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VANITY: Worse Job you ever had and still didn't "Occupy" anything.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2q19Oofl7w ^

Posted on 10/15/2011 7:31:06 AM PDT by JNRoberts

Watching these narcissists on Wall St. who think I should pay for their college loans, etc. I got to thinking, how come I never occupied or blamed anyone else for my lot in life even when I had the worse most humiliating job known to mankind. A door to door salesman for Trane Air Conditioning.

(Excerpt) Read more at youtube.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Miscellaneous; Society
KEYWORDS: job; occupy
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: Troublemaker

It’s a wonderful thing to do what you love from Day 1. I so envy people who have had that experience. My brother (a top flight comedy writer) went to work at 19 for some of the greatest stars of the industry circa 1972. And he’s never looked back. Of course, it’s not easy writing 40 jokes a day (believe me!) for crazed tv superstars. He’d probably say the worst job he ever had was working for Sonny and Cher. And...ahem...Sonny was NOT the problem.


51 posted on 10/15/2011 8:46:26 AM PDT by miss marmelstein (Let's have a Cain Mutiny!)
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To: miss marmelstein
He’d probably say the worst job he ever had was working for Sonny and Cher. And...ahem...Sonny was NOT the problem.

My BF worked on the CBS studio's air conditioning system back in the heydey of the Sonny and Cher tv show.

Please...if you value your hearing, do NOT get him started on "her." (However, he will say Sonny was "a great guy.")

52 posted on 10/15/2011 8:49:17 AM PDT by truthkeeper (Vote Against Barack Obama in 2012!)
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To: JNRoberts

Tossup. Hand loading trucks with cucumber baskets and corn crates at the King Farms packing house in Bucks county PA for a $1.00 an hour in 1963. Worked 12 hour days. Jack hammering slag out of soaking pits at the US Steel Fairless Works. Half hour in, half hour out because of the temperature. The other labor gang jobs were usually pretty bad also. Paid way better than the farm. Those were the most physically difficult. The worst job was every office job I ever had. After women got out of the typing pool in the 70s, office work became especially nightmarish.


53 posted on 10/15/2011 8:53:26 AM PDT by Stentor ("All cults of personality start out as high drama and end up as low comedy.")
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To: truthkeeper

Interesting! Everyone who I’ve ever met loved Sonny. Cher has done her best to sully his reputation over the years. He wrote her best songs, made her a star by sheer force of his personality, and she’s done nothing but denigrate his memory.


54 posted on 10/15/2011 8:53:54 AM PDT by miss marmelstein (Let's have a Cain Mutiny!)
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To: JNRoberts

Jack in the Box grave yard shift weekends after HS football games in the late 70s

Nursing home food dept - includes washing dried pea and beets puree off all the plates and silverware

newspaper deliver 3am 365 then off to a 10 hour job as a dad with two kids and going to college MULITPLE times throughout my ADULT life.

Mess crank for 5 months onboard a Fast Attack submarine - slept on a 4x8 sheet of plywood on top of Mk48 torpedos.

Now Sr. Program Manage for Fortune 500 company making 6 figures and finishing up a dual grad degree and grad certificat in IT Program Management.

so FU OWS!


55 posted on 10/15/2011 8:58:07 AM PDT by Hammerhead
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To: Dianna

For three years in the early eighties, I was a night guard at the state mental hospital which also included the prison for the criminally insane. Minimum wag, but state benefits. Broke up a lot of fights, got my head busted a few times.


56 posted on 10/15/2011 9:04:49 AM PDT by Boiling point (Cain / Palin 2012)
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To: Hammerhead

Good on you!


57 posted on 10/15/2011 9:10:23 AM PDT by truthkeeper (Vote Against Barack Obama in 2012!)
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To: Hammerhead

>>>Jack in the Box grave yard shift weekends after HS football games in the late 70s

Nursing home food dept - includes washing dried pea and beets puree off all the plates and silverware

newspaper deliver 3am 365 then off to a 10 hour job as a dad with two kids and going to college MULITPLE times throughout my ADULT life.

