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The Children of Linux
Unixmen ^ | 18 March 2012 | Chris Jones

Posted on 03/19/2012 7:37:40 AM PDT by ShadowAce

Linux. It’s really not a hard operating system to learn. In fact, that very first statement is wrong. Linux is not an operating system. Linux is a kernel which is used as the very core to build an operating system around. But these are the things that children of today are not learning. Not in public school systems anyway.

When I was a teenager, I was very interested in computers. I looked forward to and really enjoyed my Information Technology classes. But it wasn’t just the computers that I was interested. The more I got involved with them, the more I wanted to know about what goes on to make them work. Or to be precise, the operating system.

It’s a long time ago now, but I remember when I was talking to my teacher one day he briefly said something about Unix. A term that I had never heard until then. But after that one time, nothing more was ever mentioned. At the time, I really didn’t know anything about it. But I was intrigued of what this ‘Unix’ could be. It was some years later before I got my first glimpse of anything to do with Linux-The accepted modern alternative to Unix. My first encounter with Linux was SUSE 8, which came free on a magazine at the time. I might mention, the magazine was not actually meant to be giving the OS away on the front cover as they were. But anyway, that’s a story for another day. But ever since my first experience with SUSE 8, I never let go of Linux and have always been involved with it in one form another.

Now as you all know and are well aware, Windows is basically the only operating system taught in our public schools these days. I understand that Windows is the industry standard and I can accept that. But I don’t believe teaching children how to use Windows, solely, is the way forward to a positive IT future. Or if Linux even got a mention, it would be progress. My high school years were well into 15 years ago and it is now 2012 and nothing has changed. Public schools are still teaching children Windows and (unintentionally) presenting it as the only operating system you’ll ever need to learn and use.

There arises many issues and setbacks with the aforementioned. One of the primary reasons, being the IT teachers themselves having no concept of how to use Linux or even being aware of it. There are many issues from many different angles.
We are very lucky in some ways that we live in a world of fast broadband access where anyone can download and install Linux for free. When I was in high school, a 56k dial-up internet connection was a true privilege and there was only one computer in the whole school that had internet access. I’m probably still on that list to use that computer as the list was always a mile long.

But all my 10 years Linux experience that I have today has all been self-taught. I have put myself through free courses and done plenty of tinkering, configuring and certainly my fair share of breaking systems. And my wife yelling at me because I’ve broken the computer once again! And that continues to this day. Why? Because Linux offer endless learning capabilities. And despite being a 10 year Linux user, I am still learning things on Linux on a daily basis and still intentionally break things to see how they work in detail. In fact, I am currently experimenting with Arch Linux. A very different experience from the usual mainstream Linux distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora. But that is my point. There’s endless possibilities of learning when it comes to Linux. And perhaps that’s the problem when it comes to public schools and teaching Linux. It is such a large scale eco-system with so many different facets, where would one begin to teach. I see that as an excuse for not teaching it. And not a valid reason. Because even giving children a glimpse of Linux in their high school studies will no doubt have a flow-on effect to further private studies and courses.

Linux must be taught to future high school students. Otherwise we are going to experience a severe shortage of knowledgeable Linux administrators in the near future. We are already seeing the first signs of this problem. And unless we start arming the young nerds of today with the knowledge they require to make up their own mind, we are going to have problems. If things don’t change soon, I can only hope that today’s students come out of schooling as open-minded as I did and choose to at least give Linux a try and see for themselves the true raw power of free and open-source computing that is modern Unix, Linux.


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: linux
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To: central_va

yy
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51 posted on 03/19/2012 9:17:32 AM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Man is not free unless government is limited. ~Ronald Reagan)
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To: Dr. Sivana
N00b.

Agreed, unless you have used a 150 baud acoustic modem and have had to play with stop bits and parity settings, you can't really appreciate what we have today.

