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Question about the insulation in my house

Posted on 07/19/2012 2:14:15 PM PDT by Feline_AIDS

Hi Freepers.

Question:

A neighbor recently cut down some trees in his yard and took the shade off one side of my house with it. The side of the house now getting tons of sunlight has an office over the garage. That office is now a sauna.

We finished the room ~10 years ago and it's always been warm. But without the shade, it's unbearable. We're talking 90+ degrees with the main AC on. There are 4 recessed lights. I held my hand up to one light can(?) and it was like a space heater. I moved around until I could see the attic vent through the light! There's nothing between that recessed light and the attic. And the attic has a little vent area with hardware cloth over it. And I swear the room is 10,000 degrees.

I went to the attic to look, and the garage is a lower roof than the rest of the house. The main attic fan is above the duct that leads to that extra room above the garage. The only entrance to that tiny attic/crawlspace is now filled by a gigantic furnace/AC duct. Naturally, there's a 3-4 inch gap below the duct, and I can see that there's no insulation above that room.

So, what should we do?

The solutions I can think of:

-Make a shoddy temporary covering for the recessed lights, which we don't even use. (What material should I use for this? Don't want to destroy the lights if possible.)

-Pay someone to come remove the duct, crawl in the teeny space and put down some insulation. (Can the duct be moved? Or would that cost a million dollars?)

-Put a reflective curtain (if such a thing exists) in the single, east-facing window.


TOPICS: Reference
KEYWORDS: airconditioning; energysaving; houseinsulation; insulation

1 posted on 07/19/2012 2:14:20 PM PDT by Feline_AIDS
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To: Feline_AIDS

- Replace the bulbs with the curly ones (I hate them, but would nearly eliminate the heat).

- Add a good film to your window: the most reflective you can find.

- Mess with the registers and see if you can blow more cold air into the room (lower the flow to others).

- Get a small A/C unit if above doesn’t fix/help.


2 posted on 07/19/2012 2:21:18 PM PDT by elpinta (John 17:3)
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To: Feline_AIDS

You should be able to go to Home Depot and buy insulation and a machine to blow it in. You do not need to get up there in order to insulate. I have a similar problem. I have a small fan on the floor in front of the vent and turn it on when I am in there to pull more air from the duct/vent


3 posted on 07/19/2012 2:22:06 PM PDT by Why So Serious (There is no cure for stupidity!!!)
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To: Feline_AIDS

I’d put an air conditioner in the single, east-facing window.


4 posted on 07/19/2012 2:22:06 PM PDT by SoothingDave
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To: Feline_AIDS

The easiest solution, and less costly, would be to install low-E windows.


5 posted on 07/19/2012 2:23:07 PM PDT by Perdogg (Let's leave reading things in the Constitution that aren't there to liberals and Dems)
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To: Feline_AIDS

You don’t have easy, quick access to your attic? That’s bad; very bad.

You need access to your attic—if for no other reason than to inspect the inside of the roof for leaks. And, I’m not talking about removing a vent. You need a PERMANENT way to easily get up there. Either an attic staircase or a hole (I recommend spending the extra money and putting in a pull-down staircase).

You need to add insulation to your attic floor. This will pay for itself over time as it will (1) reduce your air conditioning bills, and (2) more importantly reduce your heating bills.


6 posted on 07/19/2012 2:23:38 PM PDT by Brookhaven (Obama Admits He Can't Fix What Bush Broke, So Why Reelect Obama?)
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To: Feline_AIDS

The answer is obvious: sue your neighbor for removing the tree and baking your office. :)


7 posted on 07/19/2012 2:24:52 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Steyn: "One can argue about whose fault it is, but not ... whose responsibility it is: it's his")
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To: Feline_AIDS

Some free advice (so you know what its worth)and questions to ponder:

- When the room was built, was AC directed to the room...or do you just rely on airflow throught the door to cool it?

- I’d replace the cans, with a traditional fixture, if there is room.

What about the garage below - is the ceiling of the garage insulated? That could be a problem too.

- I’ve seen ‘reflectors’ in windows....but they don’t look so great. Depending on the size, you may be able to buy a roll of auto tint at Wal Mart, and tint it. The tint, along with curtains or blinds should help alot.

- Is the room tall enough to put a drop ceiling in - that would help.


