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Casino Tribe Outcasts Claim They Were Unfairly Expelled Over Greed
(CBS) ^ | May 16, 2012 12:28 AM | Cristy Fajardo

Posted on 05/16/2012 7:19:02 AM PDT by BenLurkin

TEMECULA (CBS) — A CBS2 News investigation has examined accusations that money pouring into Indian gaming casinos is bringing trouble to Southland reservations.

Two local tribes have been banishing members, stripping them of healthcare, education and monthly stipends. The tribes argue that it comes down to bloodlines, but those kicked out insist that it is really about money.

For more than a century, generations of distant cousins Rick Cuevas and Michael Madariaga’s families have walked the same dirt roads on the Pechanga Reservation in Temecula.

“We have the original deed signed by President McKinley,” Madariaga said.

Miles away at the Pala Reservation in Northern San Diego County, Gina Howard and her family have similar roots.

“My mother, Teresa Denver, we were both born in that house,” Howard said.

Although the two families have never met, they share a common story — members of both clans find themselves without a tribe.

“You’re whole community turns away from you. And they look at your like you’re a pariah,” Howard said.

“Nobody has more of a right or is more Pechanga than us,” Cuevas said.

It is called disenrollment. In both cases their tribal councils have questioned their bloodlines.

But the families believe that this is not about ancestry, it’s about settling old scores and about money.

“It’s about greed. I think it’s about control,” Howard said.

“It’s about money and political power,” Madariaga said.

Ever since the tribes got casinos, members have been entitled to a share of the windfall. Indian gaming is estimated to be a multi-billion dollar industry in California.

In July when Howard and seven of her relatives were disenrolled, she says that her cut of the Pala profits equaled about $9,000 a month.

At Pechanga W2 forms show that in 2005 members received $269,175.25 – more than $22,431 per month.

After Cuevas and his clan were kicked out in 2006, he says that number jumped to $30,000.

“Each person that has been disenrolled now, 250 of us, has lost $1.6 million, our rights to vote, our rights to healthcare, educational system. They threw a couple of our little cousins out of the tribal school, physically removed them from the school and told them that they could no longer be here again,” Cuevas said.

In documents obtained by CBS2 News , an anthropologist hired by Pechanga itself to study ancestry said that there is significant evidence that Cuevas and his clan are Pechanga.

The anthropologist is quoted in the documents saying that he is “surprised and dismayed that the tribe continues to maintain otherwise.”

Pechanga refused repeated requests for an on-camera interview. But in a statement, the tribe’s chairman, Mark Macarro said that it was a question of ancestry.

“Though deeply painful for our tribe and the people affected, this correction was necessary to protect the integrity of the tribal government, our culture and our history,” Macarro went on to say.

Pala chairman, Robert Smith, did sit down with us. He said the issue boils down to lineage, not money.

“It has nothing to do with money. They can say what they want, but that is not true. Right is right, wrong is wrong and they don’t meet the requirements to be enrolled in here,” Smith said.

He insisted that he had documents and records, that he would not show us, proving that Howard’s great-great grandmother was only half Native American.

That would mean Howard and her cousins do not meet the blood requirement to enroll as members of the Pala Tribe.

We asked Smith why he would not show us the documents.

“Again, we’re a sovereign Indian Tribe, we shouldn’t have to show you,” Smith said.

But the Bureau of Indian Affairs disagrees. In a letter obtained by CBS2, the BIA recommends that Howard and seven relatives be put back on the membership rolls, saying that they meet the required degree of Indian blood.

“We’ve got a document from them that says that she’s half, so they talk about of both sides of their mouth, the BIA. At the end of the day, under the tribe’s constitution, it’s the tribal council that determines membership,” Smith said.

A few months ago Pala disenrolled about another 150 of Howard’s extended family. They accounted for about 15 percent of the tribe’s membership.

“It’s pretty clear that there are tribal members, who should be in the tribe who are being disenrolled,” said Matthew Fletcher, an indigenous law professor at Michigan State University.

Fletcher has been studying mass disenrollments and says that he has noticed a pattern.

