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Apple announces OS X Lion, iOS 5, iCloud
Engadget ^ | 6/6/11 | Engadget

Posted on 06/06/2011 12:35:21 PM PDT by ctdonath2

Apple introduced OS X Lion, iOS 5, and iCloud today. Lots of articles at the link and elsewhere.


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To: F1reEng1neRed; ReignOfError; ctdonath2; antiRepublicrat
Ummm, we’ve been talking about this chart.

Perhaps you should look at THIS chart instead:

This chart is a bit dated, representing the last quarter of 2010... but the change is a reduction in the size of RIM, Windows, and Nokia and an increase in both Apple and Android.

I'm curious why you root for foreign companies to keep the profits so strongly over an American company...

You STILL have not addressed the SECOND half of the MobileLens graphic you posted showing that Samsung, RIM and Motorola are eating their own markets and LG is barely holding it's own (with a 0.1% gain) while only Apple is making significant gains in the overall cell phone market. It appears they are selling only to their previous customers while Apple is selling to customers from other makers. Note that this is the traditional dead quarter in Consumer Electronics following the Holiday quarter... and Apple GAINED on that quarter!
151 posted on 06/08/2011 1:26:50 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: F1reEng1neRed; ReignOfError
Ummm, we’ve been talking about this chart. http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2011/06/hgfjhg.jpg Do try and keep up.

Your chart is misused. The top one refers to smartphones by OS provider. In this chart, Apple and RIM's numbers reflect hardware sold only by them. Google's 31% reflects hardware sold by a number of different manufacturers. Not one of those individually (Samsung, HTC, etc.) is anywhere close to the amount of hardware sold by either Apple or RIM.

The bottom one refers to total phone sales (assuming 1 subscriber = 1 phone sale) regardless whether they're smart or dumb, what OS they run, whether they're $300 smart phones or the ones that come free with a contract or cost $14.95 prepaid. These dumb phones make up the majority of phones sold. Do the numbers, if Apple is 7% of all and 24.7% of smartphones, then dumb phones are almost three quarters of the market. Almost all of Samsung sales are in the low-margin dumb phone market, so they dominate this chart. Apple and RIM actually sell enough smartphones to be included in this chart. HTC, the #1 Android and Windows Phone 7 manufacturer, doesn't even show.

152 posted on 06/08/2011 1:31:00 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed

Like most large conglomerates, Samsung is heavily diversified, each division having its own focus. I highly doubt the head of the electronics division has to worry about products from the heavy industry division.


153 posted on 06/08/2011 1:42:41 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed

I’ve been thinking of rooting. Which custom ROM do you suggest?


154 posted on 06/08/2011 1:45:19 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Swordmaker

“I’m curious why you root for foreign companies to keep the profits so strongly over an American company...”

Remind me where Apple products are made again?

Since you seem to believe that Android has stalled care to make a prediction on next quarter’s data? Will Android’s market share go up or down? And considering the new phones that have been released over the last couple months and the one’s soon to be, what do you think that’s going to do the the numbers?


155 posted on 06/08/2011 1:48:05 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: antiRepublicrat

“I’ve been thinking of rooting. Which custom ROM do you suggest?”

What handset do you have? Some devs only have their ROMS for certain phones.


156 posted on 06/08/2011 1:50:18 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed; antiRepublicrat
Manufacturer O/S support to me is really meaningless anyway. Even after my carrier updated to 2.2, I was still running a custom 2.2 ROM that was better than stock anyway. I've now been running 2.3 for a couple months and just like 2.2, I don't see the carrier's official 2.3 being anywhere near as good as the custom ROM I'm running now. Nearly all the carrier ROM’s are just the basic Android with their own UI and bloatware added to it anyway.

Do you see what you are writing? It's Geek speak.

The average phone user does NOT want to worry about what version ROM he needs to install in his phone. . . compared to what version ROM the manufacturer shipped with his phone. . . to get functionality. The average user wants it to just work... as advertised... to update, as advertised... and to forget it, other than when he wants it to work and update, and otherwise not get in the way as it does it.