Mess crank for 5 months onboard a Fast Attack submarine - slept on a 4x8 sheet of plywood on top of Mk48 torpedos.

Now Sr. Program Manage for Fortune 500 company making 6 figures and finishing up a dual grad degree and grad certificat in IT Program Management.

so FU OWS!>>>>

I was going to say, dang , youve had some crappy jobs then got to the end. You represent what these fools in the park will never understand, narcissists that they are. And I agree about your message to those fools.


58 posted on 10/15/2011 9:21:15 AM PDT by JNRoberts
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To: JNRoberts

A job is a job! If you want one bad enough you will do just about anything. In my early years I did many jobs that people today abhor. I frequently was working more than one job at a time.

At the age of 13 I worked for a family friend doing his office mailing for him each month. I got paid 1 cent per envelope ( about $50 per month). I had to address the envelopes (no computers back then, just a silk screen address printer to run each envelope through, and I had to type up the screen for each new person added to the mailing list or when a screen wore out), fold the newsletters, stuff and seal the envelopes, sort them for mailing by zipcode, fill out the paperwork for the post office and transport them to the post office.

I also did babysitting, taught Sunday school to 3,4, and 5 year olds, yard work, picked fruit and vegetables, house cleaning, worked as a motel maid, and at Taco Bell, and other restaurants, and as the office flunkie who had to do everything from making the coffee and taking things to the drycleaner to typing and filing. I also worked several door to door sales jobs getting paid on a 100% comission basis.

Those jobs got me through college, paid for two trips to the Carribbean and a trip to Europe, and helped me save up the downpayment on a condominium I bought at the age of 22 without any help from anyone.

I started a fulltime entry level job at a local bank at age 20 and worked my way up through the ranks to an AVP level department manager by the age of 35 while finishing up my college education part time at night. I became a full time housewife and stay at home mom at that stage of my life.

I did not take out any loans to pay for my college classes and did not get any financial support from anyone to achieve my goals. I went to a community college for my first two years of college and completed my associate degree, because it was cheaper and then transferred to a local university to complete my Bachelor’s degree.

Many college kids today, just aren’t willing to work several mimimum wage jobs to put themselves through school today like many of us did in our youth. They also want to have a large salary immediately after finishing college, when they have little or no work experience. Many are unwilling to start in an entry level job after finishing college, even though this is still quite commonplace even today. They don’t realize that employers want to check out their work ethic before they give them opportunities for advancement within their company.


59 posted on 10/15/2011 9:27:22 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: JNRoberts

Laundry room in a large nursing home in Niagara Falls NY 1981.Paid fairly well for the time $5.00 an hour but the job was horrible.


60 posted on 10/15/2011 9:35:38 AM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: chris_bdba

I’ll bet it was!


61 posted on 10/15/2011 9:40:46 AM PDT by truthkeeper (Vote Against Barack Obama in 2012!)
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To: ErnBatavia

Prisoners had more rights and certainly MANY more creature comforts.


62 posted on 10/15/2011 9:42:58 AM PDT by Past Your Eyes (I'm sticking with Herman. No more second terms!)
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To: truthkeeper

I wonder how surprised Sonny would be if he were alive today to find out he has a son.


63 posted on 10/15/2011 9:48:41 AM PDT by Past Your Eyes (I'm sticking with Herman. No more second terms!)
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To: cripplecreek

I was a forced union member, too. Same deal. Did that for 8 years. Buncha pukes.


64 posted on 10/15/2011 9:55:44 AM PDT by Past Your Eyes (I'm sticking with Herman. No more second terms!)
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To: JNRoberts
Was only a small part of a job but cleaning a strangers (as if that makes much difference) septic tank....nowdays I am almost daily through dairies and beef yards which some might thick as bad; I do not ;^)

Eat Beef/Drink Milk!

