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TCM Titanic Film: "A Night to Remember"
TCM ^ | April 12, 2012

Posted on 04/12/2012 6:57:39 PM PDT by re_nortex

 
The 1958 film, A Night to Remember is scheduled for a showing this Saturday night, April 14, 2012 at 10:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time.



Because the book was so well written and the facts so compelling, it reads like a suspense novel. [Walter] Lord scrupulously researched all information available at the time, reviewing testimony from boards of inquiry, plus newspaper and eyewitness accounts of survivors from both passengers and crew.

There are a few scenes where slight artistic license is taken, but no wholesale fabrication of characters or fictionalized sub-plots.

In reality, the film is more docudrama, yet never lacks for tension. Costuming was perfectly detailed and accurate, interiors perfect reproductions of the actual grand staircase, dining rooms, and smoking lounges were used. It is the most accurate of all Titanic films, even though exterior modeling shots were a bit weak.

The British production, which took five months to film, added even more authenticity to the film with a cast mostly unfamiliar to American audiences. This film features an incredibly poignant scene with cellist John W. Woodward playing and singing “Nearer My God to Thee” in the more likely Horbury setting.

It is fun to see a young David McCallum as assistant telegraph operator Harold Bride, plus Honor Blackman, and very brief uncredited appearances as crewmen from both Desmond Llewelyn and Sean Connery (the latter three later appearing together in larger roles in Goldfinger.)

Those remarks are from Tennessee Jed of CommentaramaFilms, a source for Conservative film talk.


TOPICS: History; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: anighttoremember; disaster; history; iceberg; movie; tcm; titanic; walterlord
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To: berdie; All
By any chance do you recall the movie version that had clifton Webb in it?

I recall it being a pretty good character study.

51 posted on 04/13/2012 10:53:36 AM PDT by mware (By all that you hold dear on this good earth, I bid you stand, Men of the West)
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To: combat_boots

“Too bad real hats are not worn much.”

The Brits are still good at hat wearing.


52 posted on 04/13/2012 12:30:34 PM PDT by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: the OlLine Rebel; beaversmom

It’s nice to see that I’m not the only one that hated the little romance.


53 posted on 04/13/2012 12:34:09 PM PDT by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: combat_boots
"Too bad real hats are not worn much."

"A hat should be taken off when you greet a lady and left off for the rest of your life. Nothing looks more stupid than a hat." ---P.J. O'Rourke

54 posted on 04/13/2012 12:34:59 PM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Mears

No you’re not. I’m not you’re typical woman in that I go for the average sappy romance, but it wasn’t even the romance that bothered me. It was that the story was ridiculous. I don’t want to see a documentary when going to a movie, but there have to have been plenty of interesting, TRUE stories that could have been fleshed out. If I had to rate it, it would be a C- and that’s because of the story bringing the A+ special effects down.


55 posted on 04/13/2012 1:33:56 PM PDT by beaversmom
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To: Verbosus
What does CQD stand for?

Near as I can figure out, there was no standard call for commercial shipping at the time.

CQD was a military code term for Close Quarters Distress. That is what they used ...

Most people think that SOS stands for Save Our Ship, but that is not true - in Morse Code, it was three dots - three dashes - then three dots.

This was the fastest method of signalling distress in Morse Code and they settled on it ...

56 posted on 04/13/2012 3:55:58 PM PDT by Lmo56 (If ya wanna run with the big dawgs - ya gotta learn to piss in the tall grass ...)
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To: re_nortex

thanks for the ping


57 posted on 04/13/2012 4:32:54 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: Lmo56
Near as I can figure out, there was no standard call for commercial shipping at the time.

CQD was a military code term for Close Quarters Distress. That is what they used...

By the way, the call sign for the Marconi Wireless on RMS Titanic was:

MGY

By the way, that's the IATA code for Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport in Montgomery County, Ohio.

