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Former TV Anchor Laurie Dhue Shares Her Struggle With Alcoholism (Former Fox Anchor)
AOL Health ^ | February 9, 2011 | Catherine Donaldson-Evans

Posted on 02/09/2011 1:43:14 PM PST by truthkeeper

Former television personality Laurie Dhue says she no longer knew who she was and was tired of suffering in silence from alcoholism when she decided to quit drinking and get help four years ago.

Dhue, who turns 42 tomorrow and was an anchor for the Fox News Channel, MSNBC and CNN, battled her addiction to alcohol for "at least" a decade and a half, she told the "Today" show Wednesday.

"I hid my alcoholism for many, many years," she said. "I was probably a high-functioning alcoholic, as so many people are. But there were cracks, certainly, and there were definitely times when people asked me what was wrong, and I just -- I didn't even know, myself."

Dhue remembers the day she realized she had a terrible problem and decided to get help...

(Excerpt) Read more at aolhealth.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: alcoholism; foxnews; lauriedhue
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To: truthkeeper

Is there a Mr. Dhue?...Seriously though, good luck Laurie. When the going gets tough, the tough get going...Call me!


51 posted on 02/09/2011 3:01:04 PM PST by equaviator ("There's a (datum) plane on the horizon coming in...see it?")
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To: a fool in paradise

She was thirsty. (Sober 12 years in June )


52 posted on 02/09/2011 3:05:47 PM PST by Crawdad
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To: truthkeeper

Wow. I would have never guessed. I wish her the best of luck in her continuing recovery.


53 posted on 02/09/2011 3:07:09 PM PST by Protect the Bill of Rights
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To: a fool in paradise
What do you think led her to drinking?

Childless and unmarried at 42. Probably used the booze to suppress her natural longing to be a mother in order to pursue a meaningless career.

Go to any Lincoln Park (Chicago) or other upscale neighborhood and you can see row after row of the Laurie Dhues of the world on the barstools any night of the week.

54 posted on 02/09/2011 3:07:19 PM PST by triumphant values (Never criticize that to your right.)
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To: Islander7

Emma Jade at LocalNews 8 in Idaho Falls looks
very much like Laurie Dhue. She’s a San Diego gal
who moved to Idaho.


55 posted on 02/09/2011 3:09:12 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: tirednvirginia

Wow, that’s sad. I’m glad to hear she has got it beat for now.


56 posted on 02/09/2011 3:13:03 PM PST by Ham Hock
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To: BubbaJunebug

LOL


57 posted on 02/09/2011 3:18:45 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously..... You won't live through it anyway.)
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To: truthkeeper

Ha ha! Now she “can pick and choose who she goes out with”... No more drunken one night stands!


58 posted on 02/09/2011 3:21:40 PM PST by Tea Party Reveler
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To: triumphant values

That wasn’t it at all.

We met once in a bar and I turned down her advances.

Probably crushed the poor thing.


59 posted on 02/09/2011 3:21:54 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously..... You won't live through it anyway.)
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To: OldDeckHand

According to her interview, she said it was a private dinner given by Cal Thomas. Perhaps it was also a faith based event, because she obviously spoke. She said there were about 80 people there.

The next morning, at the prayer breakfast, her blackberry started ringing and it was people telling her, her story was written up by a reporter and out there.

It’s pretty slimy to write it up, for sure, but a smart woman should know, no place is truly private anymore. How many sex tapes are out there? And I just read a story about a man being arrested for animal cruelty because some kids taped him killing a coon his dog attacked in his garage.

There is no privacy nowadays. If it’s juicy enough, anything is fair game.


60 posted on 02/09/2011 3:27:13 PM PST by I still care (I miss my friends, bagels, and the NYC skyline - but not the taxes. I love the South.)
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To: Perdogg

Probably, women get hooked quicker then men and it’s harder our their bodies.


61 posted on 02/09/2011 4:02:08 PM PST by MsLady (If you died tonight, where would you go? Salvation, don't leave earth without it!)
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To: truthkeeper

For we alcoholics next to sobriety , our anonymity is our most treasured possession, ever reminding us to place principals before personalities and that it’s important for us to maintain that anonymity at the level of press, radio(and tv) and films so that we may carry the message to the still suffering alcoholic since experience shows that discovery might make the still suffering alcoholic shy away from treatment. I guess Ms. Dhue feels otherwise.


