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Foods With the Longest Expiration Dates
yahoo finance ^ | 7-27-11 | Seth Fiegerman

Posted on 07/29/2011 11:31:36 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB

Every house has food in the pantry that has been there for weeks if not months, but according to food experts, you may want to think twice before throwing those items out. Many common food products last far longer than you might think.

(Excerpt) Read more at financiallyfit.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: expiration; food; foodexpirations; prepper; preppers; storage; survival
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1 posted on 07/29/2011 11:31:42 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB
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To: WOBBLY BOB
I don't buy the Coca Cola statement. I bought a bunch of carton of Coke after they announced that Classic Coke would be replaced with New Coke. Within a month, the (non-diet) Coke had started to ferment. Within two months, it was undrinkable.
2 posted on 07/29/2011 11:39:17 AM PDT by econjack (Some people are dumber than soup.)
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To: econjack

I don’t buy all of the stuff here, either. In fact, I think they may have underestimated the shelf life of some of these goods. For one thing, I believe that honey can be quite edible and tasty for a lot longer than one year.


3 posted on 07/29/2011 11:42:31 AM PDT by Arkansas Toothpick
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To: econjack
Within a month, the (non-diet) Coke had started to ferment. Within two months, it was undrinkable.

Storage temperature is everything.

4 posted on 07/29/2011 11:42:43 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Twinkies made the list? I didn’t think they COME with an expiration date. ;-)


5 posted on 07/29/2011 11:43:21 AM PDT by OB1kNOb (Financial Repression.......it answers a lot of questions.....read about it on FinancialSense.com.)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Coca Cola

Old fashioned Coca-Cola is the ultimate bomb shelter beverage. If left unopened, Heslin says a can of coke will take “an extraordinarily long time” to expire. Diet sodas, on the other hand, expire much more quickly because they contain artificial sweeteners that degrade with heat and time.


6 posted on 07/29/2011 11:43:21 AM PDT by 2001convSVT (Going Galt as fast as I can.)
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To: Arkansas Toothpick

Honey doesn’t have an expiration date.

And if it turns sugary, simply warm it.


7 posted on 07/29/2011 11:45:57 AM PDT by Freddd (NoPA ngineers.)
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To: econjack

Thousands of years from now, when aliens land on Earth and see the ancient ruins of human civilization, they will find a case of Diet Coke. They will drink it and understand why human civilization fell.


8 posted on 07/29/2011 11:46:47 AM PDT by Opinionated Blowhard ("When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.")
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To: OB1kNOb

Twinkies and cheezwhiz would survive a nuclear blast ;)


9 posted on 07/29/2011 11:47:43 AM PDT by bushwon ("If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait till it is free"--PJ O'rourke)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Beer doesn’t last very long either with a good taste. If you’ve bought several hundred cases for your ‘bug out’ location, be sure to rotate it out at least every 3 months.

Whiskey would probably last much longer.


10 posted on 07/29/2011 11:50:24 AM PDT by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: WOBBLY BOB

I have a gallon of maple syrup that has been in the fridge for at least 5 years and it still tastes great.


11 posted on 07/29/2011 11:52:20 AM PDT by lucky american (I'm tired.)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Spam has to be #1 on my survival list.


12 posted on 07/29/2011 11:53:16 AM PDT by Dixie Yooper (Ephesians 6:11)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

‘The only exception is if the can is dented or rusty, as that indicates the can has been punctured at some point, which speeds up the spoilage process.’——

That’s not true either.
A dent does not mean it’s been ‘punctured’. A bulging or leaking can may indicate it’s been punctured, and a rusty can.. Who would eat from a rusty can? It’s clearly either been in wetness, leaking etc. I don’t know of anyone who would want lockjaw, food poisoning etc.


13 posted on 07/29/2011 11:53:25 AM PDT by Freddd (NoPA ngineers.)
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To: WOBBLY BOB
I once read a story that honey found in a ancient Egyptian tomb was still edible. True or not I don't know but I'm sure I didn't dream it.
14 posted on 07/29/2011 11:54:22 AM PDT by Phlap (REDNECK@LIBARTS.EDU)
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To: KoRn

Distilled spirits have NO expiration date. They will still be just fine long after everyone here is gone.


15 posted on 07/29/2011 11:55:07 AM PDT by wrench
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To: KoRn

So would most red wine.

It isn’t necessary to keep it really cold, either. A root cellar or cave would work just fine.