58 posted on 04/13/2012 5:08:40 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: re_nortex; All; SkyDancer; Captain Jack Aubrey; ken5050; Snake65; berdie; Mears; elcid1970; ...
In post #16 I wrote: "I'd be interested in what other freepers feel is the reason the Titanic story never seems to lose its appeal to the imagination or to the heart".

In post #18, Nortex wrote in part, "I think part of the reason why it became such a big story was that mass communications was really starting to reach a global audience. It was THE STORY of that era."

I agree completely with the point Nortex makes. The news of the tragedy reached all continents quickly and continued in real time, something that wouldn't been possible worldwide in previous eras.

Another freeper wrote me: "IMHO, the reason the Titanic wins is because of the romance. Not Jack and Rose, but the whole idea of a ship steaming at night in darkness under the silent stars of a cold sea, wrecking and foundering with no one to hear.

"I mean, there was a monster black ice berg out there in the dark, just waiting.....and the lookouts never could see it.

"Any kid who had an imagination could see that picture in his mind's eye. Years ago, I saw a Titanic exhibit. It had an exhibit room dressed up to look like a lonely deck in the dark. You could stare out over the sea. They even had a cool fan blowing so you could feel the chill. It was eerie."

I think this is another cogent reason that the story of the Titanic is so seductively gripping....the drama, the heroics, the mystery, the darkness, the cold, the unknown, the feeling of fate and doom.....all the things that were going to be found in the ever-popular suspense and horror films of the fledging silent "moving pictures" industry (and later the talkies) of the time.

If you have additional opinions and comments of your own on the reason for the lure of the "Titanic story", let's hear from you.

Leni

59 posted on 04/14/2012 5:17:56 AM PDT by MinuteGal
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To: MinuteGal

Isn’t it true that the lookouts in the crow’s nest (”the eyes of the ship”) had no BINOCULARS!!?

IIRC, there were five pairs of binoculars on board, but none of the ship’s officers could remember where they were stowed.

Captain Smith was no doubt aware of this, but he had orders from Bruce Ismay to push the gigantic ship to its highest speed, on a moonless night, into a known ice field amid a flurry of ice reports from other ships, some of which were forced to stop in mid-ocean, surrounded by ice. Madness!


60 posted on 04/14/2012 5:58:40 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: elcid1970; flaglady47; mickie
IIRC, James Cameron, in his documentary......or some researching author (having a mental block here trying to remember where I saw this) addressed "five myths concerning the Titanic".....offering modern-day evidence to dispel each one.

One of the myths that was addressed was that Lord Ismay allegedly ordered undue speed for the ship's progress, an order that spelled ultimate disaster.

It's being stated today that there exists not one shred of evidence, written or oral (other than highly-colored newspaper accounts and feverish rumors of the day) that any such order was given to Captain Edward Smith.

I suppose that this "myth" as well as its rebuttal will always be a matter of debate and conflicting opinion. So many compelling mysteries of the Titanic are viewed and solved one way or the other through the eyes of the beholder.

Leni

61 posted on 04/14/2012 7:00:27 AM PDT by MinuteGal
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To: Captain Jack Aubrey

Quote:
“this story reminds me how fragile we are, how much we are at the whim of nature and the defects of man made creations.”

It sounds like you would have been a better captain than
Capt. Smith that night.


62 posted on 04/14/2012 7:00:44 AM PDT by Verbosus (/* No Comment */)
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To: MinuteGal

Well.... it could be explored as to whether or not Titanic was steaming faster than her maximum speed as determined during sea trials, on the night of the collision.

Lord Ismay’s biggest mistake was surviving the disaster when 1,500 souls, including Captain Smith, didn’t.


63 posted on 04/14/2012 7:16:07 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: re_nortex

Thanks for the reminders. I’ve always heard of this movie but never had the chance to see it.


64 posted on 04/14/2012 7:17:55 AM PDT by rabidralph
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To: re_nortex

I recall reading somewheres that CDQ was French..so can’t be sure what it stands for..