What you wrote reminds me of the heady days of playing with my Commodore and Amiga computers and how much fun it was to trick them out with new add-ons to the OS and how exciting each incremental upgrade and tweak to hardware and OS speed made things different... and how it was necessary to be a member of the local Amiga Users' Group to even make some of the hardware and software work together. It was no different for the Atari users, the DOS users, and later the Windows users... there were user groups to support them. And some of us made lots of money supporting all of the users who did not have the time to join the groups and learn how to do it themselves.

It was a fun time... but that was when computing was a hobby... and I have long grown out of that and have a lot better things to do with my time than tweak a device to get it to work right or spend hours trying to figure out what I need to get it to do what I want or look the way I want.

I am starting to get calls from people with Android phones asking "How do I get my phone to save changes to my contact lists?!" or "I put in a new name in my contacts, and now it's GONE! What happened to it?" and "Where is the flippin' setting for ______?" I can't help them because I don't have an Android phone and can't step them through the process. . . and the one's I've used are NOT intuitive like an iPhone.

One acquaintance of mine, who had her iPhone stolen, who was no where near the end of her contract, got a cheap Android as a replacement: she is continually swearing at the thing because it is NOT easy to use, unlike what the AT&T salesperson told her—"It's just as good, if not better than your iPhone!"—and does a lot less than what she was used to, with an inconsistent user interface. They are, at best, a make do; a poor substitute for the better choice. She's counting the days until her contract is up and can go back to an iPhone.

157 posted on 06/08/2011 1:58:00 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: Swordmaker

“Do you see what you are writing? It’s Geek speak.”

LOL, you need an IQ slightly higher than a rock to figure out how to flash a custom ROM.

If that’s too much for you, you’re exactly who Steve Jobs is looking to get money from.

Not being able to figure out Android is out of pure stupidity, laziness, or a little bit of both.

Devs make custom ROMS to INCREASE the functionality of their phones. You get increased functionality when Steve Jobs says you do. Enjoy your closed ecosystem.


158 posted on 06/08/2011 2:24:18 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
LOL, you need an IQ slightly higher than a rock to figure out how to flash a custom ROM.

If that’s too much for you, you’re exactly who Steve Jobs is looking to get money from.

Just proved my point. Flashing custom ROMs is exactly what is the essences of geekiness.

159 posted on 06/08/2011 2:55:13 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: Swordmaker

You just proved my point. Calling it “geeky” means that one is either too lazy or too dumb to figure it out. But thus is our society these days...would rather have everything given to us than try to figure out how to improve on something and make it better. You all fit quite nicely into our little nanny state.

“What? You mean you actually have to put some brain activity into it? It’s not for me then. I like my life simple and boring because that’s what Steve Jobs tells me I should like.” Signed the typical iFan.


160 posted on 06/08/2011 3:43:23 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: antiRepublicrat; F1reEng1neRed

The major software manufacturers and American carriers have all agreed to Google’s demand that phones get software updates for 18 months. It is a definite improvement. The carriers in the US have been the major hold up because they want you to buy a new phone and extend your contract. They have to add the bloat after the manufacturers update their skins. It is a tedious process.


161 posted on 06/08/2011 4:45:22 PM PDT by Mr. Blonde (You ever thought about being weird for a living?)
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To: Swordmaker

A cheap Android isn’t a good comparison to an iPhone. I would say the flagship models from the major manufacturers, Moto Atrix, Samsung Galaxy S 2 and HTC EVO (or Sensation now maybe) or at least equal to the iPhone. In some respects they are probably better depending on your needs.

Saving and editing contacts is not hard although I think the option to save to the phone or SIM is dumb when the logical choice is to save to your Google account, but that only requires paying attention.