“We’re mostly seeing mass disenrollments in California and some of the other tribes around the country that have very successful gaming enterprises,” Fletcher said.

For now the disenrolled have no legal recourse, because Indian reservations are sovereign. State and federal judges have ruled the courts have no jurisdiction and the BIA has said that it has no authority over membership decisions.

“It’s going to take an act of congress,” said John Gomez Jr., president of the American Indian Rights and Resources Organization, who is a disenrollee.

Gomez says that congress must amend the Indian Civil Rights Act to allow courts to hear the cases.

“There is no available recourse and those tribal officials understand that. Their attorneys understand that. So they can manipulate the process,” Gomez said.

Everyone agrees that that will not be easy. Casinos pour money into campaign coffers and other tribes may not want the federal government meddling in tribal affairs.

In the meantime, Cuevas, Madariaga, Howard and others are left with memories and nowhere to turn.

“Now we can’t be buried here next to our relatives,” Cuevas said.

“They just threw us away like yesterday’s trash,” Howard said.

“They have the Rolexes, but we have the time,” Cuevas added.

Although disenrollments are taking place up and down the state, we want to be clear that locally it is specific to Pechanga and Pala.

Other Indian gaming casinos in Southern California, such as Morongo and San Manuel are not presently embroiled in similar disputes.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 05/16/2012 7:19:04 AM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

Dances with Slot Machines. Just think! In 100 years, the ground where these casinos stood will be considered “sacred” ground.


2 posted on 05/16/2012 7:21:54 AM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Dumb, dependent and Democrat is no way to go through life. - Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas)
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To: BenLurkin
Pala chairman, Robert Smith, did sit down with us. He said the issue boils down to lineage, not money.

An Indian chief named Bob Smith is complaining about someone else's blood line? This is about the dough.

3 posted on 05/16/2012 7:35:41 AM PDT by Poison Pill (Obama is the hopium of the masses)
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To: BenLurkin
Casino Tribe Outcasts

Now that has a ring to it.

4 posted on 05/16/2012 7:43:56 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (they have no god but caesar)
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To: BenLurkin

Love of wampum is the root of all evil...


5 posted on 05/16/2012 7:51:41 AM PDT by gov_bean_ counter ( A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over...)
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To: BenLurkin
And so the reservation turns.. This is the continuation of a long running dispute. The clan that was ejected from Pala tried to eject the tribe's chairman from office, and this is their punishment for failing. In Pechanga’s case, their clan objected to a few of their members being ejected from the tribe's rolls when they returned to the reservation to start receiving casino checks.

It is the ultimate punishment - there is no appeal for disenrollment, no authority other than the tribe itself. The standards applied to disenroll these two clans can be applied to even more families in the tribe, hence the very muted response on both reservations - first, there's the increase in tribal checks, but second, protest too loudly, and the ax could come down on you.

The biggest irony is that the Pala family was the one which fought so hard to prevent a full scale casino from being built on the reservation, stating that once it is built, the tribe will then start finding reasons to eject members to increase the take for those who remain.

As for San Manuel - their tactic is to delay enrollment for the children of tribal members, a delay that becomes even longer if a family has more children. And Morongo has already told some tribal members that if they have any more children, they too could find themselves on the bus to Pechanga, a reference, of course, to the disenrollment.

6 posted on 05/16/2012 7:54:45 AM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer
Hmmmm. I've got an idea. Let's limit affirmative action goodies and EBT card use to only African Americans who can prove at least 25% slave ancestry.

Let's have them elect their own tribal leaders who can interpret and administer these goodies. They would have a built-in incentive to kick as many out of the tribe as possible.

The people thus excluded might be bitter enough to leave the reservation, get an education, get jobs and contribute to the government revenue flow by contributing taxes rather than consuming them.

This worked pretty darn well for my father's people. We're now into the third and forth generations and, as far as I can count, there isn't a single bed-wetting liberal among us.

7 posted on 05/16/2012 8:12:46 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: BenLurkin
“It’s going to take an act of congress,” said John Gomez Jr., president of the American Indian Rights and Resources Organization, who is a disenrollee.

