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Google Announces The Return Of Morse Code
gCaptain ^ | 1 April 12 | gCaptain Staff

Posted on 04/01/2012 2:18:11 PM PDT by GATOR NAVY

The QWERTY keyboard was invented in 1874 and yet it is still used today, largely unchanged. What’s more, the keyboard doesn’t come close to the speed and effectiveness of a simple technology used on ships over a centry ago… morse code.

Today, April 1st, Google is introducing a new input method designed by the great-great grandson of Samuel F. B. Morse: Gmail Tap for Android and iOS. Gmail Tap takes the keyboard from 26 keys to just two. Every letter of the alphabet is represented by a simple pattern of dots and dashes, and once you know them you can type without even looking at your screen. This makes it ideal for situations where you need to discreetly send emails, such as when you’re on a date or in a meeting with your boss. Watch the video to learn more:

(Excerpt) Read more at gcaptain.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: 0401; aprilfools; whathathgodwrought
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To: cuban leaf

“I find that incredibly hard to believe. For starters, an “O” is three long dashes. By the time you are done with those, a good texter could type a word while the morse operator has produced one letter.”

When morse is done properly at high speed you don’t here it as individual dots and dashes but more like music tones of dits and dahs. Each letter has a recognizable rhythm. Good operators hear the rhythm as complete words.

Usually musicians make the best code operators.


41 posted on 04/01/2012 4:12:44 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Ax

Try sending over the air. CW is a kick. Ya never know who you’ll pickup, or where.

HF bands have lots of CW ops.


42 posted on 04/01/2012 4:14:11 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Okieshooter
“di/dot or 1/0 is all binary” Yep, when you think about it our internet communcations are using something very much like morse code.

Actually it is a direct descendant ...Morse code evolved in to 5 bit teletype code...teletype code evolved in to 7 bit ASCII and 8 bit EBCDIC ...

Bottom line the first "two state"/binary electronic encoding for transmission/transport of data was Morse

And the Internet is just that a data transmission/transport system...

PC's process data ...the Internet is mass hi-speed transports of data for PC's to have something to process

43 posted on 04/01/2012 4:25:06 PM PDT by tophat9000 (American is Barack Oaken)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

I’ve tried both. While I don’t find any speed advantage to Dvorak over QWERTY, I find that there’s less strain on my left hand.

The reason I don’t use Dvorak, tho, is that re-mapping the keyboard makes using Emacs nearly impossible. I don’t think of what letter I’m typing for a particular command in Emacs, I just know muscle patterns to do some editing function.


44 posted on 04/01/2012 4:25:16 PM PDT by NVDave
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To: Okieshooter

Good operators hear the rhythm as complete words.

Usually musicians make the best code operators.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Also doesn’t hurt to be a little ‘whacko’....

I used to get into a ‘trance’ copying long grouped messages but was able to carry on a conversation while doing so.

I also did some encryption/decryption so I did have to be accurate when copying....

3 dits 4 dits 2 dits daaah
Radio Radio RAH RAH RAH

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs back
123456789 times.

I copied Morse for 20 years and it didn’t affect me a bit
Did it. Did it. Did it.


45 posted on 04/01/2012 4:25:27 PM PDT by xrmusn ((6/98) Let's start from scratch by voting ALL incumbents out.)
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To: GATOR NAVY
Woo Hoo!

I always wanted to learn Morse Code.

And And Happy April Fool's Day to you too, Google.

46 posted on 04/01/2012 4:33:22 PM PDT by Publius6961 (It’s easy to make phony promises you can’t keep. - Obama, Feb23, 2012)
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To: GATOR NAVY

REAL telegraphy uses clicks and clacks, not beeps. And yes, REAL telegraphers use the American Morse code, not the International code.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSqRSNQwDwg


47 posted on 04/01/2012 4:40:38 PM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: GATOR NAVY

Learning Morse was what I hated most in my training. The RAN expected all officers to be competent with it and there were certainly times when it came in handy and I did use it. But it took a lot longer than most of our other components for me to reach competency.

Everybody is using custom tones now but a few years ago, it used to really impress my students when I pointed out that every time they got a text message on their phones (they all seemed to have the same phone) the beeping said “SMS” in Morse. They thought that was really cool - that it wasn’t just a random beep.


48 posted on 04/01/2012 4:41:24 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: xrmusn

I just had a block against above 20 wpm. I could copy in my head faster, but could not remember what I copied, so I had to write it down and 20 wpm was as fast as I could write. Of course I could send faster since I knew where I was going.

