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At 40 Years Old, 'The Godfather' Has a Profound and Complicated Legacy
NorthJersey.com ^ | SUNDAY MARCH 18, 2012 | JIM BECKERMAN

Posted on 04/12/2012 10:21:04 PM PDT by nickcarraway

Once, it was thought of as the gangster movie to end all gangster movies.

Before he played Don Corleone, Marlon Brando had been all but written off after several flops. But of course that's exactly what "The Godfather," which opened in New Jersey 40 years ago this Saturday, was not.

Instead, it was the gangster movie that began all gangster movies, at least as we know them now: not just its own sequels, "The Godfather: Part II" and "The Godfather: Part III," but also "Goodfellas," "Donnie Brasco," "Analyze This," "Scarface," "The Freshman," "Prizzi's Honor" and "Married to the Mob," not to mention "The Sopranos." But "The Godfather" is the epic original: the "Gone With the Wind" of the boomer generation.

"It's compulsively watchable," says Teaneck-born critic Leonard Maltin. "If you should stumble onto it on cable, you can't stop watching it."

This is not the only iconic film to mark an anniversary this year; "Casablanca" returns to theaters Wednesday in honor of its 70th (for more, see Monday's Better Living).

"The Godfather" has also aged in an interesting way. Back in 1972, it was thought to be a movie that exploded all the romantic Hollywood myths about criminals. These bad guys, critics said, were not glamorous lone-wolf heroes like Edward G. Robinson or James Cagney; they were yes-men who followed orders from a vast hierarchical organization, just like the guy sitting in the next cubicle at work.

But this, it turned out, was the most romantic thing of all. The idea of a powerful, all-embracing family that would protect you, avenge your wrongs and license you to go out and kill your enemies was exactly what made "The Godfather" far more seductive than old-fashioned gangster movies like "Little Caesar" and "The Public Enemy."

Italian-Americans, needless to say, have a complicated relationship with this film. On the one hand, it reinforces stereotypes of Italians as gangsters – an old concern about Hollywood crime movies (there were similar complaints, in the 1930s, about "Little Caesar" and "Scarface").

On the other hand, it makes those gangsters so attractive, so sexy, so exciting, so operatically tragic, that Italian-American kids were proud to identify with them, and non-Italians were envious. Real-life Mafiosi took the Corleones as role models, just as gangsters of the 1930s practiced lines like "I'm takin' over the whole North Side, see?" with a Little Caesar snarl.

"The Godfather" is memorable for lots of reasons:

As the great comeback film of Marlon Brando – the 20th century's most iconic actor, the genius of "On the Waterfront," who had been all but written off after a string of 1960s clinkers. He gave the performance of his life as Don Corleone – then he gave Hollywood the finger, sent Sacheen Littlefeather to refuse his Best Actor Oscar and settled back into his long road to hell, which in his case turned out to be "The Island of Dr. Moreau."

As a fount of clichés: "I made him an offer he can't refuse." "Leave the gun, take the cannoli." "May your first child be a masculine child." "Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes."

As a great collaboration: Director Francis Ford Coppola was matched in brilliance by his cast, by cinematographer Gordon Willis, by composer Nino Rota and by novelist Mario Puzo, who started it all. (Paramount Pictures is currently trying to stop Anthony Puzo, son of Mario, from publishing a new sequel to the novel, due out in May.)

As an example of sheer movie storytelling at its best. There are those who prefer "The Godfather: Part II," a brilliant film in its own right. But it's the first "Godfather," a film that begins with a wedding and ends with the killing of the groom, that has the great story arc. It is, above all, the story of the Fall of Lucifer: Michael (Al Pacino), the apple of his father's eye, the brightest hope of the future, the college boy who will lead the Corleone family to legitimacy, turns to the dark side and ends up the coldest, most fearsome gangster of all. Brando's look of pain, when he discovers that it was his son Michael who killed his enemies, is unforgettable.

As inside baseball: Real people and incidents are referenced throughout the film. Perhaps the best – Brando's slapping the Frank Sinatra surrogate, Al Martino. In real life, there was little love lost between "Mumbles," as Sinatra called him, and Frank, who resented the actor for landing the roles he wanted in "On the Waterfront" and "Guys and Dolls." "Sinatra is the kind of guy," Brando once said, "that when he dies, he's going up to heaven and give God a bad time for making him bald."