65 posted on 10/15/2011 9:56:36 AM PDT by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: JNRoberts

Worse? Many fit that description, but here’s my worst:

Placing knife blade blanks on a tray that banged against an oven, moving them along about 10 inches per minute. They fell into a vat of crude oil.

Then I would manually remove the blades from the vat of hot crude oil and stack them neatly.

The room was over 100 degrees most of the time. The clanging was very loud. The furnace was louder. I always went home covered with crude oil and we had to eat lunch on the job because the furnace never stopped.

Oh yeah, $1.65 an hour!


66 posted on 10/15/2011 10:02:02 AM PDT by Poser (Cogito ergo Spam - I think, therefore I ham)
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To: Hammerhead
Now Sr. Program Manage for Fortune 500 company...

I've had a lot of jobs over the decades. More than one that I disliked enough not to show up again after the first day. I had one that I never came back from the lunch break on day one.

If I was Sr. Program Manager for a Fortune 500 company, that would head my list as the worst job of my life. It's good that there are people who enjoy and are good at that sort of thing.

67 posted on 10/15/2011 10:12:51 AM PDT by Wissa (Gone Galt)
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To: JNRoberts; All
Loading live chickens onto a semi for shipment to market. It was a job with some club while in high school 44 years ago. I think we got paid $5 for the night. The workplace was a large quonset hut in the middle of the night, probably 80 by 300 feet long. It was lit with dim red bulbs so the chickens couldn't see, but the workers could, barely. The chickens were thick on the floor, which was also inch deep in dried chicken poop, which soon hung in the air in a thick poop dusk cloud. This was early summer so it was hot in the hut. The semi trucks were lined up in the middle of the hut from end to end. We were given a paper mask to try, ineffectively, to keep the dried chicken poop dust out of our nose, mouth and lungs. The heat was so bad that you sweated copiously and the dried chicken poop mixed with the sweat to insure that you had a liberal coating of poop mud by the end of the night.

In this nasty scene, we groped for chickens legs as they stood, blind and helpless in the dim red light. As we grabbed three full grown chickens in each hand, they struggled and beat their wings in an attempt to get free. Rarely, as you lifted the struggling birds above your head to pass them to the person on the truck who put them in the cages, you could feel/hear a leg bone snap.

The chickens weighed about 8 pounds each, so even this scrawny farmboy’s muscles were soon burning and aching with the effort of lifting nearly 50 pounds of struggling chicken above my head to pass to the truck loader every minute or so.

The combination of brutally physical work in the debilitating heat and noxious conditions made this the worst job ever for me.

The beauty of these nasty jobs is that they teach you to want something better.

68 posted on 10/15/2011 10:21:57 AM PDT by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: JNRoberts
I've had several really bad jobs and picking the "worst" is a little difficult. It would probably be a summer construction job I had while going to college. We were building a wooden pipeline made from creosoted lumber.

I hauled timbers inside the pipeline wearing a heavy shirt buttoned to the top, rubber gloves that reached to my elbows and head protection. My face was slathered with a heavy protective salve to help prevent creosote burns that didn't work all that well. Outdoor temperatures reached nearly 100F. daily, and at least 120 degrees inside where I was.

On the plus side the job paid very well for the time and the grub was good and plentiful. While I groused about the work I was glad to have it.

69 posted on 10/15/2011 10:29:51 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: marktwain
The beauty of these nasty jobs is that they teach you to want something better.

Kudos to you for your optimism. Thanks for reminding me why I love this place.