8 posted on 07/19/2012 2:24:53 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

The prior post had some good suggestions. If your local codes permit it, consider one or more of those rotary extractor things mounted on your roof, as close to the peak as you can. They will spin like you can’t even believe and they move an astonishing amount of air. Be sure to check your codes! Don’t assume you can just throw those up there. They are prohibited where I live!

Insulation will help you, but if you have blazing sunlight on the side of your bldg, you are going to have to dump that heat, either actively or passively.


9 posted on 07/19/2012 2:25:59 PM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (This stuff we're going through now, this is nothing compared to the middle ages.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

For the windows I suggest covering with film for the panes by Gila.

It is available at Home Depot or at gilafilms.com.

My husband’s office has a gigantic floor-to-ceiling window that faces due west in Texas. We saw a huge temperature difference.

You will need to install at night, since you can’t apply the stuff in the heat (the edges will curl.)


10 posted on 07/19/2012 2:26:33 PM PDT by Mrs.Z
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To: Feline_AIDS
You first must determine what style recessed lights you have. Some recessed lights must be well clear of insulation otherwise you create a fire hazard.

You might want to consider removing the recessed lights, blowing in max insulation, and installing track lighting.

11 posted on 07/19/2012 2:27:33 PM PDT by LouAvul
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To: Feline_AIDS

I would keep procrastinating for 2 more months. The problem will go away by then.


12 posted on 07/19/2012 2:29:09 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: Feline_AIDS

I am confused by the description of your attic.
However, closed cell spray foam will be your best insulator in a small enclosed space. Spray foam has the highest R value/inch. It also does not require a vapor barrior. It can also be injected through a small hole. Unless your doing a very small area, most insulation can be installed by a professional company for about the same as you can buy it at the homecenter.

Therefore, call the two biggest insulation contractors in your area and have them give you an estimate.


13 posted on 07/19/2012 2:29:09 PM PDT by woodbutcher1963
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To: Feline_AIDS

I recommend a powered attic ventilation system.
Most are designed to kick on automatically when
the temperature exceeds a certain point.

Sometimes whirlybirds just don’t cut it.


14 posted on 07/19/2012 2:29:13 PM PDT by Safrguns
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To: Feline_AIDS

Are the recessed light edges even with the ceiling? If so go to home depot and get a sheet of Blue/Pink foam insulation board-4’X8’, cut squares/rounds to cover the recessed light holes, paint to match and use Liquid Nails to attach it over each light opening. If the lights have a decorative ring around them glue two pieces of the foam board/cut to size and hollow out one side so the piece fits over the hole flush with the ceilling and glue them over the lights.

I would pay someone to come in and move the large duct so you can blow celulose insulation into the attic. Cellulose insulation costs about $2.00 per cubic foot-installed.

There are sun blocking/insulated shades available but the cheapest thing to do is to get a large car windshield sun shield which is foam coated with reflective aluminum, cut it to fit the window space and attach it to the window with aluminum tape (easily removable-leaves no residue when removed-high sticking power) available by the role at Walmart.


15 posted on 07/19/2012 2:31:18 PM PDT by ScareyFast63
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To: Brookhaven; All

Thanks for the responses so far.

We can access the attic, but this space is under another, lowered section of the house. The house has a main part and two wings off the side. One wing was completely finished off, the other has a garage on the first floor and had an unfinished storage space above. We finished off that storage space into a room. That’s the sauna.

We have an attic over the main portion of the house, and we have full access to that. We don’t have access to the space above the formerly unfinished wing. There is not enough room to stand in that part— it’s maybe 3 feet high and at a roof angle. The duct goes into the lower roof’s gable, blocking access to that crawlspace.

Also, the heat comes out of the lights when they’re off. It just flows into the room from the light cans.


16 posted on 07/19/2012 2:32:39 PM PDT by Feline_AIDS (A gun in hand is better than a cop on the phone.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

Several options:

1) Install a pv powered attic exhaust fan.
2) Insulate between your attic and the room
3) Insulate with spray foam the side walls
4) Plant your own tree
5) Solar film on the windows
6) Move your office
7) Upgrade your airconditioning


17 posted on 07/19/2012 2:34:06 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: Feline_AIDS

Call this guy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Holmes


18 posted on 07/19/2012 2:35:59 PM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: Why So Serious
You should be able to go to Home Depot and buy insulation and a machine to blow it in.

