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1 posted on 08/11/2012 7:31:38 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
It's such a sprawling novel but it definitely has touches of genius.

Feh. It sprawls from Nantucket all the way out to the Pacific on a whaling ship, where it meets the white whale. OK, sure there's some scenery along the way, but this is not a "sprawling novel". Good grief.

And "touches of genius" is way off, too. Its genius is the unity and focus of its conception. BTW, I "reread" it at the beach in my 40's. My constant thought was, "How can they expect high school kids to read this stuff?"

2 posted on 08/11/2012 7:52:38 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: nickcarraway

2 words: Newspaper Serial. Back in the day, the main way for people to read well-known books was through newspapers serials. Most of Dickens’ books were read this way as was Moby Dick. And to sell more newspapers, Melville padded the novel to include all kinds of things that normally would have been left out of an unserialized book - for example the step-by-step instructions on how to cut up a whale.


3 posted on 08/11/2012 7:55:06 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
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To: nickcarraway
I found it tedious at times, too. However, Melville really did a greater justice for all readers in Bartelby the Scrivener.
5 posted on 08/11/2012 8:04:42 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: nickcarraway

Moby Dick was an OK short story hidden in a rotten book.


9 posted on 08/11/2012 8:18:10 PM PDT by Mr Rogers (Liberalism: "Ex faslo quodlibet" - from falseness, anything follows)
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To: nickcarraway

The hollow sound of a book hitting a head isn’t always the book.

lol


11 posted on 08/11/2012 8:27:43 PM PDT by Fightin Whitey
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To: nickcarraway

Moby Dick can be ponderous, but is still a masterpiece of the American novel. Other great works of literature can be similarly ponderous...Le Rouge et le Noir (the Red and the Black) by Stendhal, Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables and any thing by Tolstoy for example. However, nothing IMHO is more ponderous than the novels of George Elliot. I could hardly get through reading Silas Marner.


15 posted on 08/11/2012 8:50:52 PM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: nickcarraway

I got a chuckle when Starbuck seved coffee to the captains.


21 posted on 08/11/2012 8:59:37 PM PDT by stiguy
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To: nickcarraway

That’s what I think when I read Ayn Rand.


26 posted on 08/11/2012 9:13:48 PM PDT by Lx (Do you like it, do you like it. Scott? I call it Mr. and Mrs. Tennerman chili.)
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To: nickcarraway
“I Reread Moby-Dick and Thought: Where Was Your Editor?”

They were too busy also ignoring Walt Whitman...

30 posted on 08/11/2012 9:40:55 PM PDT by decal (I'm not rude, I don't suffer fools is all.)
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To: nickcarraway

I agree. The second time I read it was the most painful. Great and very amusing passages exist in the novel, and the theme and grace of the writing is wonderful. But the book is at least a hundred pages too long. By the way, all of Norman Mailer’s books needed to be chopped in half. I offer a three word tip to the deceased Mailer: try active verbs. (Duh!)


36 posted on 08/12/2012 1:07:26 AM PDT by elhombrelibre ("I'd rather be ruled by the Tea Party than the Democratic Party." Norman Podhoretz)
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To: nickcarraway

No doubt Herman Melville - wherever he is - is heartbroken that Klaussmann disapproves of his novel - having merely penned one of the great and enduring masterpieces of world literature.

Dare one suggest that she might be happier with something by Sidney Sheldon or Jacqueline Suzanne?


38 posted on 08/12/2012 2:55:30 AM PDT by Jack Hammer
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To: nickcarraway

Too many notes?


40 posted on 08/12/2012 5:00:08 AM PDT by mrs. a (It's a short life but a merry one...)
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To: nickcarraway
I **listened** to Moby Dick last week. Yes, last week! I down loaded it from I-Tunes U. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

__ At a time when books were published in newspapers one chapter at a time and read aloud to the family, I believe the best way to “experience” the book Moby Dick is by audiobook.

__ It is really a collection of short stories with a generally thin connecting story woven throughout. Each chapter could stand completely alone on its own merits and some of the stories are quite funny.

2) Each chapter explains, for the reading public some aspect of the whaling industry. Fascinating!

3) If, indeed, Mellville, captured the true speech of the common sailor, then the level of literacy and education of the common man and woman in the U.S. would be **outstanding** as compared to education of our nation's population today.

4) This book was written to be read by the common citizen of the day and it was. We as a nation have fallen so far educationally that our Founding Fathers must be weeping in their graves.

5) I am regret now that I didn't make Melville and important part of my children's homeschooling education. It would have added a minimum of 150 points to their SAT scores.

41 posted on 08/12/2012 5:22:22 AM PDT by wintertime (:-))
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