70 posted on 10/15/2011 10:35:10 AM PDT by truthkeeper (Vote Against Barack Obama in 2012!)
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To: JNRoberts
Summer of 1976 - worked in an insulation factory.
My job was at end of the production line - there was a metal ramp where the still-warm 2’ X 6” slabs of rigid insulation slid down from the ovens. We would pick it up and place it in boxes, then place the boxes on pallets to be hauled away.
Brutally hot that summer, but we were dressed like it was winter - toques on our head, long pants and long woolen shirts taped at the wrists, all in an effort to keep the insulation out (it didn't work). I think I sweated off 10 lbs. a day, and always went home itchy. We were paid $6./hr, a princely sum at the time, especially for a high school student.
BUT as bad as it was, I was damn glad to have the job, and considered myself luckier than most.
71 posted on 10/15/2011 11:06:49 AM PDT by mkleesma (`Call to me, and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.')
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To: mkleesma

>>>BUT as bad as it was, I was damn glad to have the job, and considered myself luckier than most. >>>>

You have an attitude of gratitude.

The Occupiers have an attitude of entitlements. Freebies. Give me what I want or I will threaten you. As they chant all about Love. What a bunch of frauds.


72 posted on 10/15/2011 11:12:01 AM PDT by JNRoberts
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To: JNRoberts

Basically, as a janitor at a SUBSIDIZED HOUSING PROJECT at age 16 to help my parents pay the mortgage because my father, while still employed, he didn’t get paid for a year because the company he worked for wasn’t making any money. He stuck with his company until it turned around in the early 80’s. My mother had a measly secretary’s salary. We never asked for welfare and never missed a payment on the house.

I enlisted in the Army at age 17, came back, paid for college with National Guard income and also paid my parents’ utilities while I lived in the house. I was “rich”! I have only taken loans to buy cars or homes. I have never carried a credit card balance.

I volunteered for Active Duty as often as I could and my civilian employer always supported me. I retired at age 39 and have stuck with my civilian employer through the Obama depression, taking a 20% paycut. I also run a second business which pays for the house which will be paid for in 5 years.

And when I pay off my house I’m going to buy a freakin’ sailboat whether the marxists like it or not.


73 posted on 10/15/2011 11:32:28 AM PDT by cll (I am the warrant and the sanction)
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To: 1rudeboy

I was one of the elves in the mall Christmas Santa setup one year. I had to wrangle the crying and puking children and their irate parents.

I needed the money for Christmas presents, ironically LOL.


74 posted on 10/15/2011 11:37:13 AM PDT by LizardQueen (The world is not out to get you, except in the sense that the world is out to get everyone.)
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To: JNRoberts

Never had a job I didn’t like (guess I’m lucky):


Paper Route (8 to 13 years old) about $15-20 monthly

Lawn Care (mowed lawns) (about the same years) $1-$2 a lawn

Bowling Score Keeper (10 through 16) about $4 a night - $60-$80 a month

Summer Hire Cal Div Forestry - Firefighter - 17 and 18 years old - $300 a month or so (HARD work)

Newspaper Mailroom and District Advisor - $2.50 to $4 an hour (1973 to 1976)

Night accountant at Coca Cola - $4 an hour plus deep discount on Coke product (1976 - 1977)

Air Force Weather 1977-97 - Career

Weather Observer in Galena, Alaska 97-2006 ($35 an hour plus room and board)

Pick up clerk/garden dept at Orchard Supply Hardware - $8 an hour (really loved this job but had to leave when wife became disabled)

Weather Observer in King Salmon, Alaska 2008 - 2010 ($30 an hour plus room and board

Current - Meteorological tech, National Weather Service, King Salmon Alaska - GS-10


75 posted on 10/15/2011 11:59:50 AM PDT by hattend (If I wanted you dead, you'd be dead. - Cameron Connor)
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To: JNRoberts
50 cents an hour to work for a guy just starting up a Mobil gas/truck washing and lube station. Was promised a raise "when things got better", of course they never did so I kicked it on down the road when I found something better.

Min. wage @ that time was 2.10/hr (1974-75) at that time I think. Oilfield trucks can get mighty dirty and they have many, many grease fittings!

