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Etruscan House Reveals Ancient Domestic Life
Discovery News ^ | 6-4-2011 | Rossella Lorenzi

Posted on 06/05/2011 10:23:01 AM PDT by Renfield

Italian archaeologists have discovered the first-ever intact Etruscan house, complete with furniture, bricks and terracotta tiles identical to the ones still used in Tuscany today.

Found at an archaeological site called Poggiarello Renzetti in the Tuscan town of Vetulonia, some 120 miles north of Rome, the 2,400-year-old building has been only partially excavated.

Constructed in the Hellenistic period between the third and first century B.C., the house, about 33 by 50 feet, consisted of a basement to store foodstuffs and a residential area where the rather wealthy owner lived with his family.

Although only a storage room has been brought to light by a joint team from a local archaeological museum and the Archaeological Superintendency of Tuscany, the standing ruins have been already hailed as an exceptional find....

(Excerpt) Read more at news.discovery.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: etruscans; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; italy

Furniture, pottery and terracotta tiles were among the objects found at the site of the Etruscan house.

1 posted on 06/05/2011 10:23:04 AM PDT by Renfield
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To: SunkenCiv

Etruscan ping.


2 posted on 06/05/2011 10:24:06 AM PDT by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: Renfield

“These fun-loving and sensuous people” - the archeologists found another frat house and Discovery thinks it’s news.


3 posted on 06/05/2011 10:27:10 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: blueunicorn6
another frat house

NO NO NO.

It says "light by a joint team. Not "light a joint team"...

4 posted on 06/05/2011 10:33:49 AM PDT by bigheadfred (Is it humor, or cynicasm driven by rage?????)
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To: Renfield

I have a 5” high bronze Etruscan horse sitting on my desk. May they find the exact duplicate so I can retire.


5 posted on 06/05/2011 10:56:51 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Renfield
Very cool....But how many houses can you get excited about??

What if you weren't well paid??

6 posted on 06/05/2011 11:04:00 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Renfield

I’ve always been fascinated by the Etruscans. They were a mystery already by Claudius’ day. The language having been long dead in contrast to Phoenician (which some then contemproary scholars had a vague understanding of).


7 posted on 06/05/2011 11:05:17 AM PDT by raygun (http://bastiat.org/en/the_law DOT html)
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To: Renfield

The Etruscan’s, liberal left of fairly degenerate Roman mores, would be hailed today by leftist leaning NY and San Francisco.

Interesting the article describes them as ‘fun loving sensuous people’. Fun loving?

The city of Pompeii was founded by the Etruscan’s and retained their customs.

In Pompeii, first century, all variations of sexuality were openly and blatantly pursued. Homosexuality, group orgies and pedophilia were widely accepted as normal behavior.

It has been argued that mores of Pompeii reflected the norm in general Etruscan society.


8 posted on 06/05/2011 11:06:15 AM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: bigheadfred

Ohhhhhhhh...Well, then they won’t get as many applicants for that team.


9 posted on 06/05/2011 11:19:52 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: Renfield

But did they have granite countertops? If they had granite countertops, well, then, you could maybe sell it. The real estate market is slow, but granite countertops still sell. Did it have a jacuzzi bathtub? Evreyone knows that women are the decision makers in buying homes. Granite countertops and jacuzzi bathtubs. Oh, and underground sprinkling. Those Etrucans could have all the terracotta tile they want, but you ain’t moving a house in this market that don’t have granite countertops, jacuzzi bathtubs and underground sprinkling.


10 posted on 06/05/2011 11:26:02 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: raygun
I don't think the language had died out by Claudius' time. He wrote a history of the Etruscans in Greek, which would be very useful to have.

Part of a speech by Claudius survives on a bronze tablet found in Lyon in the 16th century. He goes off on a tangent talking about the Etruscan traditions concerning the figure the Romans called Servius Tullius (6th of the traditional 7 kings of Rome).

11 posted on 06/05/2011 11:49:00 AM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Renfield

Little known is that the Etruscans were the online branch of the Truscans. Real nerds.

I hope they find more of this stuff and something to crack the Etruscan language.


12 posted on 06/05/2011 11:52:35 AM PDT by decimon
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To: Renfield
"Etruscan House"?

Wasn't that a BBC reality show where contestants lived as pre-Roman Italians and mysteriously disappeared?

13 posted on 06/05/2011 11:58:36 AM PDT by x
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To: decimon
Little known is that the Etruscans were the online branch of the Truscans.

Thanks for the information! I'll have to remember to write the word eTruscans.

14 posted on 06/05/2011 12:40:07 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Renfield

FL


15 posted on 06/05/2011 12:40:10 PM PDT by maine-iac7 (.WATCH THE OTHER HAND)
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To: Verginius Rufus
Claudius died in 54 and was the last person known to have been able to read eTruscan. Apart from his history, he wrote an eTruscan dictionary. It is cited by reference works that eTruscan became a dead language in 1 Century A.D. Don't know how viable a language would be after the last person konwn to be able to read it dies.
16 posted on 06/05/2011 1:13:39 PM PDT by raygun (http://bastiat.org/en/the_law DOT html)
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To: raygun
I don't recall hearing about the dictionary. I don't know if he definitely knew Etruscan himself--he could have learned the Etruscan information from other people who could read Etruscan. I think one of his wives was of Etruscan descent but may not have spoken the language. He also wrote a history of the Carthaginians and probably didn't learn Punic to do that.