As a showcase for a new generation of actors. Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, James Caan, Talia Shire, John Cazale, all gave the performances of their lives in this film (as did Robert De Niro in "Godfather II"). The close shot of Pacino's eyes, darting crazily back and forth in the seconds before he shoots Sollozzo, may be the great, virtuoso example of movie-acting in film history.

As a watershed in movie violence. Audiences in 1972 were horrified to see the bloody horse's head, and James Caan being riddled with bullets at the tollbooth. Today, arguably, schoolchildren are exposed to worse.

"It troubled me at the time that this epic saga was about ruthless gangsters, who murdered people with reckless abandon," says Maltin, who never forgot his first exposure to "The Godfather" at the now-defunct Rialto in Ridgefield Park. "But it's undeniably fascinating."


TOPICS: TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: abevigoda; alpacino; brunokirby; carminecoppola; clemenza; dominicchianese; donvito; francisfordcoppola; gdspradlin; jamescaan; johncazale; leestrasberg; leopoldotrieste; mariopuzo; marlonbrando; michaelcorleone; michaelvgazzo; morganaking; ninorota; richardbright; richardscastellano; robertdeniro; robertduvall; sicilia; thegodfather; vitocorleone; vivalitalia
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1 posted on 04/12/2012 10:21:07 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
The first words of The Godfather: "I believe in America. America has made my fortune."
2 posted on 04/12/2012 10:30:07 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: nickcarraway

“The Godfather” was a good movie, I thought the second one was a bit better. Although I don’t care for Deniro, he is a good actor.

As everyone knows, the third one was the worst, tho after watching it the second time recently, I realized it wasn’t quite as bad as I first thought.

The one part of the second one which I thought was nonsense, was Senator Geary. Even U.S. Senators are not stupid enough to antagonize the Mafia for no reason at all.


3 posted on 04/12/2012 10:40:26 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: yarddog
The one part of the second one which I thought was nonsense, was Senator Geary. Even U.S. Senators are not stupid enough to antagonize the Mafia for no reason at all.

The senator sure did a 180-degree turn after the "incident" was cleared up by Tom Hagen, didn't he?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but as I recall, the only time the F-word was used in either GFI or GFII was by Senator Geary when he refers to Michael's family during the meeting about the casino ownership.

4 posted on 04/12/2012 10:47:41 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: nickcarraway

“If you should stumble onto it on cable, you can’t stop watching it.”

This is true, and hubby and I did just this not too long ago.

{SIGH} I am IN LOVE with James Caan in that movie. Still, to this day, just head over heels in love with him.

I know that’s wrong, I know he’s bad.

AND I DON’T CARE!

After Sonny is killed....I lose interest.

The book is very good, it was such a bestseller when it first came out. I must have been in 6th or 7th grade. Now, our parents had all read it, and then, somehow it “trickled down” to us. And everyone passed it around...read page 75 (or whatever!)

Very racy and exciting. It’s a book I would read again.

And, as I said elsewhere recently, to get the full cultural experience you had to live in Brooklyn, years and years after the book and movie came out. Where Italian guys had special car horns that play “The Love Theme from The Godfather”


5 posted on 04/12/2012 10:57:16 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: nickcarraway
I always admired Vito Corleone. In the first movie, he seemed to be above it all. He focused on his family, was clean living, generous to friends, full of life-experience

I spend my life trying not to be careless. Women and children can be careless, but not men.

6 posted on 04/12/2012 11:00:23 PM PDT by PGR88
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To: yarddog
The one part of the second one which I thought was nonsense, was Senator Geary. Even U.S. Senators are not stupid enough to antagonize the Mafia for no reason at all.

Just different criminal organizations.

7 posted on 04/12/2012 11:13:26 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

‘Leave the gun, take the cannoli.’


8 posted on 04/12/2012 11:18:02 PM PDT by Ken H (Austerity is the irresistible force. Entitlements are the immovable object.)
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To: PGR88

That was one of the great contrasts of the book and the movie. Vito was a ruthless killer but he somehow retained his humanity. Michael started off as a good decent guy at the beginning but had lost his humanity by end.


