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Wolf sightings more common in Northwest ( WA, OR, ID )
Lewiston Tribune ^ | 09/03/2011 | Eric Barker

Posted on 09/03/2011 9:42:33 PM PDT by george76

Wolf sightings in the Blue Mountains are becoming more frequent this summer, but wildlife officials for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife have yet to document firm evidence of a pack forming in the southeastern corner of the state.

Paul Wik, district biologist for the department at Clarkston, said the canyons and timbered ridges southeast of Dayton have been a hot spot for wolf reports this year. Some hunters have even captured images of wolves with trail cameras, he said.

"It's definitely no secret they are here," Wik said. "The only question to us is what their status is."

...

It is believed there are five wolf packs in Washington. Wolves in all of Washington are protected by the Washington Endangered Species Act and those in the western two-thirds of the state are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

(Excerpt) Read more at standard.net ...


TOPICS: Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: animalrights; ar; canada; canadian; endangeredspecies; greywolf; idaho; oregon; washington; wildlife; wolf; wolves

1 posted on 09/03/2011 9:42:35 PM PDT by george76
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To: jazusamo; girlangler; Flycatcher; sionnsar; Salvation

It’s a matter of time before they are fully involved in wolf management

...then increase their budget, hire more staff, and


2 posted on 09/03/2011 9:44:48 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

....and admonish Little Red Riding Hood.


3 posted on 09/03/2011 9:49:29 PM PDT by de.rm ('Most people never believe anything you tell them unless it isn't true."-Groucho Marx)
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To: SJackson

Ping for the Outdoors/Rural/wildlife list


4 posted on 09/03/2011 10:26:59 PM PDT by PastorBooks
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To: george76
It is believed there are five wolf packs in Washington.

Oh, some believe there is more than that. Smoke a pack a day.

5 posted on 09/03/2011 10:42:55 PM PDT by existtoexcel
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To: george76

I was about 12 before I saw my first Bald Eagle in Washington. This was about 1970. Today, my son is about that same age and he has seen dozens and dozens of them. We can go out on any given day on an Eagle watch and find one easily.


6 posted on 09/03/2011 10:58:26 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: george76

My wife reports multiple calls to her police dept with mountain lions coming into yards to carry off small pets. (Pocatello/Chubbuck area of southeast Idaho)


7 posted on 09/03/2011 11:06:42 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: NavyCanDo

I’ve seen Bald Eagles hunting along the Snake River near Blackfoot, ID. Many more in Yellowstone National Park.


8 posted on 09/03/2011 11:09:14 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: Myrddin

“... mountain lions coming into yards to carry off small pets”

That is just frightening to me. If they are that bold to come into a person’s yard... how long will it be that a child is taken? (mountain lions just scare the heck out of me)


9 posted on 09/04/2011 4:24:40 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: momtothree
how long will it be that a child is taken? (mountain lions just scare the heck out of me)

Hell, I'd be more concerned that they will get me!!!

10 posted on 09/04/2011 7:57:17 AM PDT by OldPossum
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To: OldPossum

“I’d be more concerned that they will get me”

I read stories about them on FR and to be honest... they are something I wouldn’t want to tangle with. I think the most frightening part of it is that they can stalk or hide (blend in and wait to pounce). Plus, they are big and I couldn’t outrun them. It is probably a good thing that I don’t live in an area with that problem... I would probably be the nutty neighbor who carried a gun to retrieve their mail. LOL!


11 posted on 09/04/2011 9:22:42 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: george76

There’s no upside to the reintroduction of wolves in the Northwest or the lower 48 for that matter. More funds from Fish & Game money used for their management. Less game available for hunters. More livestock and pet depredation and although small an additional danger to humans.

The lack of wolves for the last 80 or so years has caused no problems whatsoever, they should leave well enough alone.


12 posted on 09/04/2011 9:56:47 AM PDT by jazusamo (His [Obama's] political base---the young, the left and the thoughtless: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo
There’s no upside to the reintroduction of wolves in the Northwest or the lower 48 for that matter.

That's false right there - The grey wolf doesn't belong in WA, MT, ID, WY. It has never been here - And the Timber Wolf, while endangered, never left here, so reintroduction is a misnomer... But you are right about the 'no upside' thing.

13 posted on 09/04/2011 10:05:22 AM PDT by roamer_1 (Globalism is just socialism in a business suit.)
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To: roamer_1

You’re point is well taken and I agree, I just don’t go into that part of it every time I post on this. The Canadian grey wolf is a larger and more dangerous animal than the American Timber Wolf.


14 posted on 09/04/2011 10:17:44 AM PDT by jazusamo (His [Obama's] political base---the young, the left and the thoughtless: Thomas Sowell)
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To: momtothree

I have a second home in Pennsylvania and just about three months ago I was told by someone I believe that some hunters had positively seen a mountain lion two years ago in an area roughly 10 miles from my house.

Given the cougar’s ability to travel long distances, I have taken to holstering my .357 magnum when I take my dog for walks up there (I’m in Virginia right now).

But as you point out, they can hide and blend into the forest and wait for you (even, as I have read, up in a tree above your path). In which case, if they’re around, I stand little chance.

Oh well, I’m old and have had a good life.


15 posted on 09/04/2011 1:01:25 PM PDT by OldPossum
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To: OldPossum

“I’m old and have had a good life”.

Nonsense, OldPossum! You are still very young at heart. You keep carrying that .357 and you stay safe! It wouldn’t surprise me at all if they were in Virginia or Pennsylvania. I would be glancing around for those big paw prints but you know what... there are a lot of predators (4 legged and 2 legged) around us all the time. IMHO, the .357 is sort of your “equalizer” and you should have it on all your walks!


16 posted on 09/04/2011 1:48:28 PM PDT by momtothree
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To: momtothree

In SW rural OR I see mountain lion tracks on my property every couple of years, heard them scream twice.

Uncanny sound.

Bears are a dime a dozen. Wolves, haven’t heard of any around here (yet).


17 posted on 09/04/2011 2:25:13 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah

Not to pry but what do they sound like when they scream? Is it usually at night or any time of the day? I bet it is the type of sound that makes your blood run cold.


18 posted on 09/04/2011 2:52:44 PM PDT by momtothree
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To: momtothree

I’d read that mountian lions, unlike other large cats, scream, that it sounds like a woman screaming. Once it was at evening twilight, once in the early night.

It was unearthly, not like any scream of a human, really. Almost like the scream or call of a hawk but of course much louder, with more depth. It was very frightening.


19 posted on 09/04/2011 3:01:48 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah

You probably reacted way better than I would have, Little Jeremiah! I would have locked myself inside the house and wouldn’t go outside till NOON the next day (and then armed like Rambo). The only GOOD thing... you are aware that they are near you. I would think that awareness is much better than assuming that they aren’t anywhere near you...


20 posted on 09/04/2011 3:08:52 PM PDT by momtothree
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To: momtothree

We’re armed around here. It’s better to avoid them than shoot them; they’re really just passing through our property because we have no livestock, although they’re happy to eat cats or small dogs. We lock up our cats right before dusk.


21 posted on 09/04/2011 3:31:23 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah

I’m sorry to be so nosey but how do people with livestock protect those animals. Is it considered just a loss.. something that occurs in that part of the country? Or, do they secure them in locked barns? (I live in a relatively “urban” type environment. I’m use to the 2 legged predators and what to watch out for but I am interested in how more rural setting dwellers deal with their environment.)


22 posted on 09/04/2011 3:42:40 PM PDT by momtothree
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To: momtothree

Oh, you’re not being nosy. A lot of people especially those with livestock have several large dogs. Mountain lions avoid dogs especially groups of dogs.

Still, there are periodic reports of predation - I can remember goats, horses and calves, in the last few years. Our valley is surrounded by mountains on one side (7000 ft) and very large hills (up to 4000 ft) on the other, all national and state forest. Lots of habitat.

There are lot of deer and that’s lions usual food.


23 posted on 09/04/2011 3:55:15 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: momtothree
I made a visit to Doc's Gun Barn in Pocatello one afternoon. A few of the folks in the shop are regular, successful hunters. They were very disheartened at the lack of elk and deer. Another pair related a recent experience hiking up Scout Mountain. They were halfway to the summit when one of them decided to "take a leak" on a tree. That attracted a mountain lion. It started stalking them. They both pulled their handguns and made a retreat the parking lot. The cat followed them all the way down.

At the local Idaho State University campus, the Bengal tiger is the official mascot. That isn't what is running around on campus. There are mountain lions wandering on campus. Not all the time, but often enough that you need to be watchful.

My wife is a dispatcher for Chubbuck PD. She had a call from a local resident who had just returned from a trip. The resident was in the basement of her house and heard something growling. The sound came from a window in the basement that looks out under the front porch. Peering through window was a mountain lion. Fish and Game and the police department were dispatched. Upon arrival, the cat was spooked and ran out. The local elementary schools were notified to keep the kids inside until Fish and Game dealt with the kitty.

I love living in Idaho, but it is still wild country in many places. The elk, deer and moose feed in my front yard during the winter. Porcupines and skunks wander through the yard during the warm summer months.

24 posted on 09/04/2011 3:57:20 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: momtothree

Thanks for the concern. That is very kind of you.

I often am armed most of the time, but all of the time is better.

And yes, there is a very good chance that the cougars are in Virginia. The house in VA is near the Shenandoah National Park and if the cats are anywhere, they’re there. But there are a lot of houses between here and the Park (roughly 25 miles), so it’s unlikely that the cougars would travel in this direction.


25 posted on 09/04/2011 4:25:24 PM PDT by OldPossum
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To: george76; abcraghead; aimhigh; Archie Bunker on steroids; bicycle thug; blackie; coffeebreak; ...
If you aren't on this ping list and are interested
in articles about Oregon, please FReepmail me.

26 posted on 09/04/2011 6:53:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: george76
Wolves are a symbol of big government controlling your life & lively hood. Get used to it.
27 posted on 09/04/2011 7:57:38 PM PDT by Cold Heart
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To: little jeremiah

“Mountain lions avoid dogs..”

I don’t know why but I find that funny. I guess even BIG cats don’t like dogs. I think if I lived in an area with them, I would have a big pack of dogs. (plus, it would give me an excuse to get even more dogs than I have now!)


28 posted on 09/05/2011 3:56:30 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: Myrddin

I have a friend that I went to elementary school up to college.. she moved to Montana after she married. I remember the first time she told me that there was a “code” set up that meant a Mountain Lion had been spotted and there were special precautions at bus stops (children had to stay in the car till the bus arrived) and at the playground. She had grown up near me... we had NO experience with this whatsoever. I don’t know if one sees it as “more normal” when they grow up in an area with that issue or not.. but she was freaking. I think after 15 years, Montana and all its beauty/and wildness... has grown on her. It did take her a bit of time.

Your story about the woman looking out the window essentially seeing a Mountain Lion looking back... gracious me! You see, I wouldn’t have to call the dispatcher. Nope... your lovely wife would have heard my screams sitting in her chair! LOL!


29 posted on 09/05/2011 4:03:15 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: george76
Wolves a deathly afraid of the human scent. The have an uncanny sense of hearing too. Because of their natural fear wolves are a low threat to humans ( barring the effects of rabbies), livestock is in danger.

When you are in area with predators, just strap on a .45 and go about your business.

30 posted on 09/05/2011 4:24:56 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va
When I am not on the top of the food chain I like something that gives me a little extra margin over the " just strap on a .45 and go about your business."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.454_Casull

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.500_S%26W_Magnum

31 posted on 09/05/2011 4:57:47 AM PDT by SLB (23rd Artillery Group, Republic of South Vietnam, Aug 1970 - Aug 1971.)
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To: central_va
I currently carry a 44 mag (S&W 629 4" bbl) when hiking. I have 460 S&W Mag, but no leather to carry it yet. The 5" bbl makes that a challenge. The big Hunter Performance version has a sling, but it's not a hiking carry. It is designed for purposeful hunting. Even better with a scope on top.

A Ruger Super Redhawk in .454 Casull or 480 Ruger with 7.5" bbl is a fine choice in the Ruger revolver line.

32 posted on 09/05/2011 10:47:46 AM PDT by Myrddin
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To: Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; phantomworker; joesnuffy; ..
If you’d like to be on or off this Outdoors/Rural/wildlife/hunting/hiking/backpacking/National Parks/animals list please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.
33 posted on 09/05/2011 5:00:24 PM PDT by SJackson (Free Palestine, return it to the inhabitants who had the land taken by the Romans, Alan West)
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To: george76
Some hunters have even captured images of wolves with trail cameras, he said. "The only question to us is what their status is."

They are tourist wolves.

34 posted on 09/05/2011 5:09:42 PM PDT by BerryDingle (I know how to deal with communists, I still wear their scars on my back from Hollywood-Ronald Reagan)
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To: roamer_1

Maybe the grizzly bear should be reintroduced in California where they used to roam. Maybe start with the hills of Malibu? After all, it is the icon on their state flag.


35 posted on 09/06/2011 8:48:09 AM PDT by Citizen Soldier ("You care far too much what is written and said about you." Axelrod to Obama 2006)
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To: OldPossum

Maybe try the old tiger trick of wearing a mask on the back of your head?


36 posted on 09/06/2011 9:05:31 AM PDT by Ellendra (God feeds the birds of the air, but he doesn't throw it in their nests.)
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To: momtothree

“It is probably a good thing that I don’t live in an area with that problem... I would probably be the nutty neighbor who carried a gun to retrieve their mail. LOL!”

I do live with AgencyPerson pampered panthers (local name for a cougar). After a number of articles about my views, my neighbors are finally going armed.

Elderly and small makes them prime prospects for predators.

PS Bears are also a local issue.

However, “When gunpowder speaks, beasts obey”.


37 posted on 09/06/2011 9:38:01 AM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles.)
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To: OldPossum

“... if they’re around, I stand little chance.

Oh well, I’m old and have had a good life.”

Actually, with a handgun in a secure holster, you have a small window of time to draw and shoot the cat. They rarely kill at the first bite.

They often go for a face bite, them suffocate the prey by biting down on the front of the face and using their lips to cover and seal off the mouth and nose of the prey.

Time to draw, feel something warm and furry and SHOOT THE SUMB*TCH!


38 posted on 09/06/2011 9:42:38 AM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles.)
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To: GladesGuru

I can only imagine that children and the elderly are “better” targets for the Cats. For one thing, they are smaller. Secondly, some (not all) of the elderly tend to walk a little slower. I am not 100% certain how a predator thinks.. but it seems to me that those two classifications of people are just what they would want.

I am very glad some of your neighbors have finally listened to you. You never know.. you could have just saved a life.


39 posted on 09/06/2011 9:45:13 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: central_va

“Wolves a deathly afraid of the human scent.”

No offense meant, but short of hard data, I must call ‘pullis fumis’ on that statement.


40 posted on 09/06/2011 9:46:41 AM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles.)
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To: GladesGuru

Very, very interesting information. Thank you.


41 posted on 09/06/2011 10:12:26 AM PDT by OldPossum
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To: momtothree

Predators share many behavioral mechanisms. My Irish Wolfhounds were superbly adapted to ascertaining the most minute changes in movement of potential prey or enemies.

Before the earliest men in the area that became Ireland arrived, the native canids were using such evolutionarily acquired skills to determine which ungulate might have an injured joint, a torn ligament, a split hoof, or any other injury which would make that animal an easier meal with less risk.

Men then bred those wolfhound predecessors for their ability to ascertain non-verbal ques to human behavior. The result was an animal that can read human body language to the extent that their usefulness as throne room guard dogs was such that export of such dogs was forbidden, and only the kings could afford to feed them, in any case.

Elderly and children move differently, as is true for all species. Predators key in on such different movements.

As Jefferson advised in his letter to Cartwright, “....let your gun be your constant companion on your walks.”

A common belief among the Founders was that “..it is the right and duty of the citizen to be at all times armed”. Given the rising frequency of home invasions, it is reasoned and prudent to carry when at home.


42 posted on 09/06/2011 12:51:39 PM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles.)
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To: central_va

“Wolves a deathly afraid of the human scent.”

Horsepucky! They are careful if they have been hunted, but will readily attack a single person if they are hungry. Recent cases in AK have shown that. Two years ago, my son in AK killed a wolf that was trying to chow down on a moose that he shot...just hanging around the perimeter of camp looking for an opportunity!

JC


43 posted on 09/06/2011 9:07:05 PM PDT by cracker45
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To: GladesGuru

Most solitary predators are extremely stealthy...less energy expended and less risk of injury and starvation. A notable exception would be a large, male grizzly bear that has no natural enemies and can run down and easily kill almost any large prey encountered, but still, it’s a shorter chase when they can sneak closer before attacking!

One could make an argument for keeping small, quick terriers that would attract predators and keep them preoccupied long enough for you to pull out your cannon for the kill shot.....3-Ss and put the monitoring collar on a bus headed for Tampa or Miami!! HAW

JC


44 posted on 09/06/2011 9:38:39 PM PDT by cracker45
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To: central_va

You are right in stating that “wolves are a low threat to humans”. There has been only 2 cases of wolves being implicated in human deaths in North America over the past 100 years. One in 2005 and the other in 2010(Alaska). Both were nears dumps where wolves, bear and coyote frequented. There was no proof of which of these animals did the killing but wolves were implicated. Since 1990 bears(brown and grizzly) have killed 59. Since 1990 cougars have killed 11. Domestic dogs kill 20-30 people every year.


45 posted on 10/04/2011 10:09:11 PM PDT by rickk (rickk)
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