The way I built my speed for the extra class test was lots of on the air qso’s. Lots more fun than listening to code tapes.

Typing was out because I was never able to type and copy at the same time.


49 posted on 04/01/2012 4:42:42 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Okieshooter

Typing was out because I was never able to type and copy at the same time.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
The Navy required one to copy on a mill.
The Army and Marines basically by stick — I guess its bad enough lugging all the important gear (weapons, ammo etc) in and to the field, and not much room for typewriter and not many ‘level places to put it’.

I was fortunate that I took typing in HS (not exactly a guy ‘thing’ in 1955) but oddly enough ‘they’ (instructors) would rather you couldn’t type or not very well at the least.

I went to CT”R” School (Intercept operators) and ended up as RM in the Fleet with a Speed Key license (CNFJ 5-61)


50 posted on 04/01/2012 4:57:17 PM PDT by xrmusn ((6/98) Let's start from scratch by voting ALL incumbents out.)
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To: GATOR NAVY

At 1:00 this morning the neighbor’s car alarm went off. It actually “tapped” out SOS.


51 posted on 04/01/2012 5:18:11 PM PDT by Excellence (9/11 was an act of faith.)
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To: xrmusn

“I was fortunate that I took typing in HS (not exactly a guy ‘thing’ in 1955”

I did about the same time, but the only reason I passed was my girlfriend was the teacher’s aid. I can type but have to concentrate on the typing to much to do anything else at the same time.


52 posted on 04/01/2012 5:24:38 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Okieshooter

What I find almost comical about this is that I remember reading a story a few years ago that, if I remember correctly, Morse Code was being abandoned by the military just as they abandoned the slide rule.


53 posted on 04/01/2012 5:30:40 PM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

skivvy waver!


54 posted on 04/01/2012 5:32:08 PM PDT by class8601_nuke (don't just be critical, be prompt critical.)
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To: dragnet2
On a side note, I think it was Jay Leno who had the worlds fastest texters VS Morse code ham operators, and all sent the same message.
The Morse code hams won the speed contest.

During my 1950s USN days, one radio guy showed me a WWII gadget that they were still using to send Morse Code. It looked like a regular telegraph key but had a long arm that would rapidly vibrate every time the guy hit the key. They were so trained that they could bang out the dits and dahs in seconds. Another deal he said they used was to copy the code to a phonograph record and then speed up the rotation when broadcasting so the whole message just took seconds. The receiving station would record it and slow their record player down.

Our radio guys drove us nuts as they wouldn't talk regular at chow time - just sit there and talk to each other in dits and dahs. When they'd REALLY get ticked off, they'd yell "THREE DITS, FOUR DITS, TWO DITS, DAH!" and think it a knee-slapper.

Look it up. :-)

55 posted on 04/01/2012 5:52:41 PM PDT by Oatka (This is America. Assimilate or evaporate.)
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To: naturalman1975

I was supposed to know it for visual signaling but I never used it enough to stay proficient at it. My most common flashing light signal was AS (wait while I go get a signalman.)


56 posted on 04/01/2012 6:02:44 PM PDT by GATOR NAVY
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To: GATOR NAVY
The QWERTY keyboard was invented in 1874 and yet it is still used today, largely unchanged. ...Today, April 1st, Google is introducing a new input method designed by the great-great grandson of Samuel F. B. Morse: Gmail Tap for Android and iOS. Gmail Tap takes the keyboard from 26 keys to just two.

From video: "A classic technology. Reinvented."

The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

Bwahahahahaha!

57 posted on 04/01/2012 6:22:54 PM PDT by Talisker (He who commands, must obey.)
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To: Talisker

My favorite line from the video was

“You can tap it in the morning. You can tap it at night. You can tap it in the bathroom.”


58 posted on 04/01/2012 6:30:32 PM PDT by GATOR NAVY
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To: Oatka

Right - that’s called a “semiautomatic key” or in radio lingo, a “bug.”

The most famous manufacture of bugs was/is Vibroplex:

http://vibroplex.com/original_bug.html


59 posted on 04/01/2012 6:39:16 PM PDT by NVDave
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To: bigbob
And of course Morse can be done on every physical layer from a lighting circuit to microwaves bounced off the moon [...]

...to the plumbing in the Hanoi Hilton.

60 posted on 04/01/2012 7:03:36 PM PDT by Erasmus (BHO: New supreme leader of the homey rollin' empire.)
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