9 posted on 04/12/2012 11:25:12 PM PDT by Huntress ("Politicians exploit economic illiteracy." --Walter Williams)
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To: nickcarraway

GF1 and GF2 are the best two movies ever made as far as I’m concerned.. add up the quality of the acting, writing and subject matter then the genius of the director putting it all of it together


10 posted on 04/12/2012 11:36:48 PM PDT by Lib-Lickers 2
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To: jocon307

Are you a guy or a gal? (now days, one has to ask)


11 posted on 04/12/2012 11:58:37 PM PDT by fish hawk (Religion: Man's attempt to gain salvation or the approbation of God by his own works)
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To: nickcarraway

A couple of useless (but hopefully interesting) bits of casting trivia:

Ernest Borgnine read for the part of Vito Corleone. Brando was great in the part, but I think Ernie would have been quite good, too. Borgnine is, IMHO, a far better actor than he often gets credit for.

When casting the part of that little weasel Carlo (Gianni Russo), one of the actors considered was none other than Alex Karras. I don’t think that would have worked too well. At least the fight seen between him and Caan wouldn’t have worked out. I mean, James Caan is tough, but *ain’t* whipping Mongo! :-)


12 posted on 04/13/2012 12:19:12 AM PDT by DemforBush (A Repo man is *always* intense!)
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To: nickcarraway
The definition of Obamacare:

Either your Signature or your Freedom will be on that contract.

13 posted on 04/13/2012 12:21:13 AM PDT by Kickass Conservative (A day without Obama is like a day without a Tsunami.)
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To: DemforBush

BTW, one often wonders what John Cazale might have done had he not died at such a young age (bone cancer took him at just 42). He was every bit the acting equal of Pacino and DeNiro in Godfather/GF II, IMHO. He was also outstanding in the few other films he was able to complete before his death (Deer Hunter, Dog Day Afternoon, and the oft-overlooked The Conversation).


14 posted on 04/13/2012 12:24:08 AM PDT by DemforBush (A Repo man is *always* intense!)
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To: DemforBush
Cazale was a great character actor. He was reminiscent to me of Louis Wolheim. The great character actor of the silents and early talkies. He was also felled by cancer, ending a brilliant career.


Louis Wolheim

15 posted on 04/13/2012 2:15:10 AM PDT by Stepan12
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To: nickcarraway

Supposedly, Sinatra was not happy about the movie and said some nasty words to the author Mario Puzo in some restaurant about the book defaming Italians. Funny coming from someone like Sinatra who associated with Mafiosi like Sam Giancana.


16 posted on 04/13/2012 3:23:07 AM PDT by driftless2
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To: Lib-Lickers 2
Prior to the movie I spent some time in the house they used on Staten Island. The inside shots were as I remember the house but outside the wall was added and then taken down afterward along with the gate. There were about 5 houses on the cul de sac.
Just a side note, but a guy I knew got a cameo in the wedding scene as a waiter, this was because he did all the catering for them.
17 posted on 04/13/2012 3:24:31 AM PDT by Recon Dad (Gas & Petroleum Junkie)
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To: nickcarraway

Bump


18 posted on 04/13/2012 3:25:30 AM PDT by lowbridge (Rep. Dingell: "Its taken a long time.....to control the people.")
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To: nickcarraway

“I’m gonna loin the casino business!”


19 posted on 04/13/2012 3:47:35 AM PDT by equaviator
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To: yarddog
They ran the “Godfather Chronicles” A month ago and it was great to see it in a mini-series format.
20 posted on 04/13/2012 4:34:38 AM PDT by Yorlik803 (better to die on your feet than live on your knees.)
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To: yarddog

Agree on the GF III. After watching the second time I found it to be pretty good. Sophia Coppola’s “acting” was what made that movie unbearable!


21 posted on 04/13/2012 4:42:11 AM PDT by MotorCityBuck ( Keep the change, you filthy animal!)
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To: yarddog
I was in The Godfather: Part II. I worked for the company that supplied the animals and was an extra. I was paid by both companies ate a lot of free food.
22 posted on 04/13/2012 5:39:21 AM PDT by Alice in Wonderland
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To: fish hawk

LOL, I’m a girl!


