Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Taco USA (An Amusing History of Mexican Food in the United States)
Reason ^ | June 2012 | Gustavo "Ask a Mexican" Arellano

Posted on 05/16/2012 2:34:51 PM PDT by mojito

....There is nothing remotely Mexican about Potato Olés—not even the quasi-Spanish name, which has a distinctly Castilian accent. The burrito was more insulting to me and my heritage than casting Charlton Heston as the swarthy Mexican hero in Touch of Evil. But it was intriguing enough to take back to my hotel room for a taste. There, as I experienced all of the concoction’s gooey, filling glory while chilly rain fell outside, it struck me: Mexican food has become a better culinary metaphor for America than the melting pot.

Back home, my friends did not believe that a tater tot burrito could exist. When I showed them proof online, out came jeremiads about inauthenticity, about how I was a traitor for patronizing a Mexican chain that got its start in Wyoming, about how the avaricious gabachos had once again usurped our holy cuisine and corrupted it to fit their crude palates.

In defending that tortilla-swaddled abomination, I unknowingly joined a long, proud lineage of food heretics and lawbreakers who have been developing, adapting, and popularizing Mexican food in El Norte since before the Civil War. Tortillas and tamales have long left behind the moorings of immigrant culture and fully infiltrated every level of the American food pyramid, from state dinners at the White House to your local 7-Eleven. Decades’ worth of attempted restrictions by governments, academics, and other self-appointed custodians of purity have only made the strain stronger and more resilient. The result is a market-driven mongrel cuisine every bit as delicious and all-American as the German classics we appropriated from Frankfurt and Hamburg.

(Excerpt) Read more at reason.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Food; History; Society
KEYWORDS: cookery; mexicanfood; mexico; tacos; texmex
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-118 next last
To: RegulatorCountry
Pit cooked barbecue is as old as cavemen. Abos in Australia do it. Eskimos do it. Everbody in the world does it. My daughter's Cambodian father-in-law did a traditional in-ground pit pig BBQ for the birth of our first grandson on that side of the family.

/johnny

51 posted on 05/16/2012 3:59:13 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]

To: mojito

I say mix them all up. Just ate chicken cooked with California red chilies, cumin, garlic and lime juice over Indian Korma rice with a side of filet.


52 posted on 05/16/2012 4:01:59 PM PDT by Rebelbase
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
Hell, even the name BBQ is based on the word barbacoa which is the Spanish bastardization of the original Caribbean word.

Besides breads and sauces, I focused on food history in culinary school.

/johnny

53 posted on 05/16/2012 4:03:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]

To: Rebelbase
That's the way humans have always done it. Take what is cheap and locally available and what you like and swipe from recipes right and left until you get the meal you want.

There is no 'authentic' anything out there. We eat what we can get and adapt it to our tastes.

/johnny

54 posted on 05/16/2012 4:06:15 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 52 | View Replies]

To: Fledermaus
"“Mexican” and “Chinese” food in the USA is completely Americanized."

As with Italian, French, Japanese or Spanish and a number of other foods. I can not even eat some of these "authentic" foods.

We have taken these foods and made them to our liking.

55 posted on 05/16/2012 4:25:09 PM PDT by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: forgotten man
was told that they fill the ice chest with hot water before they put the tamales in. They pour out the hot water, put the tamales in, then they put cloth soaked in hot water around the tamales.

Most caterers do the exact same. If the tamales are above 140F (and that's easy to do in an Igloo) or they haven't been in the danger zone (42F-140F) for more than 4 hours, you are generally safe.

I would worry more about washed hands. Shigella is ugly.

/johnny

56 posted on 05/16/2012 4:27:33 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 50 | View Replies]

To: mojito

Every “real” mexican I knew growing up at hotdogs, bologna, and potato chips. They did make their own sauces and dips though...and they were good.


57 posted on 05/16/2012 4:37:43 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fledermaus

What’s “masa”?

A buddy of mine in gradeschool...his dad married a mexican girl after his divorce. She used to make tomales from scratch. They were basically a lump of damp unleaven corn bread with a pinch of cheese and a chili pepper inside...all wrapped up in a corn husk.

