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Any tips for getting rid of ticks on wooded property? (Vanity)
11/10/2011 | BuckeyeTexan

Posted on 11/10/2011 9:40:38 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan

Does anyone have recommendations for treating heavily wooded property for ticks? My one-year-old basset hound (Sophie) is an indoor dog, but she has free access to a little over an acre of heavily wooded property. (300+ oaks and pecans.)

I've tried every treatment I can find to put on Sophie to prevent ticks, but I'm still finding them on her once every few days. She sleeps on my daughter's bed, so I'm worried about a tick dropping off in the bed. She's a lemon basset hound so the ticks are easy to see unless they're really small.

Is there anything I can do to treat the property? I don't want to poison the land or kill the trees, so I'd prefer something natural, but I'm not strictly opposed to pesticide if it'll work.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Gardening; Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: basset; oaks; ticks
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Any ideas? Thanks in advance.

Tex

1 posted on 11/10/2011 9:40:42 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Chickens

Positive all around - they clean out the ticks plus you get eggs.


2 posted on 11/10/2011 9:42:19 AM PST by PeteB570 ( Islam is the sea in which the Terrorist Shark swims. The deeper the sea the larger the shark.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Guineau Hens? Supposedly those eat ticks when they forage. You see them around farms and such, so they seem to stick close. Maybe somebody else can amplify.


3 posted on 11/10/2011 9:43:19 AM PST by Tallguy (You can safely ignore anything that precedes the word "But"...)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

invite iran to use the property as a nuclear test ground?


4 posted on 11/10/2011 9:43:45 AM PST by ken21
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Fire


5 posted on 11/10/2011 9:43:50 AM PST by MNJohnnie (Giving more money to DC to fix the Debt is like giving free drugs to addicts think it will cure them)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

6 posted on 11/10/2011 9:44:00 AM PST by Dem Guard (Obama's 57 States = The Organization of The Islamic Conference (OIC).)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Bring in a truck load of fire ants, Tex.


7 posted on 11/10/2011 9:44:05 AM PST by grumpa
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Not that I know of.

I don’t like to give my dogs a lot of crap but I’ve found that I tend to check them over multiple times during the day and find ticks before they become attached.


8 posted on 11/10/2011 9:45:21 AM PST by cripplecreek (A vote for Amnesty is a vote for a permanent Democrat majority. ..Choose well.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

If you can channel all of the illegals through your property as they ingress, they will pick up most of them to eat; the rest they wear.


9 posted on 11/10/2011 9:48:02 AM PST by arrdon (Never underestimate the stupidity of the American voter.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

http://www.dirtworks.net/Diatomaceous-Earth.html

Pets:
In case a bug decides to take up residence in their fur. You can protect them and yourself with Fossil Shell Flour (diatomaceous earth). When lightly rubbed into their coats it is very effective against fleas, ticks, lice, and other pests on pet dogs, cats, and their premises. You can puff it into the soft furniture in your house, the rug and all over the basement too.
Diatomaceous Earth Kills Pests Naturally - It is a mineral dust mined from quarries that kills the insects when they come in contact with it and it does vaporize or go away over time. Once it’s in place it works every time and it’s nontoxic.

Good remedy!


10 posted on 11/10/2011 9:48:08 AM PST by fullchroma
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To: BuckeyeTexan
Does anyone have recommendations for treating heavily wooded property for ticks?

Clearing out the underbrush and keeping the weeds cut short will help a lot.

11 posted on 11/10/2011 9:49:01 AM PST by fso301
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To: BuckeyeTexan

I’ve had success with a non toxic spray called Cedarcide’s ‘Best Yet Biting Insect Spray’. It smells good and makes his blonde coat shiny too.


12 posted on 11/10/2011 9:49:32 AM PST by nuancey
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Keep wild grassey areas cut as short as you can get them and make sure you have nothing that will attract deer.Deer are notorious tick carriers.

The only other thing you can do is spray the area with insecticide but that’s one thing I would not do.since I’d be affraid of poisoning the water supply.


13 posted on 11/10/2011 9:49:53 AM PST by puppypusher (The World is going to the dogs.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Chickens or Guinea Fowl. The Guinea Fowl are more hardy left on their own, they are great foragers. You can train any of them to come to a shed at night with a little bit of feed.


