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3 Good Reasons To Buy an Open-PC (Linux)
PC World ^ | March 4, 2011 | Katherine Noyes

Posted on 03/05/2011 4:32:42 AM PST by decimon

For many small business users, all the rational arguments for using open source software like Linux make a great deal of sense: It's free, customizable, compatible, and it's free of vendor lock-in, to name just a few.

When it comes down to the wire at purchase time, however, many fall prey to one or more of the frequently perpetuated myths out there, and vague fears of incompatibility or a lack of support or something else drive them right back into Redmond's waiting arms.

One way to make the notion of a Linux-based computer less worrisome for such users is to buy hardware preloaded with Ubuntu, Canonical's version of the open source operating system. That can go a long way toward ensuring that everything "just works" out of the box, and I've already discussed good ways and places to do this.

As of December, however, another option emerged that's well worth checking out--it's even better, in fact, from the perspective of software freedom. It's called the Open-PC, and it offers "a PC for everyday use built by the Linux community for the Linux community," in the project's own words.

With three models to choose from--two built and sold in Europe and one through ThinkPenguin in the United States--the Open-PC has several key advantages that could make it the right choice for your small business. Here are just a few to consider.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: linux

1 posted on 03/05/2011 4:32:44 AM PST by decimon
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To: decimon

Some people would rather build a heathkit tv so they can be “free of vendor lock-in” by the likes of the evil magnavox empire.


2 posted on 03/05/2011 4:36:16 AM PST by the invisib1e hand (Every knife in my back pushes me forward.)
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To: decimon

3 posted on 03/05/2011 4:54:49 AM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: the invisib1e hand
As a small business owner using Linux means

1. You will no longer be bothered by vendor software upgrades since they will not be compatible with your computer, since most vendor software is written to run in Windows.
2. Your hand writing and mathematics skills will improve greatly since you will now be communicating the old fashion way.
3. By embracing the opinion of an English major, writing for a tech publication, but who would rather be writing for a mainstream media operation, you will be viewed as someone no one will want to do business with.
Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers.

4 posted on 03/05/2011 4:55:27 AM PST by Wooly
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To: decimon

Linux is great for single function servers but as a desktop solution is still badly lacking.

As an IT professional my love/hate relationship with Microsoft often bubbles over and I and my IT buddies try to replace it with a Linux solution.

I really like Linux and run Ubuntu on a PC at the house. It is NO WHERE NEAR READY for mainstream useage.

Too many things require ActiveX to work, and that is all Microsoft.


5 posted on 03/05/2011 5:06:32 AM PST by fuzzybutt (Democrat Lawyers are the root of all evil.)
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To: fuzzybutt

I agree completely. I do run linux servers at the office, but there is not a linux distro that is complete enough yet for the average everyday user who has no critical thinking skills. To my dismay, there are daily occasions when i have to use WINE, or worse yet, boot Windows.


6 posted on 03/05/2011 5:21:39 AM PST by RobertClark (On a long enough timeline the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.)
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To: decimon

My family has teased me about using Linux for years. Since I started dual-booting our main home PC with Windows and Ubuntu and they’ve used both, I find that they all prefer Ubuntu.

Ubuntu boots way faster than Windows. It’s ready to surf the Internet in about 25 seconds. Windows takes almost 3 minutes to load all the crap before it is surf-ready.

We have a HP All-In_one printer/scanner/copier/fax. The HPLIP Linux drivers just work, and were only about 2MB in size. HP’s drivers for the Windows system: 200+ MB, and they still don’t work worth a crap and are always using up CPU cycles and memory looking for updates.

Ubuntu worked just fine from the moment of installation, including the wireless network adapter.

Open Office will open and save everything that MSOffice will(sometimes better—especially if you have an older version of Office and don’t want to spend $300 on a newer version with little to show for the cash outlay), and actually has a few nice little features that MSOffice doesn’t (like the handy “Export to PDF” button).

