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Aerial gunners kill 14 wolves in North Idaho
The Spokesman-Review ^ | February 23, 2012 | Eric Barker

Posted on 02/23/2012 1:47:17 PM PST by jazusamo

Federal wildlife agents shot and killed 14 wolves from helicopters in Idaho’s remote Lolo Zone earlier this month.

The three-day operation, aimed at reducing the number of wolves roaming the backcountry area where elk herds are struggling, was carried out in a partnership between the federal Wildlife Services agency and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Wildlife managers hope a sustained reduction in wolf numbers will allow the Lolo elk herd, which has been severely depressed since the mid 1990s, to rebound.

“We’d like to see one of Idaho’s premier elk populations recover as much as possible,” said Jim Unsworth, deputy director of the department at Boise.

The department has long had a goal of reducing the number of wolves in the area along the upper Lochsa and North Fork Clearwater rivers, once renowned for its elk hunting.

The agency first sought permission in 2006 from federal wildlife managers to kill 40 to 50 wolves that at the time were still under the protection of the Endangered Species Act. The state failed to win permission then and eventually gave up in favor of seeking the overall delisting of wolves.

Delisting occurred in 2009 and a wolf hunting season was authorized. Hunters killed 13 wolves in the zone that year, far fewer than wildlife managers hoped for.

Following the hunting season, wolves were briefly returned to federal management. They were delisted for a second time in the spring of 2011 and the department quickly approved a control action that resulted in six wolves being shot using helicopters.

Hunting resumed in the fall and trapping started in November. Through Wednesday, hunters and trappers had taken 22 wolves from the Lolo, bringing the total known wolf kills there to 42 and in line with the department’s plan for the area.

Elk herds tanked in the Lolo Zone during the harsh winter of 1996-97. But numbers had been on the decline for many years prior.

Biologists said the biggest problem was a long-term change in the habitat, but they also blamed growing numbers of bears and mountain lions. Hunting seasons on those predators were liberalized and managers expected elk numbers to slowly climb. But the herds continued to shrink and blame was placed on the increasing number of wolves moving into the area.

According to recent studies by researchers from the department, wolves are the primary cause of death in female elk in the Lolo and of calves more than 6 months old. Researchers have said the habitat is capable of supporting far more than the 2,000 elk estimated to be in the area.

Through Wednesday, hunters and trappers had killed 318 wolves throughout the state. Most hunting and trapping seasons end March 31, but wolf hunting will be allowed in the Lolo and Selway zones through June. The department has a goal of reducing the number of wolves in the state, but has not set a target population or limit.

Unsworth said the state would manage wolves to ensure they remain under state authority. Wolves could revert to federal management and ESA protection if numbers dip below 150 animals. The last official population estimate, completed in spring of last year, said there were at least 739 wolves in the state. Unsworth said the state is confident the statewide population was in excess of 1,000 prior to the start of wolf hunting last summer.

Suzanne Stone, of the Defenders of Wildlife at Boise, said the state is being too aggressive in its attempt to reduce wolf numbers.

“That is our concern and it has been all along, that Idaho is focused entirely on killing wolves rather than preserving the species,” Stone said.


TOPICS: Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: idaho; management; wolves
Good for Idaho, they haven't wasted any time putting their wolf management plan into force. The enviros and wolf lovers can't do a thing about now that wolves have been delisted.
1 posted on 02/23/2012 1:47:26 PM PST by jazusamo
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To: george76; Flycatcher; girlangler; firebrand

Idaho wolf Ping!


2 posted on 02/23/2012 1:49:09 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo

Just wondering how “mother nature” dealt with too many wolves before man wandered in to deal with the problem. What’s going to happen when the elk get too numerous and start chomping down on people’s veggie gardens and wandering around downtown? Answer? Bring in more wolves. It’s interesting how nature gets out of hand when humans starts messing around with it.