Languages survived for thousands of years before there was any writing system in use anywhere. Probably the last speakers of Etruscan were peasants in some out-of-the-way village. The extension of Roman citizenship to the Italian allies after the Social War (90-88 BC) is thought to have caused the demise of the various non-Latin languages of Italy (other than Greek).

17 posted on 06/05/2011 2:25:37 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus
Only a few educated Romans with antiquarian interests, such as Varro, could read Etruscan. The last person known to have been able to read Etruscan was the Roman emperor Claudius (10 BC – AD 54), the author of a treatise in twenty volumes on the Etruscans, Tyrrenikà (now lost), who compiled a dictionary (also lost) by interviewing the last few elderly rustics who still spoke the language. Urgulanilla, the emperor's first wife, was Etruscan.3

Livy and Cicero were both aware that highly specialized Etruscan religious rites were codified in several sets of books written in Etruscan under the generic Latin title Etrusca Disciplina. The Libri Haruspicini dealt with divination from the entrails of the sacrificed animal, while the Libri Fulgurales expounded the art of divination by observing lightning. A third set, the Libri Rituales, might have provided a key to Etruscan civilization: its wider scope embraced Etruscan standards of social and political life as well as ritual practices. According to the 4th century Latin writer Servius, a fourth set of Etruscan books existed, dealing with animal gods, but it is unlikely that any scholar living in the 4th century could have read Etruscan. The single extant Etruscan book, Liber Linteus, which was written on linen, survived only because it was used as mummy wrappings.

Source: Etruscan language
18 posted on 06/05/2011 3:03:22 PM PDT by raygun (http://bastiat.org/en/the_law DOT html)
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To: raygun
I've seen the Liber Linteus, otherwise known as the Zagreb Mummy Wrapping--it's now housed in a special climate-controlled room of the archaeological museum in Zagreb.

The archaeological museum in Perugia has a stone with an extensive Etruscan text inscribed on it.

19 posted on 06/05/2011 3:25:16 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

They’ve been deciphering eTruscan for over a century now and they have about 100 words worked out. From what I heard, they won’t be able to decipher any more until Rosetta Stone comes out with an eTruscan language program. Based on the advertisement I seen, the State Department uses that. I have no idea why the State Department would teach their envoys eTruscan, but I’m just saying.


20 posted on 06/05/2011 8:29:46 PM PDT by raygun (http://bastiat.org/en/the_law DOT html)
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To: raygun

Makes sense. Members of the US embassy staff when traveling the Tuscan countryside might encounter peasants who still speak eTruscan.


21 posted on 06/05/2011 8:38:31 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...
Note: this topic is from Sun Jun 5 13:23:01 2011. Thanks Renfield.

22 posted on 09/10/2013 4:11:47 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Renfield

23 posted on 09/10/2013 4:56:59 AM PDT by eartrumpet
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To: eartrumpet

Outstanding, no pun intended.


24 posted on 09/10/2013 5:02:05 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

Exciting news!

IIRC, up to now the only Etruscan structures which have been found and excavated are tombs. An “intact” house is an important find


25 posted on 09/10/2013 8:11:36 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Beowulf9
city of Pompeii was founded by the Etruscan’s

Not so. It was founded before Rome but not by the Etruscans, but by one of the Southern "Italic" nations,

26 posted on 09/10/2013 8:31:25 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Renfield

It’s amazing that there are still several mystery cultures such as the Etruscans, Caananites, DerinKuyu, and the ‘Sea Peoples’ etc. which have never been fully explored/explained by modern archeology.

Finding a complete house, especially one that is furnished as it was during the Etruscan period, is extraordinary.

I think they found a buried Etruscan city site not long ago that was bounded by a city wall. I wonder if the house is part of that site.


27 posted on 09/10/2013 11:15:34 AM PDT by wildbill
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To: Beowulf9
Pagans. Not just Etruscans, The Romans were pretty rotten, too.

Why Judaism (and then Christianity) Rejected Homosexuality

28 posted on 09/10/2013 2:46:27 PM PDT by ThanhPhero (Khách sang La Vang hanh huong tham vieng Maria)
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To: Renfield

Can’t bring up the link:(


29 posted on 09/10/2013 2:57:18 PM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: raygun

E-Truscan didn’t really disappear. It degenerated in online chat rooms over the centuries and came to be spoken as it was written, in IM slang and abbreviations to the point of incomprehensibility at which point its general use declined but it remained as a sub rosa method of obscurantist communication and iter slang until it experienced a new flowering when computer chat rooms again became widespread and began to degenerate the English and other languages. Latin became the dominant language 2000 years ago when Etruscan speakers could no longer understand each other.


30 posted on 09/10/2013 3:02:43 PM PDT by ThanhPhero (Khách sang La Vang hanh huong tham vieng Maria)
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To: SunkenCiv; raygun

I’m fascinated by the Etruscans, too. It should be interesting to see what discoveries they make as they excavate the house. It would be lucky to be an Etruscan archeologist. Tuscany, IMHO, is one of the loveliest places on Earth.


31 posted on 09/12/2013 4:14:03 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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