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M1 Garand: Our New Service Rifle (Original 1938 Review)
http://dailycaller.com ^ | Aug, 1938 | Maj. G.H. Drewry

Posted on 05/21/2012 7:19:38 AM PDT by BO Stinkss

For more than thirty years the Ordnance Department endeavored to obtain a satisfactory semi-automatic or self-loading rifle to replace the bolt action Springfield. These efforts were not confined to the development within the Department. Invitations were extended periodically to gun designers in this country and abroad to submit weapons for test, and tests were made of those received which showed any promise of meeting the specifications prescribed.

During this period of thirty odd years many rifles were received and tested. Mechanisms embodying every known principle of operation were represented in the many types submitted.

After many tests of various calibers, it was decided that the caliber .276 cartridge developed sufficient power for a shoulder weapon and that the use of this smaller cartridge would facilitate the design of a reliable and durable self-loading rifle within the prescribed weight limit and would also reduce the load of the individual soldier due to the lighter weight of the cartridge. Of the several rifles in this caliber submitted for test, two were outstanding: the Pedersen; and the Garand, designed and developed by Mr. John C. Garand. Both Mr. Pedersen and Mr. Garand carried on their development work at the Springfield Armory.

A number of each of these types were manufactured and submitted to the services for test. Both rifles performed very well. However, to adopt a weapon of this caliber involved further complication of the supply problem by the introduction of another type of ammunition.

In the meantime, Mr. Garand, who has been in the employ of the Ordnance Department at the Springfield Armory for the past eighteen years as a designer of automatic weapons, completed a test model of a semi-automatic rifle designed to function with either the Caliber .30, M1, Model 1906, or the caliber .30, M1,

(Excerpt) Read more at dailycaller.com ...


TOPICS: Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: banglist; m1; sourcetitlenoturl
Awesome weapon - just watch your thumb!
1 posted on 05/21/2012 7:19:46 AM PDT by BO Stinkss
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To: BO Stinkss

Own two and love ‘em. Springfield Armory, circa ‘43.

Lot of fun and shoot great!


2 posted on 05/21/2012 7:21:56 AM PDT by Chasaway (Where are we going and why am I in this handbasket?)
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To: BO Stinkss

Also much discussion here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2885364/posts


3 posted on 05/21/2012 7:22:15 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: BO Stinkss

It sure is. I had a great opportunity to get two rather good service rifles from 1943 and 1944, but with barrels that were worn out. It took me 6 months to a year to get two corresponding correct good barrels, and it took some expensive barrel and receiver clamps (from Chestnut Ridge, BTW) to replace them. Corrected a few other things also.

Then Numrich had a short period where they were selling WWII receivers and I bought two! It took about 2 years of scrounging for the right parts, stocks, barrels, etc. but I now have 4 correct Garands. Along the way, I ended up getting a significant bit of the armorers tools and the wrenches.....right now, I’m just itching to get another receiver!


4 posted on 05/21/2012 7:29:43 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: Gaffer
right now, I’m just itching to get another receiver!

The Civilian Marksmanship Program sells receivers, complete rifles, and accessories upon completion of their purchase requirements (which are not difficult to meet). You'll start off buying a receiver, but will wind up with a full safe in no time, so be careful. :)

5 posted on 05/21/2012 7:44:22 AM PDT by TonyInOhio ( It is later than you think)
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To: BO Stinkss

Now we are talking about something!

Usually, one finger bite was enougth to drive home the point.

Have two 1940’s era and a couple of ‘03’s all from CMP.
Folks at the range will let you shoot their model anything if you let them try your M1. Those who follow military history can only imagine where these ‘40’s era peices have been and what they have seen.

Thanks for the post.


6 posted on 05/21/2012 7:47:57 AM PDT by frog in a pot (When will the U.S. look at history and realize having a Marxist in the WH is not a good thing?)
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To: TonyInOhio
You'll start off buying a receiver, but will wind up with a full safe in no time, so be careful. :)

Dude, been there! TWO larger safes and four fireproof file safes for the small stuff. I know about the CMP, but I would prefer not to get my stuff from such a public concern. I've been trolling through the gunshows looking for the worst beater with a good receiver, frankly. I have everything I need to bring one back to life :)

7 posted on 05/21/2012 7:49:40 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: Gaffer

Obama’s Gun Ban

http://www.nagr.org/M1_RP_Survey1.aspx?pid=oo


8 posted on 05/21/2012 7:50:01 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: BO Stinkss

The Springfield Armory turned out many fine weapons and perhaps the best 1911 .45 ACP.