65 posted on 04/14/2012 2:10:21 PM PDT by ken5050 (The ONLY reason to support Mitt: The Mormon Tabernacle Choir will appear at the WH each Christmas)
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To: MinuteGal

The John Jacob Astor death and The Unsinkable Molly Brown story always fascinated me.


66 posted on 04/14/2012 2:42:33 PM PDT by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: re_nortex

I really don’t care too much about SFX. After all, I’m a bit of a fan of “Titanic” with Stanwyck, and that’s older (albeit American). That’s not what phases me unless it’s so bad as to be funny, like 1 of my Super8 movies. I love old movies. They’re just much classier.

As to Poe: I don’t think he was here much. Actually, he seems to have had a spotty life as far as living arrangements. He spent some time in Baltimore, but he was not “from” here.


67 posted on 04/14/2012 3:35:07 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: re_nortex
If anyone wishes to follow the History Channel's “Titanic in Real Time” Twitter feed, the collision has already occurred over there.

http://twitter.com/#!/titanicrealtime

You don't have to have a Twitter account to follow along. Just hit the link and have a look-see.

68 posted on 04/14/2012 4:24:49 PM PDT by Stegall Tx (Living off your tax dollars can be kinda fun, but not terribly profitable.)
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To: ken5050
" Kenneth More had an amazing career.
He got to sink both the Titanic AND the Bismarck."
Good point...his Lloyd's of London insurance rates were abysmal. :-)

69 posted on 04/14/2012 4:35:22 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (the DNC/RNC = D.C. Establishment...old Brazilians saying: $AME 'OL $H!T, D!FFERENT FL!E$. :^)
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To: Stegall Tx

That link is awesome!
thank you


70 posted on 04/14/2012 6:17:54 PM PDT by 1_Rain_Drop
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To: Stegall Tx

Thank you! What a great, if somewhat surreal link.


71 posted on 04/14/2012 6:55:48 PM PDT by berdie
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To: mware

It’s actually mentioned by a few of us.

Simply “Titanic”, 1953. Barbara Stanwyck was his wife.


72 posted on 04/14/2012 7:10:31 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: re_nortex
bump to the top.

73 posted on 04/14/2012 8:37:40 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (the DNC/RNC = D.C. Establishment...old Brazilians saying: $AME 'OL $H!T, D!FFERENT FL!E$. :^)
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To: skinkinthegrass; DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis; stylecouncilor; the OlLine Rebel; kalee; ...
To all on the Titanic ping list:

So, what did you think of A Night to Remember, which just finished about 20 minutes ago as I post this? I know that quite a few of you have never seen it before and your impressions would be of particular interest.

74 posted on 04/14/2012 9:31:50 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: re_nortex

It is an excellent movie. So mush better than any other Titanic movie.

I think being in black and white added to the realism and atmosphere.


75 posted on 04/14/2012 9:38:40 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: re_nortex
seen it >4x...still haven't seen the
new version...dislike dicapipo

76 posted on 04/14/2012 9:39:54 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (the DNC/RNC = D.C. Establishment...old Brazilians saying: $AME 'OL $H!T, D!FFERENT FL!E$. :^)
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To: berdie; Stegall Tx; 1_Rain_Drop
Thank you! What a great, if somewhat surreal [Titanic in Real Time] link.

After having just viewed the film, I'm now catching up with what berdie so aptly described as surreal.

Maybe they've dropped off the scroll of these "virtual tweets" but I can't help but wonder what Captain Stanley Lord's (of the Californian) messages would have said. That may be the biggest "what if" of all regarding the Titanic. What if Lord's ship had responded to the distress signal?

77 posted on 04/14/2012 9:50:26 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: re_nortex

100% better than the horrible Cameron “Titanic.”

Much more realistic...