I recently did that with my husband for a job. It's not all the expensive and the machine was a piece of cake to use. Note that you need two men to lift the maching, a 120# woman is pretty useless there.

You need to know where to build frames to vent the soffits but Home Depot is very good with that info.

The machines are incredible, and easy to use, the insulation comes in compacted bales that even I could lift. We insulated a 10,000 sq ft second story attic in 4 hours including picking up and returning the equipment and clean up.

19 posted on 07/19/2012 2:36:07 PM PDT by Jean S
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To: Feline_AIDS

Remove the light cans you have and instal sealed light cans designed to be used with attic insulation otherwise any insulation you put in the attic will spill through the openings in the light cans.


20 posted on 07/19/2012 2:36:48 PM PDT by ScareyFast63
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To: Feline_AIDS

Some effective things you can do:
1) Best: Install a vent fan to pull the intense heat out of the attic. Inexpensive powered vent fans that use small photovoltaic panels eliminate the expense of wiring. Exhausting heat directly should greatly reduce the attic temp, and is enormously more efficient that mechanical heat transfer (A/C).
2) Sneak in some sort of cover above the recessed lights. Do not jam insulation around the cans unless they are rated for it.
3) Have an insulation company put blown-in insulation into the attic space.
4) The window film and CFL bulbs are good ideas.
5) Install some sort of shade device (like a fabric awning) on the sunny side of the building.


21 posted on 07/19/2012 2:38:55 PM PDT by Chewbarkah
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To: elpinta

The LED light bulbs are even more efficient. IIRC from the ones in our house, they use about 1/10 of the wattage of the CFLs and emitt almost no heat.


22 posted on 07/19/2012 2:39:22 PM PDT by RedMDer (https://support.woundedwarriorproject.org/default.aspx?tsid=93destr)
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To: Feline_AIDS

If your window is east-facing, you shouldn’t get direct sunlight past 9am during the summer. That window is not your problem. You need to vent your attic better by increasing the number of roof jacks. Talk to a licensed roofing company and have them install more roof vents to allow the hot air to escape. Also, install blown-in cellulose debris insulation on the attic floor (min4-6 inches).


23 posted on 07/19/2012 2:39:41 PM PDT by Mashood
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To: Feline_AIDS

Some effective things you can do:
1) Best: Install a vent fan to pull the intense heat out of the attic. Inexpensive powered vent fans that use small photovoltaic panels eliminate the expense of wiring. Exhausting heat directly should greatly reduce the attic temp, and is enormously more efficient that mechanical heat transfer (A/C).
2) Sneak in some sort of cover above the recessed lights. Do not jam insulation around the cans unless they are rated for it.
3) Have an insulation company put blown-in insulation into the attic space.
4) The window film and CFL bulbs are good ideas.
5) Install some sort of shade device (like a fabric awning) on the sunny side of the building.


24 posted on 07/19/2012 2:40:00 PM PDT by Chewbarkah
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To: Feline_AIDS

You can now buy lights that will fit those cans that are curled inside of a larger bulb. Look better. Less heat. Also, if you insulate attic, be sure and keep insulation 4 inches or so away from can lights!


25 posted on 07/19/2012 2:40:56 PM PDT by donozark (Col. C.Beckwith:I'd rather go down the river with 7 studs than with a hundred shitheads.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

If you ever watch Holme’s Inspection on HGTV, he ALWAYS uses closed cell spray foam insulation. I think this would take care of alot of your heat problem. You may end up removing the recessed lights. Depending on the light, they are meant to breathe, as they get really hot. Talk to a lighting expert.

Best of luck.....


26 posted on 07/19/2012 2:41:08 PM PDT by mrpotatohead
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To: Feline_AIDS

A white metal room might be a good idea in your situation.


27 posted on 07/19/2012 2:46:16 PM PDT by PeterPrinciple ( (Lord, save me from some conservatives, they don't understand history any better than liberals.))
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To: Feline_AIDS
We finished the room ~10 years ago and it's always been warm. But without the shade, it's unbearable.

Your problem is that you didn't do the job properly 10 years ago.

What you want to do now is learn from your past mistake and not create an even worse problem such as insulating space which blocks the flow of air and thereby allows moisture to build up until you have a mold problem.

I would first contact your local electric utility to see if they offer a free home energy efficiency survey and have their guy come out and look at it to make recommendations. Your state and local government may also offer a home energy efficiency survey.

28 posted on 07/19/2012 2:48:25 PM PDT by fso301
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To: Feline_AIDS
I've read your post several times, not sure I have a clear picture...
What is your main concern today, reducing heat or aesthetics?
As a temporary measure I would purchase sheets of foam insulation. Comes in 4x8 sheets, 2+ inches thick, alum. foil backing. It's light weight and easy to cut.
Currently, in my own kitchen, incredible heat was coming through the sky light (new house), no shade, raised ceiling.
I cut a piece of foam a little larger than the “hole”, and have it braced against the ceiling with an extension pole.
It's not real attractive, but has lowered the room heat 5-10 degrees until we do a permanent fix.
I'm using the scrap foam in the west windows of the garage until we can get shutters built.
So, you might try bracing the panels against the hot walls, and tacking the panels to your ceiling until you settle on a permanent solution.
29 posted on 07/19/2012 2:48:48 PM PDT by WestwardHo
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To: Feline_AIDS
Your problem might be solved with a mini-split A/C-Heating System. It's great for room additions that do not have attic space to run duct work through.

We have one in our sunroom and it works like a charm!

The compressor unit sits outside and the unit is attached to the wall near or at ceiling height.

Photobucket

Photobucket

30 posted on 07/19/2012 2:53:02 PM PDT by KittenClaws
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To: mamelukesabre

LOL - that’s been my solution in AZ.


31 posted on 07/19/2012 2:53:56 PM PDT by Magic Fingers (Political correctness mutates in order to remain virulent.)
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To: LouAvul

“Make a shoddy temporary covering for the recessed lights, which we don’t even use.”

If you don’t use them, get rid of them and install tracklighting. What kind of insulation do you have? Fiberglass? You know, there are companies that can blow foam into walls that already have fiberglass insulation, Vastly superior! Triple-glazed window, super low E. Get the foam guys to foam the garage ceiling/office floor.
Talk to a good “Comfort Control” company about the attic space and the venting. Perhaps another fan in that vent? More insulation. Re-routing the ductwork, etc..
My house is a slab, and the only vents are in the floor. Great for heating, as heat rises. Lousy for cooling, as cool air stays near the floor. What is your venting like? Same vents for hot and cold? When I remodeled one of the upstairs bedrooms, the venting from the furnace came up from the utility room and into the tiny attic over the dining room, and then was sent through floor venting to the baseboard mounted registers. When I redid the ceiling, I installed registers and venting for cool air. The entry to the diningroom attic is through a wall hatch, behind the dresser. I installed a “Y” valve on the vent from the furnace. In the Winter, turn the valve so the heat comes from the baseboard register. Summer,,flip the valve so the cool air comes from the ceiling registers. Works great!


32 posted on 07/19/2012 2:54:13 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Feline_AIDS

You need to vent that area above that office. There is your main problem. The heat is staying above there and that air is stagnant. Insulation such as the blown in type will help. Then, there is a duct vent company (I cant remember the name) that will install remote temp controlled ducts that will manage your AC/heat ducts to deliver heat/AC to areas of your house where you need it the most. All they do is close off ducts (much like a air valve) that are giving AC air or heat to areas of your house that do not need it at that time. The end result is vastly lower heating and cooling costs over a year.


33 posted on 07/19/2012 2:54:13 PM PDT by crz
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To: Feline_AIDS
Your problem might be solved with a mini-split A/C-Heating System. It's great for room additions that do not have attic space to run duct work through.

We have one in our sunroom and it works like a charm!

The compressor unit sits outside and the unit is attached to the wall near or at ceiling height.

Photobucket

Photobucket

34 posted on 07/19/2012 2:56:00 PM PDT by KittenClaws
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To: Feline_AIDS

plant a tree....


35 posted on 07/19/2012 2:57:46 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Feline_AIDS

Ridge vent?

If not, I have heard of “irrigating” any roof with piping/fine-spray-nozzles whereby the water to the pipes gets turned on by a thermostat. Keeps the roof cool depending upon the temperature of the thermostat setting.


36 posted on 07/19/2012 3:03:44 PM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (I wanna start a Seniors' Motor Scooter Gang. Wanna join?)
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To: RedMDer

Yes indeed, I just forgot and haven’t bought any yet.


37 posted on 07/19/2012 3:06:14 PM PDT by elpinta (John 17:3)
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To: Feline_AIDS

Think of it as a car with windows rolled up in the sun.

To cool it, you can open the sunroof to let the hot air out.

You also need cooler air in, so you roll down the windows.

Now apply this to your house.

You need exhaust vents, powered or otherwise, at or near

the peak of the roof to let the hot air out, and vents in

the roof overhang(soffits) to allow cooler air in.

Make sure you have these vents, and if you add insulation,

Be sure they are not covered by it.

Lot of other great suggestions here too.


38 posted on 07/19/2012 3:14:53 PM PDT by oldm60grunt
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To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise; All

Again, thanks for the replies, everyone. Really helpful.

Unfortunately, we don’t have a huge budget for this project, so many of the more permanent fixes are out of our price range for now, though they are good recommendations.

I suppose the guy we had finish the room didn’t install insulation because the the lights needed to vent. Back when we first finished the room, before the present heyday of energy-saving lights, the lights in those cans generated enormous amounts of heat.

If we do put down spray insulation, I’ll be sure to see about getting a moisture barrier to keep mold away.

I’ll be coming back to this thread as we consider other fixes, too.

For now, I think we’re going to do the window film and the foam circles in the cans.

Thanks freepers!


39 posted on 07/19/2012 3:21:19 PM PDT by Feline_AIDS (A gun in hand is better than a cop on the phone.)
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To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise; All

Again, thanks for the replies, everyone. Really helpful.

Unfortunately, we don’t have a huge budget for this project, so many of the more permanent fixes are out of our price range for now, though they are good recommendations.

I suppose the guy we had finish the room didn’t install insulation because the the lights needed to vent. Back when we first finished the room, before the present heyday of energy-saving lights, the lights in those cans generated enormous amounts of heat.

If we do put down spray insulation, I’ll be sure to see about getting a moisture barrier to keep mold away.

I’ll be coming back to this thread as we consider other fixes, too.

For now, I think we’re going to do the window film and the foam circles in the cans.

Thanks freepers!


40 posted on 07/19/2012 3:21:36 PM PDT by Feline_AIDS (A gun in hand is better than a cop on the phone.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

Has already been mentioned in this thread, but bares repeating. Not all light fixtures are rated to be in contact with insulation. Serious fire hazard!


41 posted on 07/19/2012 3:30:02 PM PDT by Envisioning (Call me a racist........, one more time..........)
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To: elpinta

I hate those curly things too, but guess what? They now make round ones that would work perfectly in recesses lighting. I use them both in my basement and in my mirror over my bathroom sink.

Those curly things were obnoxious!


42 posted on 07/19/2012 3:34:23 PM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: elpinta

I hate those curly things too, but guess what? They now make round ones that would work perfectly in recessed lighting. I use them both in my basement and in my mirror over my bathroom sink.

Those curly things were obnoxious!


43 posted on 07/19/2012 3:34:45 PM PDT by jcsjcm (This country was built on exceptionalism and individualism. In God we Trust - Laus Deo)
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To: Feline_AIDS
-Put a reflective curtain (if such a thing exists) in the single, east-facing window.

They do exist. Black-out cell blinds. I have one on the most Southwest corner window of my house, and I live in Phoenix. It helps! And when it's closed, you can't see your hand in front of your face.

44 posted on 07/19/2012 3:44:59 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

http://www.nansulate.com/homeprotect.htm

I’ve had good results with this paint with cold and hot weather.


45 posted on 07/19/2012 3:47:33 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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To: Feline_AIDS

If the attic is so hot that it is blowing heat down through the light fixtures, I can guarantee you that the attic space is not properly ventilated.

There should be vents in the soffit (underneath the eaves) AND there should be either ‘vents in BOTH gable ends’, or ‘a continuous ridge vent’.

Inspect to make certain the insulation was not installed in such a way as to block intake from the soffit vents if they do exist (a common installation error).

Find a reputable contractor to confirm what I am saying, but I will bet you I am right.

AFTER it is proven that there is positive and adequate ventilation, THEN start worrying about adding insulation, and other periphery.


46 posted on 07/19/2012 3:47:45 PM PDT by roamer_1 (Globalism is just socialism in a business suit.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

As you can see, you will get many different suggestions.

