Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

What to do when a friend is being misprescribed psych meds
06/05/12 | Auntie Mame

Posted on 06/05/2012 4:48:53 PM PDT by Auntie Mame

A friend of mine is becoming crazier and crazier, it's almost impossible to talk with her anymore. Today I asked and she freely gave me a list of her medications. I am very scared for her. Here's what she is being prescribed:

Latuda 80 mg

Paroxetine (Paxil) 40 mg

Lamotrigine 200 mg

Topiramate 200 mg 2x/day

Her doctor is not a psychiatrist, just a general practitioner. She says she speaks with him once a week over the telephone, and then comes to his office to pick up her prescriptions which are held for her at the desk.

What do I mean when I say she's getting crazier and crazier?

She talks 90 miles an hour, she can't stay on topic, she's all over the place in her conversation. She's verbally and actively obsessive about certain things, things that because of her bad decisions (probably brought on by all these meds) she's caused herself.

I looked up the meds and it appears the dosages are really high.

I called the Medical licensing board and spoke to someone but they are of no help whatsoever. I'm thinking of calling up the doctor and putting the fear of God into him. I'm not sure what else I can do. She has been getting a lot of moving violation tickets lately, and recently totaled her car but she says it was not her fault. She is in no shape to help herself and has no family looking out for her.

She's very open to hearing me tell her how worried I am about her. I think if I could find some kind of treatment program she would be amendable to checking it out.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: drugs; prescriptionmeds; psychmeds
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-103 next last
To: Auntie Mame

You should very plainly and diplomatically tell her just what you say here, that you are concerned her medications are not helping her and urge her just to see another doctor and get a second opinion.

She should really see an actual psychiatrist (an MD not a psychologist or psychotherapist).

You might want to get a few referrals, maybe from doctors or other people you know and whose judgment you trust. Perhaps you could speak with them yourself before hand, but that might not be possible/necessary.

You could give her a choice of 3 or 4 to chose from, that should prevent her from thinking you are trying to micro-manage her life.

Of course when she goes she needs to bring all the medication with her, so the doctor can see what’s going on.

If she needs to take any psychotropic meds at all, and if she is making bad/careless life decisions for whatever reasons she probably needs to get some therapy too. I doubt a GP doc is really qualified to provide that.

I’m almost 100% sure that her current doctor will not, under any circumstances, discuss her treatment with you. Unless you are a close relative, and maybe even then, he/she just isn’t going to do it due to confidentiality issues.

She can probably find a Psychiatrist who can supervise her meds who can then recommend a less expensive therapist to see her weekly, or however frequently, for some “talking” therapy.

Good luck, mental problems are the worst, over medicating can be a big problem.


51 posted on 06/05/2012 5:47:27 PM PDT by jocon307
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

General practitioners need to suck it up and admit when they are practicing beyond their scope of expertise. Your friend needs a referral to a psychiatrist or a psychiatric hospital, to get the medications straightened out. It may require a few days of being in the hospital for a proper evaluation and diagnosis.
Several years ago, my GP diagnosed me with depression and put me on antidepressants, but I was actually severely anemic. I needed a blood transfusion, not antidepressants!
I pray that your friend finally gets the proper diagnosis and treatment. You’re a good friend!


52 posted on 06/05/2012 5:50:09 PM PDT by toothfairy86
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

You need to get your friends to a serious psyche. She has one on that list that conflicts with another and maybe two that conflictsare not necessary.


53 posted on 06/05/2012 5:50:36 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live athrough it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: shalom aleichem

The cherished HMO or Blue Cross plan does not cover the psychiatrist you should be seeing when you have true mental illness.


54 posted on 06/05/2012 5:51:18 PM PDT by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: real saxophonist
They seem to give anti-depressants for almost anything nowadays. After I was wounded, they gave me some (I don't remember the name).

