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Mystery of Anglo-Saxon teen buried in bed with gold cross
Past Horizons Magazine ^ | Friday, March 16, 2012 | unattributed

Posted on 03/16/2012 11:46:01 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

One of the earliest Anglo-Saxon Christian burial sites in Britain has been discovered in a village outside Cambridge. The grave of a teenage girl from the mid 7th century AD has an extraordinary combination of two extremely rare finds: a 'bed burial' and an early Christian artefact in the form of a stunning gold and garnet cross.

The girl, aged around 16, was buried on an ornamental bed -- a very limited Anglo-Saxon practice of the mid to later 7th century -- with a pectoral Christian cross on her chest, that had probably been sewn onto her clothing. Fashioned from gold and intricately set with cut garnets, only the fifth of its kind ever to be found, the artefact dates this grave to the very early years of the English Church, probably between 650 and 680 AD.

In 597 AD, the pope dispatched St Augustine to England on a mission to convert the pagan Anglo-Saxon kings; a process that was not completed for many decades. Using the latest scientific techniques to analyse this exceptional find could result in a greater understanding of this pivotal period in British history, and the spread of Christianity in eastern England in the Anglo-Saxon period.

To be buried in this elaborate way with such a valuable artefact tells us that this girl was undoubtedly high status, probably nobility or even royalty.

Was this teenage girl an early Christian convert, a standard-bearer for the new God? "Christian conversion began at the top and percolated down," says Dr Sam Lucy, a specialist in Anglo-Saxon burial from Newnham College, Cambridge.

(Excerpt) Read more at pasthorizonspr.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs
Gold and garnet cross after conservation. Image: Cambridge Archaeological Unit

Mystery of Anglo-Saxon teen buried in bed with gold cross

1 posted on 03/16/2012 11:46:12 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
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LR’s link:

http://news.yahoo.com/uk-experts-7th-century-teen-buried-her-bed-002203088.html

The fountainhead:

http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/mystery-of-anglo-saxon-teen-buried-in-bed-with-gold-cross/


2 posted on 03/16/2012 11:50:50 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Stunning. The find and the cross!

Looks like an early version of this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_cross


3 posted on 03/16/2012 11:50:50 AM PDT by Claud
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anglo-saxon bed burial
Google

4 posted on 03/16/2012 11:51:12 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.)
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To: Claud

They did some fine work, or had the cash to pay for fine work.


5 posted on 03/16/2012 11:51:46 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.)
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Grief fills the room up of my absent child,
Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me,
Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words,
Remembers me of all his gracious parts,
Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form.

Constance in King John (William Shakespeare)


6 posted on 03/16/2012 11:51:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.)
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To: Lauren BaRecall; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks Lauren BaRecall. Used a different source, better photos. :')

Here are a few sidebars, some are more relevant than others of course. :') To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


7 posted on 03/16/2012 11:52:11 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Don’t remove the cross. She might be a vampire.


8 posted on 03/16/2012 11:53:52 AM PDT by DannyTN
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To: SunkenCiv

Other images and details here:

http://hefenfelth.wordpress.com/2012/03/15/7th-century-english-princess-grave-revealed/


9 posted on 03/16/2012 12:24:09 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: SunkenCiv

A fascinating find.


10 posted on 03/16/2012 12:32:17 PM PDT by Neoliberalnot (Marxism works well only with the uneducated and the unarmed.)
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To: SunkenCiv

-—the very early years of the English Church, probably between 650 and 680 AD-—

1360 years was a pretty good run.


11 posted on 03/16/2012 12:36:37 PM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: SunkenCiv

It`s a Maltese Cross 500 years before its time.


12 posted on 03/16/2012 12:48:52 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem? ?? Who knew?)
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To: SunkenCiv
Written, IIRC, shortly after the death of Shakespeare's young son Hamnet.

He put a lot of himself into his work. In Hamlet, I think he is reflected best in Horatio rather than in the Prince himself.

13 posted on 03/16/2012 12:52:51 PM PDT by ExGeeEye (Islam: a transnational fascist government that demands worship.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Someday they will dig up your grave and wonder what your life was like.


14 posted on 03/16/2012 12:54:52 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thre is a``C`` at the right top of the bottom cross segnment on the back side, & an ``E`` at the left segment of the right part of the cross where it joins the middle circle.