23 posted on 04/13/2012 6:31:44 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: PGR88

It would be interesting to make a movie that further elaborates on how Vito got to where he has, II only scratched the surface, but you don’t see how he went from the neighborhood boss to the head of a large organization.


24 posted on 04/13/2012 6:37:44 AM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: nickcarraway
I remember back in 1972,when The Godfather came out, driving by the movie theater,with the marquee reading:

Held Over 3rd week!

Held over 5th week!

Held Over 9th week.

Held over 14th week!

I remember it made it up to 28 weeks!

25 posted on 04/13/2012 6:45:49 AM PDT by 4yearlurker (Sorry,no tag line today.)
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To: Recon Dad

Here is a news story about the Godfather house in Staten island from 3yrs ago: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfwSNLJ1sKk

You can also find on Google earth:
40° 36’ 24.3” 74° 5’ 53.1”


26 posted on 04/13/2012 7:09:11 AM PDT by BigRed9
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To: DemforBush
He was also outstanding in the few other films he was able to complete before his death (Deer Hunter, Dog Day Afternoon, and the oft-overlooked The Conversation).

Plus he was nailing Meryl Streep in her prime.

27 posted on 04/13/2012 7:10:48 AM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: DemforBush

And I always felt that Cazale’s performance blew away everybody else’s in the Godfather movies...the character of Fredo probably had the widest range of any of the characters, most others were for the most part, one-dimensional, compared to Fredo.


28 posted on 04/13/2012 7:13:36 AM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: BigRed9; flaglady47; mickie
If you're a classic movie buff such as I, may I recommend watching the YouTube linked in #26. Fascinating little real life vignette from 40 years ago.

Leni

29 posted on 04/13/2012 7:25:47 AM PDT by MinuteGal
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To: DemforBush

He had quite a run. Every movie he was in won the Academy Award. That is something. When you watch the Deer Hunter, remember he was dying at the time, but still hit it out of the park.


30 posted on 04/13/2012 7:37:18 AM PDT by gusty
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To: jocon307

Your affinity for Sonny Corleone have anything to do with a certain physical trait that he had, per the book.


31 posted on 04/13/2012 7:40:24 AM PDT by gusty
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To: driftless2
Supposedly, Sinatra was not happy about the movie and said some nasty words to the author Mario Puzo in some restaurant about the book defaming Italians. Funny coming from someone like Sinatra who associated with Mafiosi like Sam Giancana.

He was probably upset because Al Martino's character, "Johnny Fontaine" hit a little too close to home.

32 posted on 04/13/2012 7:50:16 AM PDT by GreenHornet
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To: nickcarraway
A couple of things...

1) "Make him an offer he can't refuse" was plagarized from an early 1930's John Wayne (as Singing Sandy) two-reeler. The bad guy is buying up all the ranches through intimidation (for water rights). Faced with a stubborn owner, he tells his henchman to "Make him an offer he can't refuse."

2) TGF ruined half a generation of Italian guys in the NYC area. They all thought they were Sonny, even if they were more like Al Bundy.

3) I grew-up around the corner from Carlo Gambino, the capo who was the model for Corleone. He lived on the water in Massapequa (Club Drive). Jerry Seinfeld grew up two blocks over and Alec Baldwin about a mile away. Joey Buttafucco was on the scene too.

I knew dozens of guys whose dads were "heavy fathers". I knew guys whose dads were kidnapped for ransom, murdered or just 'disappeared'.

Every 'father' I knew was a loser, all a bunch of ignorant assholes who got what they wanted because they we willing to go right to violence. That violence is about all that's accurate in the movie...the rest is a fairy tale.

33 posted on 04/13/2012 7:57:20 AM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
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To: jocon307

I thought so, I was just having some fun jesting. LOL Aloha from Maui


34 posted on 04/13/2012 9:03:36 AM PDT by fish hawk (Religion: Man's attempt to gain salvation or the approbation of God by his own works)
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To: Borges; DollyCali; Perdogg

ping


35 posted on 04/13/2012 10:07:09 AM PDT by EveningStar
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To: wtc911

“I knew dozens of guys whose dads were “heavy fathers”. I knew guys whose dads were kidnapped for ransom, murdered or just ‘disappeared’.