162 posted on 06/08/2011 4:50:26 PM PDT by Mr. Blonde (You ever thought about being weird for a living?)
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To: Mr. Blonde

If it were up to me, they all would run stock Froyo, Gingerbread, Ice Cream Sandwich, whatever...I can’t think of a single carrier specific app that I ever use. I don’t really use the manufacturer skins or launcher either. I like my phone to be the way ***I*** want it. That’s what’s nice about the Nexus phones...no bloat, just stock Android with updates as soon as Google pushes them out the door.


163 posted on 06/08/2011 4:58:32 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed; antiRepublicrat
You just proved my point. Calling it “geeky” means that one is either too lazy or too dumb to figure it out. But thus is our society these days...would rather have everything given to us than try to figure out how to improve on something and make it better. You all fit quite nicely into our little nanny state.

No, it is GEEKY... but I have better uses for my time and my brain than spending it kowtowing to the foibles of another gadget to make it work right. I've been there and done that... and so have many others. When I was younger, I had the time to devote to it. Now, my time is much more valuable to me. I have little patience for a company that makes me be the beta tester for their poorly designed operating systems. At least with Windows in the past the customers PAID me to fix its foibles and clean up its messes. Android users don't like to pay for anything... even their apps.

164 posted on 06/08/2011 5:23:30 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Remind me where Apple products are made again?

Remind me where the majority of all computer components are made again?

Where are ALL of the profits from your Samsung phones retained? At least Apple is an American company... Samsung is traded on the Korean Stock Exchange in Wons, not Dollars... and you repeatedly push their products? Google makes very little on Android... they GIVE it away.

165 posted on 06/08/2011 5:39:24 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone.)
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To: Swordmaker

“No, it is GEEKY... but I have better uses for my time and my brain than spending it kowtowing to the foibles of another gadget to make it work right.”

Apparently comprehending the English language is on the same level as installing a custom ROM for you. It’s to make it work BETTER, not right. Using your logic, those people who jailbreak their iPhones are “Geeky”. No, they’re not. They want INCREASED functionalilty from their devices. I had to jailbreak the iPhones I had to be able to wireless tether. And since the phones couldn’t tether out of the box, using your logic, I guess that means the phones didn’t work right, huh?

I had to root my Android phone to be able to tether without having to pay the carrier to do something the phone is already capable of doing.

To call that “GEEKY” is to put your ignorance and/or laziness on display.


166 posted on 06/08/2011 5:49:34 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: Swordmaker

“Remind me where the majority of all computer components are made again?

Where are ALL of the profits from your Samsung phones retained? At least Apple is an American company... Samsung is traded on the Korean Stock Exchange in Wons, not Dollars... and you repeatedly push their products? Google makes very little on Android... they GIVE it away.”

Is there a point to your ridiculous ramblings anywhere in that?

If there is, it must be something like this...”Since Apple is traded on out stock market, you should give more of your money to Steve Jobs. It’s the patriotic thing to do.”

That’s what you just said.


167 posted on 06/08/2011 5:55:37 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: Mr. Blonde
The major software manufacturers and American carriers have all agreed to Google’s demand that phones get software updates for 18 months.

That's good, although it's non-binding and it doesn't help me. Luckily I'm a geek so I can handle rooting it and flashing new ROM. Most others are screwed.

BTW, why do we call it ROM? It's not read-only, since we can easily write to it.

168 posted on 06/09/2011 7:32:59 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed

It’s a phone, a consumer device. Anything more than “press this button to update your phone” is geeky. I’m a geek, I can do it, but I recognize most people aren’t. In addition, people with the intelligence to potentially do it may not want to for fear of bricking their phone, losing official support (which they will), invalidating warranties, etc.

You can root an Android or an iPhone, but you have to keep that separated, in a geek context. For the majority of users it is not a replacement for automatic, supported updates from the manufacturer or carrier.


169 posted on 06/09/2011 7:44:17 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed

The skins are of varying usefulness. Those not inclined to tinker probably like them more. You can get most of the usefulness from other apps if you so choose. I believe it is Acer who allows you to choose to use their skin on bootup which I think is genius and should be a requirement for all manufacturers.