14 posted on 11/10/2011 9:50:19 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: PeteB570

Ditto on the chickens - my sister-in-law has them & there are NO ticks to be found around their place or on their two dogs. The fresh eggs are a really nice bonus - she shares! :-)


15 posted on 11/10/2011 9:50:24 AM PST by MissMagnolia (Obama 2012: Debt Man Walking.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

There are pro and con on this but I feed my border collie a tablespoon of olive oil with a half teaspoon of garlic. Never had a tick and she lives on six acres heavily wooded and deep brush. She’s in it all the time.


16 posted on 11/10/2011 9:50:44 AM PST by SkyDancer ('If you want to learn to love better, you should start with a friend who you hate ")
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To: BuckeyeTexan

No ideas for the property but you might try putting some apple cider vinegar in the dog’s water dish. That will help prevent fleas and ticks from getting on the dog.


17 posted on 11/10/2011 9:51:24 AM PST by Duchess47 ("One day I will leave this world and dream myself to Reality" Crazy Horse)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Guinea Hens: eat ticks all year round. You have to train them in the spring when they are chicks, but it is well worth it. Never had ticks on my dogs.


18 posted on 11/10/2011 9:51:48 AM PST by siamesecats (God closes one door, and opens another, to protect us.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Get a pair of Guinea hens. They will keep 2 acres free of ticks. They are tick eating machines.


19 posted on 11/10/2011 9:52:16 AM PST by Lando Lincoln (But that's just me.)
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To: grumpa

Got the fire ants. Check. Got ground-burrowing wasps too. Doesn’t seem to help.


20 posted on 11/10/2011 9:52:39 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: fullchroma

I used diatomaceous earth on my basenji dog this year. This is the first time he had fleas. Rubbed it in his fur and sprinkled it on his bedding. If your dog has worms, you can even put some in their food. Safe and non-toxic. I bought it at my local health food store. (Whole Foods didn’t have it and didn’t know what I was talking about.)


21 posted on 11/10/2011 9:53:04 AM PST by toothfairy86
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Chlordane worked great when I was a kid, didn’t even need to use it regularly.

I’ve heard chickens will eat them but we free range dogs so we haven’t tried.

Frontline on the dogs and cats, and a good spraydown with insect repellent for the humans seems to work pretty well.


22 posted on 11/10/2011 9:53:17 AM PST by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

I get some pills at the vet to give my dogs here at the farm. They are not real cheap if I remember right, but they work. I’m thinking we only have to give them to them once a month.I’ll try to get the name of the stuff for you.


23 posted on 11/10/2011 9:55:00 AM PST by Quickgun (Second Amendment. The only one you can put your hands on.)
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To: siamesecats

Train them to do what?


24 posted on 11/10/2011 9:55:43 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: BuckeyeTexan
Two words: FIRE ANTS!

But don't ask me how to get rid of the fire ants. ;-)
25 posted on 11/10/2011 9:57:49 AM PST by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Joe 6-pack

tick ping


26 posted on 11/10/2011 9:58:02 AM PST by ColdOne (I miss my poochie... Tasha 2000~3/14/11)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Free range Ducks, Chickens Or Guinea hens will take care of it. Plus you get eggs.


27 posted on 11/10/2011 9:58:11 AM PST by READINABLUESTATE (Millions of government bureaucrats are gang raping and choking the life out of America.)
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To: fullchroma

It has microscopic sharp corners that scrape holes in the insect’s skin causing then to dehydrate. It’s the basis for flea powder and is one of the few things that kills bedbugs.


28 posted on 11/10/2011 9:58:37 AM PST by BillM (.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Guinnea Hens or just plain o’l chickens. The Guinneas prefer to roost wild in the trees, so you don’t have to shelter them.


29 posted on 11/10/2011 10:00:02 AM PST by blackdog (The mystery of government is not how Washington works but how to make it stop)
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To: Lando Lincoln; PeteB570; Tallguy; SWAMPSNIPER; MissMagnolia; siamesecats; dangerdoc

Chickens or Guinea Hens? Does it matter? Will they torture the dog? Aren’t all hounds hunters? Will Sophie kill the chickens/hens?