I want to add to the list: olives survive quite well if immersed in vinegar. I just opened a jar of olives - black, green, calamata - that is over ten years old. The olives were in a vinegar solution. They taste terrific!


16 posted on 07/29/2011 11:55:13 AM PDT by SatinDoll (NO FOREIGN NATIONALS AS OUR PRESIDENT!)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

This article doesn’t talk about vacuum sealing or temperature or light either..

Practically irrelevant article.


17 posted on 07/29/2011 11:55:23 AM PDT by Freddd (NoPA ngineers.)
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To: Phlap

I read that too. Honey, if stored properly, is good forever.


18 posted on 07/29/2011 11:56:21 AM PDT by Miztiki
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To: Yo-Yo

I have had the flavor vanish in older soda...just tastes like soda water.


19 posted on 07/29/2011 11:56:49 AM PDT by bushwon ("If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait till it is free"--PJ O'rourke)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Hostess Twinkees!

Good for 25 years!


20 posted on 07/29/2011 11:59:30 AM PDT by G Larry (I dream of a day when a man is judged by the content of his character)
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To: wrench

Probably the only thing lasting that long worth consuming.

A life without fresh produce is not worth living.


21 posted on 07/29/2011 12:01:06 PM PDT by RitchieAprile
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To: SatinDoll

Well....ya.....after you’ve drowned them in Gin!!!


22 posted on 07/29/2011 12:01:10 PM PDT by G Larry (I dream of a day when a man is judged by the content of his character)
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To: Miztiki

What is ‘properly’?


23 posted on 07/29/2011 12:03:29 PM PDT by SMARTY (A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers.)
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To: econjack

A chemist working for a large multinational food company once told me diet drinks go bad - but not the others... For reasons to ‘make it simple’ they tag all of them with expiration dates...


24 posted on 07/29/2011 12:07:26 PM PDT by GOPJ (Honk if I'm paying for your car, your mortgage, and your big, fat Greek bailout - mewzilla)
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To: Arkansas Toothpick
Someone found a jar of honey in a King Tut's tomb, it was 3000 years old, and still good.

Just remember the rules of food storage, avoid oxygen, moisture and light.

Properly stored food can last for decades.

25 posted on 07/29/2011 12:07:46 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: Phlap

See post 25.


26 posted on 07/29/2011 12:09:07 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: WOBBLY BOB

In the military in Germany, I seem to remember eating a K-ration or two left over from WWII.....this was 1970...


27 posted on 07/29/2011 12:09:25 PM PDT by Gaffer
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To: WOBBLY BOB

We began our preperation about 18 months ago when we realized how bad things were getting. We’ve always planted a garden and done some home canning but we’ve gone into overdrive the last 1.5 year.
We now have about 9-12 months of food stored which we rotate to keep fresh. Factory canned goods will last about 2 years, home canned food will last as long as the seal remains unbroken. We planted 3 gardens this year and, dispite a historic drought, have gone through over 300 canning jars so far. We’ve even canned chicken that we raised, the deer I shot last year, and some older beef from the frezzer.
As a source of reference material I’d recommend “Backwoods Home Magazine”, they’re what “Mother Earth News” was before they went environazi.
It can be done quite quickly, however, be prepared to defend what you store or keep it a closely guarded secret. When things implode there will be those who will try to take what you’ve stored if they know it’s there.


28 posted on 07/29/2011 12:12:09 PM PDT by GT Vander (Life's priorities; God, Family, Country. Everything else is just details...)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Uncooked rice....keep in cool and dry and dark area, will last forever. Had a batch I forgot about for more than 5 years, and when cooked, still tasted decent. This is why this is the staple of more than a billion good folks across Asia.


29 posted on 07/29/2011 12:12:28 PM PDT by DecentAmerican
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To: bushwon
I've often wondered if Twinkies and Cheez-Wiz aren't byproducts of early nuclear testing.

Scientist: Hey, Doctor Oppenheimer, come take look at this. It's... It's some kind of spongy, yellow, almost cake-like material. And it's built up on almost every vertical rock face within 2 miles of the epicenter. [pauses, removes a piece of the material from a rock face and inserts it in to a small device] Hmmmmmm. That's strange. Even though back-ground environmental radiation levels are still quite high, this... this... "sponge cake" doesn't appear to carry ANY residual radiation. What do you suppose it is?

Oppenheimer [licking his lips]: I have no idea, Dr. Twinklestein, but it sure is DELICIOUS! And it's got a cream filling!

30 posted on 07/29/2011 12:13:24 PM PDT by WayneS (Enlightened statesmen will not always be at the helm. -- James Madison)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Fruit cake.


31 posted on 07/29/2011 12:20:47 PM PDT by BykrBayb (Somewhere, my flower is there. ~ Þ)
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To: Kartographer

Ping!


32 posted on 07/29/2011 12:26:18 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Don’t know about the “frilly” stuff like Twinkies and soft drinks, but my brother, in World War II, in 1945, while sitting in a foxhole on Okinawa, opened a C-Ration can of some kind of chicken concoction, and while “dining” he perused the printing on the can. It read: Product of Omaha, Nebraska 1929.


33 posted on 07/29/2011 12:28:23 PM PDT by Tucker39
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To: All

bump


34 posted on 07/29/2011 12:29:30 PM PDT by Maverick68
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To: WOBBLY BOB
In the 70's, my friend and I went to a flea market where we bought a large lot of various WWII surplus C rations in olive drab cans. At the time that made them about 30 to 35 years old. We ate them several times when we went camping.

Insane, I know, but, no ill effects. The varieties I recall were; spaghetti and meat sauce, canned hamburger, chicken and noodles, peaches and for a snack, crackers, candy and jam. The crackers were like English style biscuits and tasted like an old warehouse. Those did make me gag as I recall.

35 posted on 07/29/2011 12:31:44 PM PDT by freedomson (Tagline comment removed by moderator)
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To: GT Vander
Check out this site for more tips on food storage. Dehydrate2store

We've been prepping for years. I have about a year of stored stuff. I can and dehydrate. We bought a 1/4 side of beef last month, in a couple weeks we'll get our 1/2 pig. Check out your local butchers. The beef came out to $2.29 a pound, about 200 pounds. The pig, $1.69, about 100 pounds.

Our local meat market price list and quantities.

36 posted on 07/29/2011 12:32:15 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

PING!!!!


37 posted on 07/29/2011 12:38:20 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: G Larry

I think the fried pies out of the vending machines are already that old.


38 posted on 07/29/2011 12:43:54 PM PDT by Elderberry
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To: WOBBLY BOB

If there is an item in our fridge that is green and otherwise unidentifiable, it’s usually very old meat or very new cheese.


39 posted on 07/29/2011 12:44:48 PM PDT by C Lee Tolindo
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To: Elderberry

Any vending machine food is questionable, except candy bars. I wonder what the shelf life on them are. Those apples, oranges, bananas and sandwiches, yuck. Creepy thinking of eating anything ‘healthy’ from them gives me the hibbie jibbies.


40 posted on 07/29/2011 12:47:35 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: C Lee Tolindo

Some of my store bought jars grow fuzz. Time to toss. I don’t eat fuzz.


41 posted on 07/29/2011 12:49:17 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: Kartographer

From my Preparedness Manual:

RECOMMENDED FOOD STORAGE TIMES At 70° F.
Food Keep the Product Storage Tips
Baking powder Till can date Sealed & bone dry
Baking soda 2 years Sealed & dry
Biscuit, brownie, muffin mix 9 months Sealed, cool, dry, weevil proofed
Bouillon, cubes or granules 2 years Sealed, cool and dry
Cake mixes,
Regular 9 months Sealed,cool, dry, weevil proofed
Angel food 1 year Sealed, cool, dry, weevil proofed
Canned food,
Metal can, Non-Acidic 2 years Cool & Dry
Metal Can, Acidic 12-18months Cool & Dry
Glass jars 2-3 years Dark, Cool & Dry
Chocolate, semi-sweet
or unsweetened, bars or chips 18 months Cool and dark
Chocolate syrup 2 years Cool & tightly sealed
Cocoa, powder or mixes 8 months Sealed and cool
Coffee creamers, powdered 9 months Sealed and cool
Cornmeal 1 year Keep dry & weevil proofed
Cornstarch 18 months Keep dry
Crackers 3 months Keep dry & weevil proofed
Flour,
Refined white 8-12 months Dry & weevil proofed,
Whole wheat 4-6 weeks Refrigerate/freeze for longer shelf life
Frostings,
Canned 3 months Cool
Mix 8 months Dry and cool
Fruits, dried 6-12 months Cool, sealed, weevil proofed
Gelatin, all types 18 months Protect from moisture
Grains, whole 2 years Dry and weevil proofed
Hominy, hominy grits,
masa harina 1 year Dry and weevil proofed
Honey 2 years Cool, tightly sealed, dark
Jellies, jams, preserves 2 years Dark, cool, tightly sealed.
Molasses & syrups 2 years Tightly sealed
Mayonnaise 6 months Cool & dark
Milk,
Condensed or evaporated 1 year Turn over every 2 months
Non-fat dry 6 months Bone dry and cool
Nuts,
Vacuum canned 1 year Cool and Dark
Other packaging 3 months Cool and dark – better Refrigerated
In shell 4 months Cool, dry & dark, better refrigerated or
frozen
Pancake mix 6-9 months Dry and weevil proofed
Pastas (macaroni, noodles, etc) 2 years Dry and weevil proofed
Peanut butter 6-9 months Sealed, cool, dark
Peas and beans, dry
(not soybeans) 2 years Dry and weevil proofed
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months Dry and weevil proofed
Pudding mixes 1 year Cool and very dry
Rice,
White 2+ years Dry and weevil proofed
Brown 3-6 months Dry & weevil proofed, better refrigerated or frozen
Flavored or herb 6 months Sealed, dry and weevil proofed
Salad dressings 10-12 months Sealed, dark, cool. Better refrigerated
Salad oils 6 months Sealed, dark, cool. Better refrigerated
Sauce and gravy mixes 6-12 months Cool and dry
Shortening, solid 1 year Cool, dark, tightly sealed.
Soup mixes 1 year Cool, dry, and weevil proofed
Sugar,
Brown 2 years Tightly sealed, Dry.
Confectioners 18 months Tightly sealed, Dry.
Granulated 2+years Dry
Syrups (corn syrup based) 8-12 months Sealed and cool
Vegetables, dried 1 year Cool, dark, dry, weevil proofed
Vinegar 2+ years Sealed

More in my Manual which can be downloaded at:

http://www.tomeaker.com/kart/preparedness1i.pdf


42 posted on 07/29/2011 12:51:42 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Phlap

I had heard something like that too. They had a honey expert on Dennis Prager’s program one time.


43 posted on 07/29/2011 12:56:35 PM PDT by beaversmom
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To: KoRn

“Whiskey would probably last much longer.”

Better to just have a still ready so you can make what you need, when you need it :)


44 posted on 07/29/2011 12:57:21 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: Indy Pendance

Indy we raise our own beef, chicken, duck, and turkey as well as plant several gardens. We do dehydrate and vacum pack as well as home can. We’re to the point that 75% of everything you eat in our home is raised on our land and gardens or hunted/trapped within 3 miles of the house.

That’s a good link to a nice hometown butcher, you’re lucky to have them. Several years ago we purchased our own equipment and now do our own butchering. I raise miniature cattle with a butcher weight of under 500 lbs and a hog is like a large deer so we do it right here at home. Chickens, Ducks, and Turkeys are easy since I don’t pluck them, I skin them. Plucking takes 20 minutes a bird, I can skin a chicken in four minutes flat.


45 posted on 07/29/2011 12:58:08 PM PDT by GT Vander (Life's priorities; God, Family, Country. Everything else is just details...)
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To: Kartographer

“weevil proofed” - not necessarily a requirement, one of the tricks I learned in the Navy when I was in charge of the mess was if you have weevils put the flour or whatever in a freezer. the weevils will migrate to the center to get away from the cold and you just scoop em out in one go. Not that I recommend it just saying.... :)


46 posted on 07/29/2011 1:17:37 PM PDT by reed13
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To: reed13

oh - when I say “trick” I mean it was the proscribed method of dealing with it in the manual :)


47 posted on 07/29/2011 1:19:47 PM PDT by reed13
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To: GT Vander

You need an automatic chicken plucker. My uncle used to have one. He’d scald the chickens and then use the plucker. It was a rotating drum with a bunch of rubber fingers on it. It would rip the feathers out in no time, and leave the tasty skin.


48 posted on 07/29/2011 1:23:44 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: GT Vander
I'm green with envy. We just don't have the land for raising our own animals. Perhaps chickens. Other than that, it's finding the best deals around. I go to a dented can place and can get 96 cans of veggies for 15 bucks. Stuff like that.

We get turkeys in our yard all the time. I'm tempted to shoot a couple. I don't know the laws on that, but they come to our bird feeder, right by our kitchen window. The last time, there were 17 feeding. This is a different time......

Photobucket

49 posted on 07/29/2011 1:25:07 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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To: reed13

Do weevils turn to moths? One time our sunflower seeds were infected with something, we had moths flying all around our garage. It took me weeks to get rid of them.


50 posted on 07/29/2011 1:27:18 PM PDT by Indy Pendance
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