THEY WERE DELICIOUS

She called them “cheese tomales”. They made them from scratch from whole ears of sweet corn. They bought it with the husk on it and saved the husks for the wrap. When she made them, it would be a two day event with 4 or 5 women and they would make a whole pickup truck load of them.


58 posted on 05/16/2012 4:47:28 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: mojito

He’s absoiutely right that Taco Bell is terrible. He’s also right that Del Taco is surprisingly good.


59 posted on 05/16/2012 4:52:36 PM PDT by GrootheWanderer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

I dunno about that. A chinese man once told me there is nothing chinese about american chinese food and that it was invented in new york city by a jewish man.


60 posted on 05/16/2012 4:57:11 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Then there is the “ruben sandwich”...invented in omaha nebraska.


61 posted on 05/16/2012 4:57:49 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

and a lot of spanish food was actually north african arab food.


62 posted on 05/16/2012 5:00:20 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Hey, I am just sitting eating some carne sea and a bite of chiccorino but that sound ds delicious with red and yellow habeneros.

I’ll make some tomorrow and get back to you.

Tamales with the meat


63 posted on 05/16/2012 5:00:42 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: mojito

I watch his show from time to time and really enjoy the educational aspect of his show.

The last one had some theme about tequila. It was interesting but I ain’t a tequila guy.


64 posted on 05/16/2012 5:02:33 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: mamelukesabre
actually north african arab food.

Which came via the Silk Road. There's no end to it. It recurses like a fork bomb.

Bottom line is we eat what we can get locally and adapt it to the cultural tastes we establish as children. And we always have.

What has changed is that cultural memes move much faster than they used to.

/johnny

65 posted on 05/16/2012 5:08:10 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 62 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Yep like my favorite ingredient in Paella “Saffron”. The Spaniards got it from the Moors.


66 posted on 05/16/2012 5:11:15 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Yep like my favorite ingredient in Paella “Saffron”. The Spaniards got it from the Moors.


67 posted on 05/16/2012 5:11:45 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Carne Seca


68 posted on 05/16/2012 5:13:21 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Vendome

Tequila is the only alcohol known that is technically NOT classified as a depressant.

Just a little bit of trivia.


69 posted on 05/16/2012 5:13:40 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 64 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
The Indians around the MidAtlantic were big on smoked meat. When the English came the Indians were already well equipped to do any meat you wanted, plus EUROPEAN PORK.

The Spanish had been in the habit of turning breeding pairs of pigs loose all up and down the coast and the consequence of that was that by the time they got around to doing something they already had cured hams ready and waiting.

Between 1598 and 1604 most of the Spanish settlers/explorers/miners moved out of this region to better pickings elsewhere. But the Indians kept on making Virginia ham for the newer settlers to come.

70 posted on 05/16/2012 5:16:38 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]

To: Vendome

The midwest Vikings have this strange thing they call ‘hot dish’, and I have witnessed it being made: they take a 9X13 or bigger pan, start dumping miscellaneous freezer meats on it, then open a few cans of soup and whatnot, dump that on it, then slather it with shredded cheese and pave over with a layer of tater tots, then add foil and bake for an hour or so.

‘Hot Dish’.


71 posted on 05/16/2012 5:19:11 PM PDT by txhurl (Thank you, Andrew Breitbart. In your untimely passing, you have exposed these people one last time.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 66 | View Replies]

To: txhurl
Proof I'm not making this up:


72 posted on 05/16/2012 5:26:14 PM PDT by txhurl (Thank you, Andrew Breitbart. In your untimely passing, you have exposed these people one last time.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 71 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
I'm aware. I'm legendarily descended from Powhatan's half brother Opechancanough who was himself fathered by a priest from a Spanish fort further up the Chesapeake. All manner of interesting, little known history going on in the very early years of Virginia and Carolina.

Hogs are uniquely well suited to being set loose to forage in the woods, and that's what they did, regardless of how they got here, at the hands of whom. The Indians did it, the frontier English, German, Scotch-Irish and Huguenot settlers did it, the Spanish did it, it just worked for the realities of that time time and place.