62 posted on 02/09/2011 4:10:46 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: hoosiermama

AA is a program based on attraction, not promotion.


63 posted on 02/09/2011 4:13:31 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: hoosiermama
Since the 1950s the medical profession has identified alcoholism as a medical condition. The shame is that society still treats it as human weakness and legal problem. IMO if each time a person was drunk they took them to a medical facility with counseling instead of the county jail, we would take many steps forward very quickly.

With all due respect, that's liberal-mindset nanny-state horsecrap. It most certainly IS a human "weakness" in that it is entirely, 100 pecent behavioral within the context of an allergy. If you were one of the small minority of humans who broke out in a rash every time you ate strawberries, what would you do? YOU'D STOP EATING STRAWBERRIES.

I'm allergic to alcohol. I'm one of the small minority of humans who break out in arrests when I drink. I have woken up every place from a laundromat dryer to jail, with no idea how I got there, because I am alergic to booze. So guess what I finally did? I STOPPED DRINKING IT. That was about 23 years ago.

And you'll never guess what happened! All of the symptoms of this so-called "disease" disappeared! That's right! Imagine that!

It was quite simple. It sure as heck wasn't easy, but it was very, very simple. It was for me, and it is for every alcoholic alive. Not easy, but SIMPLE.

Listen, if alcoholism is a "disease," it's a self-inflicted and self-cured "disease." I can imagine how someone with a real disease, like MS or polio, would give his or her eye teeth to have the ability to get rid of all of that disease's symptoms SIMPLY by making a very cut-and-dried, straightforward behavioral change.

No counselor, no support group, no medical facility, no parent or loving husband or wife or suffering child can make an alcoholic stop drinking. There is only ONE PERSON who can do that -- the alcoholic.

64 posted on 02/09/2011 4:14:05 PM PST by Finny ("Raise hell. Vote smart." -- Ted Nugent)
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To: Crawdad

God bless you. 21 years for me on the 23rd. of this month. It works when you work it.


65 posted on 02/09/2011 4:15:29 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: Finny

Dude, a laundromat dryer, really? That must be some story.


66 posted on 02/09/2011 4:17:17 PM PST by binreadin
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To: Finny

Ah, no. The alcoholic can’t do it alone. Doing it his way is what got them there. AA works. I know , believe me I know. And only a power greater then one’s self can make the sufferer happily and usefully whole. For me it was a loving God.


67 posted on 02/09/2011 4:17:45 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: tirednvirginia

Me too. I was thinking about her yesterday, wondering where she was. I hope she’s doing better. God bless her and all who struggle with recovery and addictions.


68 posted on 02/09/2011 4:21:59 PM PST by rabidralph (...Because you never know how far you can run unless you run.--Penny Chenery, Owner, Secretariat)
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To: jmacusa
God and Jesus were my main supports, and I have now come to regard my blazing alcoholism not as a curse, but as a blessing from God, as it helped me grow toward God and within myself. It was my personal blessing, and that is another reason why I get so disgusted when I see nanny-staters who would presume to take that opportunity God gave me to grow and become close to Him away from me and try to "cure" it with their own counselors and medical "understanding."

But other than that, you are so terribly, awfully wrong when you say "the alcoholic can't do it alone." IT'S THE ONLY WAY THE ALCOHOLIC CAN DO IT. You come into this world alone, and you go out alone. It's you and God and NOBODY ELSE.

Moral support from friends and family is nice if you can get it, but sure as heck is NOT a requirement. AA may or may not help -- I've seen it do both. AA doesn't work for everyone; for some (I've seen them), it's merely trading one addiction for another and still letting alcohol control one's life -- the presence or absence of alcohol decides where you go, who you socialize with, etc. etc. That's bullpuckey, no way to live. I determined early, and prayed about it, that if I wanted to go shoot a game of pool at the local bar with my brothers, if I wanted to go to a rip-roaring bbq where folks drank and were merry, if I wanted to go to a New Year's Eve party, then I was going to go -- the days of alcohol controlling my life were OVER.

And they were. I went to the bars and shot pool with my bros, and drank soda to their beer. I went bar-hopping and dancing with my friends just like always, but drank soda to their cocktails, and was even the "safe" driver. It was MY problem, not theirs. Trading war stories with other alcoholics is entertaining and informative, but that's all. The alcoholic becomes recovered when he/she stands UP and faces alcoholism in the face, knocks it aside, and moves forward without dragging other people into it. It's you and God, nobody else.

A loving God had EVERYTHING to do with my recovery. A loving God who told me to love myself (if He tells me to love others as I love myself, then I must take it as a commandment to love myself) and act on it.

But when a person stops drinking, that person deserves the credit -- not AA, not Schick Hospitals, not counselors. It is a very, very sad and tragic thing that people who quit drinking give others the credit for it. They -- and God -- deserve 100 percent of the credit.

69 posted on 02/09/2011 4:40:08 PM PST by Finny ("Raise hell. Vote smart." -- Ted Nugent)
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To: triumphant values

“Go to any Lincoln Park (Chicago) or other upscale neighborhood and you can see row after row of the Laurie Dhues of the world on the barstools any night of the week.”

Here it is Laz!


70 posted on 02/09/2011 4:40:42 PM PST by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: Finny

I’m glad you’re sober. However it is you that are wrong not me. The alcoholics way of doing things brings them to the point of utter isolation and fearful loneness and without help, without surrendering one’s will to a Higher Power and the willigness to allow the 12 Steps to work it’s too much for one alcoholic alone. . AA is not a religious program. We ask only that you believe in a Higher power, be it God or the AA group but an alcoholic alone is in a bad neighborhood. The AA symbol is a triangle. At the top is God and at each side is AA as a whole and as a single group, the dot in the middle is the alcoholic. I never considered alcoholism a curse or a blessing. It was something I was born with. I come from a long line of drinkers. And being in AA is not about an alcoholic being alone but being part of a group and carrying the AA message to the still suffering alcoholic.


71 posted on 02/09/2011 4:53:00 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: Finny
You are correct of course that only the drinker can stop. But only the diabetic can monitor their diet. Are you aware that there is a gene in true alcoholics that has a “problem”. Also note that just like diabetes alcoholism is the body's malfunction in the use of sugar. In fact they both run in the same families.

Knowledge IS the answer to correcting the problem.... not arrest and shame! Our previous sheriff set up an educational program at the jail. He had an outreach program to the community. Arrests declined. Families got help.It was very successful. His term expired and the new sheriff chose drop the program.

72 posted on 02/09/2011 4:56:40 PM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
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To: jmacusa; Crawdad
Congratulations to you both on your sobriety. Unfortunately, this is something I have seen a lot of in my family, so I know how difficult that journey can be.
You have my utmost respect.
73 posted on 02/09/2011 5:01:40 PM PST by truthkeeper (Life is a pre-existing condition - Rush Limbaugh.)
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To: Finny

You too. (Sound like you were a pistol!)


74 posted on 02/09/2011 5:07:13 PM PST by truthkeeper (Life is a pre-existing condition - Rush Limbaugh.)
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To: truthkeeper

Well thank you but hey, I finally figured that any fool can drink himself to death. I didn’t think I was a fool and I certainly didn’t want to die. Kinda like telling people ‘Hey I’m going to stop playing in the traffic’’. But thank you again for your kind words. I’ll pray for your family members.


75 posted on 02/09/2011 5:07:45 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: jmacusa

Thank you FRiend.


76 posted on 02/09/2011 5:11:35 PM PST by truthkeeper (Life is a pre-existing condition - Rush Limbaugh.)
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To: jmacusa
On the contrary, you are sadly mistaken. One of the great continuing aftermath tragedies of alcoholism. I'm all for getting the message to the still-suffering alcoholic; it's one of the things I like about AA, and I like the sponsorship side of it, as well.

But it is a harmful lie to tell people, to drill it into their head again and again, the falsehood that "they can't do it alone." It is the ONLY way they will ultimately do it. When I quit drinking and shared my story (in print, no less!) with others, people came OUT OF THE WOODWORK who wanted to tell me how they, too, had quit all kinds of addictions,from cigarettes to cocaine to booze to pot -- TWO people even told me of quitting their heroin addictions, and these were people I knew, and hence knew they were telling me the truth -- without going through the 12-step program that you erroniously believe is the sole path to recovery. It isn't. You aren't doing yourself or anyone else any favors by trying to convince them that they are too weak to do it on their own. All that does is foster a false sense of dependency, of inferiority, of neediness.

I know for certain sure that YOU are wrong becaue I am proof, and I know other people who are proof, as well. The 12-step way isn't the ONLY way, and indeed, I think that while it certainly can work, it doesn't succeed for the reasons you think it does.

77 posted on 02/09/2011 5:12:07 PM PST by Finny ("Raise hell. Vote smart." -- Ted Nugent)
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To: truthkeeper
Alcoholism is a sneaky, unpredictable bastard. My father was one of those 'high-functioning' types. Drank every day but got the job done.

One brother had to stop completely because he was not able to walk away after a shot or two...one drink turned into pissing in a phone booth.

My other brother is the same but hasn't stopped.

Of the four of us I was the only one who could take it or leave it. During my forties and much of my fifties I genuinely enjoyed drinking (single malts only). As I got into the second half of my fifties it became less enjoyable so I just pretty much stopped. It took no effort and I still drink when the moment calls for it but if nothing's going on I don't even think about pouring. I liked my drinking days but they're over.

78 posted on 02/09/2011 5:15:33 PM PST by wtc911 ("How you gonna get down that hill?")
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To: binreadin
Dude, a laundromat dryer, really? That must be some story.

Yep. Inside the dryer, curled up and comfy, still in my halloween costume, sun up and shining on the first day of November. Had no idea how I got there. *sigh*

Worse was the time I fired six rounds from a 357 magnum, just for grins (showing off!) into the floor, ceiling, and bathtub (!!) of a friend's old ramshackle house. God most certainly rode on my shoulder and protected me in those wild days; I guess it must have dawned on me that I owed it to Him to quit drinking! [^))

79 posted on 02/09/2011 5:18:36 PM PST by Finny ("Raise hell. Vote smart." -- Ted Nugent)
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To: kbennkc
Some women can not deal with my dumping them.

_______________________________________

You should post a picture of one of them.

80 posted on 02/09/2011 5:18:46 PM PST by wtc911 ("How you gonna get down that hill?")
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To: truthkeeper
If I was a pistol, I was a blessed and lucky one! :^)

I have a lot of sympathy and empathy for alcoholics. It just breaks my heart when I see young people who are clearly alcoholic, but who don't realize it ... yet. I know so much how they feel that it's just crazy. And I know how helpless I am to anything but convince them that they are strong, worthy, and smart enough to do right by themselves someday. I don't even mention alcoholism -- it just raises their hackles and makes them defensive. I just let them know that I don't drink anymore because I got banged up and/or tossed in jail too much.

81 posted on 02/09/2011 5:44:08 PM PST by Finny ("Raise hell. Vote smart." -- Ted Nugent)
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To: truthkeeper

Great to hear that she’s getting help, although I tire of alcohol dependence being referred to as a “disease”.


82 posted on 02/09/2011 5:56:11 PM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: hoosiermama
But only the diabetic can monitor their diet.

That's ridiculous.

Eating is required for survival. The body does not need alcohol, so all the alcoholic has to do is stop drinking.

A diabetic can't very well stop eating altogether.

Alcoholism is caused by behavior and only behavioral modification can fix it. It's not a disease any more than meth addiction or porn addiction is a disease.

It's insulting to people who have real diseases.

83 posted on 02/09/2011 6:08:20 PM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: GunRunner

You need to do some research....As I said before, since the 1950s the medical profession has had the information. Why do YOU think they don’t want the general population to have it?


84 posted on 02/09/2011 6:26:07 PM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
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To: truthkeeper

She turns 42 tomorrow and she gave herself the best present: sobriety. She is intelligent and beautiful. I wish her the best of luck and hope she has family and friends to support her during this trying time.


85 posted on 02/09/2011 6:39:07 PM PST by momtothree
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To: GunRunner; All
Google or bing: “ The American Medical Association (AMA) declared that alcoholism was an illness in 1956.” There are over 58,100 posts.
Much research has been done, medications have been developed and used in successful treatments, but much still needs to be done.
Read up on it, and then treat members of your family with the same love and support you would someone with a socially acceptable disease.

Denial and guilt (created because it's not socially acceptable) keep people from getting the help they need whether it's a twelve step, counseling or other help.

86 posted on 02/09/2011 6:51:09 PM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
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To: Finny

I never said AA was the only way to go. You don’t seem to understand or notice what I’m saying. The alcoholic s way of doing things is what brings him to his knees and being so driven to near insanity and alone they’re chances of become sober alone are almost nil. And AA doesn’t lie and I take offense at that. Ours is a program of rigorous honesty and constant moral self-inventory, some people are capable of that and some aren’t, those are usually the ones who fail . AA doesn’t see anyone as ‘’weak’’, only powerless over alcohol. Our steps are suggestions as a means of recovering and you feel AA isn’t for you, your misery can be refunded at the door.’’ The 12 Steps of AA are a set of principals, , spiritual in their nature which practiced as a way of life can expel the obsession to drink and enable the sufferer to become happily and usefully whole’’. AA has been success since 1934. It’s been a success around the world for that matter. In fact AA 12 Steps are used by every addiction group from gamblers to narcotics. I’m proof of that. When you quit drinking, did you change the person you were when you drank? You’re a success? So am I, for 21 years a day at a time. The 12 Steps work, again, because of rigorous self-honesty.


87 posted on 02/09/2011 7:07:05 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: truthkeeper

Thank you. Maybe you can help ‘’Finny’’. They seem not to understand what AA is all about.


88 posted on 02/09/2011 7:13:11 PM PST by jmacusa (Two wrongs don't make a right. But they can make it interesting.)
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To: truthkeeper

Alcohol, Prozac, Paxil, nobody wants to talk of the underlying causes. I’m here to tell you that I just skipped a meeting of a “men’s group” at my local HMO, $7 co-payment, where two of the regular participants have been going and whining for over two years (I attended 4 weekly meetings myself), and for all I can tell, nothing in their lives has changed, just as nothing has changed in my own miserable existence, alcohol or no alcohol, Prozac, Paxil, men’s group, vitamin B12, fish oil supplements. And so, this evening I drank most of another bottle of BV Riesling instead. Good luck and God bless you all.


89 posted on 02/09/2011 7:17:57 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: Revolting cat!

In the end we all find our own way. Good luck friend.


90 posted on 02/09/2011 7:40:18 PM PST by truthkeeper (Life is a pre-existing condition - Rush Limbaugh.)
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To: onyx

Hey!


91 posted on 02/09/2011 7:42:37 PM PST by Hildy
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To: truthkeeper

Thank you with all my heart. I don’t wish to diss the AA or the 12 step method (Scientologists and Moonies, that’s another matter altogether), only to share my own experiences and observations for whatever it’s worth, and it ain’t much, I know. It ain’t easy, I tell ya.


92 posted on 02/09/2011 7:43:22 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: truthkeeper

Good luck to her as well. I would imagine given her figure it wouldn’t take alot of alcohol to effect her. Maybe she got enticed by the same Atlanta nightlife that once appealed to Steve Bartkowski & Brett Farve.


93 posted on 02/09/2011 7:45:25 PM PST by fkabuckeyesrule
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To: truthkeeper

Laurie,

Give me a call. I can keep you preoccupied, and you won’t have time to think about getting drunk.

PhiloBedo


94 posted on 02/09/2011 7:53:01 PM PST by PhiloBedo (You gotta roll with the punches and get with what's real.)
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To: All

Legal considerations
In 1988, the US Supreme Court upheld a regulation whereby the Veterans’ Administration was able to avoid paying benefits by presuming that primary alcoholism is always the result of the veteran’s “own willful misconduct.” The majority opinion written by Justice Byron R. White echoed the District of Columbia Circuit’s finding that there exists “a substantial body of medical literature that even contests the proposition that alcoholism is a disease, much less that it is a disease for which the victim bears no responsibility”.[30] He also wrote: “Indeed, even among many who consider alcoholism a “disease” to which its victims are genetically predisposed, the consumption of alcohol is not regarded as wholly involuntary.” However, the majority opinion stated in conclusion that “this litigation does not require the Court to decide whether alcoholism is a disease whose course its victims cannot control. It is not our role to resolve this medical issue on which the authorities remain sharply divided.” The dissenting opinion noted that “despite much comment in the popular press, these cases are not concerned with whether alcoholism, simplistically, is or is not a “disease.””[31]

