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To: EdLake

5. The three-word sentences thing might just be used to stress the number three. But maybe there’s another code as well. Sometimes a single strand of DNA can contain two overlapping codes.


28 posted on 09/19/2010 10:55:48 AM PDT by wideminded
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To: wideminded
"5. The three-word sentences thing might just be used to stress the number three. But maybe there’s another code as well. Sometimes a single strand of DNA can contain two overlapping codes"

Maybe. If you find a better code that means something more significant, please let me (and the FBI) know. :-)

Ed at www.anthraxinvestigation.com

30 posted on 09/19/2010 11:30:29 AM PDT by EdLake
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To: wideminded
I wrote: "his methods might be forgiven if he was seen as a true hero"

The FBI files say that the book that convinced Ivins to become a scientist was Sinclair Lewis's book "Arrowsmith."

According to the FBI's analysis of "Arrowsmith," it's about doctors who believe that when doing vaccine research, people might have to die for the "greater good." (You test vaccines by giving it to some people and giving a saline solution to others. If everyone given saline dies, and everyone getting the vaccine lives, then the vaccine works.)

I think that's the way Ivins saw his plan to warn America with the anthrax letters. He didn't want anyone to die, and he didn't expect anyone would die, but he felt what he was doing was for "the greater good." And he probably expected that the world would see things his way if he ended up saving millions - even if a few people were harmed.

Ed at www.anthraxinvestigation.com

31 posted on 09/19/2010 11:50:28 AM PDT by EdLake
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