30 posted on 11/10/2011 10:02:54 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Follow these steps:

1) remove as much of the tick habitat as possible. Any low to the ground brush. If possible, do a controled burn. If that is not possible, do spot burns. If that is not possible, cut and mulch with a weed trimmer / lawn mower. Move all brush to a safe burn spot or bag and dispose.

2) rake the tick infested area and burn dispose of the rubbish. Remove any ticks from all pets, clothing, and even in the house.

3) use a garden hose sprayer (hand pump sprayers do not work well) with the pesticide Permethrin. You can often find these in garden shops / hardware stors. Start by spraying around the house and work outwards. Give it a good soak. Might take a lot of spray for your area.

4) work you way over to the tick infested area. Spray to about 24 inches in height. If there is any brush left (around trees) spray both top down an bottom up. Dont forget to spray EVERYTHING ... lamp posts, mail boxes, fences, trees etc.

5) Keep your pets indoors for 2 days during and following the spraying.

6) Before letting your pet back outdoors, use Frontline Topspot according to directions.

7) On day three post-spray, lay down lawn insecticide grandules. Heavy two feet around the house, normal in the yard, heavy 2 foot wide path seperating you from the tick infested area. normal in the tick infested area

8) let sit for 2 weeks, then repeat steps 3 though 7.

Should kill ticks for a season in heavy infested areas. May kill for the entire year. Normally has to be repeated every year for most high tick concentrations. In a low tick area or after a hard freeze, may remove the threat for several years.

Also, be sure to check your house for ticks. Fog bombing works well to eliminate most ticks in the house. Wash all clothing and blankets and have and call an exterminator if you find any ticks in the house.


31 posted on 11/10/2011 10:02:59 AM PST by taxcontrol
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To: arrdon; MNJohnnie; ken21

Illegals, fire, nuclear explosion.

*snort*

I’ll be labeled a domestic terrorist and hauled in for questioning.


32 posted on 11/10/2011 10:05:47 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Frontline Plus® - Prevents and kills fleas and ticks. Topical liquid that is used once monthly. Waterproof


33 posted on 11/10/2011 10:05:51 AM PST by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

1. Cut down trees

2. Pave landscape

3. Sell to developer as parking lot

4. ???

5. PROFIT!


34 posted on 11/10/2011 10:07:12 AM PST by Space Patrol Hoppa
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Sevin dust, available at any hardware store.


35 posted on 11/10/2011 10:07:36 AM PST by Carl from Marietta (Cain, there's a new sheriff in town.)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Diesel spritz around trees and undergrowth.


36 posted on 11/10/2011 10:07:55 AM PST by Rich21IE
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To: puppypusher; fso301

No underbrush. Short grass, if any. Definitely no deer. Lots of bunnies. Occassional coyote at night. Longhorns next door.


37 posted on 11/10/2011 10:08:09 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

You will have to train the dog. I convinced my Bassets and Beagles to leave chickens alone. They wouldn’t chase our cats but any stray in the yard was fair game. My Bassets were serious hunters, slower than the Beagles but I’ve seen them run a cottontail to exhaustion and catch it.


38 posted on 11/10/2011 10:10:45 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: BuckeyeTexan

http://www.discountpetmedicines.com/comfortis-for-dogs.htm

Kind of expensive but my cousin uses it in Arkansas for his dog and swears by it.


39 posted on 11/10/2011 10:11:50 AM PST by sheana
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To: fullchroma

Thanks. I’ll check it out. Will it be expensive to cover most of an acre? (Expensive > $300)


40 posted on 11/10/2011 10:17:24 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

“Chickens or Guinea Fowl.”

I second that. Had property where ticks were a huge problem. The birds got rid of them in short order. Downside is that they will need a safe place to roost if you have coyotes, racoons, etc.


41 posted on 11/10/2011 10:17:57 AM PST by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: toothfairy86

It’s a great product. We had a silverfish problem — they like books — and D.E. took care of them. And I sprinkled it around an area of our yard where Hubby and kitty had acquired ticks. So far, no more uninvited parasites.


42 posted on 11/10/2011 10:18:35 AM PST by fullchroma
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Where home is. We kept them inside until they got their outside feathers - about one month. Then you put them outside in a large cage, so they know the smell of your property, and the sounds surrounding your house, and the sound of you coming home - another month. You feed them every day - food from a feed store - I forget what it’s called. Then you can let them loose. You still need to feed them every day so they know to come home. They roam your property and eat ticks all day long. Now, some if these birds are just plain dumb. We lost a lot. Now we don’t have any, and no dogs either. I’m not sure about hounds, we had a retired racing greyhound, and a miniature pinscher. They did not bother the birds, and the birds were not afraid of the dogs. I hope that helps.


43 posted on 11/10/2011 10:21:42 AM PST by siamesecats (God closes one door, and opens another, to protect us.)
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To: Tallguy

I had 3 guinea hens when I had the farm, got them as day olds and kept under a light until they were full feathered out. then they went in the chicken coop with the chickens. If you get them young, they will stay on your farm, if you get them as adults, I don’t know if they would stick around. Sometimes they’d roost in the coop, other times they’d roost in the trees. Nice feathers and my husband always said they look like tanks..all body, skinny neck and small head..liked them....


44 posted on 11/10/2011 10:22:49 AM PST by goat granny
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To: BillM
It has microscopic sharp corners that scrape holes in the insect’s skin causing then to dehydrate.

Effing brilliant product! I've heard that another of my favorite secrets, "snail bait," is the same stuff, only of larger texture.

45 posted on 11/10/2011 10:22:57 AM PST by fullchroma
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To: Kirkwood
When I had chickens you could sit in the yard and any time a yellow fly landed on you a chicken would jump up and grab it.

It scared the crap out of people who didn't know it was coming, LOL

Free range chickens get a lot smarter than the ones Col. Sanders raises.

46 posted on 11/10/2011 10:23:15 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: toothfairy86

“Safe and non-toxic”

Safety considerations:

The absorbent qualities of diatomite can result in a significant drying of the hands if handled without gloves. The flux-calcined form contains a highly crystalline form of silica, resulting in sharp edges. The sharpness of this version of the material makes it dangerous to breathe and a dust mask is recommended when working with it.

The type of hazard posed by inhalation depends on the form of the silica. Crystalline silica poses a serious inhalation hazard because it can cause silicosis. Amorphous silica can cause dusty lungs, but does not carry the same degree of risk as crystalline silica. Natural or dried diatomite generally contains very low percentages of crystalline silica. Diatomite produced for pool filters is treated with high heat (calcining) and a fluxing agent (soda ash), causing the formerly amorphous silicon dioxide to assume its crystalline form.

The crystalline silica content of the dust’s particulate is regulated in the United States by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and there are guidelines for the maximum amounts allowable in the product and in the air near the breathing zone of workers.[19]


47 posted on 11/10/2011 10:29:43 AM PST by NewinTexsas
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To: taxcontrol

Holy cow. That’s a lot of work. (Yes, I want to get rid of the ticks.) The only thing separating the house from the ticks is a 6 foot wide wooden deck and stone path along the length of the back of the house. Will Permethrin poison the water supply or kill the flowers & plants? With so many trees, it’s nearly impossible to keep up with the leaves. If I stay on top of those, will that help some? We’ll have several hard freezes here in Fort Worth.


48 posted on 11/10/2011 10:29:58 AM PST by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: fullchroma

Beer is great to get rid of snails also...put a lid from a jar or a saucer in the garden, they crawl in and cannot get out an drown. They love beer. The saucer should be put in the dirt up to the edge so its almost level with the dirt. Keep husband out of the garden...:O)


49 posted on 11/10/2011 10:31:32 AM PST by goat granny
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To: BuckeyeTexan

Bulk rates are listed here: http://www.dirtworks.net/Diatomaceous-Earth.html

You might contact Dirtworks directly about how to treat your acre of woods. I’d be inclined to powder the brushy areas closest to your home and where Sophie tends to wander, expanding the radius over time, as you’re able. Could be an ongoing endeavor as the stuff must wash away or disappear in time but the application is easy and the Killer Earth is pretty cheap.


50 posted on 11/10/2011 10:35:22 AM PST by fullchroma
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