The American Bar Association “affirms the principle that dependence on alcohol or other drugs is a disease.”[32]

Current acceptance
The current mainstream scientific and medical view is that alcoholism is a disease, although some debate on this topic still occurs.[33][34]

In 2004, the World Health Organisation published a detailed report on alcohol and other psychoactive substances entitled “Neuroscience of psychoactive substance use and dependence”.[35] It stated that this was the “first attempt by WHO to provide a comprehensive overview of the biological factors related to substance use and dependence by summarizing the vast amount of knowledge gained in the last 20-30 years. The report highlights the current state of knowledge of the mechanisms of action of different types of psychoactive substances, and explains how the use of these substances can lead to the development of dependence syndrome.” The report states that “dependence has not previously been recognized as a disorder of the brain, in the same way that psychiatric and mental illnesses were not previously viewed as being a result of a disorder of the brain. However, with recent advances in neuroscience, it is clear that dependence is as much a disorder of the brain as any other neurological or psychiatric illness.”

The American Society of Addiction Medicine and the American Medical Association both maintain extensive policy regarding alcoholism. The American Psychiatric Association recognizes the existence of “alcoholism” as the equivalent of alcohol dependence. The American Hospital Association, the American Public Health Association, the National Association of Social Workers, and the American College of Physicians classify “alcoholism” as a disease.

In the US, the National Institutes of Health has a specific institute, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), concerned with the support and conduct of biomedical and behavioral research on the causes, consequences, treatment, and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems. It funds approximately 90 percent of all such research in the United States. The official NIAAA position is that “alcoholism is a disease. The craving that an alcoholic feels for alcohol can be as strong as the need for food or water. An alcoholic will continue to drink despite serious family, health, or legal problems. Like many other diseases, alcoholism is chronic, meaning that it lasts a person’s lifetime; it usually follows a predictable course; and it has symptoms. The risk for developing alcoholism is influenced both by a person’s genes and by his or her lifestyle


95 posted on 02/09/2011 8:06:42 PM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
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To: PhiloBedo
I used to have an office in the Sperry building. (Next to Radio City)

This lady would join us at a bar around 7 PM, drink up and be on TV at 11. Amazed us all.
We never figured she had a problem. She could handle it.
BTW, she was just a great lady. Never seemed drunk.

96 posted on 02/09/2011 8:07:02 PM PST by AGreatPer (Voting for the crazy conservative gave us Ronald Reagan....Ann Coulter)
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To: BubbaJunebug

He did.....but that’s when the alcoholism started.


97 posted on 02/09/2011 8:13:06 PM PST by supremedoctrine (Come closer. I want to get a better look at you.)
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To: BubbaJunebug

He did.....but that’s when the alcoholism started.


98 posted on 02/09/2011 8:13:29 PM PST by supremedoctrine (Come closer. I want to get a better look at you.)
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To: hoosiermama

You are counting on the AMA to determine what is and what is not a disease? The same AMA that had homosexuality as a disease until the gay lobby organized and put pressure on them for it NOT to be a disease? THAT AMA?

Social acceptability really isn’t the reason alcoholics don’t go to AA, it’s only an excuse. Their not wanting to quit drinking is the reason. When an alcoholic wants to quit, s/he doesn’t give a damn about social acceptability.


99 posted on 02/09/2011 8:32:08 PM PST by EDINVA
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To: EDINVA

In 1988, the US Supreme Court upheld a regulation whereby the Veterans’ Administration was able to avoid paying benefits by presuming that primary alcoholism is always the result of the veteran’s “own willful misconduct.” The majority opinion written by Justice Byron R. White echoed the District of Columbia Circuit’s finding that there exists “a substantial body of medical literature that even contests the proposition that alcoholism is a disease...


100 posted on 02/09/2011 8:55:42 PM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
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