Every ‘father’ I knew was a loser, all a bunch of ignorant assholes who got what they wanted because they we willing to go right to violence. That violence is about all that’s accurate in the movie...the rest is a fairy tale.”

In that regard, would you say that “Goodfellas” is more accurate? I got a lot more sense of what you describe from that movie.


36 posted on 04/13/2012 10:39:55 AM PDT by M1903A1 ("We shed all that is good and virtuous for that which is shoddy and sleazy... and call it progress")
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To: nickcarraway

I have friends, who are either from New York or profess to be “cultured”, who still haven’t seen either of the movies. I find that incredible.


37 posted on 04/13/2012 10:42:12 AM PDT by M1903A1 ("We shed all that is good and virtuous for that which is shoddy and sleazy... and call it progress")
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To: BigRed9

Thanks very much it brought back lots of memories. The Norton’s and my family go back a long way. Ellen the wife and my dad dated. Ed and my dad used to run around together. The son Ed was just getting ready to go off to Villanova when I was there and had a 1953 Corvette he was trying to put in shape.


38 posted on 04/13/2012 12:01:09 PM PDT by Recon Dad (Gas & Petroleum Junkie)
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To: nickcarraway
The close shot of Pacino's eyes, darting crazily back and forth in the seconds before he shoots Sollozzo, may be the great, virtuoso example of movie-acting in film history.

I disagree...it doesn't come close to Belushi's "darting eyes" in Animal House.

39 posted on 04/13/2012 12:11:04 PM PDT by Night Hides Not (My dream ticket for 2012 is John Galt & Dagny Taggart!)
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To: nickcarraway
A couple of questions regarding Fredo's role in the events depicted in Godfather II:

What exactly did he do to help Hyman Roth and Johnny Ola set up the attempted hit on Michael at the Lake Tahoe house?

Who left the curtains open in Michael's bedroom, allowing the two gunmen to know when Michael was in there, so they could open fire? Fredo?

Who killed the two gunmen that were found in the drainage ditch after the attempted hit on Michael? If it was Fredo, how did he manage to quickly kill the two heavily armed men, when he was so ineffective against the men who gunned down Vito Corleone at the fruit stand in the first Godfather movie? How was he able to get to them before anyone else?

40 posted on 04/13/2012 12:17:28 PM PDT by GreenHornet
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To: Perdogg; DollyCali; EveningStar; Borges; Mr. K; Blondie; altura; mylife; Mama_Bear; Jack Deth; ...

ping


41 posted on 04/13/2012 12:18:34 PM PDT by Perdogg
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To: dfwgator; Perdogg; nickcarraway
And I always felt that Cazale’s performance blew away everybody else’s in the Godfather movies.

I'll add Lee Strasberg to that list. His portrayal of Hyman Roth was just right.

His lecture to Michael Corleone, "This is the business we've chosen", is a masterpiece of monologue. I realize that former Ronald Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan has lost her bearing but her analysis of Roth's speech, "as he stood, weak and furious, before cold-eyed Michael Corleone", is a worthwhile read, a portion of which is excerpted here:

It is simple, unadorned, direct, declarative. There isn't anything in it that is "eloquent," and yet taken as a whole it is deeply eloquent: It tells you something big in an unforgettable way. There is in it no obvious, signaled rhythm, and yet if you read it aloud you will find in it the beautiful, unconscious rhythm of concentrated human speech. There are no phrases that seem to attempt to conjure up pictures, and yet when you hear it you imagine a Moe Green and see the dusty nothingness of early Las Vegas.

It is simplicity that gives the speech its power. Each word means something and each seems to inevitably follow the word that precedes it and summon the word that follows. And so a kind of propulsion is created: It moves forward, and with good speed.

42 posted on 04/13/2012 12:36:14 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: GreenHornet

I reckon the difference was that Fredo was caught off guard in the assassination attempt on Vito, while he was actively involved in trying to get rid of Michael. And he decided on his own to eliminate the two gunmen, in order to cover his tracks while looking like the hero.


43 posted on 04/13/2012 12:36:29 PM PDT by M1903A1 ("We shed all that is good and virtuous for that which is shoddy and sleazy... and call it progress")
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To: M1903A1
Goodfellas is definitely closer to what I have seen.

Two more tidbits...

The Tom Hagen character in TGF had a real-life counterpart. His name was Sheridan and he lived two doors away from Gambino in the cul-de-sac (mapquest Club Drive in 11758 I lived on Exeter - Seinfeld on Riviera).

There was a guy named Cardinale a few doors up the cul-de-sac. Just by being there he had to be a made guy. I had an old '58 Buick (this was in '70). I was driving up from Sheridan's house (I knew his kids). Cardinale came running down the driveway waving for me to stop, like I was Mister Softee. I did, because, well, it seemed the prudent move. He said, "Hey, what's this, a 58? Come'ere, I got somethin' to show you...". I followed him to his garage where he had hundreds of brand new tires of all kinds...I found a couple of snows and paid him ten each.

A made guy, living in what is now a $1.5 million house, hustling hot tires to a kid...that's the Mafia I know.

44 posted on 04/13/2012 1:22:17 PM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
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To: nickcarraway
Someone once asked Mario Puzo who he based Don Corleone on - and Mario said “my mother.”

“Whenever the Godfather opened his mouth,” the author later wrote, “in my own mind I heard the voice of my mother. I heard her wisdom, her ruthlessness, and her unconquerable love for her family and for life itself, qualities not valued in women at the time. The Don's courage and loyalty came from her; his humanity came from her.”

Asked how a sweet Italian woman could be compared to a gangster - he supplied this little anecdote.

Mario had just been paid an advance of $500,000. The largest book advance (at that time) in history. He called up his mother to brag about a half a million dollar advance on a book he hadn't even written yet.

To his surprise, family members started calling him to congratulate him on his “$50,000” advance. He called up his mom and said “Mom - it was $500,000 - NOT $50,000!”.

And in a calm clear voice his mother told him she didn't want to tell people that!

The code of silence!

45 posted on 04/13/2012 1:32:56 PM PDT by allmendream (Tea Party did not send GOP to DC to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism)
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To: PGR88
I always admired Vito Corleone. In the first movie, he seemed to be above it all. He focused on his family, was clean living, generous to friends, full of life-experience

Excellent analysis.......and don't forget to add that he was also against drugs.

I have my favorite movies and most of them, if not all, are science fiction. But The Godfather is at the top of the list......it's the only movie that I've been willing to watch more than twice.....

46 posted on 04/13/2012 1:33:04 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Would I like to be young again? No, I worked too hard to become old,)
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To: gusty

LOL, page 75!

No, really, this is very fresh.

It’s really how he beats the cr*p out of his sister’s horrid husband. I hate it so much how that gets used against him.

He’s a pretty good actor, James Caan, I also always remember that scene in “The Gambler” (I think that’s the title.)

He’s a compulsive gambler and he loses the big bet that going to get him even, rage and self-loathing are then on full display.

A very depressing movie but well done.


47 posted on 04/13/2012 1:42:48 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: wtc911
I hung out in an old Industrial City in Mass. The mob boss was a guy named Russo, ran a plumbing business and the best Italian restaurant in the city.

The bookies were all Polocks, even Artie the Greek, went to jail on a bank scam. A local thug, a barber, started selling dope and porn out of his shop, he was a Greek. The locals mostly Irish went and saw Russo and told him do some thing about this or we will.

Russo felt that this would be bad for business and the barber got a couple of broken legs, Artie got his head busted by a cousin of mine for booking out of his Bar, before he went to Jail, Artie, and peace reigned in the land.

48 posted on 04/13/2012 1:51:23 PM PDT by Little Bill (Sorry)
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To: wtc911

Sounds like a friend’s story...he lived down in Chicago, and his family knew this one fellow down the block who didn’t appear to have an actual job. The guy and his wife were always offering my friend and his parents earmuffs, gloves, other general merchandise...but they always had grosses, caselots and the like spread out on their dining room table, not just a few!

He finally figured out this guy was likewise in charge of moving stuff that “fell off the truck”.


49 posted on 04/13/2012 2:56:34 PM PDT by M1903A1 ("We shed all that is good and virtuous for that which is shoddy and sleazy... and call it progress")
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To: re_nortex

Glad I clicked the link — that’s some great stuff from Peggy Noonan.


50 posted on 04/13/2012 3:21:37 PM PDT by Yardstick
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