73 posted on 05/16/2012 5:33:10 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 70 | View Replies]

To: txhurl
The midwest Vikings have this strange thing they call ‘hot dish’,

I get the feeling that done right it could be pretty good, and done wrong it could call for a Nuremberg Trial.

74 posted on 05/16/2012 5:34:12 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (If I can’t be persuasive, I at least hope to be fun.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 71 | View Replies]

To: mojito

That was a fun read.


75 posted on 05/16/2012 5:34:16 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vendome
And saffron was probably first cultivated in Greece.

It's recursive. It goes forever into the mists of time.

/johnny

76 posted on 05/16/2012 5:34:21 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 67 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Pretty good idea. I like it. I wonder if they scattered any seeds around too? Wild grapes? Wild barley?, turnips, wild cabbage?


77 posted on 05/16/2012 5:35:14 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 70 | View Replies]

To: txhurl

dang that looks good....like a savory version of the jello desert with marshmallows on top.


78 posted on 05/16/2012 5:36:39 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: Fledermaus
"chicken plucking"

Ditto from here in western Wisconsin. About twenty miles up the road near Arcadia is a chicken processing plant. A lot of the workers are Latino i.e. Mexican, and now the area has sort of a Polish/Mexican mix. I'm waiting for a Mexican restaurant to open around there to try it out.

79 posted on 05/16/2012 5:51:27 PM PDT by driftless2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
The Indians didn't even need to steal Spanish horses. The Spaniards figured out very quickly that the horse was uniquely adapted to the American scene so they'd let them loose on the slightest pretext ~ there was a vast surplus of meat in America so they didn't need to eat old horse flesh.

I'm probably half way along in my search for old Spanish townsites East of the Mississippi. There are not a lot of them but they are there so somebody was doing something (I and others suspect they looked for and found gold).

Up in Canada some of the old Spanish mill sites still have stuff ~ they'd set up a mill and a run from a lake. Then they'd cut segments for segmented grinding wheels from local stone. They'd set those in a frame.

You could grind grain (provided by the Indians) and ore in the same mill (though at different times).

Some of the grain would go back to the Indians, some would go in the mash, and then you'd use a rather primitive retort (looks like a beaker on its side) to do your distillation. That would end up in the bellies of the Indians as well, and the Spaniard would get his supplies for his mining operation that way.

There are signs of comparable operations in the Eastern US as well.

One thing about a well thought out enough hunk of civilization, it will find a way to fit in ~

New Jersey's shoreline is paved over with these town sites. I suspect those were the Catholic Dutch getting a headstart on everybody else ~ they've just disappeared in our history, but the Jamestown records indicate a population of 20,000 people North of the Potomac by the early 1620s, and I don't think that's incidental. At the same time 60,000 English (et al) settlers went on to die early in Jamestown ~ usually of malaria, etc. Even Jamestown's original site disappeared into the James River ~ it was relocated just a few decades ago!

80 posted on 05/16/2012 5:52:38 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 73 | View Replies]

To: mamelukesabre

Fieldcress is so common in most of the south that it’s regarded as a wild green, it’s everywhere. Pretty good too, if you enjoy a more pungent variety of greens. Locals know them only as creasy greens, whether that’s a corruption of cress or named for the appearance of the leaves, I couldn’t say.


81 posted on 05/16/2012 5:52:45 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 77 | View Replies]

To: PapaBear3625

I get the feeling that done right it could be pretty good, and done wrong it could call for a Nuremberg Trial.


You know, 20 years later, after having witnessed it, I admit the dish may have its applications. If you have sub-zero weather and a horde of teenage boys, it kinda makes sense, like a shepherd’s pie done up big.

What’s shocking - and liberating for some, I suppose - is you aren’t cooking, just dumping frozen and canned ingredients and baking.

I think I might try this at the next family get-together, if only for the shock value.


82 posted on 05/16/2012 5:54:05 PM PDT by txhurl (Thank you, Andrew Breitbart. In your untimely passing, you have exposed these people one last time.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 74 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanAbroad

Growing up in LA, you probably knew about El Coyote. Good food, but the best green corn tamales I’ve ever had!! :-d)


83 posted on 05/16/2012 5:55:54 PM PDT by Fast Moving Angel (A moral wrong is not a civil right: No religious sanction of an irreligious act.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: freedumb2003
Gringos seem to think that you slather salsa of some kind or another on EVERYTHING.