Gomez says that congress must amend the Indian Civil Rights Act to allow courts to hear the cases.

I'm not saying Mr. Gomez does or doesn't have a legitimate beef. But that's a very interesting solution he is proposing.

He's asking the Federal Government to overrule the Tribal Council and thereby effectively dissolve its sovereignty by said overrule.

The bennies the Tribal Council distributes are generated based on its sovereign immunity from the very courts to which Mr. Gomez is seeking relief from the rules of the Tribal Council. So, in the unlikely event he is successful, the entire tribal structure could come crashing down.

8 posted on 05/16/2012 8:27:51 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: the invisib1e hand

I think I have the name of a new band right there!


9 posted on 05/16/2012 8:28:51 AM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: BenLurkin

Sounds like what the Creek Indians did to my niece and nephews. My sister (now deceased) married a Creek Indian and later the tribe disowned the 3 kids them because they weren’t 100% pure Creek.
Thus they can’t take a share of the casino cash.


10 posted on 05/16/2012 8:32:00 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (End Obama's War On Freedom.)
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To: BenLurkin
“You’re whole community turns away from you. And they look at your like you’re a pariah,” Howard said.

So let me get this straight. I am supposed to care what someone who doesn't know the difference between "Your" and "You're" thinks?

11 posted on 05/16/2012 8:36:26 AM PDT by Onelifetogive (I tweet, too... @Onelifetogive)
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To: Vigilanteman
Actually not ~ the tribe exists because of a "treaty" between the USA and the tribe ~ so if there's a question about the tribe even existing the USA certainly needs to get involved.

Some tribes are already in a bind when it comes to determining who is qualified to be a member. Their namesm (or the names of their ancestors) are on the Dawes Rolls. Even there they have problems with Indians marrying into the tribe and leaving descendants with less than 1/32 Cherokee (for example), even though they might be substantially more Indian than most Cherokees.

Pechanga was named by a white trapper/trader named (I believe) Jedediah Smith. The original Pechanga is actually located in Nikel Oblast in Russia. It's a river in the Sapma, or Sa'ami homeland ~ belonging, in general, to the Skolt tribe.

I still haven't figured out why Jedediah named the place. The Indians are mistreating the name and should be forced to quit using it.

12 posted on 05/16/2012 8:52:07 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: BuffaloJack

Are there actually 100% Creek people?


13 posted on 05/16/2012 8:52:51 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

I knew a guy in college, whose grandmother was said to be 100% Creek. He looked it, except that he Robert Goulet blue eyes. He was extremely good looking, with those blue eyes, high cheek bones, black hair and dark skin.

I wonder if he’s getting money for being a Creek.


14 posted on 05/16/2012 8:57:42 AM PDT by Eva
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To: Eva
My old neighbors, the Crick family, were Creeks, but they attended Cherokee pow wows when they went to Tennessee.

They looked pretty doggone Indian ~ may be some schisms in Creekdom!

15 posted on 05/16/2012 9:01:00 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: BenLurkin

They should just go broke, like my wife’s tribe — Mescalaro Apache.

She’s 100%, born on reservation, Apache who came back to be the town doctor.

The only thing we’ve ever gotten is free ski lift tickets.


16 posted on 05/16/2012 9:01:17 AM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (I will never vote for Romney. Ever.)
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To: muawiyah

What does a Creek look like? I thought that my friend looked like an Indian, except for his blue eyes.


17 posted on 05/16/2012 9:28:08 AM PDT by Eva
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To: muawiyah
Yes and no.

Some tribes exist because of treaty obligations.

Others because of political expediency and only casual connections to tribes recognized due to treaty obligations.

There really isn't a consistent across the board approach when you get down to evaluating the smallest of tribes, which are typical in California.

There isn't even total consistency among the larger tribes (Navajo, Sioux, Cherokee), but you get much more of it.

The west coast tribes, in particular, suffered the fewest deprivations from the white man (with the possible exception of the Utes and Navajos, but that was more a function of their religious white neighbors) but are among the greatest beneficiaries in scooping up bennies which tribal recognition makes possible. That, and the large concentration of paleface neighbors to patronize their casinos and gas stations.