As for the carrier stuff, I guess the one benefit is that it could help lower the cost of the phone. I’m still crossing my fingers that T-Mobile gets a pretty standard SGS II, but $800 to get it off contract is a pretty high price. I can deal with some bloat to bring that down to $500 or so.


170 posted on 06/09/2011 11:41:03 AM PDT by Mr. Blonde (You ever thought about being weird for a living?)
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To: antiRepublicrat

I was worried about bricking mine at first. Once I was comfortable with how to do it, those fears went away. If more people were aware of the advantages of rooting/jailbreaking, I’m sure more people would be doing it. With my iPhone, I started hearing some people I know talking about it and I asked them what it was. When they first told me, I didn’t really see the point of it. As time passed, they started showing me things that their phone was capable of and mine wasn’t (namely tethering among others). Apple tries to stifle the jailbreaking with nearly every update they push, but the jailbreak devs always find a way around it. Android manufacturers started locking down bootloaders...HTC to be the latest one, but after the huge outcry, they changed their minds.


171 posted on 06/09/2011 12:12:43 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: Mr. Blonde

Yeah, it’s just what Launcher you decide to use. The manufacturers all have their own stuff. HTC has Sense, Motorola has Motoblur, Samsung has Touchwiz, Sony has the Arc.

Amazon has the SGS II for $699 off contract. I’m expecting it to be the typical $200 once it starts hitting US carriers. The MSRP on my handset was ridiculously high when it was released too, but obviously I didn’t pay that.


172 posted on 06/09/2011 12:24:06 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
If more people were aware of the advantages of rooting/jailbreaking, I’m sure more people would be doing it.

If more people knew about the advantages of putting a custom ECU mapping in their car, mo--, no, just about the same number of people as now would be doing it. It's a gearhead thing, not a regular driver thing.

173 posted on 06/09/2011 12:44:19 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

I disagree. I’m a perfect example. I had no idea what jailbreaking/rooting were and saw no point/purpose in doing so at first until I had it explained to me.

Flashing your car’s computer is much different that clicking a few buttons on your phone/PC.

Another point...you can go into the classifieds and find people who will do the root/jailbreaking for you for a fee.
The market for it is out there and as I’ve been saying all along, it’s a matter of either stupidity, laziness, or both.
The rooting/jailbreaking process is down to the point where it’s nothing more than downloading a program, plugging in your phone, and clicking a button. People are going to PAY someone to do that? REALLY? They’re that dumb or that lazy? You have perform more steps then that to setup what you want synced in iTunes.


174 posted on 06/09/2011 1:01:31 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Flashing your car’s computer is much different that clicking a few buttons on your phone/PC.

Not really that hard. On most cars it's as simple as replacing a small board in a slot on your ECU. It's still not a basic user function. It's for the more advanced or more daring.

The biggest holdup is who do you go to for help when it fails? Hope the online forums will help? What do you do if you bricked it? Your carrier certainly won't help you, neither will the manufacturer. If you keep it stock, you can get the phone re-flashed at the carrier, or just get a free replacement. No matter how well the process has been packaged and simplified by those (admittedly very talented) modders, it's still hacking, and it comes with risks.

175 posted on 06/09/2011 1:27:09 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed

Try explaining “rooting” to somebody who thinks “rootkit” comes in a box that says “Clairol”.


176 posted on 06/09/2011 1:40:52 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: antiRepublicrat

“Not really that hard. On most cars it’s as simple as replacing a small board in a slot on your ECU. It’s still not a basic user function. It’s for the more advanced or more daring.”

Not really that easy on my F-150 (a very popular vehicle). You actually had to disconnect the battery. Disconnect and remove the computer completely from the vehicle, open the case, scrape off some protective silicone on the leads, reistall the computer, plug in the programmer, and reconnect the battery. I’m going to consider that a little more complicated and a little more risk-involved than rooting/jailbreaking a phone.

Actually, I’ve seen a couple very experienced users over at XDA who bricked their phones due to a bad flash or something along those lines.

They just went to the store, played “dumb” and just said “it doesn’t work”. Both had their phones replace with no questions.


177 posted on 06/09/2011 2:07:13 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Both had their phones replace with no questions.

Lucky them. Still, above the normal user profile. IOW, buy a consumer product, use it according to the user manual that came with it. Anything beyond that is tinkering, hacking, whatever you call it for that particular product. Flashing is not in the user manual, and not supported under warranty, do at your own risk.

In the end, it's okay to compare different ROMs, or Android vs. iPhone flashing. You're on the same playing field. But a flashed one vs. another one that is stock isn't. You can no longer compare the two when talking about the overall market, because only a minuscule percentage of people will be flashing. Oh yes, tens of thousands of people are flashing, but out of tens of millions of smartphones sold every year.

178 posted on 06/09/2011 3:04:14 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

“In the end, it’s okay to compare different ROMs, or Android vs. iPhone flashing. You’re on the same playing field. But a flashed one vs. another one that is stock isn’t. You can no longer compare the two when talking about the overall market, because only a minuscule percentage of people will be flashing. Oh yes, tens of thousands of people are flashing, but out of tens of millions of smartphones sold every year.”

Yes, and those people that don’t must be OK with their gimped phones. I’m not. Ignorance really is bliss.


179 posted on 06/09/2011 3:30:51 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Yes, and those people that don’t must be OK with their gimped phones.

It's not a matter of being okay with a gimped phone, or not having the acumen to flash. It's about not wanting to go outside of the fully supported comfort zone of regular user. Apple has been so incredibly successful because they turned what used to be geek toys into regular user devices, consumer appliances. People like that comfort, and few stray outside of it. This is especially true in high-tech devices, where people are scared to fiddle with the magic that makes things work.

Admittedly, "regular user" changes. Few people these days would open up the back of their TV to see what's broken. Forty years ago, we'd pull off the back panel and take a few tubes to the drugstore to put on a tester strip at the counter. We'd buy a replacement tubes, go home, and stick them in. But even then not everybody was comfortable with that. Roving repairmen were common, and they had suitcases with all of the most common tubes, and would replace yours at home.

180 posted on 06/09/2011 4:02:15 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

“It’s not a matter of being okay with a gimped phone, or not having the acumen to flash.”

Sure it is. If I tell you that your carrier has disabled the wireless tether function on your phone because they want to charge you to be able to do so even though you’ve already paid for a certain amount of bandwidth...and you don’t care even if I offer to do it for you for free is being OK with a gimped phone.

Anyone who doesn’t work around Wifi and has would still like to use their wireless devices would stand to benefit from that.

Don’t want to spend $629 dollars on an iPad 2 with 3G? Just buy the wifi only model for $499 and tether it wirelessly through your phone. There, I just saved you $130 bucks on the iPad or $20 bucks a month w/AT&T.


181 posted on 06/09/2011 4:17:53 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: antiRepublicrat
BTW, why do we call it ROM? It's not read-only, since we can easily write to it.

It's read-only in the normal functioning of the device. Nothing gets written to ROM when you're using the phone. Almost nothing very complicated uses hard-coded ROMs any more; even wireless routers and cable modems use flashable firmware these days.

182 posted on 06/09/2011 11:47:25 PM PDT by ReignOfError
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To: ReignOfError

In most phones it’s not even a special EEPROM, it’s effectively your system hard disk where you store your photos and contacts, that’s just protected from user writes in system areas. It’s really not much different in concept than an SSD notebook where you haven’t been given admin privileges. This is why you have to “root” an Android device before flashing it.

I just found it amusing how old-time terms stick with us even though they’re not applicable anymore.


183 posted on 06/10/2011 5:57:29 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: F1reEng1neRed
you don’t care even if I offer to do it for you for free is being OK with a gimped phone.

"Are you sure this won't violate my warranty or get me in trouble with Verizon?" You do know the carriers are monitoring traffic to detect unauthorized tethering, right? I don't agree with it, but that's the state of things.

184 posted on 06/10/2011 6:08:11 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

Not sure how they can tell. I and several others I know have been doing it for quite awhile and on several different kinds of handsets with no problems to speak of.


185 posted on 06/10/2011 11:52:02 AM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Not sure how they can tell.

First, high bandwidth use. Tetherers tend to use more bandwidth. That's the heads-up. Second, deep packet inspection. For example, if an HTTP request from an Android phone has a user agent string of "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; MSIE 9.0; WIndows NT 9.0; en-US)", you're probably tethering.

I and several others I know have been doing it for quite awhile and on several different kinds of handsets with no problems to speak of.

This is a recent thing. Be careful, confirm your carrier's policy. I tend to agree with the principle: You're paying for your bandwidth, so how you use it is none of their business. That's net neutrality. But the reality is that they want to get more money from you without providing any additional service, and they'll use their position of power to do it.

186 posted on 06/10/2011 12:18:37 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

From what I’ve read about the subject over at XDA, if your rooted and just using an app that will allow tethering, the carrier can tell. If your running a custom ROM, that’s somehow preventing them from knowing.

Don’t ask me how that is since it’s way beyond my knowledge of it. So far, it appears they are correct.


187 posted on 06/10/2011 12:31:15 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
If your running a custom ROM, that’s somehow preventing them from knowing.

A custom ROM cannot bypass DPI. DPI analyzes everything you do over the Internet, and all it takes is to catch you doing one thing that cannot be done on an Android phone, run one piece of software that doesn't exist for Android and uses the network. DPI can run every byte of your traffic through a bank of signatures, and if bit of traffic matches up to a known non-Android signature, such as the IE9 user agent string I showed, you get flagged for possible action.

On a wider level, network devices can track general traffic patterns, and flag any that look more PC-like than phone-like. This same exact technology is used in intrusion-detection devices on networks (see if you're being probed or hacked), but it just gets repurposed.

There are ways you can hide some indications. The TTL (time to live) for data packets can be different between a phone and its tethered computer, and thus detectable. But a custom ROM can change the TTL back, masking the tethering. This might be what they're talking about with a tethering app. Still doesn't get you past DPI though.

188 posted on 06/10/2011 1:13:51 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: ctdonath2; Swordmaker

Downloading now!

189 posted on 07/20/2011 1:44:37 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...
Apple OSX LION Available through the Mac App store! —PING!


Apple LION!

Please, No Flame Wars, Discuss technical issues, software, and hardware.
Don't attack people!

Don't respond to the Anti-Apple Thread Trolls!
PLEASE IGNORE THEM!!!

If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

190 posted on 07/20/2011 2:48:17 PM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft product "insult" free zone. See swordmaker....macbots really do post ga)
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To: rdb3

Howdy.

Been waiting for this.....

Made a cloud of my own for Allen West podcasts years ago. It was so easy. Itunes then “realizes” it is there and seizes it and distributes it to subsribers.

Genius stuff.


191 posted on 07/20/2011 3:04:34 PM PDT by HonestConservative (http://www.freedomradiorocks.com)
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To: ctdonath2

So, I could go throughh the tedious process of ripping all my old vinyl (much of which I never got around to duplicating on CD), and music match would upgrade it to high bit rate CD quality?


192 posted on 07/20/2011 3:31:07 PM PDT by AFreeBird
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To: AFreeBird

Seems so!


193 posted on 07/21/2011 3:44:13 AM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: TheBattman; Swordmaker
The potentially wasted "energy" involved would be in sorting the posted comments in reverse order -- for your convenience -- as Swordmaker did.

Nice to see folks being appreciative! (And if you don't see the "</SARC>" in that, you need not fear sunburn on your scalp.)

194 posted on 07/21/2011 9:31:47 AM PDT by TXnMA (There is no Constitutional right to NOT be offended.)
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To: F1reEng1neRed; Swordmaker
When you grow up, you'll sing a different song...

Most of us adults have better things to do with our time than to muck with something we've bought -- trying to make it do what we paid for.

195 posted on 07/21/2011 9:41:23 AM PDT by TXnMA (There is no Constitutional right to NOT be offended.)
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To: TXnMA
Well you seem to have the time to post on this forum...

Since you seem to be incredibly ignorant to what the purpose behind jail-breaking and rooting is, I'll let you in on a little secret....

It increases the functionality, not make it “do what we paid for”.

Just because you don't know how to do it, doesn't mean you have to knock the people that do.

196 posted on 07/21/2011 4:59:13 PM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed; Swordmaker; All
"Just because you don't know how to do it, doesn't mean you have to knock the people that do."

Just because you know how to do it, doesn't mean you have to knock the people who no longer care to do so.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read once again what Swordmaker wrote in #157:

"What you wrote reminds me of the heady days of playing with my Commodore and Amiga computers and how much fun it was to trick them out with new add-ons to the OS and how exciting each incremental upgrade and tweak to hardware and OS speed made things different... and how it was necessary to be a member of the local Amiga Users' Group to even make some of the hardware and software work together. It was no different for the Atari users, the DOS users, and later the Windows users... there were user groups to support them. And some of us made lots of money supporting all of the users who did not have the time to join the groups and learn how to do it themselves."

"It was a fun time... but that was when computing was a hobby... and I have long grown out of that and have a lot better things to do with my time than tweak a device to get it to work right or spend hours trying to figure out what I need to get it to do what I want or look the way I want."

Just change that to "Apple ][+", "][e" or "//GS", and you describe when I was writing code in Pascal, BASIC, 6502 Assembler, or even in Binary (by flipping sixteen "bit switches" on the front panel of a "minicomputer" -- in 1978 or so.... And it was a heck of a lot of fun -- and a great sense of "power over the machine"!

No doubt, Swordmaker will remember when it was the user groups that held contests as to who could write the flashiest program in a single 80-character line of BASIC code. Some of us pushed the envelope by using BASIC "PEEKs" "POKEs" and "CALLs" to subroutines we had written in assembly code. And the users were the ones who developed the code that wound up in private-sale ROMs that turned 40 (uppercase) character/line machines into 80 (upper and lower-case) character lines and displayed them on screen. And those ROM codes wound up in the next generation of commercial microcomputer models.

Heck -- I even wrote my own "PowerPoint" years before it appeared commercially -- because I wanted to use complex computed transitions between screen buffers to add animations to my professional (CG Videotaped) presentations (created on an Apple //GS).

~~~~~~~~~

Congratulations! You have (three decades after the fact) [re]discovered the "joy of hacking" (in its original good sense)... Just don't act supercilious toward those of us who now prefer to treat computing devices as tools -- not toys.

And -- unless you wrote the code, don't think you are hot $#]+ because you can load code someone else has written onto your latest toy -- and make it do something new (to you).

~~~~~~~~~

FULL DISCLOSURE: I truly enjoy "hacking around" and making "the machine" do just what I want it to do.

But, when I retired from MA, and moved back to God's Country, I retired three things:

  1. My snow shovel

  2. My DayTimer/PDA

  3. My cell phone

And I haven't missed them one bit! But I do love the freedom from those "balls and chains"!!


Just don't come here on FR and strut around as if you are a "hot ticket" -- merely because you have learned to "muck with your machine".

Just keep in mind that you are standing on the shoulders of a hell of a lot of us who made it possible for you to do so.

</RANT>

197 posted on 07/21/2011 7:00:05 PM PDT by TXnMA (There is no Constitutional right to NOT be offended.)
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To: TXnMA

Then don’t do it then and see if anyone cares.

One thing you CAN’T deny though is that it gives added functionality to the device. Period.DOT


198 posted on 07/22/2011 11:13:18 AM PDT by F1reEng1neRed
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To: F1reEng1neRed
Whatever -- NØØB...
199 posted on 07/22/2011 1:59:10 PM PDT by TXnMA (There is no Constitutional right to NOT be offended.)
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