I had to increase the dosage to get to the "right" level....and whatever I do, don't stop taking them immediately. I wasn't suicidal, but I cannot describe the feeling, but think intense anger and severe apathy at the same time (like intense rage at anything and everything and not caring about the consequences or much else for that matter). The more I took, the worse it got. And oh, it didn't stop the physical pain from the injury.

I remember burning holes into the living room floor with my eyes and then somewhere in the fog, THANK GOD, I tried to think of why I was so angry............I dumped every last one of those pills into the toilet. I never heard so much pissing and moaning as when the "doctor" found out I quit cold turkey.

Of course, these pills are "safer" than narcotics.

Never felt like that before or since. I had one other doctor try to get me to take them anyway afterward (even after I explained my negative reaction); just gotta get the dosage right. I asked him if he would care if his house were burned down.....because his patient would probably be angry enough to do it and stop at the DQ for a carefree ice cream cone aafterward.

Strange, he stopped recommended me that crap.

55 posted on 06/05/2012 5:54:23 PM PDT by Repeat Offender (While the wicked stand confounded, call me with Thy Saints surrounded)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
“Her doctor is not a psychiatrist, just a general practitioner. She says she speaks with him once a week over the telephone, and then comes to his office to pick up her prescriptions which are held for her at the desk.”

To expand on my comment #31, please understand that your friend's statements CANNOT be relied on if she is manic and/or delusional...starting with “her doctor is not a psychiatrist”! I find if hard to believe that a GP would prescribe these meds. I also don't even believe that she would be going “to his office” to pick up what appear to be several “controlled drugs”.

My wife has been taking piles of psych meds from a dozen doctors in five states and NEVER has she been told to pick up drug prescriptions from the MD’s office. Doctors are always being watched as they are frequent pill abusers, so they must carefully comply with controls such as having prescriptions get filled by a third party pharmacy.

If you could suggest that she show you her pill containers so you can see which MD actually prescribed the pills without setting her off in some way, it would help prevent you from jumping to wrong conclusions based just on what she is saying. Again, I strongly recommend that you refrain from concluding that her GP has done anything wrong based only on her statements.

56 posted on 06/05/2012 5:57:18 PM PDT by Seizethecarp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
You seem to be worried that the drugs are causing her symptoms but it may be that the symptoms come from her and the drugs are are not set properly to relieve her particular condition. The best thing that could happen to her is that she could be seen by a GOOD psychiatrist, one who knows how to properly use psychotropic drugs when necessary, but doesn't over-medicate, who does not rely only on "talking therapy", and who will also be on the lookout for any possible physical explanation.

It's possible that her current doctor could refer her to a psychiatrist. There are all kinds of laws now about medical privacy but you may be able to express your concerns to her doctor, especially if she gives permission for you to come to a doctor appointment

57 posted on 06/05/2012 5:57:56 PM PDT by wideminded
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: shalom aleichem; sarasmom; Auntie Mame
.I suggest you first talk to an actual pharmacist, preferably with your friend present.

Talk to your pharmacist, then a psychiatrist
.

I second,...er..third that.

A good pharmacist can your best friend ...get to know him/her and them know you if you have health problems. A pharmacist will know what the drug interactions will be and if the dosage is too high or even if the drug(s) are redundant.

Often doctors don't give clear instructions in a short office visit.
58 posted on 06/05/2012 5:59:42 PM PDT by RedMonqey (Men who will not suffer to self govern, will suffer under the governance of lesser men.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

Sounds like she’s in the throes of a full blown mania despite the meds typically prescribed for manic-depressive disorder.

Take away her car keys and credit cards if you can. If it veers into sexual encounters that can get pretty unsavory, too.

But, as bad as that sounds, it won’t be as bad as the crash that inevitably follows.

She needs help. Try to get it for her with as few permanent repercussions as possible. Psych eval maybe, that would be an opportunity to get her meds straightened out.