18 posted on 05/16/2012 9:29:49 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

More then just the Tribal Council for his own tribe, what he’s proposing would destroy the sovereignty of EVERY tribe in the US that has it.


19 posted on 05/16/2012 9:34:00 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: Eva
He was extremely good looking, with those blue eyes, high cheek bones, black hair and dark skin.

Pics?
20 posted on 05/16/2012 9:38:24 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: Ellendra

No, I don’t even remember his name. It was too long ago, but he was so good looking and the first Indian that I had ever met, that I never forgot him.


21 posted on 05/16/2012 9:40:53 AM PDT by Eva
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To: Eva
Anybody can have blue eyes. This has to do with the way your eyes get color, and which layers are constructed in what manner.

I think the last time I saw a news article on eye color there were 15 different genes involved, and each of them may affect the deposition of pigment ~ and there are TWO KINDS OF PIGMENT. There's your standard black-brown pigment. About 6.7 billion people have that kind. Color varies by density of pigment in which layers of the eye, and there are several lawyers, and age can make a difference.

Then, there's your very special red-yellow pigment. About 300 million people have that kind. That's where color just goes crazy, particularly if the individual also has some black-brown pigment.

Indians are descended from East Asian people who seem to have gotten here in a number of ways over the last 18,000 years. All it takes is one guy with a clear retina, clear iris, clear lens, and maybe some other clear stuff and he can create a one man cascade event where you end up with blue eyed people just all over the place.

Knowing that all North American Indians have some Sa'ami ancestry (from maybe 24,000 years back), or Yakuts/Sakha (from maybe 5,000 years back, maybe even more recent) the probability of finding a clear eyed Indian (which looks blue or gray) is exceedingly high.

White folks aren't the only blue eyes on the planet. Check this dog: http://www.google.com/search?q=blue+eyed+husky&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=aNmzT7iVOais2gXr4rHpCA&ved=0CHcQsAQ&biw=1106&bih=547

22 posted on 05/16/2012 9:45:19 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: BenLurkin

Just get a loan through an American Indian loan company. Anyone ever see the commercials? They will lend you five grand at 118% interest! Such a deal!


23 posted on 05/16/2012 9:58:12 AM PDT by 4yearlurker (No matter who you elect,the government eventually gets in.)
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To: Ellendra
. . . what he’s proposing would destroy the sovereignty of EVERY tribe in the US that has it.

A definite possibility. However, the could also limit its ruling to this particular tribe. Or others sharing similar characteristics. See my post #18.

There are a number of small tribes located in California who were recognized for reasons of sheer political expediency. Most of them you would never have heard of even if you are somewhat well versed in Native American cultures, as am I.

As just one example, you will find a giant gas station/retail/casino/hotel/ luxury resort establishment off I-10 just 30 or so miles west of Palm Springs, California. No disrespect intended to that tribe. In fact, I take my hat off to them for running a successful thriving business and knowing how to work the system so the government leaves them alone. But they have a handful of tribal members and no history of treaties with the United States to give them the sovereign status which they enjoy.

I think it would be nice if just about everybody could swing such a deal. Including paleface tribes. Then federalista jurisdiction could be limited to just the non-self sustaining portion of our drone population.

24 posted on 05/16/2012 10:05:02 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: BenLurkin
You’re whole community turns away from you. And they look at your like you’re a pariah,” Howard said

Sigh

25 posted on 05/16/2012 10:12:18 AM PDT by don-o (He will not share His glory and He will NOT be mocked! Blessed be the name of the Lord forever.)
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To: muawiyah

Yeah, but brown eyes are genetically dominant.


26 posted on 05/16/2012 10:22:25 AM PDT by Eva
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To: don-o

This is not a new phenomenon. During slavery days, the Cherokees in Oklahoma were quite welcoming to plantation escapees. Many of them have mixed negroid and indian features.

Four generations later - when the $$s started flowing in - all of a sudden things weren’t so cozy anymore.


27 posted on 05/16/2012 11:25:18 AM PDT by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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