76 posted on 10/15/2011 12:01:00 PM PDT by Free in Texas (Member of the Bitter Clingers Association.)
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To: Free in Texas

Too many “at that times”....Doh!


77 posted on 10/15/2011 12:03:20 PM PDT by Free in Texas (Member of the Bitter Clingers Association.)
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To: IMTOFT
Baling hay at 13 and 14 for $30 a week,...

I did that in the late 60's (I was 10 years old then) and the early 70's on my Uncle's farm. 50 cents per hour.

I would be at the farm at 5:15 am, open the Milk House and prep. At 5:30 we would start letting the cows in. Done by 8:30 AM and then join the crew out in the field to bail hay.

At 5:15 PM I would be back at the Milk House to start the milking process all over again and then home by 9:30 PM.

Like I said, 50 cents pet hour but at that age and time I was in heaven with all that cash.

78 posted on 10/15/2011 12:13:41 PM PDT by OldMissileer (Atlas, Titan, Minuteman, PK. Winners of the Cold War)
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To: JNRoberts
Thank you, I am enjoying the thread.

My Worst Job

I was 16 years old. I was hired as a Bus-Boy for a steak house which was close to home in suburbia, Long Island. That doesn't sound so bad, you say...

Well, let me tell you. My hours were 4:30 pm till When-ever. The whenever was when the Russian owner told me I could go home. For starters, I would have to prepare to go to work. That meant I would come home from school and iron my outfit, which included a crisp white shirt, black dress pants, vest, and tie.

When I arrived at the restaurant I was second to lowest man on the totem pole. The only one lower was the Mexican (alien) dishwasher. He washed everything by hand. He didn't speak a lick of English.

My hourly rate was something far less than minimum wage. I was told the waiters would tip me at the end of the night. They would, but, I assure you, they gave me very little. They were all thieves. I had to fill the water for strangers and empty their ash trays.

Not so bad, you say? Well, I had to hear every complaint the stranger-customers had. It was my job to report back to the chef. The chef was a pot smoking nut job. He once told me to go down into the basement to get him a live lobster? When I didn't move fast enough he, literally, kicked me in the ass!

Still not so bad? When the last diner left the building, it was my job to clean up. That meant every table (there were about 20 tables). I had to throw out the garbage into the dumpster. Now, here's the best part...I had to vacuum the entire diningg room!

Most times, I would get home by 4:00 am and have to go to school in a few hours. It was the job from hell!

Lastly, the owner had me do something strange every night that I didn't realize was extremely dangerous until after I quit... Can you guess what it was? I doubt it. Right before we would leave for the night (usually around 4:00 am, the obnoxious Ruskie would hand me his keys and have me go out into the dark to start his Mercedes. It seemed innocent enough to me until I thought about it about a year later.

P.S., I lasted at that dump for about two weeks. I quit and never looked back. I always felt that job was an eye opener for me and I have never forgotten the lessons learned from that experience.

79 posted on 10/15/2011 1:11:35 PM PDT by UnBubba
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To: JNRoberts

Cleaning the bathrooms and scraping chewing gum off the dance floor of a waterfront disco (The Mad Hatter) in Boston for $2.00 an hour.

Bicycle Messenger (straight 50/50 commission)

Lead Singer and manager of a traditional Blues Band touring New England before Blues became popular again. (the Door and perhaps tips)

Cleaning people’s houses.

Trying to sell skin care products by giving people free facials, and then having them not buy anything.

Selling Timeshares in a Florida Resort that was 22MILES from the Beach!


80 posted on 10/15/2011 1:42:20 PM PDT by left that other site (Psalm 122:6)
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To: JNRoberts

After reading all entries (79 at the time) I can only kiss my hands that I never had anything NEAR as nasty as some.

My bona fides:
35c an hour in the late ‘40s as a 15-year-old stockboy in a local mom and pop grocery. $10-$15 a day shining shoes in NYC (15c and usually got a dime tip - let the good times roll!)