I once had a good laugh while on the internet when a “Windows Security Alert” popped up to tell me that Windows was infected with a virus and that I had to buy this software to fix it. I was on Ubuntu at the time. Yes, there is a Linux virus scan on Ubuntu, just in case. But I don’t really worry about viruses and such.

The only thing that Windows can do that Ubuntu can’t is run most video games. I think that’s the only reason I keep it on my computer. Now that I think about it, I believe I’ll migrate all of the data, pictures, and music on my Windows partition to Ubuntu, purge it of everything but games, and resize it accordingly. Windows has become the red-headed step child of my family’s PC.


7 posted on 03/05/2011 5:41:42 AM PST by EricT. (Can we start hanging them yet?)
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To: Wooly

Tell that to the young lad from IT of a small machine shop I met in a class over 3 years ago. He went with either Early Ubuntu or Red Hat and was running CNC cutting etc and the entire office off this OS to save money. I lost touch with him, during the auto downturn I hope their customer base was non DCC-GM centric and I hoped they survived.


8 posted on 03/05/2011 5:47:32 AM PST by taildragger (( Palin / Mulally 2012 ))
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

9 posted on 03/05/2011 5:52:36 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: the invisib1e hand

There’s one pretty compelling reason to go for Linux on the desktop even in the corporate environment, and that’s Desktop Virtualisation or Application Virtualisation.

I recently saw a Quest vWorkspace VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure) implementation. It blew my socks off.

The administrators no longer have to worry if a computer has got the right OS, or the right patches, drivers, antivirus, a certain amount of memory, doesn’t have App X installed on it because that breaks App Y, and so on.

They’ve got stripped-down PCs that don’t have anything except the VDI software installed, and are using proximity badges and the builtin cameras on the monitors, to identify the user at the keyboard.

Sit at a machine and tap the proximity reader - boom there’s your applications. Get out of the chair, within ten seconds the screen locks because the camera saw you walk away. Sit at another machine at another desk, tap the reader, and there’s your applications from the first machine.

Say you get halfway into writing a Word document up and go to browse for a picture to add, and realise the file is sitting on your iPad. Simple. Log into your iPad. The screen locks on the desktop PC, and Word appears on your iPad, with your document still open and Word still waiting for you to browse for that picture. Only now you can grab the file from the iPad. Need to put it on a Linux PC? Log into it. There’s your Word session, again. File, Save As. Job done.

This is sexy stuff (if you’re a nerd) but a bean-counter will wet himself because of the implications.

You can make a Linux image with the VDI client software included, that’ll run on any machine that’s not quite powerful enough to cope with Windows 7.

Bingo - no “we’re short on Windows 7 licenses”, no “the machines in Marketing need bigger hard disks”, no more “OurApp v8 needs a RAM upgrade”. And if the usable life expectancy of old computers can easily be doubled overnight - even tripled - without any expenditure on them, then Linux allows the IT department to make significant cuts in spending without any detrimental impact on the service.

To prove the point, my customer took an old Pentium III with 512MB of RAM and a measly 8GB hard drive out of a cupboard, wiped it with the same Linux disk he uses on new thin client PCs, kickstarted the setup, and walked away.

An hour later I went back to that machine, and it was sat on the login screen. I logged into the virtual desktop and fired up Word 2010 - the entire process from hitting “Log In” to being able to type into a new document, took about eight seconds.


10 posted on 03/05/2011 5:53:50 AM PST by MalPearce
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To: Wooly
Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers.

...says the person who obviously has no clue about what he's talking about.

11 posted on 03/05/2011 5:54:08 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: EricT.

Open Office? Well, yes, uh... Ahahahahah-Ohohohoho-Oohoohoo...sniff, sorry, please stop...


12 posted on 03/05/2011 5:59:18 AM PST by epluribus_2
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To: epluribus_2

(Just kidding mostly) - we use linux all the time. OO does make my hair hurt occasionally but I find myself using officey-type software less and less anyways these days.


13 posted on 03/05/2011 6:02:09 AM PST by epluribus_2
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To: decimon

Don’t understand all the folks with anti-business linux posts.