3 posted on 02/23/2012 1:54:50 PM PST by SkyDancer ("No Matter How The People Vote There Will Always Be A Federal Judge To Over Turn It")
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To: SkyDancer

The only places I’m aware of that too many elk were causing problems before the reintroduction of wolves was National Parks. No hunting is allowed in them, the balance of the western states hunting is allowed and there didn’t seem to be a problem.


4 posted on 02/23/2012 1:59:12 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo
Biologists said the biggest problem was a long-term change in the habitat, but they also blamed growing numbers of bears and mountain lions. Hunting seasons on those predators were liberalized and managers expected elk numbers to slowly climb. But the herds continued to shrink and blame was placed on the increasing number of wolves moving into the area.

According to recent studies by researchers from the department, wolves are the primary cause of death in female elk in the Lolo and of calves more than 6 months old.

Finally!!!!

I think this is the first report I've read where the biologists are being HONEST about the declining elk numbers. To paraphrase our politicians: "It's the wolf, stupid!"

Glad to see some action being taken on this front.

Thanks for the ping, Jaz!

5 posted on 02/23/2012 2:00:46 PM PST by Flycatcher (God speaks to us, through the supernal lightness of birds, in a special type of poetry.)
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To: SkyDancer

Elk herds have been decimated due to the re-introduction of these wolves. if the wolves are not hunted there won’t be any elk left. With the hunting of these wolves it will allow the elk herds to thrive. they will not overpopulate as they are also hunted. And the fact remains that if the wolves are not hunted they will overpopulate, drain their food sources eliminating the ungulate populations then they (the wolves) will starve and die. So it is better for humans to manage these animals as they are not capable of managing themselves. Wolves kill for sport and DO NOT find balance with the rest of nature around them.


6 posted on 02/23/2012 2:02:52 PM PST by eyrish69 (Yellowstone Wolves - Smoke a Pack a Day!!!)
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To: Flycatcher

Amen...Idaho was hit hard by elk depredation from wolves, glad to see them acting quickly.


7 posted on 02/23/2012 2:04:21 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo

I was just being curious. I’ve read where wolves were re-inserted in areas because the local wildlife was getting out of hand. I think they did it in the Olympics in WA and in Oregon someplace. My thoughts were, well how did nature take care of over population of one species. So perhaps looking at areas where there is no hunting, such as National Parks and see how the wolf/elk population is being handled on a natural level. If elk were being depleted by wolves one has to ask why? Introduce more elk? Still seems to me that nature had a way of dealing with over population.


8 posted on 02/23/2012 2:04:25 PM PST by SkyDancer ("No Matter How The People Vote There Will Always Be A Federal Judge To Over Turn It")
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To: SJackson

Consideration for your ping list.


9 posted on 02/23/2012 2:06:03 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: eyrish69

I mentioned to another poster was how did nature take care of over balance? It seems the problem was acerbated by the re-introduction of wolves. Why? Was the wolf population down and the elk population increasing? Will be interesting to see how this develops.


10 posted on 02/23/2012 2:07:49 PM PST by SkyDancer ("No Matter How The People Vote There Will Always Be A Federal Judge To Over Turn It")
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To: SkyDancer
My thoughts were, well how did nature take care of over population of one species.

It seems to me there's no such thing as "over population" (or under, or just right) in nature. Stuff happens.
11 posted on 02/23/2012 2:41:16 PM PST by caveat emptor (Zippity Do Dah)
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To: caveat emptor

Well, yes and no. When areas are over populated there’s not enough food. So that species will die out somewhat and what food they ate slowly recovers and then they come back.


12 posted on 02/23/2012 2:46:45 PM PST by SkyDancer ("No Matter How The People Vote There Will Always Be A Federal Judge To Over Turn It")
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To: jazusamo

Overkill?

13 posted on 02/23/2012 2:48:16 PM PST by nonsporting
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To: nonsporting

Nah, that wouldn’t be overkill. :-)

It’d get the job done fast and be an excellent training tool for the gunners.


