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Deciphering the Indus script: challenges and some headway
The Hindu ^ | Thursday, April 15, 2010 | Interview with Professor Asko Parpola

Posted on 04/18/2010 7:39:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

All those features of the Indus script which have been mentioned as proof for its not being a writing system, characterise also the Egyptian hieroglyphic script during its first 600 years of existence. For detailed counterarguments, see my papers at the website... The script is highly standardised; the signs are as a rule written in regular lines; there are hundreds of sign sequences which recur in the same order, often at many different sites; the preserved texts are mostly seal stones, and seals in other cultures usually have writing recording the name or title of the seal owner; and the Indus people were acquainted with cuneiform writing through their trade contacts with Mesopotamia... the language underlying the Indus script in South Asia belongs to the Dravidian language family... Rigvedic hymns often speak of horses and horse-drawn chariots, and the horse sacrifice, ashvamedha, is among the most prestigious Vedic rites. The only wild equid native to the Indian subcontinent is the wild ass, which is known from the bone finds of the Indus Civilisation and depicted (though rarely) in its art and script. The domesticated horse is absent from South Asia until the second millennium BCE. Finds from Pirak and Swat from 1600 BCE show it was introduced from Central Asia after the Indus Civilisation.

(Excerpt) Read more at hindu.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; harappan; india; indusvalley
Photo: SHAJU JOHN

Deciphering the Indus script: challenges and some headway

1 posted on 04/18/2010 7:39:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: indcons; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; ...

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2 posted on 04/18/2010 7:40:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
If they could figure out trans-national trade, construction of rectangularly-laid city blocks and indoor plumbing made of fired clay components, they probably knew how to read and write:

Indus bath / pool ruins:

Indus sewage system (cover tiles removed):

Indus trade seal:

 

Indus map:

 

Time period: Circa 3300 BC to Circa 1300 BC.

3 posted on 04/18/2010 7:53:46 PM PDT by James C. Bennett
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To: SunkenCiv
Interesting ~ the key to deciphering that particular ancient script is probably a Dravidian language that simply no longer exists.

There are two arguments about ancient Sumerian ~ it is either an isolate ~ with no connection to any other modern or known language, or it is actually closely related to one or more modern languages, but through a now extinct intermediary.

It has been proposed that Sumerian is derived from a Dravidian base ~ and that it forms the basis for the known Sa'ami languages ~ and that all are actually outside the Fenno-Ughric, or Uralic-Altaic linguistic groups, with the Sa'ami languages having a large accretion of Fenno-Ughric and Germanic vocabulary.

One aspect of this latter argument is that Germanic languages show signs of having adopted Sa'ami grammatical rules before there was a clear differentiation of the Indo-European linguistic group.

Interesting that we have a Finn who accepts the idea that his language has a Dravidian rootword (I am aghast in fact!).

Given the exisgence of a vast number of pictoglyphs in Northern Finland and in the (now Russian) Kola Peninsula that date back at least 7,000 years (in part) it's inescapable that this Finn has something up his sleeve eh!

I can hardly wait for him to roll out the "writing began in Finland) story ~ with PROOF.

4 posted on 04/18/2010 7:56:09 PM PDT by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
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To: SunkenCiv

If you want to get into some truly bizarre conversations, I recommend Indian websites dedicated to the idea that the Aryans didn’t invade and conquer India.

The obvious correspondence in the Indo-European languages is instead due to the Indo-Europeans originating in India and spreading from there to Persia and Europe. (We’ll leave aside the fact that there is no historical evidence of any migration in this direction other than that of the Gypsies. While there are multiple examples of invasions from Central Asia into the subcontinent.)

Very odd people. Europeans aren’t offended because the areas where they now live were conquered by Indo-European speaking peoples from elsewhere, but some Indians definitely are.


5 posted on 04/18/2010 7:59:08 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan

That’s like 78% or so of over a billion-plus population being in denial of their Central European roots, LOL!


6 posted on 04/18/2010 8:03:14 PM PDT by James C. Bennett
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To: muawiyah

Interesting.


7 posted on 04/18/2010 8:07:51 PM PDT by Bhoy
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To: SunkenCiv

If you digitize the script and play it backwards, it says “Paul is dead.”


8 posted on 04/19/2010 11:40:54 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Well, if we count his brain...


9 posted on 04/20/2010 5:05:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Sherman Logan

I quite agree. There is new evidence (in a topic that’s posted, or is on deck somewhere) that Harappan settlements became more numerous in the western areas of the civ’s range over a period of time (yeah, in fact, one of our fellow FReepers did post it, along with a nice colorful series of maps) from 4000 BC to 2500 BC. Obviously this could easily be an artifact of where the dig sites have been made, or an artifact of said political agenda, or an artifact of population increase out of the SOUTH, which is where the Dravidian tongues are mostly found today. It could also be due to having been pushed south by the Aryan invasions. :’)


10 posted on 04/20/2010 5:09:37 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: muawiyah

The click languages of Africa have contributed loanwords to other African language families, so, not farfetched at all.

http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Sami-languages
http://sarasvatihieroglyphs.blogspot.com/


11 posted on 04/20/2010 5:14:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: James C. Bennett

The pools are interesting, in that they also are found (of much more recent construction, for the most part) in the Maldives.


12 posted on 04/20/2010 5:15:38 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Sherman Logan
The Indians are probably "upset" because for a very long time it was imagined the first Indo-Europeans (the Aryans) were tall blue-eyed blonds rather than short brown-eyed brunettes.

We now know the first Indo-Europeans were simply unlike modern Europeans ~ and in fact, modern Europeans are pretty much the descendants of the two Eastern-most Ice Age Refugia (one encompassing the Franco-Spanish border area, and another the Adriatic Coast).

13 posted on 04/20/2010 8:05:33 PM PDT by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
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To: James C. Bennett

Lovely artwork on the seal.


14 posted on 06/26/2010 8:31:42 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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