N00bs - all of you
110 Baud Teletype

52 posted on 03/19/2012 9:22:19 AM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: ShadowAce

Perhaps Mr. Jones needs to put some of his energy into mastering grade school English topics such as subject-verb agreements, what constitutes as sentence, and punctuation. Oh, but those are soft skills that technies are not required to master.


53 posted on 03/19/2012 9:23:29 AM PDT by MIchaelTArchangel (Romney ruined Massachusetts. Now he wants to ruin the nation.)
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To: Explorer89

Though I have not been involved with it, I understand that LISP is the preferred language for neural network researchers, and that they have come a long long way in the last years. I am surprised none of the super-IT guys here on the thread didn’t reply to you.


54 posted on 03/19/2012 9:26:43 AM PDT by AFPhys ((Praying for our troops, our citizens, that the Bible and Freedom become basis of the US law again))
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To: discostu
Windows is taught in schools because it IS the only OS you NEED to learn and use.

Engineers and scientists must learn and use UNIX. Its operation, at its heart command-line based, is very different from Windows.

55 posted on 03/19/2012 9:31:14 AM PDT by Yossarian ("All the charm of Nixon. All the competency of Carter." - SF Chronicle comment post on Obama)
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To: ShadowAce

Wold Class Software(&hardware) = when it has both Windows and Linux drivers..

Note: Most Linux software is FREE... as is the version of Linux OS..


56 posted on 03/19/2012 9:35:44 AM PDT by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole...)
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To: Yossarian

Yep. My spare XServ is a 1,1. I’ve already tried rEFIt on it.


57 posted on 03/19/2012 9:40:08 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
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To: Dr. Sivana
Agreed, unless you have used a 150 baud acoustic modem and have had to play with stop bits and parity settings, you can't really appreciate what we have today.

Not to mention selecting your transfer protocol. ZMODEM changed my life. :)
58 posted on 03/19/2012 9:41:38 AM PDT by andyk (Tax credits for your kids == Welfare)
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To: Vermont Lt
My first computer was a complete building - a BIG building! The IBM Q7 Computer used for the Norad SAGE Air Defense System. I was a maintenance man for this beast for 7 years. You actually had to know how a computer worked - down to the and-gate level - in order to troubleshoot and repair this monstrocity. Today, when there is a display problem, a kid can just change the entire display system with the swap of a card. Back then, you had to troubleshoot it down to which flip-flop or which leg of a specific and/OR gate was failing. Those were the days my friend!
59 posted on 03/19/2012 9:44:58 AM PDT by JaguarXKE
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To: Dr. Sivana
900 baud cradle was the first one I had a chance to play with.

Good times.

60 posted on 03/19/2012 9:51:52 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
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To: Yossarian

It’s not really that different. All OSes have basically the same stuff they’re trying to do: organize files, apply security, give applications access to the hardware, manage memory. And there’s still stuff to be done in Windows on the command line, just solved an issue on the MILs Windows 7 box from the command line last week.


61 posted on 03/19/2012 9:52:19 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: Dr. Sivana

That would be 110 baud! Most acoustic modems could do up to 300 baud though. But for real fun - 029 Keypunch or 110 baud with a KSR28!


62 posted on 03/19/2012 10:00:27 AM PDT by fremont_steve
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To: ShadowAce
FTA: Linux is a kernel which is used as the very core to build an operating system around. But these are the things that children of today are not learning. Not in public school systems anyway.

Writing this on a laptop running Fedora Verne; the kiddos run Fedora as well, even the youngest. We homeschool, though. It's very simple: Start teaching command line stuff as needed, and before you know it, you child knows more than you do :)

63 posted on 03/19/2012 10:06:17 AM PDT by mountainbunny (Seamus Sez: "Good dogs don't let their masters vote for Mitt!")
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To: MIchaelTArchangel

To be fair, comparatively few people understand the basic rules of grammar these days. Somewhere in the rush to push kids into science and math, we forgot how important it is to be able to communicate.

People balk at Linux for the same reason they’re afraid to use no-contract cell phone service: fear of change and belief of the misinformation they’re fed. Unless we can change human nature, Linux will remain a tool for geeks and the odd free thinker.


64 posted on 03/19/2012 10:06:28 AM PDT by Cato in PA (1/26/12: Bloody Thursday)
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To: fremont_steve

65 posted on 03/19/2012 10:12:55 AM PDT by jaydubya2
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To: ShadowAce

Sorry.

Not ready for prime-time.

Nothing like typing in

MAN RENAME

and then having to decipher twelve pages of rubbish.
That’s if you’re lucky and it’s ONLY 12 pages!!


66 posted on 03/19/2012 10:18:38 AM PDT by djf (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2801220/posts)
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To: discostu
Windows is taught in schools because it IS the only OS you NEED to learn and use.

Define "NEED". We didn't "need" to go to the moon or invent cures for diseases, strictly speaking, but we did because we have a desire for innovation and excellence.

Windows is the minimum. It's the floor, the bottom.

If we want to produce engineers and scientists, we need to teach Linux. Students need to know how their computers work and how to manipulate them.

If we want to produce critical thinkers, we should encourage the use of operating systems which require critical thinking and problem solving.

67 posted on 03/19/2012 10:18:55 AM PDT by mountainbunny (Seamus Sez: "Good dogs don't let their masters vote for Mitt!")
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To: douginthearmy

Nah - Sentence Number 1 is a true statement - more accurately, The Linux GUI is not a hard thing to learn.

Sentence number 2 is merely an indicator that the author is a follower of Richard Stallman who got apoplectic about the fact that HIS BABY got renamed, and he didn’t get all the credit.

For the record - from someone who has been using Linux since BEFORE the SLS distribution - Linux is both the Kernel AND the collection of tools on top of it that make it a useable computing environment...it’s not gnu/linux.

As for the original article’s point. Uhm - he forgot that most schools are actually Apple territory! And now-a-days that is Unix too!


68 posted on 03/19/2012 10:21:06 AM PDT by fremont_steve
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To: varmintman
Ubuntu would be more for developers and/or power users. Puppy is terribly fast even on late 90s or early 2000s computers.

How about Lubuntu?

69 posted on 03/19/2012 10:25:51 AM PDT by Kennard
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To: Explorer89

The ELISP variant of LISP is used to customize EMACS and Xemacs and I use it a fair amount.


70 posted on 03/19/2012 10:29:05 AM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: mountainbunny

I actually answered that question in the very next sentence, perhaps you should have read the entire post.

Students DO NOT need to know how their computer works. You’re in the old pre-appliance thinking, we’re in the appliance age of computing. The computer is just a tool people put data into and get data out of, the average person doesn’t need to know how they work anymore than the average person knows how microwaves, florescent lights or the internal combustion engine work. They need to know how to USE it, but you don’t need to know what’s behind the buttons to use something.

Not teaching OSes that the students will almost certainly not encounter in adulthood isn’t preventing critical thinkers. If they want to go learn other OSes they can, nobody is stopping them, and you don’t need to know ANY OS at all to be a critical thinker. It’s just an OS, not a religion, in spite of what some Nix-weenies and Mac-heads want you to think.


71 posted on 03/19/2012 10:50:33 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: JaguarXKE

God, we sound like old guys sitting on the front porch. My career has 15 more years. Talk about a business that has just grown like a damned weed.


72 posted on 03/19/2012 10:51:52 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (I just don't like anything about the President. And I don't think he's a nice guy.)
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To: martin_fierro; brownsfan

Well, that was a waste of time and a DVD. I downloaded Ubuntu 10.04.04 and burned it to a DVD on my main Dell laptop. At reboot, it recognized my wireless card. But, I’d want to run it on my Toshiba which is about 6 mos newer than the Dell, and still in warranty.

I booted the disc on the Toshiba. It does not recognize my wireless card, a Realtek RTL8188CE, 802.11n PCI-E NIC.

I’m now downloading Mint and will put that on a stick, so if it doesn’t recognize the card as well, I’ll not be out another DVD.

This is what I meant in my remarks about Linux.


73 posted on 03/19/2012 11:06:51 AM PDT by bcsco
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To: andyk
Not to mention selecting your transfer protocol. ZMODEM changed my life. :)

Kermit forever!

74 posted on 03/19/2012 11:16:14 AM PDT by zeugma (Those of us who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living.)
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To: hoosierham

>>>Driver’s ed teaches only how to (hopefully) safely operate the car;little or nothing is taught of what goes on under the hood.

This analogy doesn’t fit: there are two types of computer classes. One for the majority of students who just want to learn Microsoft Word, etc. (the one that fits your analogy). And another group of eager students who want to learn to program and hot rod their own game computers (the case that doesn’t fit your analogy). For this second group (any programming class) should learn how an operating system works under the covers.


75 posted on 03/19/2012 11:20:33 AM PDT by Hop A Long Cassidy
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To: bcsco
I booted the disc on the Toshiba. It does not recognize my wireless card, a Realtek RTL8188CE, 802.11n PCI-E NIC.

I’m now downloading Mint and will put that on a stick, so if it doesn’t recognize the card as well, I’ll not be out another DVD.

This is what I meant in my remarks about Linux.

Generally speaking, you'll want to look up wireless network cards to determine if they are supported by the distro you want to use. Wireless network cards are problematic because some manufacturers of the wireless chipsets are very unhelfpful to the Linux developers who maintain and develop drivers for them.

I'd put the fault on the manufacturer rather than the Linux developers. I don't buy stuff that's not supported. I figure its best to vote with my dollars.

You probably also want to use Google, as it can really be your friend in such things. From the first link on a google search of "Linux Realtek RTL8188CE", you'll find this...


Both the windows and Ubuntu drivers are at:
http://www.realtek.com.tw/downloads/...true#RTL8188CE

A little further down the page is this...

After some trial following instructions on this post this is what worked for me:

1) Go to Rhttp://www.realtek.com.tw/downloads/...true#RTL8188CE and download the tar.gz file

2) open terminal and do 'sudo apt-get install build-essential'

3) Follow the readme file's instructions:

  • sudo su
  • make
  • make install
  • reboot
When I logged in again I was on WiFi....

 


76 posted on 03/19/2012 11:43:44 AM PDT by zeugma (Those of us who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living.)
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To: bcsco

Give PCLinuxOS a try. I had no experience in Linux when I began experimenting with a number of distros last year. PCLinuxOS was the most user-friendly for me. I installed it on six computers — three desktops and three laptops. No connectivity issues with any of the installs.

http://www.pclinuxos.com/

They have a good support forum also for newbie questions.


77 posted on 03/19/2012 11:54:20 AM PDT by kevao
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To: Vermont Lt

But I AM an old guy sitting on the front porch!


78 posted on 03/19/2012 12:04:46 PM PDT by JaguarXKE
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To: Hop A Long Cassidy
>>>Driver’s ed teaches only how to (hopefully) safely operate the car;little or nothing is taught of what goes on under the hood.

This analogy doesn’t fit: there are two types of computer classes. One for the majority of students who just want to learn Microsoft Word, etc. (the one that fits your analogy). And another group of eager students who want to learn to program and hot rod their own game computers (the case that doesn’t fit your analogy). For this second group (any programming class) should learn how an operating system works under the covers.

The analogy works, because most schools (or school systems; it's not at every campus) also have classes in auto repair. The basic class teaches a basic life skill that everyone should have, the advanced class a job skill that some students may wish to pursue.

79 posted on 03/19/2012 12:08:42 PM PDT by ReignOfError
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To: discostu
Students DO NOT need to know how their computer works. You’re in the old pre-appliance thinking, we’re in the appliance age of computing.

Yes, and all those appliances are built by elves. Certainly not by people who were in high school years ago. And the future of those "appliances" certainly won't be built and coded by people who are in high school now.

Besides, it's not like the next generation of code hackers won't be there if they don't learn it in American high schools. They're learning it in Korean, Chinese, Indian and Japanese (and even Russian) high schools.

80 posted on 03/19/2012 12:13:29 PM PDT by ReignOfError
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To: ShadowAce

bkmk


81 posted on 03/19/2012 12:20:46 PM PDT by Sergio (An object at rest cannot be stopped! - The Evil Midnight Bomber What Bombs at Midnight)
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To: ReignOfError

Wow what a long list of idiotic assumptions built into bad sarcasm all having no basis in the passage quoted. Just because somebody didn’t learn Linux in high school doesn’t mean they’ll never learn it or can’t program it. I’m in a generations programmers who didn’t learn Linux in high school, BECAUSE THEY ALL GRADUATED IN THE 80S, and they seem to be programming just fine, many are even making apps for Linux.


82 posted on 03/19/2012 12:33:33 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: discostu; ReignOfError
Students DO NOT need to know how their computer works. You’re in the old pre-appliance thinking, we’re in the appliance age of computing.

If they want to be consumers, you're correct. If they want to be producers, you are entirely wrong. If they are content to wait for someone to write solutions for them, you are correct. If they want to solve their own problems, you are entirely wrong.

You’re in the old pre-appliance thinking, we’re in the appliance age of computing.

I know how all of my appliances work, and can fix those which are fixable. Windows users can not (generally) say the same about their systems.

The computer is just a tool people put data into and get data out of, the average person doesn’t need to know how they work anymore than the average person knows how microwaves, florescent lights or the internal combustion engine work.

First off, you're wrong. When I was in Home Ec, we learned how all of the appliances worked and how to do minor repairs. How can you know if your stove is working optimally if you don't know how it works at all? I know how internal combustion, microwaves, and florescent lights work from physics class. They teach all of that in high school. Or they used to.

Secondly, it takes more than "average" people with average educations to be the engineers and scientists of the world. It takes innovative, better-than-average minds.

I am not satisfied with average. Why are you? More to the point, why should we be satisfied with average results from America's students? Many are capable of much more than average.

I started teaching command line Linux to the six year old this year. You'd be surprised how easily they pick things up at this age. Of course, we strive for excellence, not "make do" and not "average".

Not teaching OSes that the students will almost certainly not encounter in adulthood isn’t preventing critical thinkers. If they want to go learn other OSes they can, nobody is stopping them, and you don’t need to know ANY OS at all to be a critical thinker. It’s just an OS, not a religion, in spite of what some Nix-weenies and Mac-heads want you to think.

Well, you've got me there. If we teach the minimum and demand very little, most American students will almost certainly never encounter various OSes in adulthood. The menial jobs they will land will not require much that way. So you're right. If we raise another generation of people who don't know how things work, they will have no need for anything difficult.

83 posted on 03/19/2012 12:40:55 PM PDT by mountainbunny (Seamus Sez: "Good dogs don't let their masters vote for Mitt!")
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To: bcsco
Try these instead:

Knoppix
Mepis
Kanotix

All of these are available as bootable .iso formats, so they will not touch your system while you evaluate them. For older machines Puppy and DSL (Damn Small Linux) are the most popular from what I gather, but do not make use of the most well-known repositories so I would hesitate to put them on newer machines. If someone knows of a small distro for older machines that use the .deb format (Debian) I would love to hear about it.

84 posted on 03/19/2012 12:56:24 PM PDT by Utilizer (What does not kill you... -can sometimes damage you QUITE severely.)
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To: discostu

There are certainly a lot of self-taught programmers, or programmers who didn’t get started until college. Just not enough of them. Have you looked at the H1B visa numbers lately?

I’m not suggesting that programming should be part of the curriculum for everyone, and I don’t share the OP’s dedication to Linux as the only way to teach programming. But it ought to be available as an option (and as part of a profession-focused education that does not require a four-year degree, but that’s another subject).


85 posted on 03/19/2012 12:59:10 PM PDT by ReignOfError
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To: bcsco

Oh, and, just a thought mate; rewritable dvd’s are available, and possibly a better choice when trying out several different OS’s for evaluations. Worked out great on this end so far.


86 posted on 03/19/2012 12:59:24 PM PDT by Utilizer (What does not kill you... -can sometimes damage you QUITE severely.)
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To: zeugma; kevao; Utilizer

Well, downloaded Mint 12 and installed on a stick. It opens on my Toshiba and recognizes my wireless connection where Ubuntu 10.04 didn’t. BUT. I can find no way to add a printer. I scanned Google and see that Ubuntu 11/Mint 12 have a problem with their printer installer. There ya go...

Sorry folks, but with stuff like this, Linux isn’t ready for prime time. This merely shows why Linux continues to be a geek system and nothing but frustration for the average Joe.

Oh, not to mention the continued reliance on terminal/sudo commands and such (that’s so DOS 3.0...)


87 posted on 03/19/2012 1:11:04 PM PDT by bcsco
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To: mountainbunny

And again I refer you to the second sentence in the post you originally replied to but demonstrably did not bother to read: “Sure if you get into the business you MIGHT wind up in front of a different OS, but only a small percentage of the kids will wind up in the business, and thanks to Windows’ dominance most of the jobs in the business are on Windows, if they go to a non-Windows shop they can learn it there...” You CAN be a producer and not learn Nix. I AM a producer, been a producer for nearly 20 years, and I never touch Nix. Because Windows dominates the desktop space it also dominates the application space and therefore dominates the job space. I could jump to a Nix shop if I had to, because I’ve been around long enough to be able to ramp up to any OS in a couple of months (once you’ve used half a dozen they all are pretty much the same), but I don’t need to, and most folks don’t.

Do you know “how” your appliances work or do you understand what’s going on? There’s a massive difference. And actually only being able to fix those that are “fixable” shows you only know “how” they work. If you can’t actually build a microwave cannon from parts you don’t really know how your microwave works (same here), so you are just using it like an appliance, just like a Windows user.

Minor repairs != knowing how it works. Build from parts == knowing how it works. When you’re talking about knowing what’s going on under the covers that’s what you’re talking about. Most of that stuff on your list they NEVER taught in the main section of high school. The closest you’ve got is auto shop, which is an elective.

High school is for teaching average people. Above average people figure crap out on their own. Best programmer I know never took any classes in high school or even college, books, lots of books.

Anybody that’s not satisfied with average doesn’t understand math, average is average for a reason, a reason that cannot be fought. Those capable of more than average will, because they’re already above average. They’ll learn from books, they’ll qualify for accelerated schools, they’ll join hobby clubs. The generation that’s primarily responsible for cranking out the software that runs the world today didn’t learn ANY computer stuff in high school because it wasn’t there in most schools, and even when computers were there they got out of high school before there was Windows or Linux so clearly people can learn this stuff outside of high school.

OSes aren’t that hard, even on the command line the modern age is easy. Try those funky Commodore 64 commands, that’s a learning curve.

It’s not teaching the minimum, it’s teaching the useful for the most of them. 99% of the kids in high school today will never sit down in front of a Linux box in their lives. Why teach them something that will never be of any use to them ever? Should we teach all high school kids how to run a thresher? Of course not, because most of them won’t, and the ones that will can learn it elsewhere. Who said anything about menial jobs? I specifically mentioned desk jobs, you know, where people work with Windows computers. Most people don’t know how most things work, that doesn’t stop them from using them, and it doesn’t stop us from getting plenty of people who know how they work well enough to produce the next generation of those items. We still make tons of cars in this country in spite of the fact that the vast majority of American have no freaking clue what actually happens when the turn the key.


88 posted on 03/19/2012 1:15:09 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: ReignOfError

It IS available as an option in most high school, all colleges, and numerous trade schools. And doing it in college doesn’t necessitate a four year degree, the vast majority of people entering the field do so without a degree, they take the classes they want and or need and get a job. That’s how I did it, 2 years in focused on classes and instructors a friend pointed me to and into the company that friend and one of the instructors worked at. Any numerical problem with the number of programmers we’re producing isn’t because there aren’t enough ways for them to learn, it’s because there aren’t enough people that want to. Your top end number will always be the people that want to, and in this day and age with so many ways to learn so much computer stuff pretty much anybody that wants to is in.


89 posted on 03/19/2012 1:21:01 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: bcsco; brownsfan; zeugma; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Dude, you've really got to use more mainstream hardware. (ducking/running)

Generally speaking, you'll want to look up wireless network cards to determine if they are supported by the distro you want to use. Wireless network cards are problematic because some manufacturers of the wireless chipsets are very unhelfpful to the Linux developers who maintain and develop drivers for them.

True dat. I've found the chips in Linksys-style cards (Broadcomm?) to be VERY Linux-unfriendly.

This cheapie no-name brand works well, though

90 posted on 03/19/2012 1:27:23 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: DeFault User; Dr. Sivana
Agreed, unless you have used a 150 baud acoustic modem and have had to play with stop bits and parity settings, you can't really appreciate what we have today.

I remember downloading text and seeing it come on the screen one character at a time. Ahh.. the good old days. 56K my tail!:) Blinding speed compared to those early day modems. My first computer was a Tandy color computer with a tape drive and a TV that doubled as a monitor.

91 posted on 03/19/2012 1:35:47 PM PDT by calex59
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To: martin_fierro

lol!

I still have a 300 baud Hayes Smartmodem in the closet. It would probably work, if I could find a computer with a serial port to hook up to it.


92 posted on 03/19/2012 1:53:06 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: FreedomPoster
Think this would work?

Taken in the storage room just off my office about 5 minutes ago...

93 posted on 03/19/2012 2:06:42 PM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
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To: Dead Corpse

You are mistaking an attack on the Web browser with an attack on the OS. The unix OS is safe from attack if the attacker does not have the root passwd


94 posted on 03/19/2012 2:14:19 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: discostu
For end users I guess windows will do.

OTH, If you are building high end SEVERS nothing but UNIX will do. The fact that a server would need a graphics card (windows) to interact with the system admin is a joke. we don't even get a graphics card in our unix servers. Useless waste of CPU.

95 posted on 03/19/2012 2:18:06 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

But we aren’t teaching high school kids how to build high end servers.


96 posted on 03/19/2012 2:26:43 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: Explorer89
When I learned LISP (does that even still exist?)

Yes. But have you heard of "blub"?

http://www.paulgraham.com/avg.html

97 posted on 03/19/2012 2:37:38 PM PDT by cynwoody
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To: central_va
You are mistaking an attack on the Web browser with an attack on the OS.

A successful attack on a Unix user's web browser can still do plenty of damage. It takes root to rm my /bin/ls, but I can fix that easily without a backup. However, an attacker needn't be root to rm -rf ~, and I might not have a backup. Plus, some of that stuff might even be confidential.

98 posted on 03/19/2012 2:47:54 PM PDT by cynwoody
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To: brownsfan
I setup VB on my Ubuntu box and had XP, Puppy, Watt OS and android going all at once. It was a lot of fun.

I bought a new Win 7-equipped laptop and it wouldn't play nice with Mint because it had four primary partitions, so I nuked Win 7 and installed 64-bit Mint 12...It screams.

99 posted on 03/19/2012 3:00:16 PM PDT by 4mer Liberal
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To: central_va

Nope. I’m not. More people click on malformed links via email than following clicks off a web page...


100 posted on 03/19/2012 5:11:00 PM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
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