59 posted on 06/05/2012 5:59:53 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

Has she ever been diagnosed with any type of disorder or mental illness. I’d find out because that might help in finding a treatment center where they can deal with both her addiction problem(if there is one) and the actual underlying mental illness.

I fail to understand someone receiving that many drugs for something that hasn’t even been diagnosed.


60 posted on 06/05/2012 6:04:24 PM PDT by formosa (Formosa)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Repeat Offender

I actually know that feeling. I think antidepressants can do wonders in some cases, but it’s such an agonizing process to find the right meds and dosage. They are way overprescribed, and that’s the main problem.


61 posted on 06/05/2012 6:06:31 PM PDT by real saxophonist (The fact that you play tuba doesn't make you any less lethal. -USMC bandsman in Iraq)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 55 | View Replies]

To: Seizethecarp

“and then comes to his office to pick up her prescriptions which are held for her at the desk.”

She is probably doing what my mother in law does which is pick up the “paper” script and take it to the drug store for her arthritis pain medicine, which can’t be phoned in and has to be physically delivered to the pharmacist.


62 posted on 06/05/2012 6:17:34 PM PDT by conservativesister
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 56 | View Replies]

To: steveo

You nailed it!


63 posted on 06/05/2012 6:17:43 PM PDT by Born Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: mtrott

Topiramate and lamotrigine are both seizure meds.


64 posted on 06/05/2012 6:18:00 PM PDT by Bainbridge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: mtrott

Topiramate and lamotrigine are both seizure meds.


65 posted on 06/05/2012 6:18:04 PM PDT by Bainbridge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All

To all of you who have responded, thank you.

The second opinion, try to get her to see a psychiatrist, is a what I’m going to do and something I hadn’t considered. She told me in slight wonderment that her doctor was a GP, not a psychiatrist and that she wasn’t seeing one but it never occurred to me that that might be the way to go.

The reason I’m really concerned about this doctor is I looked him up and he’s been chastized because of a situation where he was medicating himself and the police had to come to his house in 2009 because they found him in the back yard howling at the moon. He was taken away by the police on a 5150 (??). Apparently now all is well and he got his license back and is practicing medicine again.

When I first met her in the early 2000s, she was perfectly fine. It was only about five years ago where she went to the doctor, was told she was probably bipolar, that the meds began. She’s only been this bad for about five months.

Anyway, thank you all for your thoughts. There’s some good stuff you’ve all come up with and I appreciate your kindness.


66 posted on 06/05/2012 6:18:22 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: yldstrk

It’s also used for bipolar disorder.


67 posted on 06/05/2012 6:19:55 PM PDT by Born Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Copenhagen Smile

He didn’t post her name, for crying out loud!

How could listing med’s and dosages be illegal?


68 posted on 06/05/2012 6:20:04 PM PDT by G Larry (Criminals thrive on the indulgence of society's understanding)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: MagUSNRET
Call your local social services

Thank you. Good idea but I want to wait until there is no other choice. I hate getting getting government involved, it always turns into a mess. But I have put it on the bottom of my list. I hadn't considered social services, so .. thank you!

69 posted on 06/05/2012 6:21:33 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: G Larry
I dunno if it is or isn't. But so many seemingly harmless things are illegal, I was merely speculating.

In MA, for example, a minor using a cellphone in a parked car is illegal.

Again, just being cautious.

70 posted on 06/05/2012 6:24:06 PM PDT by Copenhagen Smile
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra; ransomnote
He won’t or can’t talk to you about her.

He isn't prohibited from listening though. While I agree a second opinion may be the best, as others have pointed out, the present doctor may not know what's going on.

He wouldn't have to talk to you, but you could tell them what's going on and your concerns.

71 posted on 06/05/2012 6:31:24 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (Liberals, at their core, are aggressive & dangerous to everyone around them,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Seizethecarp

Actually, I did see her prescriptions today, saw them with my own eyes when she opened a sealed envelope and took them out to show me and that’s where I got the list of meds. She wrote them down for me herself and wrote her doctor’s phone number down when I told her I wanted to call him because I was very angry at him for making her crazy. She actually wants me to help her. I personally saw the prescriptions and her doctor’s name on them. She commented how he always spells her name wrong.