9 posted on 05/21/2012 8:00:46 AM PDT by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: trebb

Springfield in its time produced excellent weapons. I’m partial though, to my 1911A1 from Colt (1943). Also have a 1911 Colt that I think was from a time when Colt actually meant something. Today’s Colt weapons you see (new manufacture) are, frankly overpriced, and the craftsmanship is not there.


10 posted on 05/21/2012 8:14:03 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: Gaffer
Springfield in its time produced excellent weapons. I’m partial though, to my 1911A1 from Colt (1943). Also have a 1911 Colt that I think was from a time when Colt actually meant something. Today’s Colt weapons you see (new manufacture) are, frankly overpriced, and the craftsmanship is not there.

Yep - my 1911 was made in 1914, has a low serial number, and has "all the right stamps" to make it a collector's item. Still smooth and sweet and have never known it to jam or misfeed in the 50+ years I have been aware of it (born in '52 and first shot it at age 10, but Dad used it for competition shooting at the local NRA-affilliated ranges). My Dad gave it to me before he died and I trust it with my life...

11 posted on 05/21/2012 8:18:53 AM PDT by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: trebb

I love lever action rifles, does anyone know of a lever action in .556 or .223?


12 posted on 05/21/2012 8:23:49 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Gaffer
I brought back an M1 with a shot-out barrel from Viet Nam. I had it re-barreled to 7.62 NATO and brought it to National Match standards. (I have another NM M1 in the standard .30 caliber.) One of the interesting things I discovered was the recoil impulse from these identical rifles (except caliber) is very different. The .30-06 Springfield gives the shooter a steady shove to the rear in recoil. The 7.62 NATO is more of a punch or abrupt push. Unless you fire both, you'll never know the difference.

One thing for new shooters that may have learned on the AR/M16/M4 platform — the M1 in either .30 caliber or 7.62 NATO has RECOIL. Shooters learning on the light recoiling .223 Remington/5.56 NATO are unprepared for the much greater recoil of the M1 calibers. To shoot the M1 or its successor M1A/M14, these shooter may have to “unlearn” some bad habits picked up from the smaller caliber. With these Main Battle Rifles, correct position behind the rifle and hold are critical to accurate shooting (and shooter comfort).

13 posted on 05/21/2012 8:24:52 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: central_va
I love lever action rifles, does anyone know of a lever action in .556 or .223?

I doubt such a rifle exists. Most 556/223 bullets are spire-point, which is very unsafe in the tubular magazine of a lever-action rifle. Generally, lever-action rifles are designed for round-nosed bullets only.

14 posted on 05/21/2012 8:37:15 AM PDT by Spirochete (Sic transit gloria mundi)
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To: central_va

http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/126/products_id/61428%22%20onmouseover=%22showNotifyBox=true%22%20onmouseout=%22showNotifyBox=false


15 posted on 05/21/2012 8:48:02 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: dangerdoc
Browning BLR 81 223

Looks like a lever action with a bottom feed magazine. Very interesting.

16 posted on 05/21/2012 8:58:46 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BO Stinkss

Got mine during replacement infantry basic training in Feb 44. First use was on firing range in the prone position firing distance with the straps wound around my arm. Drill sergeant asked me if I was comfortable. When I said Yes, he said that shouldn’t be and moved my arm to where it wasn’t. Anyway I liked the Carbine better but ended up with a M-1 in Europe where the stacking swivel was never of any use.


17 posted on 05/21/2012 9:13:58 AM PDT by ex-snook ("above all things, truth beareth away the victory")
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To: ex-snook

Awesome story! Thanks for sharing and thanks for your service.


18 posted on 05/21/2012 9:56:37 AM PDT by BO Stinkss
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To: BO Stinkss

Bump.


19 posted on 05/21/2012 10:08:31 AM PDT by EternalVigilance (The saving of America starts the day conservatives stop supporting what they say they hate.)
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To: MasterGunner01

My ‘06 Garand has what I consider to be relatively mild recoil.

I’ve got a Savage 110FP that likes a load roughly comparable to a .300 Win Mag; that one beats the heck out of me.


20 posted on 05/21/2012 10:09:38 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring
The recoil impulse of a .30-06 Springfield is about 15-18 ft-lbs. (or the equivalent of that weight dropped from one foot onto your shoulder).

With a gas operated rifle like the M1, part of the recoil impulse is soaked up by the operating system of the rifle. The felt recoil seems much milder and I could shoot the M1 all day long without any recoil shyness problems.

On the other hand, my M1903A1 Springfield belts me with the full recoil with every shot. Shoot 100 rounds from a Springfield and your shoulder feels like it was worked over with a guy wielding a baseball bat. The reason for the difference is the action of the rifle — a Springfield (or your Savage) is a bolt action and all the recoil impulse is felt as RECOIL. That's the big difference and a new shooter who's learned to shoot on a Mouse Gun is going to get pounded before he or she gets rid of bad habits and gets things sorted out.

21 posted on 05/21/2012 10:51:11 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

That, and the load I fire out of that bolt rifle uses a bullet 20 grains heavier and 100 fps faster than the M2 Ball round.


22 posted on 05/21/2012 11:02:40 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring
I generally shoot the equivalent of M72 Match or M852 Match ammo in my Garands, The M72 Match loads puts a 168 grain Sierra Match King projectile out there at 2,650 fps and the M852 Match is 2,550 fps. As a rule of thumb, the heavier the bullet, you should reduce the load to keep the breech pressure within limits (either 50,000 psi or 52,0000 psi). If you're pushing a 168 grin bullet at 2,900 fps, I can understand why it feels like a .300 Win Mag.
23 posted on 05/21/2012 11:17:35 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

Haven’t done much NM’ing at all. I brought these back to issue condition.


24 posted on 05/21/2012 11:45:19 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: ex-snook
I went through Signal Corps "basic" at Camp Gordon in Feb 1951. This lasted 6 weeks, and was about equivalent to a good Boy Scout jamboree, I guess. We had a little bit of basic infantry weapons, mostly based on the M1 carbine, with which I qualified Expert. Would have liked to see what I could do with the Garand, but they only let me fire one clip, prone in the sand, followed by 3 rounds from the .50 MG! Later, in the Chemical Corps, someone who saw my records said that I was listed as having 16 weeks basic training (FECOM fodder!)
25 posted on 05/21/2012 12:16:08 PM PDT by 19th LA Inf
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To: MasterGunner01

No no no ... in the Garand, I shoot M2 Ball or equivalent handloads (168gr MatchKing and 47-or-so grains of 4064).

The .300 WinMag load is a 190 gr MatchKing with 58.5 grains of RE-19 out of a bolt rifle. That load would destroy the op-rod on a Garand in short order.


26 posted on 05/21/2012 12:59:42 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring

The 4064 load for the M1 sounds good.

That’s a pretty heavy load for the bolt gun. Is this an actual .300 Win Mag load or is it a .30-06 trying to perform like a .300 Win Mag — I’m a little foggy here — I’m not sure of the bolt gun’s caliber.


27 posted on 05/21/2012 2:24:42 PM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: MasterGunner01

The bolt gun’s a .30-06.

Didn’t plan for that particular load, just loaded up a bunch of different charges and it shot most accurately at the charge that I believe puts the MV at just short of 2900 fps.

Which, with a 190 gr MK, very nearly matches Federal’s published data for their 300 Win Mag Gold Medal Match load.


28 posted on 05/21/2012 2:58:31 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: ex-snook

Great to hear from some “Brown Shoe” vets about first hand Garand use!

I started my service with an M16A1, but the AR series will never generate the warm, fuzzy feeling I have for the Garand.

It’s a great rifle and a link to a time when America did some things better than it does today.


29 posted on 05/22/2012 8:24:09 PM PDT by M1911A1
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