I’ve run my business on almost all linux based pc’s for several years now. There’s not a client I have that can detect that my “.doc and .xls” pages are generated from Open Office and not a Microsoft product.

Almost every person that’s worked for me in the last 5 years has asked me “how much would it cost” to put our office OS on their home system.

The single drawback for businesses like mine (< 20 employees) is the lack of a drop in replacement for quickbooks. We’ve got one legacy windows box (off network) for the single purpose of running quickbooks.

Other than that, I’ve been quite pleased with ubuntu on my laptop, and OpenSuse on the desktops. Actually I’m sitting in a coffee shop right now and have already had someone ask me how I can “spin” my desktop and “wobble” the windows when I move them. I can hardly imaging working on a lame windows “single desktop” environment anymore.


14 posted on 03/05/2011 6:06:12 AM PST by crescen7 (game on)
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To: crescen7
I’ve run my business on almost all linux based pc’s for several years now. There’s not a client I have that can detect that my “.doc and .xls” pages are generated from Open Office and not a Microsoft product.

Yeah, but you have to waste time with other than good games. ;-)

We’ve got one legacy windows box (off network) for the single purpose of running quickbooks.

I like that. That you have a network needn't mean that everything must be on it. Nothing wrong with sneakernet.

15 posted on 03/05/2011 6:18:31 AM PST by decimon
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To: Wooly

Wow, my business uses linux. Of course, being in telecom, Windows doesn’t really work to well. Perhaps if you write a lot docs and don’t need a system that can run high throughput, Windows might be for you.


16 posted on 03/05/2011 6:27:10 AM PST by stratboy
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To: decimon
I like that. That you have a network needn't mean that everything must be on it. Nothing wrong with sneakernet.

Yeah, running an old windows box connected to a network means that eventually someone is going to go online, which means either paying for some goofy security software and or tech time or certain disaster.

Not anxious to put all of our financial transactions into the public domain!

17 posted on 03/05/2011 6:40:33 AM PST by crescen7 (game on)
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To: crescen7
Don’t understand all the folks with anti-business linux posts.

It's called ignorance.

18 posted on 03/05/2011 6:55:17 AM PST by raybbr (People who still support Obama are either a Marxist or a moron.)
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To: Wooly

[Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers. ]

Well then, I guess I should shut down my Linux box where I run all my websites and my real estate database. I’m only down to a handful of apps that are Windows only (my MLS link through Internet Explorer, and some Word documents which I could use in OpenOffice, actually, that’s about it).

I do our office programming in Java and mysql with Netbeans for the development environment, that alone will save $10s of thousands over the years in license fees. But I guess I R not too smart.


19 posted on 03/05/2011 7:09:32 AM PST by DaxtonBrown (HARRY: Money Mob & Influence (See my Expose on Reid on amazon.com written by me!))
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To: crescen7

My main desktop PC at home is a dual-boot XP Pro/Ubuntu box. I only run Windows when I absolutely must have Excel, Word or Publisher. Open Office is still a little clunky and often deals poorly with .docx formatting. Quickbooks is also a Win must.

For everything else, I use Ubuntu. Since I’m the only one who does anything particularly advanced in the way of formatting or accounting, everyone else who uses that computer sticks with Linux. It gives them a 100% safe web surfing tool that starts and runs fast.

Gnome Mahjong has addicted pretty much everyone who has ever sat down at that computer.


20 posted on 03/05/2011 7:10:51 AM PST by Poser (Cogito ergo Spam - I think, therefore I ham)
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To: martin_fierro

I find the Atom processor to be less than acceptable for any sort of video. That computer is a piece of crap. For $99 you can get a good refurb 2.8 dual core box.

Seriously... A parallel port, VGA only and PS2 ports? It’s not 2003 anymore.


21 posted on 03/05/2011 7:26:25 AM PST by Poser (Cogito ergo Spam - I think, therefore I ham)
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To: Wooly
We run high performance middleware on Linux (RHEL5). WebSphere and weblogic systems provide exceptional throughput on Linux blades. We run zLinux guest images on mainframe to provide trading transaction rates that are among the highest of any systems on the planet. IBM alphaworks is a great place to learn about how valuable Linux is in the enterprise server space.
22 posted on 03/05/2011 7:51:02 AM PST by gcraig (Freedom isn't free)
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To: decimon

The fallacy inherent in all these arguments is that in this day and age of computers and devices everywhere all plugged into the same net that it’s necessary to make a choice.

Fact is that we live in a heterogeneous computing environment and that trend is likely to stay in place for a very long time. I’m typing this on a Windows7 laptop, sitting right next to my homebuilt dual-boot Fedora Core/Windows 7 desktop. A few feet away are (currently out of service) XP and Fedora boxes. If I was a smartphone geek (I’m not) I could easily have an Android phone in my pocket but that’s not the case.

All these either/or arguments make as much sense to me as someone having a tool chest in it with only one tool. Hardware is (relatively speaking) cheap! OS’s are either free (linux) or at worst affordable (Mac/Windows). Embrace the clutter, pick the right tool for the job! If I want to run Quicken or Turbotax I’m going to run it native under windows and not mess with WINE or Vbox etc. Why bother? If I want to run photoshop - same thing. If I want a web server it’s going to be apache/linux. Web surfing can really be either. The trick is to build a net/cloud so that it doesn’t matter which device you come in on, your experience will be roughly the same. My employer is already doing this - they now are supporting both Windows and Macs as supported machines and there already has been a cadre of people who have linux on their laptops.


23 posted on 03/05/2011 8:04:22 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten (Welcome to the USA - where every day is Backwards Day!)
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
If I was a smartphone geek (I’m not) I could easily have an Android phone in my pocket but that’s not the case.

The smartphone/tablet market could be a game changer as people become used to different interfaces.

24 posted on 03/05/2011 8:11:27 AM PST by decimon
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To: epluribus_2
Open Office? Well, yes, uh... Ahahahahah-Ohohohoho-Oohoohoo...sniff, sorry, please stop...

Go ahead and laugh. I have MSOfficeXP at work and even with the compatibility pack installed, it won't open many files I get that have been made on newer versions of MSOffice. Open Office does not have this issue.

25 posted on 03/05/2011 8:47:52 AM PST by EricT. (Can we start hanging them yet?)
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To: decimon

This PC is already outdated. It’s very very expensive, 387 EURO ! It’s very bulky, it’s using a PSU with 180W too much power, and the cost to ship stateside would be prohibitive.

On top of that, using an Atom dual core for a situation like this (thin client) is less energy efficient than using an embedded CPU with integrated GPU. These systems became available 2 weeks ago...

For that price range, get these little suckers for US$200:
http://www.globalscaletechnologies.com/p-40-guruplug-display-devkit.aspx
GuruPlug Display - DevKit
110mm (L) x 69.5mm (W) x 48.5 mm (H)
Consuming under 5 Watts of power

I’m thinking about buying one as a testbed for a very small Linux home media server.


26 posted on 03/05/2011 9:12:07 AM PST by JerseyHighlander (p.s. The word 'bloggers' is not in the freerepublic spellcheck dictionary?!)
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To: EricT.
I once had a good laugh while on the internet when a “Windows Security Alert” popped up to tell me that Windows was infected with a virus and that I had to buy this software to fix it. I was on Ubuntu at the time

LOL, happened to me too -- I was (still am) using Xubuntu.

27 posted on 03/05/2011 9:29:29 AM PST by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|http://pure-gas.org|Must be a day for changing taglines)
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To: JerseyHighlander
I’m thinking about buying one as a testbed for a very small Linux home media server.

If an ARM processor can handle it. Might be best to wait for some reviews.

28 posted on 03/05/2011 9:40:26 AM PST by decimon
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To: EricT.

I’m a big, big, MS fan, running Win7 on an intel build.

Even I run OO, exclusively. As for the MS formatting, it’s easy enough to fix it so that the MS formatting works well in both OO and MS.

Now that being said, OO, has some very BIG BUGS that have cost me considerable time and money. One of them being the old bug with their restore. Restore won’t retrieve autosaves, as I found out the hard way. That’s since been fixed.


29 posted on 03/05/2011 10:13:47 AM PST by BenKenobi (Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong. - Silent Cal)
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To: Wooly

Really?

I met someone a few years ago who had replaced all the windows workstations at a small school district with diskless Linux workstations.

Between that and Googleapps they were saving $500 per workstation.

But hey I’m sure they didn’t have any customers.


30 posted on 03/05/2011 10:45:22 AM PST by desertfreedom765
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To: ShadowAce; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW
I'm just pinging who I saw on the list.

I finally installed Ubuntu (10.10) on one of my desktop systems and really like it. There are some issues with video and audio (seems cached and doesn't play at the right time) and it doesn't run my favorite software under WINE, so my Windows 7 box is used for things that don't run quite right.

Other than that, Ubuntu works for me on my HP desktop.

I built a server a few years ago and keep loading newer version of Fedora on it, but since Ubuntu worked so well on my desktop I thought I'd try 32 and 64 bit on the server. Neither worked. At first I thought it was a boot timing issue but think the motherboard may not be supported. So Fedora 14 is back on the server and it runs great.

Other than Ubuntu, what linux distros do you suggest for the desktop?

31 posted on 03/05/2011 12:28:07 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: scripter

Linux Mint. It’s a derivative of Ubuntu, but I’ve found it to be far more resilient and performs better.


32 posted on 03/05/2011 12:54:43 PM PST by MalPearce
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To: scripter
Other than Ubuntu, what linux distros do you suggest for the desktop?

i have had good success in running Open SuSE. Currently i'm on version 11.1, about to upgrade to 11.4 when it is released next week.

As you have more experience with the Windows Desktop, i strongly recommend that you use the KDE environment rather than Gnome. While KDE does use more system resources, it is far more highly configurable than Gnome.

There is an Ubuntu version called KUbuntu.

As for software deficiencies aside from gaming (where Windows is to this day and for the forseeable future the superior system), can you replace those applications with Linux equivalents?

Perhaps give us an example of what software you speak of.

33 posted on 03/05/2011 3:14:29 PM PST by Calvinist_Dark_Lord ((I have come here to kick @$$ and chew bubblegum...and I'm all outta bubblegum! ~Roddy Piper))
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To: MalPearce

Linux Mint Rocks!


34 posted on 03/05/2011 3:17:23 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: MalPearce
Linux Mint.

Hmm. I've heard of it but that's all. I'll check it out. Thanks.

Since I wrote that last post, my Windows 7 laptop has crashed twice... Sigh.

35 posted on 03/05/2011 4:02:41 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: Calvinist_Dark_Lord
I tried Open SUSE a long time ago and didn't like it, although why I didn't like it I can't remember. Maybe I'll try installing it and I'll remember. :-)

I"ve been meaning to try KDE again - I used it years ago under Solaris and liked it, but somebody else mentioned Gnome was superior to KDE so I went with Gnome this time. For the most part I connect to Linux/Unix via putty and never see the graphical interface.

I've never played games on Windows - just doesn't appeal to me. The software I mentioned is Logos Bible software. I have a lot of money tied up with Logos and can't part with it, so I have to keep a Windows box for now just to run Logos. I might try setting up a Windows VM under Ubuntu...

36 posted on 03/05/2011 4:19:14 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: scripter
FWIW, and I'm the classic Mac fanboi, that's possibly not Windows 7 causing the crash. HP has gotten to where they make some bad computers, and their underlying software is atrocious.

Please understand I'm saying this as a Mac guy, but part of the problem with Windows is frequently crappy hardware. XP and 7 are pretty good operating systems.

37 posted on 03/05/2011 4:38:11 PM PST by Richard Kimball
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To: Wooly
Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers.

No guys, wooly's right.

Burlington Coat Factory has been using Linux desktops for a decade now and they haven't had any customers. This piddly little start-up called Amazon.com is using Linux "in nearly every corner of its business" The result? No customers. Dreamworks Animation uses 1,000 Linux desktops (as of 2007) and used Linux for animation and visual effects in Shrek 3. I don't think anyone saw it, much less even knows who Dreamworks is... Google uses Linux on desktops in its corporate environments. I don't think they've made a nickel's profit...

38 posted on 03/05/2011 5:57:36 PM PST by MichiganMan (Oprah: Commercial Beef Agriculture=Bad, Commercial Chicken Agriculture=Good...Wait, WTF???)
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To: Richard Kimball
I completely understand. The motherboard on my laptop has been replaced 3 times in 7 months, and the current motherboard has lasted about a month... so it very well could be the hardware although the current problem is different. Part of the problem is my dislike for all or most things Windows so I tend to blame everything on Microsoft when the problem may very well be hardware. I'm not a Mac fan either. Got a Mac Book Pro and it sits doing nothing.

FWIW, the laptop is a Toshiba and my last Toshiba laptop from 2001 is still running although I've replaced the drive one.

My desktop is the HP (running Ubuntu), my other desktop is a Compaq (64 bit Vista) and the other is an HP (32 bit Vista)... all of which means HP anyway. I've only had hardware problems with the new Toshiba.

My server running Fedora was something I built from Newegg which has had no problems at all, it was just expensive to build because I can't buy in bulk.

It's interesting how everything works or doesn't work out for all of us.

39 posted on 03/05/2011 7:18:49 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: Wooly
Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers.

There's a company headquartered at 1600 Amphitheater Parkway which has over a million computers, spread across a couple of dozen data centers around the world, all running Linux. They have lots of customers and one hell of a lot of users. Last year they netted about $8.5b.

40 posted on 03/05/2011 7:33:42 PM PST by cynwoody
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To: cynwoody
There's a company headquartered at 1600 Amphitheater Parkway which has over a million computers, spread across a couple of dozen data centers around the world, all running Linux.

Now that is a great post.

41 posted on 03/05/2011 7:38:54 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: MichiganMan
Microsoft is catching it from all sides now. Apple is cleaning up in the consumer end and Linux seems to be making huge inroads in areas where there's IT support.
42 posted on 03/05/2011 8:28:34 PM PST by Richard Kimball
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To: scripter

Other than Ubuntu, what linux distros do you suggest for the desktop?

I use PCLinuxOS, it just works out of the box. I have it on one of my desktops and run win7 on Vbox, I also put it on my OCZ neutrino netbook, again just works

43 posted on 03/05/2011 9:17:47 PM PST by markman46 (engage brain before using keyboard!!!)
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To: markman46

Thanks. I’ll check that out as well.


44 posted on 03/05/2011 9:27:29 PM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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To: Wooly; cynwoody

Using Linux for business makes no sense at all, unless you do not plan on having customers.

Then there's the US Department of Defense:

“When we rolled into Baghdad, we did it using open source,” General Justice continued. “It may come as a surprise to many of you, but the U.S. Army is “the” single largest install base for Red Hat Linux. I'm their largest customer.”

The US Navy nuclear submarine fleet is using GNU/Linux

Linux headed into Boeing antisub aircraft

No customers there.  Piddly lightweight stuff, this Linux.  Just further proof of your point Wooly. 

By embracing the opinion of an English major, writing for a tech publication, but who would rather be writing for a mainstream media operation, you will be viewed as someone no one will want to do business with.

Indeed.  Isn't it funny when people write about subjects of which they know so little?  

45 posted on 03/05/2011 10:29:51 PM PST by MichiganMan (Oprah: Commercial Beef Agriculture=Bad, Commercial Chicken Agriculture=Good...Wait, WTF???)
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To: RobertClark

Why boot winders when you can use something like Sun’s Virtualbox?


46 posted on 03/05/2011 10:49:40 PM PST by AFreeBird
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To: Richard Kimball

Depends on the computers you buy.

I’ve got four Dell desktops (all of them cheap and cheerful but they all have awful onboard graphics cards - the card in the media center is so abysmal it can’t even obtain a 3dMark rating which is pathetic for a system that’s only five years old).

I have had 3 HP laptops for work and they’re all business grade - and are fantastic (the Elitebook is just excellent).

Best quality laptop I’ve ever had, bar none, was a Toshiba Satellite Pro 490xcdt, a work laptop I was given after it had passed its five year birthday.

By 2008 (a few months shy of its tenth birthday) it still had no dead pixels, and the original battery was still holding a 40 minute charge. Amazingly, it totally spanked my oldest Dell tower - a P4 3.2Ghz system with stock parts and only a RAM upgrade - in a benchmark test.

I sold it to a student who’s now a year from graduation and is still using it on a daily basis, XP + OpenOffice.

Some years back I compared business grade laptops and Dell certainly deliver more bang for buck than anyone else, but the build quality was nowhere near as good as the Toshibas and HPs. They’re fine if you’re only going to use them on a desk but if a laptop can’t survive serious punishment (e.g. a five foot fall from a shelf in a server rack, onto a solid floor) then it’s no use to me.


47 posted on 03/06/2011 12:44:56 AM PST by MalPearce
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To: crescen7; decimon
Yeah, running an old windows box connected to a network means that eventually someone is going to go online, which means either paying for some goofy security software and or tech time or certain disaster.

Not anxious to put all of our financial transactions into the public domain!

Something like that is a great candidate for virtualization. You can make the VM have host-only networking so the only 'network' it can see is the local host it is running on. 

One of the really cool things about running a VM is that you can fire it up, do some work, then 'suspend' it to disk. If that disk space is on a shared network drive within your office, you can resume it from another workstation, and be right where you left off. It also makes the image insanely easy to back up.

48 posted on 03/06/2011 3:33:11 PM PST by zeugma (Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam)
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To: scripter
I tried Open SUSE a long time ago and didn't like it, although why I didn't like it I can't remember. Maybe I'll try installing it and I'll remember. :-)

i've been using SuSE since 9.2 Professional. i found it to be more user friendly. It has since been split off into Novell SuSE Enterprise Linux and the OpenSUSE project. Novell Enterprise is less cutting edge and more stable. OpenSUSE is used as more of a beta testing platform for Novell Enterprise, and can be downloaded freely.

I"ve been meaning to try KDE again - I used it years ago under Solaris and liked it, but somebody else mentioned Gnome was superior to KDE so I went with Gnome this time. For the most part I connect to Linux/Unix via putty and never see the graphical interface.

KDE has two available versions, 3.5.x and 4.6.x. Gnome always reminded me of Macintosh OSX. While it was impressive, i always thought it to be somewhat limited in comparison to KDE.

The software I mentioned is Logos Bible software. I have a lot of money tied up with Logos and can't part with it, so I have to keep a Windows box for now just to run Logos. I might try setting up a Windows VM under Ubuntu...

There is a great deal of software available with the OpenSuSE distribution. Among that is an application called BibleTime. i'm certain that others have Linux versions. i don't know about Logos. If it does exist, you may have to download it as an RPM, and install it yourself.

49 posted on 03/07/2011 6:01:45 AM PST by Calvinist_Dark_Lord ((I have come here to kick @$$ and chew bubblegum...and I'm all outta bubblegum! ~Roddy Piper))
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To: Calvinist_Dark_Lord
IMO, Logos is the best Bible software out there and keeping a windows system around just for Logos is worth it, I just wish I didn't have to! Check out Logos here: http://www.logos.com/. If I had more time I'd do what I could to help port Logos to Linux. From what I understand the Mac version isn't all that great but getting better.
50 posted on 03/07/2011 9:55:07 AM PST by scripter ("You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis)
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