C = Christus?
E = ?


15 posted on 03/16/2012 12:58:24 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem in England? ?? Who knew?)
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To: SunkenCiv

``E`` = Etiam?
\
``The history of the reformation of the Church of England` - Google Books Result
Gilbert Burnet, Edward Nares, Nicholas Pocock - 1679 - 864 pages
``CHRISTUS ETIAM instituendo Sacramentum hoc Corporis & Sanguinis siii,inquir
,Hocquo- tiescunq} facitis, facite in raeam commemorationem``...


16 posted on 03/16/2012 1:04:02 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem in England? ?? Who knew?)
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To: bunkerhill7

Also what looks like a five-pointed star and a crux ansata on the top cross segment, tilted at roughly the same angle as that C.


17 posted on 03/16/2012 1:09:17 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero

Yes could be correct-

also

13 x 4 garnets = 52 weeks in a year
10 garnets in circle = 10
62 garnets
gold balls 7 x 4 = 28

7 balls = 7 days in a week
4 weeks in a month?
28 days?


18 posted on 03/16/2012 1:30:57 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem in England? ?? Who knew?)
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To: Cicero

Could be an OMEGA Gk. letter directly opposite the ``E`` on the left side back on the circle joint?


19 posted on 03/16/2012 1:35:12 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem in England? ?? Who knew?)
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To: bunkerhill7

I don’t see the omega, but the numbers are interesting. The seven-day week is essentially religious, being derived from the Genesis account of the Six Days of Creation and the Sabbath day of rest.

You might want a reminder of which day Sunday comes around, if you don’t have printed calendars, computers, or newspapers to tell you what day of the week it is.


20 posted on 03/16/2012 1:44:05 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero

Could be ``J`` directly above the ``C`` and at the bottom rt. of the top segment?


21 posted on 03/16/2012 1:56:33 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 (Knights of Jerusalem in England? ?? Who knew?)
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To: SunkenCiv

English Church? In those years, it would be the Roman Catholic Church. Imagine being converted by St. Augustine, or his emmisary!

Beautiful cross.


22 posted on 03/16/2012 2:06:13 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: GeronL

One of the most humorous books I have ever read is David Macaulay’s Motel of the Mysteries.

http://www.amazon.com/Motel-Mysteries-David-Macaulay/dp/0395284252/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_7


23 posted on 03/16/2012 2:19:17 PM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: SunkenCiv; netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; ...
In 597 AD, the pope dispatched St Augustine to England on a mission to convert the pagan Anglo-Saxon kings; a process that was not completed for many decades. Using the latest scientific techniques to analyse this exceptional find could result in a greater understanding of this pivotal period in British history, and the spread of Christianity in eastern England in the Anglo-Saxon period.

Catholic Ping
Please freepmail me if you want on/off this list


24 posted on 03/16/2012 2:19:53 PM PDT by NYer (He who hides in his heart the remembrance of wrongs is like a man who feeds a snake on his chest. St)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
The town in the Cotswold's that my family originated in was founded in 668 as a Priory by Tetta who ever that was. I often wondered what it was like to live in a town where everyone had the same last name,
25 posted on 03/16/2012 2:35:11 PM PDT by Little Bill (Sorry)
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To: kalee

That sounds hilarious


26 posted on 03/16/2012 2:37:58 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: SunkenCiv

You’re welcome! And that’s ok - I’m going to have fun exploring all those links later. :-)


27 posted on 03/16/2012 2:48:55 PM PDT by Lauren BaRecall (I declare for Santorum)
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To: GeronL

I’m surprised that her skull (and teeth) survived in such good shape.


28 posted on 03/16/2012 2:50:47 PM PDT by Lauren BaRecall (I declare for Santorum)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

The first Council of Arles was held in 314, bishops from the western part of the empire including three from Britain attended.

If the church did not exist in England before Augustine who were they?


29 posted on 03/16/2012 2:57:41 PM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: kalee

Culdees


30 posted on 03/16/2012 3:11:08 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: kalee
If the church did not exist in England before Augustine who were they?

The early English church was essentially wiped out by the various pagan invaders, of whom the Anglo-Saxons were merely the most prominent.

31 posted on 03/17/2012 4:25:55 AM PDT by jimtorr
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