Since you have decided to address the recessed lights as a first step I suggest you go to Home Depot and get the new replacement lamps they sell which cost about $40 each. They are LEDs and turn a standard RC light into an air tight fixture. Installation is a snap - there are videos on Youtube and Home Depot has one on their website.

If you are going to go for a more detailed approach then the advice a poster mentioned above about having a professional advise you to avoid problems down the road (mildew, mold) is spot on.


47 posted on 07/19/2012 4:08:13 PM PDT by There's millions of'em
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To: KittenClaws

Don’t know if they would work in the poster’s situation, but I agree that mini-splits are the best! We had them installed in our 100+ year old house instead of the mess of running ductwork for central air. With four units we can “zone” the house, keeping higher temps where we aren’t, and lowering the temperatures in rooms we’re in.


48 posted on 07/19/2012 4:12:13 PM PDT by LSAggie
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To: Feline_AIDS

It appears that you have several issues present.....

Comfort issues usually revolve around 3 main factors...

1) Overall capacity of the system(s). Does the A/C equipment meet the buildings heat gains and losses? Note that the design of the building, windows, use of thermal mass etc. and it’s insulation values change the gains losses of any building and therefore the A/C capacity requirement for the structure. There are also internal load factors to consider, but in a home these are usually a minor consideration.

2) Even distribution of the A/C capacity throught the various parts of the structure is essential to comfort.... Is the above total capacity distrubuted correctly for each room or area of the house? This is accomplish through proper ductwork design and sizing.

3) Control of the A/C equipment’s cycling....Is the thermostat located in an area that is representive of what loads are effecting the home’s comfort level? Does the A/C equipt cycle on or off to meet changing conditions?

That said there are Building design issues that must be addressed also.....

The greatest ‘heat gain’ in any structure is through the roof. The biggest bang for your buck here is to insulate your attic space. Doing this is essential and a basic must for any effective solution. Note that it will be only one of several steps you may need to take. beter windows, drapes, awnings, etc all improve the Buildings thermal performance.

The can lights you have are acting as internal heat sources. THe heat rejection from other equipment/occupants/etc can also effect the internal load. Using cooler bulbs than the ones you currently use will mitigate the internal heat load from this one source. Can you identify other sources? What is the occupant load?

The A/C system cycles on and off by the thermostat that I assume is in another part of the house (downstairs?) with dissimiliar environmental conditions. Some sort of zoning system with duct dampers and ‘slave’ thermostats could be used if there is good access to all of the ducting. It essentially shifts airflow/capacity from one part of the house to another that has higher load conditions. This option is expensive, and not a DIY project. I do not recommend it at any rate no matter what the A/C company salesmen may say.....Note that this is NOT a solution if your basic system is undersized capacity wise.....

Another, and best option is to create another A/C zone separate from the main house system by conditioning this space with it’s own dedicated A/C unit. The mini split heat pump pictured above or even a wall/window mounted heat pump (ya get both heat & cool with heat pumps) would be optimal. the PTAC is much less expensive than the mini split by orders of magnitude, but may generate noise issues.....

Are you using the same A/C system that existed before the addition of this room or did you up size the unit when you addded the room, and it’s extra load? If you are using the original pre-additon system, then adding a dedicated system (and increasing the total capacity of the house) to the new room, will restore the comfort to the rest of the home by accounting for the additional load caused by the addition of the room while meeting the demands of that additional room.

By adding both additional capacity to the overall house and dedicating that capacity to your problem room you should solve your problem and be much more comfortable throughout the entirity of your home.


49 posted on 07/19/2012 5:49:42 PM PDT by Forty-Niner (The barely bare, berry bear formerly known as..........Ursus Arctos Horribilis.)
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To: Feline_AIDS

Here in Texas, I had a really hot room that was being hit by the afternoon sun. The rest of the house was fine, but that room was, at least, 10 degrees warmer.

The room was on the second floor, and like many homes here, we have two AC units. So I went to the attic and added a small (4 inch) duct from the FIRST FLOOR unit, which runs a lot more. That little puff of air did the trick and balanced out that second floor room. It works great. Obviously, every case is different, but maybe I’ll spur some ideas.


50 posted on 07/19/2012 6:28:52 PM PDT by BobL
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