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Italy: Ancient Etruscan home found near Grosseto
ADNKRONOS ^ | Tuesday, May 25, 2010 | AKI

Posted on 06/01/2010 8:45:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

An ancient Etruscan home dating back more than 2,400 years has been discovered outside Grosseto in central Italy. Hailed as an exceptional find, the luxury home was uncovered at an archeological site at Vetulonia, 200 kilometres north of Rome.

Archeologists say it is rare to find an Etruscan home intact and believe the home was built between the 3rd and 1st century BC.

Using six Roman and Etruscan coins uncovered at the home, archeologists believe the house collapsed in 79 AD during wars unleashed by Roman general and dictator, Lucio Cornelio Silla.

Archeologists have discovered a large quantity of items which have revealed a great deal about life in the home and the construction techniques of the era.

"These are the best ruins that have ever been found in Italy," said Simona Rafanelli, director of the Isidoro Falchi archeological museum in Vetulonia, told journalists.

"They represent something incredibly important from an archeological and historical point of view, because they finally give us an understanding of new techniques linked to Etruscan construction that we did not know until today.

"Here today we are rewriting history. It is a unique case in Italy because with what we have found we will be able to completely reconstruct the entire house."

From the ruins they discovered a basement or cellar in which the family is believed to have stored foodstuffs.

A beautiful earthenware pot was found in the corner of the room and an olive press.

Pieces of vases and plates were also uncovered at the house, while the walls were made of sun-dried clay bricks.

(Excerpt) Read more at adnkronos.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: anatolia; archaeology; carian; carians; epigraphyandlanguage; etruria; etruscan; etruscans; godsgravesglyphs; grosseto; italy; lemnianstele; lemnos; minoan; minoans; roman; romanempire; rome; vetulonia

1 posted on 06/01/2010 8:45:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

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Gods
Graves
Glyphs
This is a big deal, because the Etruscans are mostly known from their burials; even their written language primarily survives as inscriptions on grave markers. To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · LiveScience · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


2 posted on 06/01/2010 8:47:35 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks for the ping(s).....

PICTURES...WHERE ARE THE PICTURES??? Really this is one thing that drives me absolutely nuts. (You should see me when I really have a problem! lol) But how can anyone writing of such critical finds, not include PICTURES with the article.


3 posted on 06/01/2010 8:59:53 PM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Blessed Is The Nation Whose God is the Lord. Psalm 33:12)
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To: SunkenCiv
What did an Etruscan earn?

:)

4 posted on 06/01/2010 9:01:42 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: SunkenCiv

What’s an Etruscan urn?
About as much as anyone else.


5 posted on 06/01/2010 9:03:27 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: SunkenCiv
I think it's supposed to be 79 BC and the Dictator was the ever lovable Sulla (not Silla), who came close to killing a minor young noble of the opposing party, named Julius Caesar. 79 AD was well into the time of the Caesars and I think was the year Vesuvius erupted and buried Pompey and Herculaneum.

But what do I know? I'm not a well paid Italian reporter.

6 posted on 06/01/2010 9:17:54 PM PDT by katana (Part Neanderthal, and proud of it!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Nice, but of all Italy’s various histories and civilizations, the Etruscans (to me) are the least appealing. And Grosetto’s probably the least Tuscan part of all Tuscany. Hope it brings tourism to the country.


7 posted on 06/01/2010 9:49:20 PM PDT by Mach9
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To: katana

According to Mary McCullough (sp?), Sulla eventually married into the Julius family but made sure the young heir became Pontifex Maximus to keep him away from military training. Obviously, his plan didn’t work.


8 posted on 06/01/2010 9:55:04 PM PDT by Mach9
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To: Outlaw Woman; SunkenCiv
I don't think they had cameras back then.

.

Ok...I'll be quiet now...;)
9 posted on 06/01/2010 10:28:23 PM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus)
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To: Mach9

Nope, the priesthood wasn’t his style. Julius had other plans.


10 posted on 06/01/2010 10:32:06 PM PDT by katana (Part Neanderthal, and proud of it!)
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To: Tainan
Just for that cutsey reply smart-a.., I am sending a bug your way for your puter! :)
11 posted on 06/01/2010 10:57:53 PM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Blessed Is The Nation Whose God is the Lord. Psalm 33:12)
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To: Outlaw Woman
Fair is fair...


12 posted on 06/01/2010 11:09:48 PM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus)
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To: SunkenCiv

Larger Image

13 posted on 06/01/2010 11:16:08 PM PDT by Daaave ('Home, home, where I wanted to go')
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To: Tainan

14 posted on 06/01/2010 11:28:28 PM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Blessed Is The Nation Whose God is the Lord. Psalm 33:12)
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To: SunkenCiv
Using six Roman and Etruscan coins uncovered at the home, archeologists believe the house collapsed in 79 AD during wars unleashed by Roman general and dictator, Lucio Cornelio Silla.

Lucius Cornelius Sulla died in 675 AUC, 78 BCE.
Rome was not a Republic in 79CE, it was ruled by Emperor Vespasian and then hi son Titus in 79.
15 posted on 06/02/2010 1:09:28 AM PDT by rmlew (There is no such thing as a Blue Dog Democrat; just a liberals who lies.)
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To: katana

‘I think it’s supposed to be 79 BC and the Dictator was the ever lovable Sulla (not Silla)’

I tend to agree.


16 posted on 06/02/2010 2:45:23 AM PDT by Lucius Cornelius Sulla (Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of.-- Idylls of the King)
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To: Lucius Cornelius Sulla

Geeez who wrote this article? They needed to do a little research.


17 posted on 06/02/2010 2:52:45 AM PDT by sonic109
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To: Outlaw Woman

That’s some feat. Before I read your post, I spent five minutes trying to kill it.


18 posted on 06/02/2010 8:10:32 AM PDT by Mach9
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To: Mach9

lol!


19 posted on 06/02/2010 8:25:50 AM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Blessed Is The Nation Whose God is the Lord. Psalm 33:12)
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To: SunkenCiv

bump


20 posted on 06/02/2010 8:50:44 AM PDT by VOA
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To: Outlaw Woman
Artist's reconstruction:


21 posted on 06/02/2010 12:32:09 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks. I find the Etruscans fascinating because we know so darn little about them.


22 posted on 06/02/2010 12:32:43 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: katana

It looks like the average Italian knows as little about his history and the average American is taught about his.


23 posted on 06/02/2010 12:33:34 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

o they were quite modern weren’t they? lol The only thing missing is Mellancamp’s “Little Pink Houses” playing in the background.


24 posted on 06/02/2010 12:34:11 PM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Blessed Is The Nation Whose God is the Lord. Psalm 33:12)
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To: Outlaw Woman

Yes, it’s a little known fact the Etruscans invented the suburb. :-))


25 posted on 06/02/2010 12:46:43 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker
It looks like the average Italian knows as little about his history and the average American is taught about his.

I think that tends to be true everywhere. I was talking to a Brit about some royal history--Richard III or Henry VIII or something--and the guy, college educated, admitted he really didn't know much about history.

26 posted on 06/02/2010 12:54:03 PM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: Bubba Ho-Tep

Things have sure changed. I’m reading some Macauley, who wrote in the mid-nineteenth century. He assumes his reader not only has a basic knowledge of the historic narrative, but also can read Latin, Greek and French. :-))


27 posted on 06/02/2010 2:39:50 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Yeah, they’re fair game for speculation. ;’)

http://www.google.com/search?q=lemnian+stele+site:freerepublic.com


28 posted on 06/02/2010 3:07:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Daaave; Outlaw Woman; Tainan

Thanks Daaave. I didn’t post the pic because I wanted to get to bed, but knew it was only a matter of time before someone found it. :’)


29 posted on 06/02/2010 3:17:05 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: katana; rmlew; Lucius Cornelius Sulla; sonic109

I think Silla was the ancestor to Dora (the Explora).

/rimshot!

and now, back to our thread.

Thanks, btw!


30 posted on 06/02/2010 3:19:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Mach9

I’ll try to do better. ;’)


31 posted on 06/02/2010 3:19:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Ken H; Army Air Corps

Vaudeville will someday be like Horace.


32 posted on 06/02/2010 3:20:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: colorado tanker
I guess it's too late for this:

Image and video hosting by TinyPic
33 posted on 06/02/2010 3:21:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

The Etruscans actually treated women equally with men - they would even dine together. Probably why they were ejected from Asia Minor. :-))

34 posted on 06/02/2010 4:00:18 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: SunkenCiv
No problem.

Swish! Nothin' but net.

35 posted on 06/02/2010 4:30:22 PM PDT by katana (For what is an Irishman ? But a .......)
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To: SunkenCiv
Thanks Daaave.

Oh, you're welcome. I guess I'm not alone in needing to see pictures with a story.

36 posted on 06/02/2010 4:55:10 PM PDT by Daaave ( Magically delicious!)
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To: colorado tanker

(I think it was) Some relative of Napoleon’s was given the concession to pot-hunt some large Etruscan site. His crews found so much like-new pottery in the tombs and graves that he figured he’d flood his monopoly market, and had most of the artifacts smashed.

That one is a lovely piece, and like most Etruscan stuff, comes from a burial. They may have influenced Rome with their preference for cremation, but inhumation was also practiced among the E’s. One of their symbolic acts was the passing of a hen’s egg from one to another, a symbol found in both terracotta works (such as that nice one above that you posted, thanks!) and in paintings and I think their bronzes.


37 posted on 06/02/2010 6:12:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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