14 posted on 02/23/2012 2:54:30 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo
“That is our concern and it has been all along, that Idaho is focused entirely on killing wolves rather than preserving the species,” Stone said.

I'm trying really hard to see what the problem is. My cousin summed this up very well: "We're now learning why our forefathers worked so hard to get rid of wolves."

15 posted on 02/23/2012 2:54:41 PM PST by CommerceComet (If Mitt can leave the GOP to protest Reagan, why can't I do the same in protest of Romney?)
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To: eyrish69
Wolves kill for sport and DO NOT find balance with the rest of nature around them.

No... Wolves are part of an ecosystem, nothing more, nothing less. They play a role, and a vital one pertaining to their natural prey. For an example of what happens when folks think they can extirpate predators and not suffer the consequences, refer to "Playing God in Yellowstone" by Alston Chase. Further proof can be found in what happened to the deer herds on the Kaibab Plateau in the 1920s. Once the predators were killed by man, the deer herds starved, with losses in the thousands.

16 posted on 02/23/2012 3:33:41 PM PST by Fury
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To: jazusamo
Federal wildlife agents shot and killed 14 wolves from helicopters in Idaho’s remote Lolo Zone earlier this month.

Dumbass federales! What did that hunt cost the taxpayer? The profitable solution would have been to sell a limited number of licenses and offer a bounty on the wolves killed........

The same thing applies to the invasive species of snakes in Florida that the state doesn't know how to deal with. Allow open season hunting and offer a bounty.........sheesh!

17 posted on 02/23/2012 3:40:18 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (The only solution to this primary is a shoot out! Last person standing picks the candidate)
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To: jazusamo
“That is our concern and it has been all along, that Idaho is focused entirely on killing wolves rather than preserving the species,” Stone said.

These people are insane!

18 posted on 02/23/2012 3:42:58 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (My greatest fear is that when I'm gone my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them)
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To: jazusamo; Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; phantomworker; ...
If you’d like to be on or off this Outdoors/Rural/wildlife/hunting/hiking/backpacking/National Parks/animals list please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.

Thanks to jazusamo for the article. Good for the elk

19 posted on 02/23/2012 3:49:33 PM PST by SJackson (The Pilgrims Doing the jobs Native Americans wouldn't do !)
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To: Inyo-Mono
These people are insane!

You're most certainly right. If Idaho was really focused on killing wolves there would be no wolves left in Idaho.

20 posted on 02/23/2012 3:54:50 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: SJackson

Thank you for pinging, SJ!


21 posted on 02/23/2012 3:56:00 PM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: Fury; SkyDancer

Agreed that nature will find a balance its own way.

However, that way may not be best for humans. Direct impact is the sport and tourism money for elk hunts. And once the weaker elk are gone, or the elk population brought so low, then the wolves will either die, or start eating more sheep (and probably also die from a gun or poison).

I believe that at the Kabob they also did not allow hunting - so the deer without any predators (wolves or human) did suffer a huge loss and environmental devastation. But still - nature found it’s balance - enough deer finally died.

It is just that in nature the balance can swing too far in either direction to be good for what us humans need or want. (Should we not interfere with a natural wildfire in a residential area?).

What I am amazed at is the rapid population increase in the wolves. I was in central Idaho for awhile in 1994 and they had just introduced 2 pairs of wolves to the area (and I thought it was for the entire state?) Although I imagine they brought in many wolves over the years.


22 posted on 02/23/2012 4:00:55 PM PST by 21twelve
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To: 21twelve

I’m agreeing with you that humans should not interfere with the balance of nature. It basically comes down to what is good for nature vs what is good for humans. If humans encroach on nature why should nature (in this case the wolves) be the one to suffer? Just saying.


23 posted on 02/23/2012 4:04:18 PM PST by SkyDancer ("No Matter How The People Vote There Will Always Be A Federal Judge To Over Turn It")
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To: SkyDancer

Well, my recollection was off, it was 1995 and it looks like they introduced 15 wolves into Idaho. No significant populations of wolves prior to that. (An odd sighting here and there, no packs).

The following I found on the net. Only goes to 2004, with a wolf population of 454.

The point is, humans are in nature - so we aren’t “interfering” when we try to manage it. We can either try to take it over (like wiping out the wolves when we first settled), or living with it and trying to manage it to fit our needs. One “need” perhaps is to have native species in their former areas to fill perhaps a natural urge to have “wilderness” areas available - if not to actually enjoy, at least to know that they are there. (Yes - it makes me feel good to know that there are wolves and bears and cougars roaming in the woods a few hundred miles from where I live, even if I rarely get to them, and have yet to seen a wild wolf.)

I imagine that the wolves that were reintroduced could care less if they lived in Idaho or Canada. I don’t know if the wolves were brought in to manage elk or deer herds. I imagine that is more easily managed by issuing more licenses, increasing hunting limits, etc.

From the net:

*****************************

Growth of the Wolf Population in the Central Idaho Wolf Recovery Area-

My best estimates for the growth of the Idaho wolf population follow.

1995- 15 wolves (including one “native” wolf not identified as such until 1997).

1996- 41 (including one “native” wolf).

1997- 74 (including one “native” wolf and two more likely “native” wolves)

1998- 121-123

1999- 176-180 (late spring 1999)

1999- 141 (official minimum est. end of 1999)

2000- 192 (official minimum est. end of 2000)

2001- 261 (official minimum est. end of 2001)

2002- 284 (official minimum est. end of 2002)

2003- 368 (official minimum est. end of 2003)

2004- 454 (official minimum est. end of 2004)


24 posted on 02/23/2012 4:27:01 PM PST by 21twelve
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To: SkyDancer

From the article:

“Biologists said the biggest problem was a long-term change in the habitat...”

I wonder if that change has anything to do with the downturn in the logging industry? Elk and deer do much better in areas with some trees for more protection, and some open areas for grazing. With no logging those pastures aren’t being created and the old ones the trees are only getting bigger.


25 posted on 02/23/2012 4:31:20 PM PST by 21twelve
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To: jazusamo

Good for Idaho


26 posted on 02/23/2012 5:54:07 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: SkyDancer

The Canadian wolves introduced to Montana, and Idaho are decimating the elk, moose, and deer.

Now, after 15 years of living with Canadian wolves, the people are waking up to a nightmare.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYxGJB5dJxI


27 posted on 02/23/2012 5:57:50 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: jazusamo

NOW START THE SAME SHOOT IN THE IDAHO PANHANDLE!!
YES, I’M YELLING to the State and Fed’s.


28 posted on 02/23/2012 8:26:31 PM PST by TaMoDee ( Lassez les bons temps rouler dans les 2012!)
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To: SkyDancer

“Well, yes and no. When areas are over populated there’s not enough food. So that species will die out somewhat and what food they ate slowly recovers and then they come back.”

EXCEPT when livestock are introduced into the equation. Now, when the natural prey are decimated, wolves turn to livestock, pets and anything else they can kill and eat, including unwary humans. I’m aware that folks claim that wolves always avoid humans, but that’s only when they’re otherwise well-fed! Even well-fed wolves will aggressively kill domestic dogs, regardless of human presence.

JC


29 posted on 02/23/2012 8:32:17 PM PST by cracker45
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To: jazusamo

Yeah, they just chased them into Montana. I have two competing packs in my valley.

Gunner


30 posted on 02/23/2012 8:36:42 PM PST by weps4ret (Republicans are suffering from Testicular Atrophy!!!)
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To: AnAmericanMother; Titan Magroyne; Badeye; Shannon; SandRat; arbooz; potlatch; ...
WOOOF!

The Doggie Ping list is for FReepers who would like to be notified of threads relating to all things canid. If you would like to join the Doggie Ping Pack (or be unleashed from it), FReemail me.

31 posted on 02/23/2012 8:40:59 PM PST by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: cracker45

Read the book “Wolves in Russia”. Enlightening and a bit frightening. Wolves kill just to kill. The gentle term for it is “surplus killing”.

Gunner


32 posted on 02/23/2012 8:48:20 PM PST by weps4ret (Republicans are suffering from Testicular Atrophy!!!)
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To: SkyDancer

Too many elk will be a good problem. They are eatable, wolves, no so much.


33 posted on 02/23/2012 8:49:26 PM PST by Ditter
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To: SkyDancer

Well, government has made sure that *nature* cannot deal with overpopulation by making laws against things like hunting wolves. Don’t forget, humans are part of nature too. Of course, sometimes things get out of balance for various reasons and one population blooms and they die of starvation and disease. Sometimes they even become extinct even without man’s help (amazing that!). Natures way of dealing with over population is to simply let it get out of hand and let them die off when there aren’t enough resources to support them. She doesn’t wring her hands over it. She also doesn’t try to amass a power base and raise funds over it either.


34 posted on 02/24/2012 6:59:50 AM PST by brytlea (An ounce of chocolate is worth a pound of cure)
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To: Hot Tabasco

I don’t get why they don’t do that. Makes a lot more sense. If they don’t have a lot of wolves to kill they can sell the licenses by lottery, it would probably be quite popular.


35 posted on 02/24/2012 7:04:19 AM PST by brytlea (An ounce of chocolate is worth a pound of cure)
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To: weps4ret

I’m going to go out on a limb and say predators in general do that. I’m not defending it, but it’s probably how they keep their skills sharp and teach the younger members of the pack to hunt. But watch cats, and heck, my dog loves to kill lizards. So it should come as no surprise. Predators kill things, and not just enough to eat.


36 posted on 02/24/2012 7:24:25 AM PST by brytlea (An ounce of chocolate is worth a pound of cure)
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To: jazusamo

Shooting animals from planes is lazy and unfair.

They should be hunted and shot from the ground.

Disgusting.


37 posted on 02/24/2012 7:42:24 AM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: Mears

Well, this kill wasn’t about fair or lazy, it was about bringing the wolf population down by the ID Fish & Game and the fed Wildlife Agency in very rough mountainous country.


38 posted on 02/24/2012 9:08:30 AM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: jazusamo

Our forefathers did it in rough,mountainous country.


39 posted on 02/24/2012 9:40:20 AM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: Mears

You’re correct, but they didn’t have helicpters or planes, I’ll bet they wish they had had them. ;-)


40 posted on 02/24/2012 9:58:34 AM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: Mears

These “animals” are a pure killing machine that eats its way through the deer, elk and moose population of any given area. There are areas in Idaho that had wonderful herds of Elk, great deer population as well as moose. NOW NOTHING!
The stupid green weenies of the Fed Fish and Game have screwed up this whole wonderful hunting and hence the income for 1000’s of people in small towns supporting the hunters. I saw it happen!


41 posted on 02/24/2012 4:29:09 PM PST by TaMoDee ( Lassez les bons temps rouler dans les 2012!)
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To: TaMoDee

200 years ago would there have been a balance? If wolves,elk,deer,and moose had been left alone would that have made a difference?

I am not making an argument here. I have never lived in wolf territory and am not a zoologist. I really would like to know.


42 posted on 02/24/2012 5:49:13 PM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: Joe 6-pack

Thanks for the ping Joe. I’ve always hated to read about animals being mass slayed but guess it has to be done. I actually worry about a coyote running out of my pasture at night when I have my little Yorkie out.


43 posted on 02/24/2012 7:51:06 PM PST by potlatch
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To: SJackson

I’m sure this won’t show up on the page, but there is a you tube video of a pair of wolves running thru a Jackson, WY yard, and reports of another running thru Kalispel, Mt. FWS seems to find all kinds of reasons not to count the Yellowstone elk this year


44 posted on 02/27/2012 6:44:56 AM PST by midwyf (Wyoming Native. Environmentalism is a religion too.)
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