You know something strange? As nuts as she appears to be, she RARELY forgets to take her meds. We discussed this phenomenon today, as much as anyone can discuss anything with her, and she agreed it was interesting. She says if she does forget, which is extremely rare, she can tell within a day.

Oh, and I saw several of her prescriptions in the bottles; she carries them around with her in her purse.

It sounds like your wife has good doctors. My friend is not the only person I’ve known whose doctor never (or rarely) sees them and just talks to them over the phone and precribes psych meds.


72 posted on 06/05/2012 6:32:20 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 56 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame; Copenhagen Smile; G Larry
Not sure, but is it a crime for you to list her meds, a violation of confidentiality or something?

HIPAA only applies to “covered entities”, i.e. health care providers, a health plan or a health care clearing house (third party administrators who process enrollments or claims) or employers particularly if their health plans are “self insured”.

http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/coveredentities/index.html

It would not be illegal under HIPAA for a concerned family member or friend to tell her doctor that they are concerned, but it would most likely be a violation of HIPAA for the doctor to discuss her condition, care plan or medications with anyone other than other medical professionals or covered entities if necessary to providing care and only with the patient having signed a HIPAA release form or someone like a family member or friend with a medical power of attorney.

Listing her meds here is not a violation of her privacy and not in violation of any law because no identifying information about the person was provided.

Auntie Mame: I concur with what some others have said. You are right to be concerned but don’t necessarily have all the facts. If a GP is truly proscribing those drugs in those doses to your friend as you described and she seems to be getting worse (without knowing if it is the drugs or her underlying condition) probably the best you can do under the circumstances is encourage your friend to get a second opinion from a competent physiatrist. IMO, GP’s have no business proscribing those sorts of meds and only monitoring the patient via telephone calls if that indeed is what’s going on, any more than a podiatrist should be proscribing cardiac medications.

73 posted on 06/05/2012 6:33:30 PM PDT by MD Expat in PA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: blackdog

No. The entire mental health scam is a game. The circumstances change.....but the truth always stands firm.

No one who goes to a psychiatrist should believe that they are seeking help akin to a bodily injury treated by a surgeon. The two are polar opposites.

All you will ever get from a secular counselor or therapist is bad advice and harmful perscriptions.


74 posted on 06/05/2012 6:33:52 PM PDT by SkyPilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: blackdog

No. The entire mental health scam is a game. The circumstances change.....but the truth always stands firm.

No one who goes to a psychiatrist should believe that they are seeking help akin to a bodily injury treated by a surgeon. The two are polar opposites.

All you will ever get from a secular counselor or therapist is bad advice and harmful perscriptions.


75 posted on 06/05/2012 6:34:20 PM PDT by SkyPilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: sarasmom

Thanks, sarasmom, that is a really good suggestion. I think I’ll go to the pharmacist tonight by myself and see what they say and then bring her with me another time.


76 posted on 06/05/2012 6:34:42 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: conservativesister
“She is probably doing what my mother in law does which is pick up the “paper” script and take it to the drug store for her arthritis pain medicine, which can’t be phoned in and has to be physically delivered to the pharmacist.”

OK, that makes sense (must be my own ME/CFS brain fog again). Controlled RXs can't even be mailed and must be picked up in person.

My point to all is that you can't rely on what folks say if they appear to have “bipolar mania with psychotic features” or perhaps schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (a mash-up of schizophrenia and either bipolar or depressive disorders). That last one is my wife's latest diagnosis.

When she is having a relapse, I can't rely on anything she says as she confuses times, dates, places and persons as well as names of things. Yesterday she was talking about a blue penguin at the beach when she meant a blue heron, for example. The friend under discussion in the thread may actually have a psychiatrist prescribing those meds, but may be confused and say the MD was "only" a GP, for example.

77 posted on 06/05/2012 6:39:01 PM PDT by Seizethecarp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 62 | View Replies]

To: mtrott
I guess the issue is, did she have these symptoms before being loaded up with all these meds?

No, until she was diagnosed bipolar she was basically normal, as normal as we all are as individuals. It was only once she was given meds that she started to go sideways and it was gradual over time.

Thank you for your thoughts. I appreciate your comments. It's really helpful, food for thought, and has given me direction.

78 posted on 06/05/2012 6:39:01 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
She sounds like she might be Bipolar.

If that's the case then she definitely needs to see a psychiatrist.

79 posted on 06/05/2012 6:39:39 PM PDT by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (It's hurricane season! Yay!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
those are doses in the range of what is used to treat schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and Mania. Not working. she needs an antimanic med. psychiatrist should be treating her not a GP or internist, You are right to be concerned.

Is she on drugs like cocaine or amphetamine?

Does she have family? Will she go with you to an ER or a mental health clinic.she may need an hospital.

The drugs are not dangerous in these doses but they are not working and that is dangerous. Good luck!

80 posted on 06/05/2012 6:39:58 PM PDT by cajungirl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

G-d alone cannot cure or help mental illness.

Medication is needed.


81 posted on 06/05/2012 6:44:52 PM PDT by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (It's hurricane season! Yay!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Flag_This
D = Distractibility and easy frustration
I = Irresponsibility and erratic uninhibited behavior
G = Grandiosity
F = Flight of ideas
A = Activity increased with weight loss and increased libido
S = Sleep is decreased
T = Talkativeness

I guess most of these she exhibits although I don't find her easily frustrated nor is her behavior erratic or uninhibited. I have no idea about increased libido. She does have weight loss, talkativeness, not sure about irresponsibility. She says she can go three days with no sleep or food and it's not a problem.

Can these manic episodes last for six months? Because she's been pretty bad for six months although the past week has been off the charts, that I know of. I've been dodging her phone calls and she leaves these long rambling unintelligible messages that I just delete but today she came to my office and although I made her leave, when I went out to lunch she was out in the parking lot waiting for me in her car.

Actually being in her physical presence, added to those crazy phone messages is what finally scared me enough to try to do something.

Thank you.

82 posted on 06/05/2012 6:46:41 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

I am Bipolar and take Lamictal (a mood stabilizer) and Cymbalta. I would be lost without them.

And no,you don’t want to stop taking them,at least not cold turkey.

I have and it’s really bad.


83 posted on 06/05/2012 6:52:45 PM PDT by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (It's hurricane season! Yay!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

***She talks 90 miles an hour, she can’t stay on topic, she’s all over the place in her conversation.**

Sounds like my mother-in-law, her sister, her daughters and her son, my brother-in-law (If you know him he probably owes you money). And this is without meds!


84 posted on 06/05/2012 6:55:12 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Anything Goes, Phantom of the Opera, Nice work if you can get it, EVITA. On BROADWAY last week.!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
“She actually wants me to help her. I personally saw the prescriptions and her doctor’s name on them.”

The first thing I would do is to research the MD and verify just what his specialty is!

That is very good that she is open to having you help her because at the very least, she could might be open to the suggestion of many here for her to be seen by a psychiatrist if her MD is not one.

As another FReeper suggested, an MD can only prescribe based on information that he/she has and ofter the patient appears to be normal in the MDs office, but is bonkers as soon as they leave the office.

In my wife's family it has taken me two decades to finally get her and her sister first to see a psychiatrist (they denied there was anything wrong) and once I got them to go to the psychiatrist, they only complained of depression, not mania. But antidepressants without mood stabilizers can trigger mania! So if the MD doesn't know of manic symptoms in addition to depression, they may inadvertently trigger mania by prescribing only antidepressants.

Ofter it is only the family members and friends who can report mania to the MD. The patient tends to LIKE mania and can get away with at lot of HYPO-mania (lower grade mania) which doesn't require hospitalization, but qualifies for a bipolar dianosis and the need for a trial of mood stabilizers.

Long-winded way of saying that I have a lot of compassion for the frustrated psychiatrists that have tried to treat my wife's family. Perhaps your friend's MD just needs more information. That is all I am suggesting.

85 posted on 06/05/2012 6:57:17 PM PDT by Seizethecarp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

Board certified shrink here.

Most people are not that hard to treat safely and effectively if you know what you’re doing. She could most likely be stabilized within a few weeks outpatient, a few months max.

She’s not in my area, not even in my state, but I’d be happy to see her if she were. Send me mail if she may be headed my way (Puget Sound area), and if she wants to strictly follow my recommendations: I’m willing to work with patients in a reasonably flexible manner, but I’m not interested anymore in going through the charade of trying to treat patients who want to do it “their way.” I’m not sure whether your friend is willing to do that after the loose follow-up she’s now used to - not sure of her part in the loosey-goosey care she’s currently getting, but I’ve found such care is all too often the result of an overt or tacit agreement between patient and doctor, unfortunately. I’m strict, but I know what I’m about, and I get results.

Hope she gets better care.


86 posted on 06/05/2012 7:03:20 PM PDT by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cajungirl

You have no idea how relieved I am with your statement these drugs are not dangerous at these doses (however, I’m going to stop by a pharmacy right after I type this).

Thanks for suggesting a mental health clinic. Is that a psychiatrists office or is it something different? I’m not really up on all the medical jargon, I try to stay away from those people. I believe she will go with me if I insist. She’s very open to my concerns, unless it’s just an act, I guess we’ll see. But she has never been one to put on an act.

As far as I know she’s not on any drugs like cocaine, but am not 100% positive but pretty sure.

Thank you very much.


87 posted on 06/05/2012 7:03:49 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 80 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

“Because she’s been pretty bad for six months although the past week has been off the charts, that I know of. I’ve been dodging her phone calls and she leaves these long rambling unintelligible messages that I just delete but today she came to my office and although I made her leave, when I went out to lunch she was out in the parking lot waiting for me in her car.”

“Unintelligible messages” sounds like possible “word salad” which can be a symptom of psychosis (which my wife experienced for two weeks last month during her most recent hospitalization).

Here is Wiki on schizophasi, or “word salad”:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizophasia

In the mental health field, schizophasia, commonly referred to as word salad, is confused, and often repetitious, language that is symptomatic of various mental illnesses.[1]

It is usually associated with a manic presentation and other symptoms of serious mental illnesses, such as psychosis, including schizophrenia. It is characterized by an apparently confused usage of words with no apparent meaning or relationship attached to them. In this context, it is considered to be a symptom of a formal thought disorder. In some cases schizophasia can be a sign of asymptomatic schizophrenia; e.g. the question “Why do people believe in God?” could elicit a response consisting of a series of words commonly associated with religion or prayer but strung together with no regard to language rules.

Schizophasia should be contrasted with another symptom of cognitive disruption and cognitive slippage involving certain idiosyncratic arrangements of words. With this symptom, the language may or may not be grammatically correct depending on the severity of the disease and the particular mechanisms which have been impacted by the disease.

The American diagnostic codes, from the DSM-IV, do not specifically code for this disorder although they include it as a symptom under the diagnosis of schizophrenia.[2]


88 posted on 06/05/2012 7:05:47 PM PDT by Seizethecarp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 82 | View Replies]

To: dagogo redux
Thanks for responding, Doc.

I’ve found such care is all too often the result of an overt or tacit agreement between patient and doctor,

This is what I've always thought. She scared me today, though. And her openness with giving me her doctor's name and showing me her prescriptions and her "right on" when I told her I was going to call him up and give him hell, gave me pause.

I guess I'll just take it a step at a time and see what happens. You all have calmed me down considerably and for that, I thank you.

89 posted on 06/05/2012 7:11:53 PM PDT by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 86 | View Replies]

To: sarasmom; Auntie Mame

“I suggest you first talk to an actual pharmacist, preferably with your friend present.”

Best advice so far.


90 posted on 06/05/2012 7:22:35 PM PDT by panaxanax (Voting 'Third Party' will ensure a Communist-Marxist-Socialist dominated Supreme Court!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

Find a shrink you trust by referral. Then tell her you are worried the meds are causing problems and tell her you want her checked by the expert you have who is supposed to be good. Then make an appointment for her and accompany her to the new doctor. Have her take all her medicine vials.

Don’t call social services on her unless you think she is going to do serious damage to herself -guarenteed, they will do damage.


91 posted on 06/05/2012 7:41:09 PM PDT by SaraJohnson
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

Psychiatrist. Now. (Her, not you.)

If you can talk her into it, you might want to ask a pharmacist to review her medication list and see if the drugs and dosages are appropriate.


92 posted on 06/05/2012 9:02:44 PM PDT by Slings and Arrows (You can't have Ingsoc without an Emmanuel Goldstein.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Teflonic; Auntie Mame

“She soon thankfully quit cold turkey and thanks me for it to this day.”

Having dealt with a family member in a similar situation, my understanding it that it is VERY DANGEROUS to suddenly stop taking most psychiatric medication.

It must be tapered off gradually and consistently, or hallucinations and suicide are a major risk.

(I am not a physician, and highly suggest you consult with one to contact hers).


93 posted on 06/05/2012 9:04:58 PM PDT by Yehuda
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame

At the very least, she needs to see someone who knows about psychiatric disorders and meds - will she agree to accompany you to a local mental health clinic or a local general hospital which should have a mental health professional available on a consultation basis -if she beomes obviously dangerous to herself or others (like erratically driving her car) she can probably be involuntarily committed to a facility for a short period of time while a treatment program is developed for her under the care of a competent mental health professionals........


94 posted on 06/05/2012 9:41:53 PM PDT by Intolerant in NJ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: POWERSBOOTHEFAN

With GOD, ALL things are possible!!!! That’s what Christians believe.


95 posted on 06/06/2012 2:55:56 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 81 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Well,I’m Jewish and I while I believe that faith in G-d is important we also need to rely on doctors as well.

If you have a psychaitric illness you need to take meds to help even out the chemical imbalance in your brain. It’s not going to go away because you pray.


96 posted on 06/06/2012 3:19:23 AM PDT by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (It's hurricane season! Yay!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 95 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy
Well,I'm Jewish and I while I believe that faith in G-d is important we also need to rely on doctors as well.

If you have a psychiatric illness you need to take meds to help even out the chemical imbalance in your brain. It's not going to go away because you pray.

97 posted on 06/06/2012 3:19:49 AM PDT by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (It's hurricane season! Yay!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 95 | View Replies]

To: POWERSBOOTHEFAN

We believe in miracles. Faith in God is the MOST important!!


98 posted on 06/06/2012 3:24:57 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 97 | View Replies]

To: blackdog
9/10 psychiatrists are drug pushers who pose as doctors

That may be true, but they are probably all caught up in the same magic pill mentality. A good psychiatrist will work with a patient on behavior modification, coping, etc, but also provide medications in the cases where the patient can't function without them. It's never an easy call and unfortunately numerous bad doctors (like this one apparently) are too lazy, too stupid and/or greedy to actually help their patients.

99 posted on 06/06/2012 3:47:15 AM PDT by palmer (Jim, please bill me 50 cents for this completely useless post)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Born Conservative

you are kidding me..........that is so bizarre


100 posted on 06/06/2012 4:00:13 AM PDT by yldstrk ( My heroes have always been cowboys)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 67 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-103 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson