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New Thoughts on the Maya City of Kiuic
Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, January 08, 2013 | unattributed

Posted on 01/16/2013 7:48:32 PM PST by SunkenCiv

A pyramid at the Maya city of Kiuic in Yucatan Peninsula started out as a ceremonial platform in 700 B.C., much earlier than previously thought, according to George Bey of Millsaps College. Many scholars think that the Maya collapse was caused by long-term drought and the depletion of natural resources, but Kiuic seems to have been abandoned rapidly around 880 A.D. Bey and Tomas Gallareta Negron of Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History have found evidence that the residents left behind their grinding stones and other valuable kitchen tools, along with the remains of ancestors. “These were the Maya middle class, and they were doing well,” Bey said.

(Excerpt) Read more at archaeology.org ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; kiuic; mayan; mayans
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To: SunkenCiv
I have been to Yucatan several times and have a hard time envisioning a farming society supporting a large population. The soil seems poor and the dry season can be pretty darn dry.

It makes me wonder if the height of the Maya civilization wasn't based on a climate anomaly.

21 posted on 01/28/2013 2:48:33 PM PST by colorado tanker
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