
cinnamon candies in a pot; bring to a boil.

Cook pear halves until transparent in a syrup
made of the sugar, vinegar, and cinnamon
candies.

If you choose to use the cloves, put them in
a little cheesecloth bag so they can be removed
before the pickles are put in jars, that are
equipped with standard canning lids.

Process for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath.


9,590 posted on 05/14/2011 12:13:56 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8814 | View Replies]

To: All

http://www.rivenrock.com/recipes.html

One should harvest the nopal cactus when the individual
leaf is young and fresh. The leaves will generally be hand
sized, they must have a glossy green sheen and be of
minimum thickness, about 3/8” thick. When the leaf has
grown too thick and has lost it’s sheen it will be pithy inside.
The harvested nopal leaf must now be rid of glochids
(the hair-like tiny spines that still get in the skin) and the
green nubs that grow on the aeroles (the mole-like
protuberances).
These green nubs and glochids will remove easily with a
green scrubbing pad.
Once the leaf is prepared it is generally sliced french-fry
style, or diced into 3/8” dimensions for use in the various
recipes.

NOPALITOS CON CHILE (Cactus Chile)

2 lbs cleaned Nopales
1 Onion — sliced 1/8” thick
1/8 cup Corn Oil or Olive Oil
2 jalapeno chilis
2 Chili Serrano
1/2 bulb garlic
1 Cup Cilantro
Salt to taste

Clean and dice nopales. Chop onion into similar
sized pieces and place in a large oiled skillet and
begin to fry. Add garlic and chilis and salt. Cover
and simmer until tender. Serve over diced and
toasted tortillas or bed of rice.


http://www.rivenrock.com/recipes.html
Victoria’s cactus breakfast burrito

One should harvest the nopal cactus when the individual
leaf is young and fresh. The leaves will generally be hand
sized, they must have a glossy green sheen and be of
minimum thickness, about 3/8” thick. When the leaf has
grown too thick and has lost it’s sheen it will be pithy
inside.
The harvested nopal leaf must now be rid of glochids
(the hair-like tiny spines that still get in the skin) and the
green nubs that grow on the aeroles (the mole-like
protuberances).
These green nubs and glochids will remove easily with a
green scrubbing pad.
Once the leaf is prepared it is generally sliced french-fry
style, or diced into 3/8” dimensions for use in the various
recipes.

This is one of my favorite recipes, the cactus mixes very
well with these ingredients and tastes very good.

Take the prepared and diced cactus and add to some
potatoes that are already pretty well cooked with your
favorite spices including garlic and onions. After a
minute or so add a couple of fresh eggs to the mix and
scramble all together well. Heat some tortilla shells and
spoon the mixture into the shells, add salsa roll up and
enjoy.


Stir-Fried Edible Cactus With Tomatoes and Herbs

1 lb edible cactus, small and thin, prickers removed
1/2 Tbsp olive oil
2 garlic cloves
pinch of salt
1/2 cup chopped Vidalia onion
1/2 small red bell pepper, diced
1 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 pint small, ripe cherry tomatoes, halved
fresh oregano, thyme, basil, salt, pepper

* Cut nopales into strips about 1/4 by 2 inches.
Heat oil in large skillet; add garlic and toss. Add
cactus and a pinch of salt; toss to coat. Cover and
cook over moderately low heat until sticky juices are
thoroughly exuded and cactus is not quite tender —
about 5-8 minutes; stir fairly often. Mixture will appear
quite sloppy.
* Uncover and stir often over moderate heat, until
tender and no longer sticky, about 10 minutes.
* After mixture has finished heating, toss with
onion and vinegar; add tomatoes, red bell peppers,
and herbs and toss gently. Add salt and pepper if
desired. Serve warm.

Yield: 4 servings
Each serving equals four and one half 5-a-Day servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 61, Protein 3g,
Fat 2g, Calories From Fat 30%, Cholesterol 0mg,
Carbohydrates 10g, Fiber 1g, Sodium 145mg.


Nopales and Couscous Salad

2 1/2 cups cooked, whole-wheat couscous
3/4 lb small edible cactus (nopales), prickers removed
1/3 cup lemon juice
1 tsp salt
1 1/2 Tbsp olive oil
1 small red onion, coarsely diced (about 3/4 cup)
1 fresh chili pepper
2 Tbsp cilantro

* Cook couscous according to package directions.
* Steam nopales about 4 minutes. Cool and cut into
1/4-inch wide strips.
* Combine lemon juice, salt, and olive oil; blend.
Toss with nopales and onion.
* Remove stem and seeds from chili, then dice into
small pieces. Add to nopales and toss.
* Combine with couscous and cilantro and mix well.
Cover and chill until serving time.

Yield: 4 servings
Each serving equals three 5-a-Day servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 122,
Protein 3g, Fat 4g, Calories From Fat 27%,
Cholesterol 0mg, Carbohydrates 19g, Fiber 1g,
Sodium 400mg.

SOURCES: This article is reprinted from
“Vegetable of the Month: Edible Cactus,”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Department of Health and Human Services.

©1996-2005 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.


Sautéed Nopales, Peppers, and Corn

1 large red bell pepper
1 large green bell pepper
1 large onion
1 Tbsp trans-fat free butter
4 small ears of small summer corn
1/2 lb fresh, firm edible cactus, deprickered,
cut in 1/4- to 1/2-inch dice finely minced cilantro
or parsley

* Halve peppers, then remove seeds and stems.
Cut into 1/4-1/2 inch squares. Cut onions the same size.
Cook both vegetables in butter in a heavy pan over
moderate heat until just softened.
* Shuck corn, than cut from cob. Add edible cactus and
corn to peppers and onion; stir over high heat until
vegetables are cooked through, but firm-tender, about
5 minutes. Sprinkle with herbs and serve hot.

Yield: 4 servings
Each serving equals four 5-a-Day servings

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 184, Protein 6g,
Fat 4g, Calories From Fat 20%, Cholesterol 8mg,
Carbohydrates 32g, Fiber 4g, Sodium 29mg.


Cactus Leaf (Nopales) Slaw With Red Fresno Chile

4 cactus leaves
1 jicama
1 chili seeded and finely diced
1 orange, peeled and diced
1 Tbsp parsley, chopped

* Peel the jicama including the fibrous layer just beneath
the skin. Cut in half and slice jicama into 1/8-inch thick
pieces. Stack the slices and cut into julienne strips.
* Scrub cactus leaves and remove spines. Use a potato
peeler or a knife to cut around the nodules and remove them.
Preheat oven to 350 ºF. Place cactus leaves on a baking
sheet and roast in the oven for 10 minutes. Set cacti leaves
aside and allow to cool.
* Slice cactus leaves into thin julienne strips and combine
with the jicama. Combine remaining ingredients and toss
with your favorite vinaigrette dressing.

Yield: 4 servings
Each serving equals one 5-a-Day servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 53, Protein 1g,
Fat 0g, Calories From Fat 5%, Cholesterol 0mg,
Carbohydrates 13g, Fiber 5g, Sodium 5mg.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Cactus/Cactus%20Meals/


9,591 posted on 05/14/2011 12:25:01 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

From:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Cactus/Cactus%20Jam%20and%20Jelly%2C%20Marmalade%20and%20candy/Cactus%20Jelly/

http://homecooking.about.com/od/condimentrecipes/r/bljelly1.htm
Festive Cactus Pear and Wine Jelly Recipe

From Nicole Routhier’s Fruit Cookbook by
Nicole Routhier (Workman Publishing)

The fruit of the cactus blends with dessert wine
to make a jelly that also works as a condiment
for meats. Fresh apple, grapefruit, or pineapple
juice may be substituted for the cactus pears.
INGREDIENTS:

* 5 large ripe cactus pears, peeled and quartered
* 1 cup Muscat, Sauterne, or other sweet dessert wine
* 2 cups sugar
* 1 pouch or 1/2 bottle (3 ounces) liquid pectin, such as Certo

PREPARATION:
Sterilize seven 8 ounce canning jars and lids according
to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Place the cactus pear pieces in a food processor and puree.
Sponsored Links

Strain through a fine sieve, pressing on the pulp to extract
as much juice as possible. (There should be 1 cup of juice.)

Combine the cactus pear juice, wine, and sugar in a medium
size, heavy saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring
constantly, just until bubbles appear around the edge of the
pan and the sugar is dissolved, 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in the
pectin, and cook 1 minute longer. Remove from the heat, and
skim the foam.

Pour into jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Seal and continue
with standard sealing methods in a water bath. Label and
date the jars.

Jelly should be stored in a cool, dark place for up to one year.
Refrigerate after opening. Include serving suggestions.

This jelly is a most appropriate condiment for grilled lamb chops,
roast duck, venison, or pork. Ruby red in color, with a delicate
wine taste, cactus pear jelly is also great for glazing fruit tarts.

Yield: About 7 half-pint jars

Source: Nicole Routhier’s Fruit Cookbook by Nicole Routhier
(Workman Publishing)
Reprinted with permission.


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly
in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Hot
Jar Size 0-1,000 ft 1,001-6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15



Prickly Pear Cactus Jelly 1
Follow grape jelly recipe on the Sure jel box

Prickly pear cactus juice
Sugar
Sure Jel

Pick cactus fruit when fully ripe, I use bacon tongs
for this. Burn off the spines over a flame. I use
tongs for this too. Cut fruits in half, put in pan
with small amount of water and boil gently until
fruits are soft. Put in a jelly bag and drain off the
juice.

Follow directions for grape jelly but use one cup less
of the cactus juice, then the recipe calls for. This
recipe needs a little experimenting to get just right.

In Mexico and points south, this cactus is cultivated
to yield food, candy, and a natural diabetes medicine.
A famous red dye, cochineal (co-chin-ee-ya) is
harvested from white scale insects that afflict its
skin.

With thorns burned off, the plants even become
succulent cattle fodder. And nothing creates a more
impenetrable security barrier than a prickly pear
hedge.

Prickly pear is returning from obscurity to take its
rightful place in our gardens. It’s not just an
attractive ornamental, it yields culinary delights in
the kitchen. But before you dive in to cactus cuisine,
it helps to know the terminology.

The entire plant is called “nopal” and individual stem
segments are “nopales.” Tender young stem segments are
the edible parts, called “cladodes” or “nopalitos.”
These are chopped and used to make over two hundred
dishes from stews to salad pickles.

In Mexican gardens you’ll find the top half of paddles
are pruned off at an odd right angle. This encourages
development of more numerous cladodes which are picked
at just a few weeks old while still thin and before
fibers develop inside.

The fruit that follows the extraordinary flowers are
called “tunas.” These are green, turning soft in
orange, pink or red when ripe and sweet. The skin is
peeled away to reveal flesh that is fifteen percent
sugar, with a texture like melon peppered with BB
sized seeds. Fresh tunas taste similar to kiwi fruit,
and can be made into jams and jellies just like tree
fruit.

The challenge to cooks and gardeners is working around
the thorns. Most species bear long, wickedly sharp
thorns protruding in clusters from evenly spaced
aeroles. Surrounding the thorns are “glochids,” fine
hair-like fuzzy spines that cloak the surface of the
aerole. These microscopic glochids are brutally
painful and almost impossible to remove from the skin.
Even though a prickly pear may be visibly spineless,
the glochids on paddles and fruits remain just as
nasty.

The best way to pick prickly pear is with a strong
pair of metal salad/barbecue tongs with the tips
wrapped in duct tape. This prevents cutting into the
skin which can introduce glochids to the inner flesh.
In the kitchen use a propane torch and a non-taped
pair of tongs to old the piece of cactus, then brush
the flame back and forth over the surface. You’ll see
both spines and glochids quickly burned away.

Prickly pears have for centuries been cultivated in
Mexico. Various species were brought into villages and
grown next to one another in home gardens. This
produced widespread cross pollination resulting in
many hybrids of unknown origin. For this reason they
are sold “as is” and to verify flower color, buy only
when in bloom.

The most outstanding species or group of prickly pear
is Opuntia ficus indica. This is the commercially
harvested species that grows upright and arborescent
at maturity. It will take some cold but will never
achieve its true stature in the north or at high
elevations. Frost is not the only enemy. Rainfall and
cold weather can foster rot at the heart of the plant.
Once this sets in it is nearly impossible to stop
except in hot, dry weather.

There are many other cold hardy natives to choose
from. Log on to www.desertusa.com and click on the
Plants/Wildflowers for a superior list of prickly
pears and their regional adaptations. A variety of
online cactus nurseries can get you started with
plants that match your climate.

.For anyone who loves the traditional foods of the
Southwest, or those exploring the more unconventional
cuisine of Mexico, growing prickly pear is a must. In
the process you’ll discover that the true beauty of
these plants is in their resilient nature so deeply
admired it is pictured on the national seal of Mexico.

(Maureen Gilmer is a horticulturist and host of
“Weekend Gardening” on DIY-Do It Yourself Network.
E-mail her at mo@moplants.com. For more information,
visit : www.moplants.com or : www.DIYNetwork.com.
Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.)


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly
in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Hot
Jar Size 0-1,000 ft 1,001-6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15



Cactus Fruit Jelly

The Tohono O’Odham in southern Arizona harvest this
fruit every year.

3 1/2 cups of juice from red-ripe prickly pear cactus
fruits (tuna)
1/2 cup lemon juice
4 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 (3 fluid ounce) package liquid fruit pectin

You should have enough fruit to make 3 1/2 cups of
juice. Carefully remove thorns from fruit by wiping
with a paper towel and then brushing with a vegetable
brush under water. Put fruit in a saucepan with enough
water to cover. Boil for 15 to 20 minutes. Pour off
water and discard. Mash or purée fruit through a
strainer lined with doubled cheesecloth. Strain juice
into a large measuring cup. Let juice sit for at least
30 minutes to allow sediment to settle to the bottom.
Pour off juice carefully. You should have 3 1/2 cups.

In a saucepan combine fruit juice, lemon juice and
sugar. Bring to a boil and boil 1 minute. Stir in
pectin and boil for 1 minute longer. Remove from heat.
Stir and skim foam off the top. Spoon into sterilized
jelly jars and seal.

Makes 3 cups.


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly
in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Hot
Jar Size 0-1,000 ft 1,001-6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15

Beautiful garnet color - with a distinct, delicious
taste.

Pick prickly pears when deep purple (usually ready in
September). Use LONG BBQ tongs to pick and long
sleeves to protect against cactus thorns. Half of a
large grocery bag is enough to start with.

Wash pears good - hold each pear with tongs (NOT
fingers). Cut in half with sharp scissors. Use large
canning kettle - fill pan no more than half full.
Cover with water and boil until pears are soft and
mushy. Run the pears through a ricer, food mill or
force them through a sieve. Strain juice through
cheesecloth.


Apple Gem Jelly
- Makes 24 servings -

Ingredients

1 cup apple juice
1-1/2 cups Agave Nectar
1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 red apple, grated with peel on
3 oz. liquid pectin

Directions

In a 5-quart saucepan, combine apple juice, Agave Nectar, lemon juice and grated apples.
Bring to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir
in liquid pectin. Skim off foam. Ladle into hot sterilized jars. Seal. Makes three 1/2-pint jars
(24 2-Tablespoon servings).


Recommended process time for Jam/conserves/jelly/butters in a boiling water canner.
Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size 0 - 1,000 ft 1,001 - 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Hot Half-pints
or Pints 5 min 10 15


Prickly Pear Marmalade

4 cups chopped prickly pears
1 cup sliced lemon
2 oranges
1 or more cups of sugar (see below)
Chop orange peel and pulp. Add 4 cups water to lemon
and orange. Let stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place.
Boil until peel is tender. Cool. Measure lemon, orange
and water in which cooked. Add chopped prickly pears
and 1 cup of sugar for each cup of combined pear,
lemon, orange and water. Boil to the jellying point.
Pour, boiling hot, into hot jars. Seal at once.


9,592 posted on 05/14/2011 12:33:55 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/home_canning_meltingpot/files/Eatable%20Plants-Gathered%20Food/Cactus/Cactus%20Jam%20and%20Jelly%2C%20Marmalade%20and%20candy/

Barrel Cactus Candy

To prepare cactus:
Select small barrel cactus. With long sharp
knife remove spines and outer layers. Cut the
pulp crosswise in 1” cubes, and cook in boiling
water until tender, about 1 hour. drain.

To prepare syrup:
3 Cups sugar
1 cup water
2 tbsp orange juice
1 tbsp lemon juice
powdered or granulated sugar for garnish

Heat all ingredients together until sugar is dissolved.

Measure 2 quarts of cactus cubes and add to syrup.
Cook until nearly all of the syrup is absorbed, being
careful not to scorch. Keep heat low, and stir
occasionally with a wooden spoon to keep candy from
sticking. Remove cactus from syrup. Drain and roll in
granulated or powdered sugar.

For colored candy, and veggie coloring may be added
to the syrup.

Navajo


9,593 posted on 05/14/2011 12:37:55 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

>>>World Naked Gardening Day - Saturday May 14, 2011<<<

LOL - Too danged cold for that! 55 degrees and chilly rain...

Think I’ll wait till July once the tall growing plants are an effective screen and the weather is hot..... LOL


9,594 posted on 05/14/2011 6:57:01 AM PDT by DelaWhere (Better to be prepared one year early than one day late!)
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To: All

More Victory Garden Wisdom

Posted: 13 May 2011 09:50 PM PDT
Companion crops are a great way to save space and have more variety in your garden. The Victory Garden Manual from 1943 shares some tips on this along with some other great advice.

A mixture of radishes with the seeds of slow-germinating vegetables, such as parsnips, parsley, and carrots, is an excellent way to get enough yearly radishes to supply the average family without sowing a special row. Be sure to mix in very few radish seeds, not more than 5 or 10 per cent. The radishes will germinate and mature before the slower companions have begun to grow well.

A short season crop such as radishes or spinach can be sown between parsnips and chard to save space.

Here are a variety of tips I thought were interesting and helpful:

Carrots need not be thinned until they have reached an edible stage. When they are about a thick as a pencil they can be pulled and thinned at the same time.

Beets always grow in clusters because a beet seed is really many seeds together and they can be thinned when the young roots have just begun to thicken. Be sure to thin them or they will suffer from crowding.

Lettuce can be used from the time a leaf is 2 inches wide but growth is much faster if thinned earlier.

Reading through this helpful book I enjoyed these frugal ideas, which I summarized in my own words.

-If you don’t have a seed spreader simply poke holes in the bottom of a coffee can and shake to spread seeds.

-Use a metal file to sharpen hoes and other garden tools and they will work much better than when they are dull. They should also be washed off and rubbed with an oily rag.

-Dried grass clippings can be used as mulch. After mowing, gather up clippings and allow them to dry before using around plants to avoid mold or mildew.

-Disease can be prevented at least most of the time by providing sunshine, plenty of air circulation and a clean garden. Never leave debris of any type (such as pulled weeds) in the garden. Keep it well maintained and watered on a regular basis. Always remove any plants or leaves that look like they could be diseased.

On OFL we have a nice article on growing peas this spring:
http://oldfashionedliving.com/The-Spring-Garden:-Growing-Peas.html

~Brenda


9,595 posted on 05/14/2011 11:34:18 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: All

1. (Tip)-—Cure a bad case of the Hiccups
Posted by: “Russie

CURE A BAD CASE OF THE HICCUPS

You tried drinking water upside down, having someone scare you, holding your breath, but your hiccups are still going strong. TO BEAT THEM: simply mix 1 tsp of apple cider vinegar with 1 cup of warm water in a glass, then drink. The tart taste interrupts the nerve impulse patterns that cause the spasms so you can breathe without the blips...

________________________________________________________________________
2. (Doughnuts)-—w/ Sauce & Dusted
Posted by: “Russie

DOUGHNUT HOLES WITH ALMOND CARAMEL SAUCE Makes 6 dozen.

Powdered sugar
1/4 tsp almond extract
Finely grated peel of 3 oranges
1 3/4 tsp salt
1 cup almonds, toasted
1 tbs + 2 tsp active dry yeast
Vegetable oil
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 eggs, room temp
1 cup low fat milk
1 stick + 3 tbs unsalted butter or margarine
5 1/2 cups flour
1 1/3 cup sugar or Splenda

In a bowl, combine 1/2 cup warm water, yeast and 1 tbs plus 1 tsp sugar. Let stand until foamy. In a food processor or blender, finely grind almonds and 1/4 cup sugar, transfer to a bowl. Mix in flour, 1/3 cup sugar and 1 tsp salt.
-In a saucepan, melt 1 stick butter, remove from heat. Beat in milk, eggs and orange peel. Beat in yeast mixture, knead 15 min. Transfer dough to a bowl, cover and let stand in a warm place until doubled in size.
-On a floured surface, roll out dough 1” thick. Using a 1 1/2” cookie cutter, cut out rounds of dough and transfer to 2 greased baking sheets. Cover loosely and let stand 30 min. In a saucepan, combine remaining sugar with 1/4 cup water. Bring to a boil and cook undisturbed until amber. Remove from heat and stir in cream. Stir in almond extract and remaining butter and 3/4 tsp salt.
-Fill a saucepan with enough oil to reach a depth of 3”. Heat oil until 350°. Fry dough turning once until golden. Transfer to paper towels to cool slightly. Dust with powdered sugar and SERVE with sauce...

________________________________________________________________________
3. (Salad)-—w/ Dressing & Tuna & Veggies
Posted by: “Russie

TAHINI TUNA SALAD Makes 4 servings.

Whisk together 1/3 cup tahini or sesame paste, zest of 1 lemon, 1/4 cup lemon juice, 1 minced garlic clove, 1/4 tsp salt and 3 tbs olive or vegetable oil. Drizzle dressing over a salad of canned tuna, lettuce and grated carrots, then SERVE...

________________________________________________________________________
4. (Cake)-—w/ Lemon & 3 Layers & Flowers
Posted by: “Russie

LEMON LAYER CAKE Makes 16 servings.

Edible flowers
1/3 cup reduced fat sour cream
1 cup powdered sugar
8 oz mascarpone cheese
5 eggs, separated, + 2 egg whites
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
2 1/4 cups cake flour
4 lemons
1 cup lemon curd
1 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 1/2 cups sugar or Splenda
1 Ruby Red grapefruit

Heat oven to 325°. Grease bottoms of 3 round cake pans. Line bottoms of pans with parchment paper, grease parchment. From lemons, finely grate 4 tsp peel and squeeze 1/4 cup juice. From grapefruit, squeeze 1/2 cup juice, set aside.
-In bowl, blend flour, 1 cup sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Make a well in center. Add oil, 5 egg yolks, lemon juice, grapefruit juice, and 2 tsp lemon peel, whisk into dry ingredients until smooth.
-In another bowl, beat 7 egg whites until foamy. Add cream of tartar and beat until soft peaks form. Sprinkle in remaining sugar, beat until whites stand in stiff peaks. Fold 1/3 of whites mixture into yolk mixture then fold in remaining whites mixture.
-Divide batter among pans. Bake 35 min. or until done. Cool completely in pans. Loosen cakes from sides of pans. Invert onto wire racks, peel off parchment and discard. In a bowl, beat mascarpone and cream to combine. Beat in powdered sugar, beat until soft peaks form. Fold in vanilla and remaining lemon peel until blended.
-Fold in sour cream and lemon curd until blended. Place 1 cake layer on plate, flat side up. Spread with half of curd and top with another cake layer, flat side up. Spread remaining curd on top. Top with remaining cake layer, flat side up. Frost side and top of cake with frosting. Refrigerate assembled cake 1 hour. TO SERVE-—let stand at room temp 15 min. Garnish with edible flowers, then SERVE...

________________________________________________________________________
5. (Crisp)-—w/ Apples & Cereal & Cinnamon
Posted by: “Russie

SHREDDED WHEAT APPLE CRISP Makes 4 servings.

1/4 cup margarine or butter, melted
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat cereal, finely crushed
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1 tbs tapioca
1 tbs lemon juice
1/2 cup light brown sugar or Splenda
5 cups peeled apple slices

Mix apples, 1/4 cup brown sugar, lemon juice, tapioca and cinnamon in a bowl. Let stand 10 min. Stir crushed cereal, remaining sugar and margarine in bowl until blended. Spread apple mixture in ungreased baking dish. Sprinkle with cereal topping. Bake at 350° for 45 min. or until topping is browned and apples are tender, then SERVE...

________________________________________________________________________
6. (Vegetables)-—w/ Herbs & Healthy & Pepper
Posted by: “Russie

MIXED VEGETABLE SAUTE Makes 4 servings.

1/8 tsp pepper
1 onion, finely chopped
1 red or yellow bell pepper, finely chopped
5 tsp margarine or butter
2 tsp chopped parsley, optional
2 cups broccoli florets
1 1/2 cups sliced carrots

Melt margarine in a skillet. Cook carrots, bell pepper, broccoli and onion until vegetables are crisp tender, 6 min. Stir in parsley and pepper, then SERVE...

________________________________________________________________________
7. (Ravioli)-—w/ Potato & Cheese & Herbs
Posted by: “Russie

SWEET ‘N’ SPICY POTATO RAVIOLI Makes 4 servings.

1/2 cup crumbled queso fresco
1 tbs finely chopped chipotle chiles in adobo sauce
12 egg roll wrappers
1/4 cup chopped flat leaf parsley
2 1/2 tbs sugar free maple syrup
4 sweet potatoes, pricked
1 tsp vegetable bouillon base
Ice water
Salt
1/4 cup hulled pumpkin seeds
1 stick butter or margarine

Heat oven to 425°. Place potatoes on a baking sheet, bake until soft, 45 min. Let cool, then peel. In a skillet, heat 1/2 tbs each butter and maple syrup. Add pumpkin seeds and toast until beginning to pop, transfer to a plate. Using same pan, melt 1 1/2 tbs butter, add parsley and cook until crisp. Drain on paper towels.
-Using a food processor or blender, puree sweet potato, 2 tbs butter, remaining maple syrup and 1/4 tsp salt. Lay out egg roll wrappers. Top each with 3 tbs of the puree in a line down the center. Moisten the edges with water, fold in half, press out the air and seal. Transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet in a single layer.
-In a pot of salted boiling water, melt 1 tbs butter. Add half of the ravioli and cook until tender, transfer to a bowl of ice water to cool. Repeat with remaining ravioli. Reserve 1 cup of the cooking water.
-In a skillet, melt remaining butter. Add chipotles and cook 1 min. whisk in pasta cooking water and bouillon base. Transfer ravioli to skillet and cook until heated through. Divide ravioli and spicy butter among 4 plates, sprinkle with cheese, parsley and pumpkin seeds, then SERVE...

________________________________________________________________________
8. (Glaze)-—w/ Dill & Mustard for Meats
Posted by: “Russie

DILL MUSTARD GLAZE FOR MEATS Makes 1 cup.

In bowl, whisk 1/2 cup yellow mustard, 1/3 cup light mayonnaise, 1/4 cup chopped dill leaves, 2 tbs capers, chopped, 1/4 tsp celery seed, and 2 tsp sugar or Splenda. SERVE with ham or other meats...

________________________________________________________________________

Originally published May 5 2011

High fructose corn syrup and cane sugar - Your body knows the differenceby Bethany Sciortino

(NaturalNews) A current television commercial from the Corn Refiners Association touts the equality of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to cane sugar. It claims, “When it comes to corn sugar or cane sugar, your body doesn’t know the difference. Sugar is sugar.” True, sugar is sugar, but it certainly is not HFCS, a highly processed sweetener that is linked to obesity and a host of other health problems. This, undoubtedly, is the reason for the marketing strategy of changing its name to corn sugar, an attempt to have consumers believe that all sugar is created equal.

SUGAR BROKEN DOWN
Sugar is the broad spectrum term for sucrose, lactose and maltose, respectively. Sucrose is the form most commonly found in foods, or table sugar, a derivative of sugar beets or cane sugar. Fructose is derived from fruits, lactose from milk, and maltose from malted foods, such as barley.

HFCS is derived from highly processed corn, a starchy grain. It has near equal amounts of fructose and sucrose and is similar to table sugar from a compounding perspective. Unlike fruit, however, this type of fructose is not bound to fiber causing the body to process it faster and leaving the body unsatisfied. Starches and grains often have a higher glycemic index than all sugars, and corn falls within this category. In addition, almost all of the United States corn production is genetically modified, adding to health risks.

A Princeton University study showed rats gained significant more weight when consuming HFCS in comparison to table sugar, even when the caloric intake was the same. Most interesting is the rats accessibility to sucrose was equal to the sweetness of sugar and the HFCS was half as sweet as that found in soft drinks. The rats who consumed HFCS gained 48% more weight than their sucrose peers and had significant deposits of abdominal fat and circulating triglycerides. In humans, these are characteristics of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

THE GLYCEMIC INDEX
Glucose is released into the blood stream when the body metabolizes carbohydrates. The glycemic index (GI) is the rate at which the body processes the glucose. A high GI indicates a food that is rapidly absorbed by the body. A low GI indicates a food that is slowly absorbed and prevents spikes in blood sugar by releasing small amounts of insulin from the pancreas. In turn, your body is more likely to use the glucose as fuel, rather than store it as fat. Mass release of insulin causes a rapid drop in blood sugar, signaling hunger in the brain. This is why (controlled) diabetics use carb-counting as a method of sugar control: eating small meals every two to three hours to moderately release glucose and avoiding rapid spikes and dips in blood sugar.

Type of Sugar Glycemic Index
Artificial Sweeteners n/a
Stevia 0
Xylitol 7
Agave Nectar 15-30
Fructose 17
Brown Rice Syrup 25
Raw Honey 30
Organic Sugar 47
Turbinado 65
Raw Sugar 65
Cola 70
Corn Syrup 75
Table Sugar 80
High Fructose Corn Syrup 87
Glucose/Dextrose 100
Maltodextrin 150

The GI does not determine whether a sugar is healthy or unhealthy. For example, artificial sweeteners do not fit into a GI category; however, they should never be used as all are toxic chemicals by design.
HFCS clearly substantiates weight gain with consumption as well as raises blood sugar levels. Re-branding HFCS as corn sugar does not change its properties, and while marketing campaigns may fool consumers short term, the intelligence of the human body cannot be trumped and definitively knows the difference.

[Editor`s Note: NaturalNews is strongly against the use of all forms of animal testing. We fully support implementation of humane medical experimentation that promotes the health and wellbeing of all living creatures.]

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine...
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/...
http://www.naturalnews.com/024466_c...

About the authorBethany Sciortino is a married, stay-at-home mother of three young children. Bethany left her career to aggressively research the cause of and treat her eldest daughter’s autism, as well as take care of her growing family. Bethany is an advocate of proper nutrition, natural healing and illness prevention through herbal and vitamin supplementation and dietary intervention not only for her daughter’s autism, but for adults and children of all ages. Contact Bethany at bsciortino@cfl.rr.com.

All content posted on this site is commentary or opinion and is protected under Free Speech. Truth Publishing LLC takes sole responsibility for all content. Truth Publishing sells no hard products and earns no money from the recommendation of products. NaturalNews.com is presented for educational and commentary purposes only and should not be construed as professional advice from any licensed practitioner. Truth Publishing assumes no responsibility for the use or misuse of this material. For the full terms of usage of this material, visit www.NaturalNews.com/terms.shtml

________________________________________________________________________
11. Beauty from your kitchen
Posted by: “Jean C. Turley-Sinclair”

Hidden Beauty Secrets from Your Kitchen
By Anesta Dawkins

For me, a trip to the beauty supply store can cause a bad case of sticker
shock. And the cosmetics counter is even worse. Sometimes it feels like you
need
a second job just to pay for your beauty regimen.

But you don’t have to pay those high prices just to look good. You can
replace many expensive beauty products with alternatives you may already
have right
in your own kitchen.

Over the years, I’ve discovered several foods that also make great
substitutes for those pricey beauty-counter products. Take potatoes, for
instance.

How often have you spent extra time applying makeup to hide those dark
circles under your eyes? Talk about frustrating!

Try a slice of fresh raw potato instead. Just place potato slices on the
skin under your eyes and let them sit for a few minutes. It works wonders.

You see, potatoes are a rich source of catecholase, an enzyme used in some
high-end skin lighteners. With potatoes, you get the same effect for pennies
instead of dollars.

Another way to cut your cost – but not cut corners – is with plain old
table sugar. It’s not very healthy to eat, but it can leave your skin glowing.

In the shower, rub your skin gently all over with a little sugar and rinse
it away. Along with the sugar, you’ll rinse away lots of dull, dead skin cells.
Sugar works likes those fancy exfoliating creams… but for a lot less money.

Next, let’s head to the fridge to soften and smooth skin. Yogurt does an
excellent job and leaves your skin simply glowing.

Yogurt is high in lactic acid, which testing shows helps keep skin smooth
and soft. Studies also show that yogurt can help your skin recover from sunburn
faster.1

Just smooth a little plain organic yogurt on rough skin, let it sit for a
few minutes and wash it off with a gentle cleanser. Many women swear by yogurt
facials.

Another inexpensive way to soften your dry skin is with olive oil.

You’ve probably seen lots of expensive cosmetic products that contain olive
oil. But why not go right to the source and save a few dollars?

In a recent hospital test, olive oil helped keep newborns’ skin healthier
than conventional moisturizers.2

Just massage a tablespoon of virgin olive oil into rough, dry skin and let
it go to work. You don’t even have to wash it off.

Another must-have from my kitchen collection is apple cider vinegar. I call
it my cure-all. It’s one of the most versatile beauty remedies I know.

It makes a great astringent and toner. If I have a stubborn pimple, I just
dab on a little apple cider vinegar before bed. It may not have the most
“cosmetic”
smell, but it almost always does the trick. You’ll wake up with tighter
pores, too.

For razor bumps, it’s practically a miracle. It stops itches fast, too.
When the inside of my ear starts itching, I just put a little apple cider
vinegar
on a cotton swab and dab it on the itchy spot. It gives me instant relief.

img/Honey

Finally, here’s my favorite skin-care miracle from the kitchen… honey.

You may have heard that honey is anti-bacterial. But it’s also used to
speed the healing of wounds and minimize scarring.3

Honey contains powerful antioxidants, encourages healthy tissue growth and
stimulates the immune system. It’s truly one of Nature’s wonders.

A honey facial mask is a refreshing moisturizer. Just apply a little raw,
organic honey to your face and wash it off with a gentle cleanser after 10
minutes.
The honey feels sticky, which may seem strange at first. But the results
are worth it.

And honey doesn’t just moisturize. Many people claim it helps clear up
stubborn acne. Considering the price of most acne products, I think it’s
worth a
try.

These kitchen remedies aren’t just less expensive. They have none of the
dangerous chemicals often found in over-the-counter beauty products…
because they’re
all natural.

So the next time you’re looking for a quick beauty fix, your kitchen would
be a good place to start.

Keep on Stylin’!

Anesta

________________________________________________________________________

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SimplfyMeWithTipsAndHints/


9,596 posted on 05/14/2011 12:24:51 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Herman or Friendship Starter

1 c Sugar
1/3 c Warm water
2 Envelopes active dry yeast
2 c Milk
2 c Flour

Sprinkle 1 Tbsp sugar over warm water. Sprinkle yeast over this and let stand
in warm place until doubled in size, about 10 minutes. Mix milk, remaining
sugar, flour and yeast mixture. Place in plastic or glass container about the
size of a 5 quart ice cream bucket. Stir, using only a wooden spoon or paddle,
as metal retards growth. Cover loosely and let stand in a warm place overnight.
The next day, refrigerate. Stir each day with a wooden spoon to retard
spoilage.

On the 5th day, measure out one cup to bake with. Measure out one cup for
gift. Feed remaining starter 1 cup flour, 1 cup milk and 1/2 cup sugar. Stir
well. Refrigerate and stir daily.

On the 10th day, measure out 1 cup, if desired, to give to a friend. You
should have enough left over to use in a recipe, plus extra to feed as before
and refrigerate.

Thereafter, use the starter almost daily or as desired, feeding every five
days.


Herman Wheat ‘n’ Honey Starter

1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup white or unbleached flour or use all wheat flour if you prefer
2 cups milk
1/2 cup honey or brown sugar
1 Tbsp ginger
1/3 cup warm water
2 Tbsp dry yeast or 2 packages

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon ginger and honey or brown sugar over the warm water.
Sprinkle yeast over this and stir. Let stand in warm place to double in size,
approximately 10 minutes.

Mix milk, honey or brown sugar, flours, and yeast mixture in a plastic bag or
glass container, about the size of a 5 quart ice cream pail or a gallon size
Pyrex jar. Stir, using only a wooden spoon as metal objects will retard
Herman’s growth. Leave the cover on loosely or place a glass plate over the
top of the container so that Herman can breathe. Herman doubles, even triples
at times of vigorous rising. Stand Herman overnight in a warm place.

Next day refrigerate, covered, and stir each day. This is very important with
Wheat ‘n Honey starter as more gases form in the bucket and are released
during stirring.

Formation of this gas may cause Herman wheat ‘n honey starter to appear
darker on top before stirring each day. On the fifth day measure out 1 cup
Herman to bake with and another cup to give to a friend if you wish, then
feed the Herman you have left :

1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup white or unbleached flour or use all wheat flour if you prefer
1 cup milk
1/4 cup honey or brown sugar
1/4 tsp ginger

Stir well. Keep in refrigerator. From day five on you may bake with Herman
any day you wish, always making sure you have one full cup left for feeding.
Feed Herman every five days. If you have a lot left, feed him only 1
tablespoon honey or brown sugar. If you have one cup or a little more left,
add the same ingredients as you did on the fifth day. When you share a cup
of Herman with friends they should feed Herman the same day he arrives the
same ingredients listed above for the fifth day and continue the same as above.
With care you should be able to continue a honey of a Herman for a long, long
time.

Submitted by: Darlene


Grated Raw Potato Starter

1 cup warm water
1 1/2 cup white flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 grated raw potato, medium size

Mix the 1 cup warm water, 1 1/2 cups white flour and 1 tsp each salt
and sugar in a 2 cup measure. Add enough grated potato to make 2
cups. Place in a wide mouth glass jar or small mixing bowl (do not use
metal or plastic) which will hold about 1 quart. Cover with a single
thickness of cheesecloth to allow wild yeast from the air to settle into
it for 24 hours. Stir well, cover tightly with a clinging transparent wrap
which will cause the moisture to drip back and keep top of mixture
from drying. Stir several times a day. In two or three days it will
become foamy and very light. (The length of time depends on
temperature. 80 to 85 is ideal. It can go a little below 80 without harm,
only slowing the procedure a little, but if it goes much higher than 85 it
will be spoiled.) Then stir well, pour into glass jar with screw top
lid and store in refrigerator at about 38 degrees. As soon as 1/2 inch
of clear liquid has risen to the top it has ripened enough to start using.
Do not be concerned if the mixture turns dark because of the raw
potato during the fermentation period. It does not affect the bread
made from it in any way and as soon as the starter is mature, it will
become a snowy white. To renew starter: Add 1 1/2 cups white flour
and 1-1/2 cups water each time it is used so that there are always 2
cups to bake with and 2 full cups to return to refrigerator. If for some
reason it cannot be used regularly about twice a week, add 1 tsp sugar
and stir well every three or four days.

Submitted by: Darlene


Rye Sour Dough Starter and Bread

Starter

2 cup lukewarm milk
2 cup rye flour
2 1/2 tsp yeast
1 Tbsp gluten

Mix the starter ingredients with an electric mixer on low speed until combined.
Cover your starter and place in a warm, draft free location for 4 to 7 days,
gently stirring once daily.

To replenish starter: Replace the amount taken out by adding equal parts of
milk or water and flour as was used. Always use the same kind of flour. Also,
alternate between milk and water for each feeding. For instance, your original
starter was milk so use water on your first “feeding”. Every third feeding add
1 tablespoon of gluten.

BREAD

1 cup rye starter
1 cup water
2 Tbsp butter
1 egg
1 1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp sugar
1 cup rye flour
2 Tbsp caraway seeds
3 Tbsp gluten
3 cup bread flour
1 1/2 tsp yeast

Set bread color to light. Put all ingredients into your bread machine in order
recommended by the manufacturer and start.

NOTE: The dough will look wet, but ignore this. It works!

Submitted by: Darlene


Grape Sourdough Starter

It definitely tastes like sourdough bread. The grape skins contain a natural
yeast that doesn’t bother me like, say, Fleshman’s or Red Star, does. The idea
is to get the yeast from the grape skins to start working in the flour, just
like using regular bread yeast to make a sourdough starter. After all, you’re
fermenting the dough, which is really what gives you the sour taste.

The actual recipe and instructions are:
1 cup flour
1 cup water
5 large dark red grapes (preferrably organic)

Mix the flour & water. Peel grapes and place the grape skins in the
flour/water mixture. Set on counter and cover with a moist towel or napkin,
out of the sun, for 2-3 days. Stire the mixture several times a day. Keep the
towel moist. Smell the mixture and check for an increase in volume and bubbl
lool. Look for the surface to turn slightly mauve colored. When this happens,
search for and remove all pieces of grape skin. Feed the mixture a teaspoon of
flour and a teaspoon of water about every 12 hours for 3 more days. (I
increased it to 1 tblsp once a day). Now your sourdough starter is ready. I
find that if I keep it out of the fridge for another week and keep feeding it
every day (or making bread every day), it seems to work even better.

Submitted by: Naola


Converting Regular Recipes to Sourdough

Nearly any thing that can be baked can be made with sourdough. Some of the
recipes in this book are jus told favorites that I have converted. As far
as I am concerned almost with out exception it has improved them.

There are really only two things to remember, the first is to control the
leavening action and the second is to keep the thickness or wetmess the same.

For instance, if you were going to convert a cookie recipe recipe add a cup
of starter and a teaspoon of soda. this is pretty well standard for cookies,
cakes or pasteries. By adding the soda and starter you have introduced more
leavening actioin. If the recipe calls for baking powder, leave a teaspoon
of it out. If the recipe doesn’t call for it, try it the way it is with the
starter and soda. If the results are heavy just put a little in next time.

When you add the sourdough starter you are adding more flour and liquid. Cut
the flour in the recipe back about a half of a cup and this will usually take
care of it. If you cut the flour back much more than that be sure to cut some
liquid out also. If you don’t your batter will be too thin. If the recipe
calls for milk try substituting buttermilk. Buttermilk and sourdough really
compliment each other.

Just remember, adjust the leavening ingredients and keep the thickness the
same.”

Submitted by: Darlene


Here is how I dry my starters:

1. Feed your starter until it is very active, i.e., rising doubled in about 3
to 4 hours or however you determine your starter is ready to make your dough.

2. Take a baking sheet or jellyroll pan moisten the surface and add a layer
of plastic wrap to it. The water will give the plastic some tension to adhere
it and hold it down. (I have even used a large piece of cardboard covered with
plastic wrap. Something that will give you a flat surface to put your plastic
wrap on or around it.

3. Place a couple of tablespoons of starter on the plastic wrap, add about
1/2 tsp. of water to thin it down and mix it ont the plastic wrap until smooth.

4. Spread out the thinned starter with a rubber spatula until the plastic is
coated evenly.

5. Please this into your oven or microwave so that it is covered, and let it
dry.

6. When completely dry roll up your plastic into itself and loosen the dried
starter. Put into clean ZipLock back and seal. You can make two or three
pans of this at a time.


Instructions for Reviving a Dried Starter

1. Place a teaspoon of dried starter in a sterilized jar. Add enough lukewarm
water to cover. Stir. Do not add too much water.

2. Stir until dissolved. This varies depending on the particular starter.

3. Weigh or measure out one portion of the starter. (Example, one teaspoon or
10 grams.) Discard the rest.

4. Place the measured portion back into the jar.

5. If you are using measurements, place 4 teaspoons of all purpose flour and
3 teaspoons of filtered water into the jar. Stir well.

6. If you are weighing, place equal WEIGHTS of flour and filtered water into
the jar. Stir well.

7. Stir about every time you walk by the jar. The added oxygen seems to
help activate the starter.

8. After about 12 hours (not critical) weigh out whatever portion you used
at the beginning. Discard the rest.

9. If you are using measurements, repeat step 5. If you are using weights,
repeat step 6.

10. Repeat these steps (5 or 6) every 12 hours.

11. Depending on the starter, in about 3 days, you should have lots of tiny
bubbles.

12. Now you can start feeding to build up the starter to what you need.
Follow the steps in “Care and Feeding of Sourdough Starters”.


Instructions for Feeding Sourdough Starter

For Flour Bases:

1. Put one teaspoon of starter in a clean container. Add four teaspoons of
flour and 3 teaspoons of filtered (non chlorinated) water. Stir well.

2. Repeat the above at 12 hour intervals, discarding the excess.

I do this at 6 am and 6 pm as that suits my work schedule.

If you flush the excess down the drain, use plenty of COLD water. Also wash
your utensils and containers with COLD water.

Remember, the paste you made as a kid was just flour and water!

3. When the starter is nice and bubbly, you can start building up to the
quantity you need for your recipe.

4. Use this ratio: one portion of starter, 4 portions of flour and 3 portions
of water. Example: ¼ cup of starter, one cup of flour and 3/4 cup of water will
give you more than a cup of starter, which is what a lot of recipes call for.

Others use the ratio of 1/2/2 or even 1/6/6. But the 1/4/3 works for me.

5. After you remove what you need for your recipe, feed the starter again and
refrigerate.

6. I usually start feeding on Thursday evening for a Saturday bake. That way
I know my starter is good and healthy.

Another thing you can do with the excess starter is store it in a large
container in the fridge and use it for sourdough biscuits and pancakes. Waste
not, want not!!!!

For Potato Based:

1. Put one Tablespoon of starter in a clean container. In a separate container,
mix 3 Tablespoons of dried potato flakes, one cup of warm water and a half cup
of granulated sugar. Mix well and add to starter.

2. Use the steps for flour-based starter, except discard about half the
mixture. Mix the added ingredients well before adding to starter. Use the
ingredients and proportions in step 1.

This starter will separate. Just keep mixing it. This is a very liquid starter.

Note: Some people save their discarded starter to use in pancakes, waffles,
etc. I do not do this during the time you are reviving a starter, as I do not
feel the starter is strong enough to support rising action. After your starter
is strong enough, then you can start using the discard. I dump it all in one
jar and use it to bake bread with. I also keep only small amounts of starter
stored in the fridge and usually do not have any to discard as I build up to
what I need for the recipe. Following the ratio of starter, to flour, to water
is what I consider important.

From: Bob

Submitted by: Darlene


9,597 posted on 05/14/2011 12:38:29 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Sourdough French Bread

1 cup sourdough starter
1/2 cup water (to start, but added probably 1/8 cup more, since my starter is thick)
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
3 cups bread flour
1 Tbsp yeast

Add ingredients to pan in order recommended by your manufacturer. Select dough
cycle.

When done divide dough into two equal portions, pat each one out pretty flat
to a rectangle about 15” long. Roll up tightly into baguette shape and place
side by side on a sheet of parchment cut to fit largest cookie sheet. Make 5
diagonal slashes across each one, cover with a damp towel and let rise for
about an hour.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. with a small Corning Ware bowl of water in the
bottom. The cookie sheet was preheated along with the oven. Took the hot cookie
sheet out and slid the parchment on. Reduced temperature to 375 degrees F. and
baked for 30 to 35 minutes.

Submitted by: Darlene


Sourdough Whole Wheat Tortillas

6 cups whole wheat flour (preferably freshly ground)
1 1/2 cups water
1 1/2 cups fed starter
1 1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil or melted virgin, unrefined coconut oil
oil for frying

In a bowl with a mixer, combine water, starter, salt and oil. Mix to
incorporate. Keep mixing and adding flour, 1/2 cup at a time until dough
cleans sides of bowl and forms ball in center of bowl. Let the mixer
knead the dough for 2 minutes. Remove dough. Place in a bowl that is
oiled. Rotate the dough around so all sides get coated with the oil.
Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Let rest for twelve hours or
overnight.

After rest time is over, divide the dough into 32 parts for small
tortillas or 24 parts for large tortillas. Roll each part into a ball
and put the balls back in the bowl. Cover the bowl again to prevent the
dough from drying out.

Heat a flat cast iron frying pan (or a comal if you have one) over
medium heat and add a small amount of oil. Oil a clean, flat work
surface. With an oiled rolling pin, roll out one ball of dough into a
circle that is approximately 1/8 thick. Place rolled out tortilla in
the pan. Let it cook for about 25 seconds or until there are several
bubbles in the tortilla. Flip the tortilla with a spatula and cook the
other side for another 15 to 25 seconds, or until the bubbles are
browned. Remove tortilla from pan and place between towels to stay warm
and moist.

Meanwhile, roll out the next tortilla. Repeat until all of the balls
have been rolled out and cooked. Add oil to pan and / or rolling pin as
needed. Store in a zipper seal freezer bag in refrigerator or freezer.

Submitted by: Darlene


Sourdough Whole Wheat Bread

3 cups of sourdough sponge (See notes below) **
3 to 3 1/2 cups of unbleached white flour
1/4 cup sugar or 1/8 cup honey and 1/8 cup agave syrup or 1/4 cup of either
(I prefer 1/4 cup of honey)
1/4 cup melted shortening (I use 1/4 cup melted butter)
1 1/2 cup milk
1 Tbsp salt
4 cups whole wheat flour
2 fresh eggs
1 cup old fashioned oats
1 Tbsp of sesame or 1/4 cup sunflower seeds

**Sponge notes: Set the sponge the night before from one cup of sourdough
starter, 2 1/2 cups unbleached flour, and 2 cups of warm water. Be sure to
put one cup of your starter back in your starter jar before you start the
recipe. You will be using 3 cups of sponge in the recipe.

Let all ingredients come up to room temperature. Place 3 cups of starter
in your Kitchen Aide bowl, or whatever bowl you use to make bread. Mix in
one cup of the white flour and the honey/agave syrup or sugar. Add the salt
and 1 cup of dry old fashioned oats, the beaten eggs and mix well with dough
hook (or by hand).

Pour in the fairly warm milk and the melted butter. Mix well again. Dump in
the sesame or sunflower seeds. Add 4 cups of whole wheat flower. Add about
one more cup of unbleached white flour and knead about 8 minutes in the
Kitchen Aide or by hand until it is ready to put on for the first rise.

Grease the inside of a large bowl with Crisco or whatever you use as a pan
release agent. Put the dough in the bowl and cover with a towel. Set in a
warm spot for rise for about 2 hours...then punch down, recover and let rise
for 30 more minutes. Take our of the bowl, knead for about 30 seconds to get
rid of any air pockets in the dough...then cut into 3 equal f you are using
4 1/2” x 8 1/2” pansor cut into two pieces if you want to make two LARGE
loaves. Form into loaves (I ball the dough, flatten with a rolling pin and
roll and press, sealing the edges by pinching closed) and put in non stick
sprayed pans. ( I prefer Pyrex or cast iron loaf pans) The dough should just
be touching the ends of the pans. Brush the tops with beaten egg white and
sprinkle on some dry old fashioned oats and some sesame or sunflower seeds.
Cover and let rise in a cool spot over night, or if your in a rush, in a
warm spot for about a hour and a half or until ready to bake. I prefer to
let mine do the final rise in the fridge over night and let it warm up on
the counter for a couple of hours the next day before baking.

When ready to bake, bake in a preheated 375 degree over for about 45 minutes
for 2 large loves and 40 minutes for smaller loaves. When golden brown and the
internal temperature is around 185F to 195F (using an instant read thermometer), and the loaves have shrunken away from the sides, they are done.
Remove from the pans and place on a wire rack, covered with a clean towel to
cool. For a softer crumb, brush with melted butter when they come out of the
over.

Submitted by: Barb


Sourdough Sopapillas

1 cup sourdough starter
1 cup all purpose flour
3/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
2 Tbsp shortening
Cooking oil for frying

Measure starter into a large bowl. Mix dry ingredients together. Cut in shortening
until mixture resembles cornmeal. Add starter mixture to dry ingredients. Stir
quickly with a fork to moisten dry ingredients. Turn out onto lightly floured
surface and knead until smooth, adding small amounts of flour as needed. Cover
with clean cloth and let dough rest for 5 minutes.

Roll dough out into a 12 x 15 inch rectangle about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick. Cut into
3 inch squares or triangles.

Drop a few pieces at a time into deep, hot cooking oil at 400 degrees F. Fry about
2 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Sopapillas will puff up like
pillows. Drain on paper towels.

Submitted by: Darlene


SOURDOUGH ENGLISH MUFFINS

The night before you’re ready to bake these, you will need to do this:

Mix 1 cup starter, 2 TBSP honey, 2 cups whole milk in a very large bread-type
bowl, until smooth. Add 2 cups unbleached white flour, mix in well, and then
add another 2 cups of flour and mix. Do not overmix, just get all the flour
thoroughly wet. Cover bowl with a clean tea towel and leave at room temp in a
draft free place overnight.

The next morning, you will stir down the mixture, as it should have risen
considerably. If it has risen too high and fallen, that is not a problem, just
stir down the rest of the way. Sprinkle a scant tsp baking soda and 2 tsps sea
salt over the surface of the dough and work in with a wooden spoon, or even your
hands.

Flour a board or countertop with 1 c flour (or more, up to 3 cups before you’re
through) and place dough to start working it, until dough is medium stiff,
enough to roll it out. Once you have enough flour mixed in (I go by feel -
never too dry, but always moist) and the dough no longer sticks to your hands,
give it a 5 minute kneading.

Get 2 baking sheets or jelly roll pans and line both with parchment paper.
Sprinkle corn meal over both. Flour your board again and lightly roll dough to
about 1/2 inch thick. Take a cutter of your choice and cut as many rounds as you
can. Roll the leftover dough out and cut some more, until the dough is all used
up. Try to keep them uniform in size and thickness. As you cut each one, place
it onto the cornmealed paper. Don’t allow them to touch, as they will end up
sticking together. When all rounds are cut, then sprinkle the tops with corn
meal. Allow to rise in a warm place, covered, for about 1 hour or until risen
again. Don’t be in a hurry - let the muffins rise plenty long, and you’ll have
the bigger holes like store-bought! Real English Muffins (from England) really
don’t have big, huge holes in them.

Preheat a griddle (I use my electric, non-stick). Use low heat setting, about
275 or so, so that the inside of the muffin bakes but the outside doesn’t burn.
Using some melted butter, brush on tops of muffins and place them, buttered side
down, onto griddle; you will need to keep lifting them, after about 4-5 minutes
to check for brown-ness, then turn when they are fully browned but not burned.
Squish them down just a little bit with spatula, brush with butter on this
second side, and bake for 4-5 minutes and then check them for brown-ness again.
Turn only once, so be sure the first side is fully done and browned before
turning. The timing depends on the griddle, and can even be as long as 10
minutes or so. You can skip the butter if you have a non-stick griddle, but they
won’t taste as good. Serve with butter, honey, jam, cream cheese, lemon curd,
clotted cream, powdered sugar, cinnamon & sugar, fruit slices — whatever!

Submitted by: Deb


9,598 posted on 05/14/2011 12:46:39 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Sourdough Crumpets

1 cup warm water
3 tbsp powdered milk
1/2 cup sourdough starter
1 tbsp sugar
1 beaten egg
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp instant yeast

1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 cup warm water

Mix everything EXCEPT the baking soda and 1/4 cup water and beat several
minutes til smooth and elastic. Cover and allow to rise in warm place til
doubled, about 1 1/2 hours (or longer if not using boughten yeast).

Stir baking soda into 1/4 cup warm water. Fold this into the batter. Cover
and set aside 30 minutes.

Spray/grease 8 english muffin rings or wide mouth canning jar rings. Place
rings on griddle and heat on medium-low, 250 to 275 degrees F. on an electric
griddle. If the heat is too high, your crumpets will be overcooked outside
and raw inside. If using canning jar rings, place them lip side down.

Pour/spoon batter into rings no more than 1/2” deep. Cook until surface forms
a dull skin and tiny holes cover the surface, and the bottoms are golden
brown (just like pancakes) 8 to 10 minutes. Turn crumpets, rings and all,
and cook the second side for another 8 to 10 minutes (or less if you make
them very thin) til golden. You can slip the rings off while they are cooking
on this side, maybe with a little help from a butter knife. Cool on a rack.

Submitted by: Darlene


SOURDOUGH CIABATTA (Italian Bread)

Makes 1 loaf

Sponge: *I use my sourdough starter in place of making a sponge, or should I say
instead of making a NEW sponge.

Dough:

1 cup sourdough starter, room temperature
3/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F.)
2 TBSP extra-virgin olive oil
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 TBSP sugar
1 1/2 cups bread flour or unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup semolina flour
1/2 tsp diastatic malt*
1 tsp instant yeast (I use Red Star Instant Active Dry Yeast)

* Diastatic malt contains active enzymes which help break starch down into
sugar. The extra sugar feeds the yeast in the dough, helping the bread to rise,
and also gives the bread a browner crust. It can be purchased at -

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop-home-b.html(then type in diastatic malt).

Place all ingredients in bread pan of your bread machine. Select dough setting;
press start. When dough cycle has finished, dough will be very soft (between a
batter and a runny dough). Remove dough from pan and place into large, greased,
oiled or buttered bowl. Cover (you must use plastic wrap for this step) and let
rise in at room temperature about 1.5 hours, or until tripled in bulk (dough
will be sticky and full of holes/bubbles).

On a baking sheet, place a sheet of parchment paper. Sprinkle parchment paper
with semolina flour. Turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Pat
dough (do not punch down) into a rectangle and dust with flour. Place this onto
the baking sheet covered with parchment. Push tips of your fingers into the
dough in several places to dimple its surface. Cover dough; let rise at room
temperature for 1.5 - 2 hours or until at least doubled in bulk.

About 45 minutes before baking, place baking stones on lowest oven rack in oven
and set the temperature to 500°F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Lower oven temperature to 400°F. Transfer loaf (with parchment paper) to the hot
baking stones. Bake 15 minutes or until pale golden. Remove from oven and
transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Submitted by: Deb


Pecan Bread

You will need 4 cups of starter (sponge) that was set to work the night before.....and don’t forget you will need another cup to put back in your
jar. I used my Sourdough Jack starter to make this. There was just enough
for 4 cups of starter some leftover.....1/2 of a cup went into my starter
jar along with some unbleached white flour and warm water to increase that
starter (it is sitting out on the counter in a covered jar until it gets
bubbly) and about 3/4th of a cup that I spread out to dry on plastic wrap.

4 cups of starter from sponge set overnight
2 Tbsp. melted butter
1 cup of milk
2 tsp. of salt
1 1/2 cups of chopped pecans (or walnuts)
1/2 cup honey (I used 1/4 cup of Agave Syrup and 1/4 cup honey)
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
3 cups whole wheat flour ( I used fresh ground hard WHITE winter wheat flour)
3 cups unbleached white flour

1. Melt butter over moderate heat, add the milk to the butter and warm. Add
the salt, pecans (or walnuts), honey, ginger and stir. Add this mixture to
the starter sponge and mix well.

2. Add the whole wheat flour and mix well. Add the white flour a cup at a
time until too stiff to mix by hand. Turn out onto floured board and knead
in remaining flour until satiny.

3. Divide the dough in half and form 2 balls.

4. Pat each ball into a 1 inch thick oval and form loaves by rolling from
the long sides, pinching the seam together as you roll the dough to form
the loaf.

5. Place in greased loaf pans and proof at 85 degrees for 1 1/2 to 3 hours.
When the dough rises 1 to 2 inches above the lip of the pans, it is ready to
bake.

6. Bake in preheated oven at 375 degrees F. for 50 to 59 minutes. Turn out
and cool on wire rack. Bread should be 200 to 205 on an instant read
thermometer.

I used anodized aluminum pans that measure 8 1/2” by 4 1/2”. When I take
bread out of the oven, I brush all surfaces with melted butter and then
cover the loaves with a clean piece of plastic and a clean dish towel for
about 20 minutes....then I take the plastic off and recover it with the
towel until it is completely cool. This makes the surface nice and soft and
the butter adds an extra good taste to the loaves.

This bread looks good so far so I am hoping it will be really good eating!!
We love nuts in bread.

I made two batches of cranberry vinegar over the holidays and can’t wait to
use some of it. It is the most beautiful red color and has a very
interesting taste to it.

Submitted by: Barb


No Knead Sourdough Hamburger Buns

By Don Simpson

Recipe (see note, below) Produces 6 4” buns

1 cup fully active sourdough culture
440 grams (3 cups) all purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
1 cup water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1. In a large bowl briefly combine sourdough culture, flour, water and salt.
The consistency should be very firm and shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap
and proof 12-18 hours at about 70° F. At 70-75 degrees the bread leavens well
and has the distinct sourness and flavor of sourdough. At more than 75 degrees
the dough becomes too acidic which inhibits the wild yeast and leavens poorly.
At much less than 70 degrees the dough leavens well but has a mild flavor.

2. After the 12-18 hour fermentation this is very sticky dough. Use a plastic
spatula to ease it away from the edges of the bowl onto a lightly floured
board. Sprinkle the surface with additional flour and let the dough rest 15
minutes or so.

3. Stretch and fold the dough a few times, then split into 6 equal pieces; roll
into rounds. Add minimal additional flour for handling.

4. If using the hamburger bun pan, a very light spray pan with non-stick spray,
such a PAM will reduce sticking. Put one piece per indentation, press slightly
to make more flat than round. Let rise approximately double. Pans are usually
available from King Arthur Flour: www.kingarthurflour.com The buns can also
be made on a cookie sheet—the only advantage of the bun pans is that they help
the bun rise up more than out.

5. When nearly double, pre-heat oven with pizza stone to 450°, and coat buns
with melted butter. Once the oven is hot, place pan on pizza stone and turn
oven down to 375°. Bake for about 20 minutes, until golden brown. Let fully
cool on rack.

6. For softer crust, store in plastic bag until ready to consume.

7. Slice just before serving.

Note: In developing the above recipe for No Knead sourdough bread, Dr. Ed Wood
used his Original San Francisco culture. There are several additional recipes
for no-knead sourdoughs in the section on batter breads in “Classic Sourdoughs”, by Dr. Ed Wood.


9,599 posted on 05/14/2011 12:52:58 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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Golden Gingham Sourdough Bread

Recipe from: Barb

1 cups warm water
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons salt
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cups sourdough starter well fed (feed 1 or 2 times if not recently used)
3 1/2 cups oatmeal, uncooked dry
1/3 cup butter or margarine

Pour 1 cup water over sugar, salt and butter. Stir in 2 cups flour, starter
and oats. Stir in enough additional flour to make stiff dough. Knead on
floured board until smooth. Make dough into ball. Place in greased bowl,
lightly grease surface of dough by turning it over in bowl, cover and let rise
in warm place until nearly double in size 4 or more hours. (I set this out at
night and continue in the morning.)

Punch dough down. Shape into 2 large loaves. Place on greased cookie sheets;
let rise in warm place until double in size.

Slash tops with sharp knife,lame or kitchen shears. Bake in preheated 400
degree F oven for 35 to 40 minutes. Cool on wire racks.

Submitted by: Darlene


SOURDOUGH FRENCH BREAD

This recipe rivals anything I’ve ever found in stores, and is relatively easy to
make.

Makes 2 loaves

Ingredients:

1 pkg (1/4 oz.) active dry yeast
1 3/4 cups warm water (110 - 115 degrees)
4 1/4 cups unbleached flour
1/4 cup Sourdough Starter (recipe below)
2 TBSP coconut oil (or other vegetable oil)
2 TBSP sugar
2 tsp sea salt

Cornstarch wash:

1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tsp cornstarch

In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the flour, starter,
oil, sugar and salt; mix well. Turn onto a floured surface and gently knead
20-30 times (dough will be slightly sticky). Place in a greased bowl, turning
once to grease the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about
1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down the dough. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide in half; roll
each into a 12 inch x 8 inch rectangle. Roll up, jelly-roll style starting with
a long side; pinch ends to seal and tuck under. Place, seam side down, on 2
jelly roll pans which have been lined with parchment paper. Cover and let rise
until doubled, about 30 minutes or so.

With a sharp knife make four shallow diagonal slashes across the top of each
loaf.

In a small saucepan, combine the water and cornstarch. Cook and stir over
medium heat until thickened. Brush some over each loaf. Bake at 400 degrees for
15 minutes. Brush loaves with remaining cornstarch wash. Bake 5-10 minutes
longer or until lightly browned. Remove from pans to wire racks to cool.

SOURDOUGH STARTER:

1 pkg (1/4 oz) active dry yeast
2 cups warm water (110-115 degrees) but not tap water, use chlorine-free
filtered water ONLY
2 cups unbleached white flour
Makes about 3 cups

In a 4 qt non-metallic bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water; let stand for 5
minutes. Add flour and stir until smooth. Cover loosely with a clean towel.
Let stand in a warm place to ferment for 48 hours; stir several times daily with
a wooden spoon. The mixture will become bubbly and rise, have a “yeasty” sour
aroma, and a transparent yellow liquid will form on top that can be stirred in
later when ready to use. Use starter for your favorite sourdough recipes. It
will keep in a crock type container in the fridge. Replenish (or feed) once
every week (I do this each Friday evening). In order to replenish, you will need
to discard about half of the starter. This will bring the acidity to the proper
level.

Mix in 1/2 cup filtered water and 1 cup flour. If you are going to use the
starter that day, leave it set out on the counter for anywhere from 2 - 16 hours
before using in a recipe. If you aren’t going to use the starter and want to
refrigerate it, add the 1/2 cup filtered water and 1 cup flour, mix in with a
wooden spoon and let set for 2-4 hours, then place in crock in the fridge.

If you are just “feeding” your starter (after the original batch is made as
above) you can haul it out of the fridge, discard 1 cup and then add 1/2 cup
water and 1 cup flour, stir well, and place back in fridge immediately.

About every other time you feed your starter, place it into a bowl and clean the
crock well and rinse it with boiling water. Don’t want any weird critters
growing in there along with the starter!

To increase the starter, just add more water and flour (such as add 1 cup water
and 2 cups flour) without discarding any. You can feed it again in 2-4 hours if
you need even more starter for larger recipes.

If your sourdough starter starts to mold, or the odor is not the usual clean,
sour aroma (an alcohol smell is ok), or if it develops a pink or orange color,
throw it out and start over. It’s very rare that this happens, so don’t worry
excessively about it.

If you just need to sweeten your starter because it became too sour, reserve 1
cup and throw away the rest, then feed the reserved starter with 1 cup filtered
water and 2 cups flour. Mix well and let rest for 4 hours before using or
refrigerating.

Submitted by: Deb


Classic San Francisco Sourdough French Bread

2 cups warm water (about 110 degrees F)
7 1/2 cups to 8 cups all purpose Flour, unsifted
1 cup Mr Baker’s San Francisco sourdough starter batter at room temperature
2 tsp plain or iodized salt
2 tsp granulated sugar

Bread Baste or Wash Recipe:

1 tsp cornstarch brought to a boil with 1 cup water, then cooled to room
temperature. See step #5.
Hot water for the oven as required. See step #4.

In a large mixing bowl, combine water, sourdough starter batter and 4
cups of the flour. Mix well and cover with clear plastic wrap and
let stand in a warm place (85 degrees F) 8 to 12 hours.

Stir in salt, sugar and enough remaining flour (about 4 cups) to form
a very stiff dough. Knead until smooth. Cover and let rise in a warm
place until doubled in size (2 to 2-1/2 hours).
Punch
down and divide in half. Knead gently until smooth. Shape each half
into loaf or round shape. Cover the sourdough bread loaves lightly;
let them rise in a warm place until puffy and almost doubled in size
(1 to 1-1/2 hours).

Carefully place a small pan on the shelf, below the oven baking rack,
and fill it with hot water.

Place your sourdough bread loaves on the baking rack, close the oven
door and bake in a preheated (400 degree F) oven for 10 minutes. Then
brush your sourdough bread loaves with the baste mixture. Close the
oven door and continue baking for 20 to 25 minutes more until the
loaves are golden brown and sound hollow when tapped. Remove the loaves
from the oven and place on a cooling rack until cooled down to room temperature.

Makes: 2 loaves

Submitted by: Barb


Basic Sourdough Bread (Makes 2 - 1 1/2 pound loaves)

BREAD PROFILE: Lean, standard dough; method; wild yeast

DAYS TO MAKE: 2 or 3

Day 1: 5 hours firm starter

Day 2: 1 hour to de-chill firm starter; 15 to 17 minutes mixing; 5 to 7 hours
fermentation, shaping and proofing; 20 to 30 minutes baking (day 2 or 3)

Firm Starter:

2/3 cup (4 ounces) barm
1 cup (4.5 ounces) unbleached high-gluten or bread flour
1/8 - 1/4 cup (1 to 2 ounces) water

Final Dough:

4 1/2 cups (20.25 ounces) unbleached high-gluten or bread flour
2 tsps (.5 ounce) salt
1 1/2 - 13/4 cups (12 to 14 oz) water, lukewarm (90º to 100º F)
Semolina flour or cornmeal for dusting

Baker’s Percentage Formula:

Basic Sourdough Bread Percent

Firm Starter:

Barm 88.9
High-gluten flour 100
Water, room temp. 33.3
Total 222.2

Final Dough:

Firm Starter 49.4
High-gluten flour 100
Salt 2.5
Water, room temp. 64.2
Total 216.1

1. Remove the barm from the refrigerator and measure it out 1 hour before
making the firm starter to take off the chill. To do this, dip a 2/3 cup
measuring cup into a bowl of water, then scoop it into the barm to fill
(the wet cup will allow the barm to slide out easily). Or just weigh out
the 4 ounces. Transfer it to a small bowl, cover with a towel or plastic
wrap, and allow it to warm up for 1 hour.

2. Add the flour to the bowl and mix together the barm and the flour, adding
only enough addi¬tional water so that you can knead this into a small ball,
about the texture of French bread dough. You do not need to work this very
long, just until all the flour is hydrated and the barm is evenly
distributed. Lightly oil a small bowl or mist the inside of a plastic bag
with spray oil, and place the starter in the bowl or bag, turning to coat
it with oil. Cover the bowl or seal the bag.

3. Ferment at room temperature for approximately 4 hours, or until the
starter has at least dou¬bled in size. If it takes more time than 4 hours,
give it additional time, checking every hour or so. Then, put it into the
refrigerator overnight.

4. Remove the starter from the refrigerator 1 hour before making the dough.
Cut it into about 10 small pieces with a pastry scraper or serrated knife.
Mist with spray oil, cover with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit for 1
hour to take off the chill.

5. To make the dough, stir together the flour and salt in a 4 quart mixing
bowl (or in the bowl of an electric mixer). Add the starter pieces and
enough water to bring everything together into a ball as you stir with a
large metal spoon (or mix on low speed with the paddle attachment).

6. Sprinkle the counter with flour, transfer the dough to the counter, and
knead by hand for 12 to 15 minutes (or mix with the dough hook for 4 minutes
on medium-low speed, allow the dough to rest for 5 to 10 minutes, and then
mix for 4 minutes). Adjust the water or flour as needed. The dough should
be firm but tacky, like firm French bread dough. It should pass the
windowpane test and register 77° to 81° F. Lightly oil a large bowl and
transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling it around to coat it with oil.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

7. Ferment at room temperature for 3 to 4 hours, or until the dough has
nearly doubled in size.

8. Gently remove the dough from the bowl and divide it into 2 equal pieces
(about 22 ounces each), or divide it into smaller pieces if you are making
rolls, being careful to degas the dough as little as possible. Gently shape
the dough into boules, batards, or baguettes.

9. Proof the dough in bannetons or proofing bowls, on couches, or on parchment
lined sheet pans that have been dusted with semolina flour or cornmeal (see
pages 34-38). Regardless of the method, mist the exposed part of the dough
with spray oil and loosely cover the dough with a towel or plastic wrap, or
slip the pans into a food-grade plastic bag. At this point you can either
proof the loaves for 2 to 3 hours, or retard overnight in the refrigerator.
If retarding, remove them from the refrigerator approximately 4 hours before
you plan to bake them.

10. Prepare the oven for hearth baking as described on pages 91-94, making
sure to have a steam pan in place. Preheat the oven to 500°F. Carefully
remove the towel or plastic wrap from the dough, or slip the pan from the
bag, 10 minutes before baking.

11. Generously dust a peel or the back of a sheet pan with semolina flour or
cornmeal and gently transfer the dough to the peel or pan, carefully removing
the cloth liner from the top of the dough for dough proofed in a bowl. (If
the dough was proofed on a sheet pan, it can be baked directly on that pan.)
Score the dough as shown on page 90. Slide the dough onto a baking stone (or
bake directly on the sheet pan). Pour 1 cup hot water into the steam pan and
close the door. After 30 seconds, spray the oven walls with water and close the door. Repeat twice more at 30-second intervals. After the final spray,
lower the oven setting to 450°F and bake for 10 minutes. Rotate the loaves
180 degrees, if necessary, for even baking and continue baking for another 10
to 20 minutes, or until the loaves are done. They should register 205°F in
the center, be a rich golden brown all over, and sound hollow when thumped
on the bottom.

12. Transfer the finished loaves to a rack and cool for at least 45 minutes
before slicing or serving.

COMMENTARY:

This dough is made with a 3-build method: barm to firm starter (also called
the levain or chef) to final dough. As noted earlier, this process could go
on to 4, 5 or 6 builds, but by using cold fermentation (retarding), we
develop maximum flavor without all the intermediate builds.

I encourage you to veer from this method and modify either the technique or
the ingredients. Consult the ‘Grace Note’ for a number of options, but only
your imagination limits the full range of possibilities.

GRACE NOTE § Variations of Sourdough Ingredients and Methods

Some bakers prefer to work exclusively with firm starters, keeping even the
mother starter in a firm state. Professional bakers like this because they
can throw the firm piece easily into a mixer for either refresh¬ing or
elaborating. It is less messy than working with big batches of wet sponge.
One of my baking friends, Keith Giusto of Giusto Mills in South San Francisco,
keeps his mother starter as very dry dough, like bagel dough. This is not
only easy to trans¬port and handle (assuming you have a mixer capable of
handling such stiff dough), but also makes a very sour bread, for those who
like it extra sour. Acetic bacteria prefer the denser, less-aerated
environment of the firm starter; lactic bacteria prefer the wetter sponge of
the barm method. Home bakers, I find, prefer keeping a wet sponge, as it is
easy to refresh and keep track of it in small batches. However, if you
prefer to use the firm starter system, simply reduce the water weight to 50
to 57 percent of the flour weight when you refresh your mother starter and
then make your elaborations.

It is also perfectly acceptable to make your final dough directly from the
barm. You will have to diminish the water in the final dough to compensate
for the wetness of the barm, but otherwise you can proceed with an equal
amount of barm for firm starter.

To spike the dough with commercial yeast, which guarantees a 90-minute first
fermen¬tation and a 6o-minute final proofing (and a less sour flavor); add
1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast to the final dough.

You can substitute other types of flour, including whole-wheat flour, for
some or all of the high-gluten or bread flour. A classic French pain au
levain includes about 10 percent whole-wheat or rye flour (or a combination
about 1/2 cup total).

You can make a meteil rye bread (less than 50 percent rye flour), or a seigle
rye bread (more than 50 percent rye flour), by substi¬tuting the desired
amount of rye flour, either white rye or a blend of white and pumper¬nickel
grind. This can be done either in the final dough or in the firm starter.

Submitted by: Barbara


Barb’s Sourdough Country Bread

1 cup starter (room temperature)
1/2 cup warm water
1/2 Tbsp salt
1/2 Tbsp sugar
3 1/4 cups bread flour
1/2 Tbsp yeast

Use dough cycle.

Divide dough in half and roll into balls. Flatten bottoms and place in
greased 8 inch cake pans, or just go freeform on a cookie sheet.

Rise at least one hour.

Mix: 3 Tbsp water and 1/2 Tbsp salt and brush onto top of loaf.

Bake 30 to 35 minutes at 375 degrees F.

Submitted by: Barb


Alaska Sourdough Bread

1 cup Sourdough Starter
2 1/2 cups Warm Water
4 Tbsp melted lard (any shortening will do I’ve used several oils too)
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1 Tbsp salt
8 cups flour (approx)

Combine ingredients, adding flour gradually and knead until the dough
is smooth. Place in a greased bowl in a warm place and let rise. When
doubled, knead it down shape into loaves and let rise until doubled.
Bake in moderate oven (350 degrees F) for about an hour or until done
(Mine usually take about 40 min.)

I usually set a sponge the night before using the starter, 5 C flour
and 2 1/2 C water. Sometimes I let that be my first rise and go to
shaping the loaves as soon as the first kneading is done. Sometimes I
let it rise once before shaping the loaves. Depends on my schedule.
Made as described this is not a real tangy loaf. Adjust that with
amount of starter used and the time the sponge sets.

Makes two 4”x9” or four 3.5” x 7.5” loaves.

Submitted by: Marcie



9,600 posted on 05/14/2011 12:58:28 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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