78 posted on 04/14/2012 10:34:49 PM PDT by Bon of Babble (The Road to Ruin is Always Kept in Good Repair)
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To: re_nortex
If The Californian had responded, there is no doubt the loss of life would have been significantly less. It even compounds the tragedy.

I have read many different accounts of why there was no response. One account even speculated that the Californian wasn't the “mystery ship” at all. But I think that theory was shot down during the inquiry. Whatever the truth was, there is no doubt in my mind that Captain Lord had to have carried guilt with him to his grave. I don't know what maritime protocol was, but if I were in sight of another ship shooting off flares in the middle of the night..I'd have to check it out.

She just went down so quickly. Totally amazes me.

(BTW, I sat down tonight to watch a Night To Remember...and realized that I don't get TCM! Shows how much tv I watch. I was disappointed since I hadn't seen it is a long while.)

79 posted on 04/15/2012 12:21:20 AM PDT by berdie
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To: All

I kept getting phone calls last night, so could only watch the movie in bits and pieces. Sigh. It looked great what I saw. Guess I’ll have to see if I can find it on DVD.

As for James Cameron’s version, I agree, the Jack/Rose story was ridiculous. We’re supposed to feel sorry for Rose...who ditched her fiancee to party with Leonardo down in third class, (where the people were so much nicer and more fun, of course!) And she not only sleeps with Leo after just meeting him a day or two before, but she rubs her fiancee’s nose in it by posing nude for Leo and leaving the drawing where the fiancee will find it. Yes, the fiancee was a jerk, but still!

One thing I did love about the movie was the costumes, though. After two hours of sitting in the theater and looking at those beautiful costumes, I left the theater, and I felt like I’d gone back in time and just returned. There were all these people walking around wearing sweatpants that clung to every inch of their flab, ripped jeans, T-shirts with crude sayings on them, etc. The same clothing that had looked perfectly normal to me two hours earlier now looked so ugly and unflattering. It was an odd feeling.


80 posted on 04/15/2012 7:15:06 AM PDT by Nea Wood (When life gets too hard to stand, kneel.)
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To: re_nortex

I just saw it this evening, finally have some time (I have a million other shows to watch for it, so watching this now is just for you, RE).

I have to say I was quite impressed. It was very good, overall.

I had a beef with the 3rd-class treatment, but that may be expected at that time; just that it was more blatant than other details. Also bugged me that they made Olympic out to be niggling on details and “idiotic”, but that was brief.

I was so sad by the little boy. I fear he died. Little children in trouble really upsets me now, that I have a little 4yo boy.

But I was impressed by the movie overall. A good move-along story for just about anyone to watch.


81 posted on 04/16/2012 5:45:16 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: berdie
There was a Titanic exhibit a few years ago where I work.

Each visitor was given a "passport" with the identity of a real passenger. They were not told till the end of the tour if they survived.

82 posted on 04/16/2012 6:01:05 PM PDT by Churchillspirit (ads I read nowadays)
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To: the OlLine Rebel

.


83 posted on 04/16/2012 6:03:07 PM PDT by Churchillspirit
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To: Nea Wood

“The same clothing that had looked perfectly normal to me two hours earlier now looked so ugly and unflattering. It was an odd feeling.”

Good. We need more of that feeling, and less of “casual Friday”.


84 posted on 04/16/2012 6:20:15 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: Churchillspirit

Wow...if you walked thru an exhibit with a “passport” that attached you to a real passenger...

Interesting twist that would bring things home like no other.

I have to ask...were you a survivor?


85 posted on 04/16/2012 10:37:32 PM PDT by berdie
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To: berdie
I have to ask...were you a survivor?

The exhibit brought so many people we were too busy to take the tour ourselves!

86 posted on 04/17/2012 10:26:48 AM PDT by Churchillspirit
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To: berdie

I did the tour with two other people. 2 of us (including myself) didn’t make it and 1 did.


87 posted on 04/17/2012 10:38:17 AM PDT by xp38
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