1951-54. USN submarine service for 3 years 8 months and 24 days (roughly). Think I got $50 a month hazardous duty pay and $360 bonus if I re-upped for another six years of b/s. I didn’t.

Stockboy at R.H. Macys while going to Linotype school - $35 a week to start, $54 a week after two years (HR guy pounds table to emphasize the wealth I’d be raking in. Thought then that if I was still at Macy’s in two years, I DESERVED to be making only $54). First introduction to a union (Garment Workers under Dave Dubinski- what a joke).

Linotype operator 1955-67. Started out at 95c an hour under a Colorado apprentice program that would pay me $2.00 an hour after six years. Once I came up to speed, I became a tramp printer and hit that figure in two years (1957) and thought I was rolling in dough. (I remember seeing a new 1958 Pontiac station wagon selling for $2,800 - a small fortune.) Loved the work but had to quit when I saw photo offset coming in.

Switched gears in 1967. Work the graveyard shift at a union print shop (only way to get a job in San Diego was to join the ITU - another joke) while going to a school to learn to be a computer programmer (whatever that was). On graduation I went from $4.50 an hour to $2.65 at the Camp Pendleton PX as a civilian employee. When I left them in 1980 I was knocking down $35,000 a year and again rolling in dough. (My 1600 sq ft house cost $30,500 - in California!)

Really hit my stride later on as a contractor and when I retired in 1990 was making 90K a year with only about half being taxable due to tax free per diem and a maxed out 401K. Loved that work too, so consider myself truly blessed all along the way.

I really feel for those who wrote - man was I lucky! (kisses hands again after posting)


81 posted on 10/15/2011 2:11:03 PM PDT by Oatka ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." –Bertrand de Jouvenel)
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To: Arrowhead1952

I worked AC installation and repair in College I feel your pain. There is no place hotter than a Texas attic in June except maybe Hell!


82 posted on 10/15/2011 3:05:00 PM PDT by willyd (your credibility deficit is screwing up my bs meter...)
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To: marktwain

You might appreciate this....

http://gizmodo.com/5832367/this-insane-machine-sucks-up-living-chickens


83 posted on 10/15/2011 3:21:17 PM PDT by Eepsy
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To: Eepsy; All
I appreciate the link to the chicken catching machine page on Gizmodo.

“Harvesting chickens by hand is back-breaking work—often called the worst job in the poultry industry.”

Thanks for validating my 44 year old memories. On reflection I recall that it was early spring, not early summer. The heat was from the bodies of thousands of chickens in a confined space, not from the outside temperature. Every couple of hours we took a brief break outside. Breathing the cool, clean northern Wisconsin air seemed a touch of heaven.

84 posted on 10/15/2011 3:44:17 PM PDT by marktwain (In an age of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: JNRoberts
When our children were born we invested for their education, so our boys graduated from college debt free...

I realize not everyone can do this, like my liberal brother, he had nothing saved for his only child to go to school.....but he did have money for a boat, truck, new cars and Disney trips.....

It was hard but it was worth it....

85 posted on 10/15/2011 3:47:42 PM PDT by Kimmers (Pray more and shoot straight.........)
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To: JNRoberts

I think in reading (and posting my own experience) on here, it seems that everyone one here (at least those that post) are united in one aspect of life: work was not an option. I was very blessed to be raised by two hard-working parents, within the family of five, we have 7 graduate degrees, not to say that assures success, it’s just that work wasn’t an option, whether it was baling hay, working as a janitor, con ass at the park, it was expected as that’s what normal, responsible people do...

I have been very blessed, too, that now I have and have had for my entire career, very good opportunities, but if they were to go away, I’d work three jobs to simply make ends meet because that’s what we are supposed to do...

The incredible sense of entitlement those OWS people exhibit is what is going to backfire on them - most of us DON’T feel we’re entitled, we work for what we earn...and damn proud of it...

