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Turkmen capital is 8 thousand years old, archeologists say
Turkmenistan.ru ^ | June 7, 2010 | unattributed

Posted on 06/11/2010 5:25:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

The fifth season of excavations at Akdepe settlement in Chandybil district of the Turkmen capital, Ashgabat, has come to an end. Deputy Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography of the Academy of Sciences of Turkmenistan Professor Ovez Gundogdiev led the first national expedition.

According to the Neitralny Turkmenistan newspaper, during the excavations the age of the settlement was defined. Until recently, Akdepe was dated to V-IV century BC, i.e. the Eneolithic age. However, the archeologists of the national expedition found pottery belonging to the Neolithic period (VI millennium BC), which corresponds to the Jeitun culture.

"Our white-marble capital has sprung up on the place that people used to live on as early as eight thousand years ago. In the outskirts of the city there is an archeological monument as old as the most ancient proto-urban civilizations of the Near East", the newspaper article says.

In addition, the theory that the life in Akdepe ceased to exist in the late Bronze Age (end of II century BC - early I century AD) has been disproved during the excavations. The Turkmen archeologists received material evidence of the continuity of life at Akdepe having found ceramic fragments of all missing epochs including medieval ages and the time of Mongol invasion.

"We know no other monument that would have existed for so long (with small breaks) from VI century BC to early XIX century", said Ovez Gundogdiev, who led the expedition, in the interview for the newspaper.

(Excerpt) Read more at turkmenistan.ru ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: bactriamargiana; centralasia; crockaganda; godsgravesglyphs; propaganda; silkroad; turkmenistan; victorsariyiannidis; viktorsarianidi; viktorsarigiannidis


Turkmen capital is 8 thousand years old, archeologists say

1 posted on 06/11/2010 5:25:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

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2 posted on 06/11/2010 5:26:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
Sunny beaches ~ 'at's whut I ala's sez.

8,000 years is almost enough to link Anatolia and Assyria with other, smaller but older discoveries in Ukraine ~ that overlap this.

These guys will eventually work their way all around the Black Sea and find a general development of civilization ~

3 posted on 06/11/2010 5:50:20 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah; blam
Ancient writing found in Turkmenistan
Tuesday, May 15, 2001, 05:57 GMT 06:57 UK
A previously unknown civilisation was using writing in Central Asia 4,000 years ago, hundreds of years before Chinese writing developed, archaeologists have discovered... The discovery suggests that Central Asia had a civilisation comparable with that of Mesopotamia and ancient Iran as far back as the Bronze Age, University of Pennsylvania archaeologist Fredrik Hiebert told the BBC... It is not known what the people of the civilisation called themselves, so researchers have dubbed the society the Bactria Margiana Archaeology Complex (B-Mac), after the ancient Greek names for the two regions it covers.

4 posted on 06/11/2010 5:56:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

It’s not really 8,000 years old. It just looks as if it is!


5 posted on 06/11/2010 5:56:49 PM PDT by MIchaelTArchangel (Obama makes me miss Jimmah Cahtah!)
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To: MIchaelTArchangel
X bactria margiana site:freerepublic.com
Google

6 posted on 06/11/2010 6:03:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

I thought it was another Helen Thomas story....8,000 years old...


7 posted on 06/11/2010 6:03:53 PM PDT by lexington minuteman 1775
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a forgotten oldie, found in the keyword:

Darvaza: The Door to Hell
English Russia
Posted on 05/17/2008 2:47:52 PM PDT by Ultra Sonic 007
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2017461/posts


8 posted on 06/11/2010 6:13:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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Turkmenistan: Making Bid For Cradle-Of Civilization Bid
Eurasianet | 5-21-2007
Posted on 05/23/2007 4:33:27 PM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1838727/posts


9 posted on 06/11/2010 6:14:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
Writing in Mesopotamia is known to have developed and been quite advanced by 5200 years ago ~ almost at the same time as the Egyptian hieroglyphic method.

Except for the use of stylized hieroglyphs ~ that is, the cuneiform wedge orthography ~ Egyptian and Sumerian aren't particularly distinguishable. Arguments are currently being advanced that the Sumerian system was transmitted to Egypt as it was being developed in Sumer, and further that the earliest Chinese hieroglyphs were substantially influenced by the writing at Sumer ~ and probably developed by trained scribes from Sumer.

Some of the deer stones in Mongolia are about 7,200 years old and bear characters that appear to be meaningful ~ some of which show up in other later writing systems. The deerstone code hasn't been broken yet.

Contemporaneous with the earliest deerstones there are pictographs in the Kola peninsula (the Sapma, home of the Laplanders or Sa'ami, the ancient indigenous population of the far North) that may be interpreted even today.

Philologists argue that the Sa'ami languages of today have the same root as ancient Sumerian, and that there is some link, not yet figured out, between the pictographs and the cuneiform wedge hieroglyphs.

10 posted on 06/11/2010 6:14:42 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: SunkenCiv
Writing in Mesopotamia is known to have developed and been quite advanced by 5200 years ago ~ almost at the same time as the Egyptian hieroglyphic method.

Except for the use of stylized hieroglyphs ~ that is, the cuneiform wedge orthography ~ Egyptian and Sumerian aren't particularly distinguishable. Arguments are currently being advanced that the Sumerian system was transmitted to Egypt as it was being developed in Sumer, and further that the earliest Chinese hieroglyphs were substantially influenced by the writing at Sumer ~ and probably developed by trained scribes from Sumer.

Some of the deer stones in Mongolia are about 7,200 years old and bear characters that appear to be meaningful ~ some of which show up in other later writing systems. The deerstone code hasn't been broken yet.

Contemporaneous with the earliest deerstones there are pictographs in the Kola peninsula (the Sapma, home of the Laplanders or Sa'ami, the ancient indigenous population of the far North) that may be interpreted even today.

Philologists argue that the Sa'ami languages of today have the same root as ancient Sumerian, and that there is some link, not yet figured out, between the pictographs and the cuneiform wedge hieroglyphs.

11 posted on 06/11/2010 6:14:42 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

Sumerian was an isolate as far as can be determined now (since it was uniquely a literate society), and has no living relatives. I’ve never seen any philologist argue otherwise. It was agglutinative, but its morphemes were not carried on anywhere else; Turkish, Korean, and Japanese are sometimes grouped together (particularly Turkish and Korean), and all are agglutinative, but other agglutinative languages aren’t related to any others, or are in small families that are unrelated to other agglutinative families.

Here’s one Finno-Ugric chart:

http://www.helsinki.fi/~tasalmin/fu.html


12 posted on 06/11/2010 6:28:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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probably also of interest:

Tocharians
Answers.com | unknown
Posted on 07/26/2006 4:11:31 PM EDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1672757/posts


13 posted on 06/11/2010 6:31:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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well, I got thinkin', and found this name on the hard drive:

Andis Kaulins Sumerian
Google

14 posted on 06/11/2010 6:34:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
Sumerian and the Sa'ami languages (the grammar, not all the vocabulary) can be argued to fit within the Dravidian languages. The Iranians are working on a major dig that ties Sumerian elements with Indian sources (which are, given the time period, necessarily Dravidian).

Used to be folks thought the Sa'ami were simply Suomi and Swedes who'd wandered away from camp. We now know they are genetically different sufficiently to identify them as "genetic isolates".

The Sa'ami languages certainly drew on the neighboring tongues for vocabulary, but not the grammar. BTW, there is a grammatical construct in the Germanic languages that must necessarily be a derivative of Sa'ami, and that's enough to demonstrate that they should not be classed with the Finno-Ugric subgroup.

The Japanese and Korean languages necessarily draw on the Yakut/Sakha language of their 6th century AD conquerers! That language is pretty much the same as the Yakut/Sakha their ancestors spoke in Nepal from about 500 BC to 200 AD when they got kicked out by the Hindus. They returned to Yakutia, encountered some seriously negative climatic changes circa 535-41 AD and fled East toward the much warmer East Asian maritime (Korea and Japan).

The Yakut have some genetic information in common with the Sa'ami in the East that they don't share with any other group, not even the Mongol or Hun populations.

Note, although there is a broad trend toward populations speaking similar languages sharing lots of ancestors, that's not always the case. In the earliest periods 8,000 years ago, there's not even any reason to believe that the ethnic groups living in any particular region of the world are the same as the people who left signs of civilization behind.

15 posted on 06/11/2010 6:53:26 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: SunkenCiv
Turkmenistan


16 posted on 06/11/2010 7:11:54 PM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

Cradle of civilization? LOL.

Sounds awfully like another Turk propaganda stunt.


17 posted on 06/11/2010 7:13:26 PM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: MIchaelTArchangel
It’s not really 8,000 years old. It just looks as if it is!


18 posted on 06/11/2010 8:40:54 PM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 505 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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