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Techie question (Vanity)
me

Posted on 11/18/2010 3:53:34 PM PST by West Texas Chuck

I'm about to start learning Fedora Linux and I'd like to build up an older Dell Dimension I have into a box to play on. I was able to get an old copy of Red Hat to load and boot but it's useless because I can't figure out how to get it on my wireless network and besides, I never could figure out anything useful to do with it. I tried PCLinux and Ubuntu but could never get either to boot. I've been told I can boot Linux from a thumb drive and this might be an interesting option so I can keep it as a Win95 box with all my Windows apps still useable.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: linux; unix
Ideas, insults, jokes and dirty pictures welcome. I'm a Winders guy, hardly know squat about Linux, but I need to learn to use it.
1 posted on 11/18/2010 3:53:37 PM PST by West Texas Chuck
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To: West Texas Chuck

Have you tried a bootable CD, like Knoppix? Tons of free ditros out there, and it’s a great way to get a feel for the OS without having to start your experience trying to make hardware work.


2 posted on 11/18/2010 3:56:49 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (We conservatives will always lose elections as long as we allow the MSM to choose our candidates.)
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To: ShadowAce

Linux Ping


3 posted on 11/18/2010 3:56:49 PM PST by herewego ( Got .45?)
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To: West Texas Chuck

(My wife keeps all my dirty pictures. In a lockbox.)


4 posted on 11/18/2010 3:57:44 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (We conservatives will always lose elections as long as we allow the MSM to choose our candidates.)
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To: West Texas Chuck

You mention that you have an old version of Redhat. The first step would be to get a current version of Fedora (or Ubuntu or other current distribution) and try that.

New device drivers get added all the time, and in general the newer the distribution, the more likely it will support your hardware.


5 posted on 11/18/2010 3:58:01 PM PST by Johnny B.
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To: West Texas Chuck

Linux Mint was as easy an install I have ever done.
I am still a newbie and have had no problems.


6 posted on 11/18/2010 3:58:55 PM PST by herewego ( Got .45?)
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To: West Texas Chuck
How old is this Dell machine? And how new was the Ubuntu?

I had a lot of trouble with and older toshiba and older redhat and linux for wireless - it was fussy about driver and the hardware. It didn't like a linksys pcmcia, but was ok with a Lucent card.

I had no trouble with the recent Ubuntu and a new HP.

7 posted on 11/18/2010 3:59:19 PM PST by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: Cyber Liberty

Not yet, I’ve been working with a copy of Red Hat that is bootable (came with my Linux for Dummies) but it is so old and out of date that I gave up. I’m wondering if I might need to flash the BIOS to a newer version or something.


8 posted on 11/18/2010 3:59:25 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck

Did anyone see the $99 Netbook at CVS??

I have a 13 year old neice and this thing might be a good birthday gift for her. They run Windows CE which is bad but they can open Word and PDF files and play Youtube videos (not in HD of course) and it has a webcam and mic.

So it can do all the basics. Definitely wouldn’t give this kid a more expensive computer. heh.


9 posted on 11/18/2010 3:59:29 PM PST by GeronL (http://libertyfic.proboards.com <--- My Fiction/ Science Fiction Board)
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To: West Texas Chuck

I am a newbie myself. I have a couple of bootable linux CD’s already burned. One of them is tiny ol’ PuppyLinux.


10 posted on 11/18/2010 4:00:46 PM PST by GeronL (http://libertyfic.proboards.com <--- My Fiction/ Science Fiction Board)
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To: West Texas Chuck

By the way, the default boot setup for the latest linux is to setup a dual boot environment, so both systems would be available.


11 posted on 11/18/2010 4:01:01 PM PST by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: slowhandluke

Yah, I may just have to get a newer box. The Ubuntu I tried was, I forget the version, downloaded it last spring and put it on a DVD.

This is a Dimension 4400, probably 6-8 years old, might be a waste of time.


12 posted on 11/18/2010 4:01:39 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck

Might try suse, its free and dead easy

Basically insert cd and click ok a few times


13 posted on 11/18/2010 4:02:01 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Lots of good information at this link on making a live USB.
14 posted on 11/18/2010 4:02:17 PM PST by relee ('Till the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away)
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To: West Texas Chuck
I put Ubuntu on a box in the basement. It loaded all the drivers for my wireless card and automatically found the network. I was literally on the 'net in less than ten minutes from initial boot. It's a fairly new version of Ubuntu. I had gads of problems with that same box getting Elyssa Mint to get on the 'net. I would suggest trying the newest version of Ubuntu.

Learning the nomenclature of Linux will take a long time. If you started on 'puting with DOS like I did you have to learn a whole new language and you keep comparing the Linux command with something in Windows/DOS to try to understand what you're doing.

15 posted on 11/18/2010 4:05:05 PM PST by raybbr (Someone who invades another country is NOT an immigrant - illegal or otherwise.)
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To: West Texas Chuck
I run Fedora 13 on an old Gateway 1G Pentium I set up for dual boot with Win98 (for those old games...).

Cabled to the router.

16 posted on 11/18/2010 4:31:20 PM PST by Calvin Locke
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To: Calvin Locke

I’m a ways away from the router, but I guess I could always run some Cat5 cable out here in the Dawg House if need be. I’m pulling Ubuntu 10.10 so I can burn it to a DVD and try to set up a dual booter setup.

A man’s gotta do what a man’s gotta do ;)


17 posted on 11/18/2010 4:37:27 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Download "VMWare Player."

It is a free application. It will let you run virtual machines on your windows computer. You can find "appliances" or virtual machines of all different flavors of linux online (again, for free), download them, run them in VMWare Player and decide which distribution is right for you.

You can run several virtual machines at once (depending on the resources of your host computer). You can network them together and treat them as if they were stand-alone machines, each with its own operating system.

18 posted on 11/18/2010 4:43:41 PM PST by Washi
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To: West Texas Chuck

I run Fedora 14 for 64 bit. I would go with Fedora over Red Hat except if you want to run Oracle. The downside with Fedora, they only now do Intel x86 for both 32 and 64 bit systems. They dropped PPC which bummed me out since I have quite a few PPC machines. Of course not I don’t have to keep updating them every 6 months to a year anymore.

The only thing with FC14 is I have not been able to get VMWare to run where as it worked with FC13. Other software like xine to play DVD’s is available at RPM Fusion but however, the site will not carry libdvdcss which is essential to play them.


19 posted on 11/18/2010 4:43:41 PM PST by CORedneck
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To: West Texas Chuck
I don't know what your system specs are, but as someone who never throws a working PC away...

I dual-boot Win 98SE & Puppy Linux (4.3.1) on a HP Vectra VL Series 7, 266mhz Pentium 2, 192mb PC100 RAM. (IIRC This system's around 12 years old.) I'm very pleased with the performance.

And for really old systems, there's always Damn Small Linux, which reportedly will run on a 486 w. 8mb RAM. It's only about a 50mb download.

I use Linux Mint on a HP VL400DT, Pentium 3 w. 512mb PC133 RAM. (No install, I just use the live CD.)

And Knoppix might be worth a look.

20 posted on 11/18/2010 5:05:55 PM PST by holymoly
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To: West Texas Chuck

Yep - this is pretty darn old. There are linux distros that would run on it, but you would want to go get something from that era. The other issue is that any software so old is going to be loaded with security holes.


21 posted on 11/18/2010 5:30:45 PM PST by fremont_steve
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To: holymoly

Good advice, and thank you to all. This box is a 1.6G P4 with 1G of RAM. I may need new BIOS but I’m gonna try and use it. If all that fails, new box time. What the hell, that is only a few hundred bux.


22 posted on 11/18/2010 5:38:51 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Stay away from Red Hat Enterprise. Go with Fedora to use Red Hat technology. Alternatively, you can use CentOS.

I use Fedora here at home on my personal machine. My family has a Ubuntu machine.

Fedora is not really meant for newcomers to Linux, though it will do whatever you want as it is a general purpose distro.

As far as wireless, I can't help you very much as I run a wired-to-router setup here. I used to have wireless working several versions ago, but haven't set it up in a while. I don't honestly know the current capabilities of Fedora and wireless. I think the ease of setting it up depends on your wireless chip brand.

The initial install will be quite simple. It's all menu-driven, and pretty self-explanatory. Once you boot up the first time, it will guide you through setting up the clock, initial user (not root), and passwords. Again, it's all menu-driven and self-explanatory.

Once it's installed, and you boot up and login the first time, You should have no trouble figuring it out. It's all GUI, and menu based. It'll probably be GNOME, but you can load up other window managers to try out. I use Xfce, and sometimes KDE. Some suit your style better than others.

One thing to keep in mind, though--Linux allows you greater freedom than Windows does. At least 6 different window managers, several web browsers, and multiple choices of software for just about any task you can think of. The point is to explore these options, use the ones you like, and ignore the ones you don't.

23 posted on 11/18/2010 6:08:47 PM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Hey Chuck! You are right (and someone else who mentioned it) to look for a BIOS update first.

Assuming that you can burn a DVD-R, Fedora is easy to set up. Out of the box, Fedora enables NetworkManager instead of network, as the service of choice to handle network devices. That is good for you because it handles wireless very well. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is really just for the enterprise, and is not free.

In the Red Hat world, your free choices are Fedora and CentOS (Community Enterprise OS). CentOS is really suited for servers, and is considered a stable release, on par with RHEL, minus support (there is support within the community, but that's different than paid support). Fedora is more of the leading edge. Features that are in Fedora today that are considered useful and successful will be included in subsequent releases of RHEL/CentOS.

There are tons of distros out there. Don't get distracted by them. :) Find one that you can get installed, so you can start to get a feel for it, and the world of hurt you're about to enter.
24 posted on 11/18/2010 6:27:12 PM PST by andyk (Hi, my name's Andy, and I was a BF 1942 / Desert Combat junkie.)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Also, what is the version of Red Hat that you have running?

You can try a little of this mojo:

~> whereis NetworkManager

If it points to a location, you'll know it's on your installation. Check to see if network is running, which it probably will be:

~> service network status

OR

~> /etc/init.d/network status

If you have network running, and NetworkManager exists, try the following:

~> sudo /etc/init.d/network stop

~> sudo chkconfig network off

~> sudo chkconfig NetworkManager on

~> sudo service NetworkManager start

If you can work your way through that, kudos. If you are logged in as root, and see the "#" at your prompt, you do not need to use the "sudo" command above where listed.

What that is trying to do for you is stop the network service, set it to not start automatically any more, set NetworkManager to start automatically, and then start up NetworkManager.

You should see an icon in the tooltray area for NetworkManager if you can get it running, and depending on your version of linux, you should see the available wireless networks, if it started your wireless device properly.
25 posted on 11/18/2010 6:40:19 PM PST by andyk (Hi, my name's Andy, and I was a BF 1942 / Desert Combat junkie.)
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To: herewego; West Texas Chuck
I use Linux Mint on a Dell Optiplex GX280 that sits beneath my 42" HDTV. Using a wireless keyboard it's great. Never had any kind of problem installing it or getting any device to operate...wireless or otherwise.

Best option would be to get the latest Redhat distro and see what happens. Or download Linux Mint. New drivers are added all the time and an old version of RH could be the issue. Burn either to CD and boot from that. I'm betting you'll have no problems getting either of those to recognize all your hardware.

26 posted on 11/18/2010 7:01:08 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (An armed man is a citizen. An unarmed man is a subject.)
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To: Washi; West Texas Chuck

As old as that machine is,...I would guess it might not run any Virtual instructions....didn’t see what processor it was...


27 posted on 11/18/2010 7:54:47 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: West Texas Chuck
This box is a 1.6G P4 with 1G of RAM.

Speed should be enough,...more memory might be nice....

I think you should start with a recent Puppy Linux....has some nice capabilities....ought to perform on that machine...and will hunt pretty good for your hardware...

28 posted on 11/18/2010 8:00:49 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: andyk

I’m gonna try to get it installed, just to get my feet wet. I signed up for a Linux course at the local community college so I can get a real education on the OS. That would be nice for a change ;)


29 posted on 11/18/2010 9:34:36 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: andyk

Yah, Fedora is what they say they will teach me at the local CC. I’m an old DOS guy, spent a bunch of years with Windows doing software test. Been out of work for over a year, looks like all the test positions want experience with HP Mercury stuff and some sort of Unix, so I’m starting over here. I’m not gonna be happy building bikes at the local shop for $14/hr the rest of my life, I want to get back to where I was money-wise. I need some skins on the wall to compete in this market, but I am in Dallas and there are plenty of jobs out there for somebody with the right skillset. I’m gonna get some education and then a couple of HP certs, maybe Windows Server 2008, and hope for the best. I was always a seat-of-the pants guy who spent enough time on my products that I could pull off stuff that would normally take a BS. I gots plenty of BS, but nothing from a real university. Sucks starting over at age 53, but I ain’t dead yet.


30 posted on 11/18/2010 9:40:19 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck; rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; ...

Now that I have access to the list, I am pinging it.

31 posted on 11/19/2010 5:24:16 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: West Texas Chuck

With that great attitude, you ain’t got a thing to worry about. Have a great weekend.


32 posted on 11/19/2010 5:43:54 AM PST by herewego ( Got .45?)
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To: West Texas Chuck

You couldn’t get Ubuntu to boot? Then there is something you are doing wrong. If you have correctly downloaded a free copy of ubuntu onto your cd, then you need ONLY to do a “warm boot” or turn off your computer with the ubuntu CD in the disk drive. Then when you get to the introductory screen of the computer’s boot or load phase (which is not ubuntu), press the function key f12 and you will be able to select the device to boot from; select your cd drive, accept that setting, and then it will take things from there.

You do not even have to install Ubuntu from the cd onto your hard drive. Ubuntu will run from the cd (more slowly, usually) but you can test drive it from there. It will auto detect your internet connnection and you can then get used to a regular, point, drop the menu, click, experience.

There are many other “distros” (distributions of Linux) that will allow test drives from CDs. But one thing at a time. If you cannot get Ubuntu to run from a cd, then it is not ubuntu that is the hang up. It is something you are or are not doing. I run Linux/Mint mostly (sometimes ubuntu) off old IBM laptops. Which are plenty cheap. It is a “disposable” computer. If I lose or damage it, gosh, no grief.

But don’t get distro-fever and go trying every distro out there until you can get what is known to work to work. Otherwise you will have a frustrating experience. But then that is just my opinion. Have at it.


33 posted on 11/19/2010 6:19:09 AM PST by bajabaja (Too ugly to be scanned at the airports.)
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To: West Texas Chuck
Not yet, I’ve been working with a copy of Red Hat that is bootable (came with my Linux for Dummies) but it is so old and out of date that I gave up.

Ok, first thing you need to do is get an up-to-date Linux Live CD/DVD.

In order to get a feel for Linux, i recommend that you go onto your Windows system, and 'burn' an ISO DVD of the most recent version of Knoppix...this presumes that the machine you want to install to has both a DVD drive and the ability to boot from it.

Then you would burn an ISO of the Live CD/DVD of whatever version of Linux you wish to install.

The reason you want to test out a Live CD/DVD version first is to determine if you'll have any hardware issues BEFORE you install.

i run OpenSuSE 11.1 on this computer,and have had no problems. It took about 20 minutes to install. i'll soon be upgrading to OpenSuSE 11.3.

Remember though, Boot from a recent Live CD/DVD first to make sure that you don't have any other hardware issues.

BTW, Knoppix, mentioned earlier, is very useful to diagnose problems on both Windows and Linux systems, since it can read both file systems.

34 posted on 11/19/2010 7:36:56 AM PST by Calvinist_Dark_Lord ((I have come here to kick @$$ and chew bubblegum...and I'm all outta bubblegum! ~Roddy Piper))
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To: West Texas Chuck

Linux is easy to learn now point and click not the old command line like it used to be but if you choose to you can run it that way. A good link to look at www.distrowatch.com you can read about or download many Linux distros there.Myself I run NST sever edition which is Fedora core based because I like the stability.
There are many easy distros you could use I don’t like to say this one or that one is easiest because what runs on my machines may not on someone else’s but most distros are live now so you can try them out before you install.


35 posted on 11/19/2010 7:57:10 AM PST by Lees Swrd ("Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe and preserve order in the world as well")
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To: West Texas Chuck
Ideas, insults, jokes and dirty pictures welcome.

Lets see how many of those categories I can hit at once:


36 posted on 11/19/2010 8:21:53 AM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Still Thinking

OMG, I don’t care who you are that right there’s funny!


37 posted on 11/19/2010 8:03:11 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck

I’m not sure it qualifies in the “ideas” category, but 3 out of 4 ain’t bad!


38 posted on 11/19/2010 9:10:42 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: bajabaja

OK, I have tried every way I know to install Ubuntu 10.10 on this stupid box, I give up. It always throws some dumass error whatever I throw at it. I give up. Moving on to a download of Fedora.

Maybe this box is just cursed. My retarded stepson blew it up with virii a couple of times, but I wiped it clean and put XP on, by the numbers, a couple of times. It just don’t like that Linux stuff. May be time for new hardware.


39 posted on 11/19/2010 10:56:27 PM PST by West Texas Chuck (US out of the UN - UN out of the US)
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To: West Texas Chuck

I have successfully run a variety of Linux distros on a Dell Optiplex GX240 with only 512mb of RAM. You might try some earlier versions of Ubuntu. Version 8 is rock solid. A lot of changes have been made over the last several releases and sometimes not for the best. It may take a while for the latest bugs to be corrected in the latest version.


40 posted on 11/24/2010 7:43:49 AM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: West Texas Chuck

Try e17 or LXDE... they work great on very old computers... won’t choke up like GNOME or KDE.


41 posted on 12/10/2010 11:49:08 PM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: holymoly

The new version of Puppy Linux is now based off Ubuntu for hardware compatibility... particularly with wireless cards plus you can access the universe of Ubuntu repositories for all the free software you’ll ever need and then some.


42 posted on 12/10/2010 11:51:55 PM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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