My oldest son just graduated college, and while he does have student loans, he has a fraction of what he would at that school as he earn athletic and academic scholarships...now, he’s applying to all the police academies he can...in the final round for a state trooper slot! I really hope he gets it as he is earning it...


86 posted on 10/15/2011 4:41:31 PM PDT by IMTOFT (At least I'm enjoying the ride...)
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To: Hammerhead

“Mess crank for 5 months onboard a Fast Attack submarine - slept on a 4x8 sheet of plywood on top of Mk48 torpedoes”

Had a high school buddy who went into the Navy after dropping out of college (1981), became a navigator on a fast attack boat, loved it, spent 22 years in, last 6 years at Groton as an instructor, earned a BS and MS in the Navy, now working for a to-be-unnamed defense contractor earning six figures plus, it’s what you make of it that counts...


87 posted on 10/15/2011 4:45:53 PM PDT by IMTOFT (At least I'm enjoying the ride...)
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To: JNRoberts; All

In the final analysis I think Bill Whittle says it better than just about anyone...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAOrT0OcHh0


88 posted on 10/15/2011 8:15:01 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: rockrr

Wow. good stuff. Thanks.


89 posted on 10/15/2011 8:26:42 PM PDT by JNRoberts
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To: Just another Joe

I heard that Kirby sales job is one of the worst jobs, a scam.


90 posted on 10/16/2011 12:28:52 AM PDT by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: JNRoberts
Worse job ever and you still didn't occupy anything?

Pimp.

91 posted on 10/16/2011 12:34:21 AM PDT by Lazamataz ("If Herman Cain does become President, his Vice President will be known as Co-Cain." -- Laz, 2011)
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To: JNRoberts

Paper boy was a great job. Except for stuffing the Sunday paper at 4 am in Minnesota in the winter. My fingers get pretty cold and numb at the slightest anymore. Agree with the other posters on hating the sales thing though. I kept getting yelled at every meeting by the drop manager for not “selling”. After about the third time I told the guy above him to tell him to knock it off or I would quit. For some reason my route was a bad route and they had a hard time filling it. So I never got bothered about it again.

Hmmm - I got laid off from my last job for not “selling enough” - I was more concerned with the technical aspects of the work. (Funny - “not selling” enough - so I became an independent consultant!! That was 16 years ago, and I still don’t do any “selling”.)

I had the paper route from 10 years old to 17 years old! Well, 16 & 17 I subbed out most of it to a younger kid on the block as I was busy with sports, etc. Most of the houses I still had to go around and get my collections. It would take me three evenings usually. Mainly because of the older folks inviting me in for drinks and cookies and chatting!

I didn’t realize it at the time, but that was probably the best learning part of it - learning how to talk and act like an adult. That and performing a job on time and with care.

Can’t say it was too bad, but it sounds bad - “work staff” at the summer camp where one of the jobs was cleaning the out-houses every morning. Except me and the other guy would have a race to see who could get done with theirs the fasest - and make it to the ball field first to play softball. We probably each had about 10 or so scattered around the camp. Winner bought the other a soda at the canteen behind the ball field after the game.

Sorry for the long post, but thanks for letting me indulge in some memories!


92 posted on 10/16/2011 1:24:14 AM PDT by 21twelve (Obama Recreating the New Deal: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2185147/posts)
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To: willyd
There is no place hotter than a Texas attic in June except maybe Hell!

LOL. That was one job I regretted having to do, but it paid OK for being in school.

93 posted on 10/16/2011 4:32:21 AM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (Dear God, thanks for the rain, but please let it rain more in Texas. Amen.)
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To: Democrat_media
I heard that Kirby sales job is one of the worst jobs, a scam.

It is. It's very VERY hard to get any commission when trying to sell a $2,000 vacuum cleaner in 1987.

94 posted on 10/16/2011 7:29:43 AM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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