The only reason I eat burritos is because it is too messy to eat salsa out of my bare hands. A burrito is nothing but a foundation material for eating salsa. I bury my burritos in salsa, and I laugh.

84 posted on 05/16/2012 6:04:22 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free (REPEAL OBAMACARE. Nothing else matters.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: freedumb2003

Oh, and chili con carne sucks. Real chili doesn’t have beans!


85 posted on 05/16/2012 6:04:58 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free (REPEAL OBAMACARE. Nothing else matters.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

I suspect they weren’t deliberately set loose on the barrier islands from Assateague and Chincoteague on down to Ocracoke Island. They’re still there, known as Banker Ponies in NC. Their origin has long been attributed to shipwrecks, there are shipwrecks including Spanish Galleons going back to the earliest records kept.


86 posted on 05/16/2012 6:05:58 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 80 | View Replies]

To: mojito

There is a guy who comes around Koons Toyota on Leesburg Pike in Tyson’s Corner, VA most days around 11 a.m. with a cooler of delicacies such as tamales and empanadas. The empanadas are delicious. People waiting for their cars to be serviced buy him out.


87 posted on 05/16/2012 6:09:40 PM PDT by La Lydia
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: houeto; All
That's got to be the silliest thing I have ever seen you type bcsco.

I frankly don't give a damn whether you, or anyone else, thinks it's silly, wrong, or whatever. It's what I've decided. Got it?

88 posted on 05/16/2012 6:10:52 PM PDT by bcsco
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Freedom_Is_Not_Free
Chili con frijoles does. Chile con carne can, depending on where it's from, and chili con queso almost never does.

Chili con carne means chili with meat. And it can be done a million ways. And there isn't a real one, except the one you like.

/johnny

89 posted on 05/16/2012 6:13:08 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 85 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
The typical Spanish transport group would have several ships ~ and one of them would be carrying livestock for the most part.

I would not have cared to travel on that particular ship BUT I am sure they dined well.

There were thousands of private ventures that were never reported and show no evidence here of ever having happened, but there are some extensive reports about some of them.

I suspect the death rates were spectacular for those 16th century voyages ~ but you would have had people coming from every Hapsburg land ~ so they were already here to some extent when your more familiar Brits and French arrived.

As a side venture in looking for these earlier settlements I've been looking for practical connections between the Swedes and the Spanish and there do seem to be "such events" and business deals. I guess they were just too far apart to cause each other trouble, but the Swedes were a house afire in pursuing improvements in common technology ~ better boats, better firearms, better steel, better armor, better machines ~ new designs.

As the Spaniards found out America was a huge place and it took everything they could to do anything at all.

90 posted on 05/16/2012 6:15:44 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 86 | View Replies]

To: freedumb2003

I think the best Mexican food in the world is to be had in a corridor that begins in Ciudad Chihuahua and runs north to Cuidad Juarez, crosses the river to El Paso and continues up the Rio Grand Valley through Old Mesilla and Las Cruces (best fresh green chile, Hatch, actually) north to Albuquerque, and from there north to Santa Fe, Chimayo (best dried red chile) and Taos. And yes, lard is a blessed ingredient.


91 posted on 05/16/2012 6:16:50 PM PDT by La Lydia
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: clbiel

What about the turducken? That’s GOT to be USA.
Personally, I like the copurnican. That’s a deep-fried cow stuffed with a pig stuffed with a turkey stuffed with a chicken that has a Snickers bar shoved up its a**. ( No duck, too greasy. lol)


92 posted on 05/16/2012 6:24:01 PM PDT by clbiel (Islamophobia: The irrational fear of being decapitated)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: txhurl

Often done w/macaroni.

Neighbor boy described his favorite: basically macaroni and cheese w/chopped chicken filets. This is family that considers fish sticks a dinner entree.

Chili feeds here are bland. Tabasco and macaroni are both offered as garnish/condiment.

But you know what? They are super friendly people and will always set another place at the table. We were raised to be polite, so we smile and say “Thank you!”


93 posted on 05/16/2012 6:26:21 PM PDT by reformedliberal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 82 | View Replies]

To: La Lydia
I've lived for extended amounts of time at 2 places in that corridor. And I'd have to agree.

I also convinced some ancient wimmenfolk that didn't even speak Spanish to teach me some of the 'traditional' dishes.

I don't know what language they spoke, but it wasn't spanish, and it wasn't english. The best cooks were ancient crones that liked me a whole lot better after I lost my store bought teef and really paid attention to what they were trying to teach.

I am grateful to have learned from masters. And what the hell, I can actually cook on a wood cook-stove now. Doesn't take many switches with a green switch to get a point across about temperature control.

/johnny

94 posted on 05/16/2012 6:31:06 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 91 | View Replies]

To: clbiel
Henry the 8th timeframe stolen from a Roman Empire era dish. Almost nothing is original.

/johnny

95 posted on 05/16/2012 6:33:41 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 92 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

The far interior Spanish fort in NC was burned by Indians in 1568, according to Spanish records. This would have been Joara in native parlance or Fort San Juan, established by Juan Pardo, really more of a garrison with thirty or so soldiers and held for less than two years. Seems to have been a coordinated attempt to drive out the Spanish, as forts in SC and TN were burned that same year as well.


96 posted on 05/16/2012 6:36:21 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 90 | View Replies]

To: reformedliberal
My favorite form of chili con carne is chili powder (homemade) and cumin powder (fresh ground) smoked in a searing pan until the oils release, followed with a little oil or lard, chopped onions, and when the onions are sauted, add pork stock and roasted and skinned jalapenos and Hatch chilis. Add chunks of pork, put over a smokey fire until the meat falls off the bone, and all the liquid is reduced to a thick sauce. I do generally add fire roasted tomatoes.

For me, that is what I like as chili.

It certainly isn't 'chili' as defined by 80% of America. And it damn sure ain't Wolf Brand(tm). But that's what I like. Chili with meat.

/johnny

97 posted on 05/16/2012 6:41:48 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 93 | View Replies]

To: clbiel

I’m a Texan and bought what from the picture should have been a simple Tex-Mex, folded crisp taco in Kansas City, MO. around 1974.

I forget the other details, but the cheese was American, and the ‘hot sauce’ was ordinary ketchup.

I was also shocked to eat Chili con carne on spaghetti in Kansas City, not too bad by the way.

The taco is as memorable as a hot dog I bought in rural France, the colors and parts were there, a bun, a wiener looking thing, and a mustard of a sort, but it was all totally foreign from an American hot dog.


98 posted on 05/16/2012 7:08:36 PM PDT by ansel12 (When immutable definition of Bible marriage of One Man, One Woman, is in jeopardy, call the Mormon.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: La Lydia

Here is a blog of a Texas woman living in New York.
http://homesicktexan.blogspot.com/2008/05/how-to-render-lard.html

In this recipe she shows how to make lard, and describes it as easy, with much better flavor.

Excerpt:
“But the best thing about lard is that it’s not bad for you. It has less saturated fat (the bad fat) than butter, while it also has more than twice as much monosaturated fat (the good fat) than butter. And it has none of those pesky trans fats—that is, if it hasn’t been hydrogenated to prolong its shelf life.

And that, my friends, is the problem. Most lard you find at the grocery store has been hydrogenated to make it shelf stable indefinitely, which robs it of its good qualities.”


99 posted on 05/16/2012 7:17:11 PM PDT by ansel12 (When immutable definition of Bible marriage of One Man, One Woman, is in jeopardy, call the Mormon.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 91 | View Replies]

To: mamelukesabre
A chinese man once told me there is nothing chinese about american chinese food and that it was invented in new york city by a jewish man.

Thats true.
BTW, that Chinese guy has moved back to Taiwan now.
He sells lottery tickets in a shop around the corner from my house.
Has a distinct "inside NYC" accent.
"Hey...You gonna win dis time or not?"

He tells me he's 104 yrs old.
Or 66...which ever one I wanna believe...;)

100 posted on 05/16/2012 8:13:44 PM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 60 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-118 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson