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Unable to pay for husband's funeral, Apple Valley woman allegedy buries him in backyard
presstelegram ^ | 06/21/2013 | Beatriz E. Valenzuela

Posted on 06/21/2013 7:33:40 AM PDT by JoeProBono

APPLE VALLEY Calif- Unable to pay for a funeral, an Apple Valley woman reportedly told sheriff's deputies she was forced to bury her husband in a shallow grave in the couple's backyard weeks after the man died, according to San Bernardino County Sheriff's officials. Investigators are trying to determine if the man died of natural causes.

The identity of the deceased man has not been released. The woman has also not been identified but neighbors and San Bernardino County property records show they are Thomas and Yvonne Winn.

"She's a really nice lady," said Colin Wilson who lives behind the Winns. "She would always wave to me every morning."

Apple Valley deputies were called out to a home in the 16000 block of Navajo Road around 1 p.m. Wednesday for a welfare check on a 63-year-old man, according to authorities.

At the home, deputies found the man's 59-year-old wife who told deputies her husband, who has not been identified, had died weeks earlier, according to sheriff's officials. Unable to pay for a funeral, she reportedly told officials she buried him in the backyard.

"I saw her kneel down near where the cops started digging and she just broke down," Wilson said. "She was obviously devastated."

The man's body was found in a shallow grave and his body did not appear to have any obvious signs of trauma, sheriff's officials said.

The woman was not arrested pending a cause of death ruling from the coroner, according to Cindy Bachman, spokeswoman for the sheriff's department.

Neighbors said the 63-year-old man had been ill for some time.

Touched by the woman's situation, Wilson and his sister, Emily Wilson, decided to set up an online fundraising account through Fundrazr.com where people can donate to help bury the woman's husband.

"I just feel terrible for her," he said. "I can't imagine what she went through."

In the first hour, the online fundraising effort had already raised $120.

Phyllis Jerscheid, owner of Jerschied's Men's Apparel in Victorville, said she would donate a suit to the Winns so he could be buried.

"This story just broke my heart,"Jerscheid said from her busy store on Hesperia Road. "I wanted to help in some small way."

The couple had recently purchased the home in November but moved in early this year, said Wilson, after some repairs had been made to the property.

"She was out there almost every day painting and fixing up that house all by herself," Wilson said. "She's a really strong lady."

A day after their neighborhood was overtaken by sheriff's investigators, news vans now lined Navajo Road.

"It's really weird to think that she was able to do this and no one saw anything," said Wilson as he stood in his back yard which faced the rear of the couple's home. "We all have chain link fences here and we can see right into each others back yards. I can't believe no one saw anything."

It's a violation of the state's health and safety code to bury a human body anywhere other than an approved and recognized cemetery.

To donate, visit, www.fundrazr.com and search Thomas Winn.


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An unearthed, shallow grave remains in a woman's backyard in Apple Valley on Thursday, June 20, 2013. Unable to pay for a funeral, the Apple Valley woman reportedly told sheriff's deputies she buried her husband in the makeshift grave weeks after the man died, according to authorities. (Rachel Luna / Staff Photographer) (Rachel Luna)


1 posted on 06/21/2013 7:33:40 AM PDT by JoeProBono
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To: JoeProBono

Unable to pay for husband’s funeral, Apple Valley woman allegedy buries him in backyard


I don’t get the big deal about this. My wife and I would like to be cremated and burried on our property. Heck, even without cremation...


2 posted on 06/21/2013 7:34:55 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: cuban leaf

If it can be shown that he died of natural causes, my hope is that the authorities will give him a proper burial and leave the woman alone.

She did what she could for him.


3 posted on 06/21/2013 7:37:19 AM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: JoeProBono

Seems that we can not only no longer LIVE free, but we can’t die FREE either: even in death, we’re still bound by the dictates of nanny government. ..


4 posted on 06/21/2013 7:44:01 AM PDT by Salgak (http://catalogoftehburningstoopid.blogspot.com 100% all-natural snark !)
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To: JoeProBono
The big-government/big-corporate criminal complex didn't get to cash in when the guy died.

That is criminal activity.

5 posted on 06/21/2013 7:50:02 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Religious faith in government is far crazier than religious faith in God.)
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To: Salgak

Used to be, you could just tuck Grandpa in somewhere in the south 40. Hardly cost a thing.


6 posted on 06/21/2013 7:50:19 AM PDT by Noumenon (What would Michael Collins do?)
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To: Jonty30

My wife and I both see our bodies as a shell we occupy. Once the body dies, it is is like a costume thrown away. It has no value whatsoever.

If my wife dies first, I will never visit her grave. There is nothing there for me.

My wife’s first husband died of Leukimia at the age of 27. She spread his ashes to the wind from a particular spot in the cascade mountains in Washington state. To this day his father is ticked at her that she has honored his wishes and told nobody where that spot is. Interestingly, she couldn’t find it if her life depended on it.


7 posted on 06/21/2013 7:51:23 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: JoeProBono

I really don’t have a problem with this, as long as a person is buried in a coffin I think.

I wouldn’t have a problem buying a house with the old folks buried in the yard, as long as they’re not next to the house and as long as they died of natural causes. ;)

What did we do before the price of a burial was such a rip off? What came naturally of course.


8 posted on 06/21/2013 7:52:03 AM PDT by AlmaKing
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To: Noumenon

Used to be, you could just tuck Grandpa in somewhere in the south 40. Hardly cost a thing.


That’s what we will probably do. But most people don’t have a “south 40”.


9 posted on 06/21/2013 7:52:46 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Salgak


10 posted on 06/21/2013 7:53:23 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: JoeProBono

I hope Sunset Hills Memorial Park and Mortuary in Apple Valley will step in and help if there has been no foul play. Northeast corner of this high desert community with a nice chapel. Where Roy Rogers and Dale Evans are buried.


11 posted on 06/21/2013 7:54:00 AM PDT by twister881
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To: cuban leaf

True. Well, it’s off to the government soylent factory, then.


12 posted on 06/21/2013 7:54:07 AM PDT by Noumenon (What would Michael Collins do?)
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To: JoeProBono

I can’t fault her, she did what she could at the time. Its not easy to react calmly when you lose someone who is very close to you. If she had a large freezer she could have kept him on ice, like so many of the other stories I’ve read. I wonder how many more of these type stories will appear with the new Obama care in place? I’m sure the Gov’t. will come up with some kind of burial welfare entitlement check eventually.


13 posted on 06/21/2013 7:55:10 AM PDT by Bringbackthedraft (Remember Ty Woods, Glenn Doherty and Sean Smith? Forgot already?)
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To: cuban leaf
The big deal is that the funeral industry has made burial prohibitively expensive for people of limited means.

Very sad, really. My sister was widowed last month. She had to dip into her retirement funds to give my brother-in-law a proper burial even after the rest of the family chipped in to help her as we could.

She got a cut-rate funeral service (Their slogan: "Haven't You Lost Enough Already?") and owned plots. The tab still came to $3500 or roughly half the cost of an average funeral without owned plots.

We lived in Japan for 14 years and I personally have no qualms about cremation. The Japanese actually have a commendable reverence for their dead-- showing up to clean and spruce up the family plot including rewriting the name stakes which have faded. They do this every year in a plot slightly larger than a telephone both and a marker about the size of typical suburban bird bath. Some of them even split the ashes between two plots-- one in their ancestral hometown and another near where they work and live.

Meanwhile, I've visited my Dad's grave about once in the last five years because the location is so remote even if the setting is beautiful and spacious. We send money to a family friend to decorate and take pictures.

The problem is that my wife, mother and many other Americans have a cultural taboo about cremation and, of course, the funeral industry promotes this as a way to jack up their profits. I can see common sense regulations such as prohibiting burials on a hillside subject to erosion and landslides or places likely to pollute the water supply. But the results for minimum gave sites sizes, vaults, etc. go way beyond the pale.

14 posted on 06/21/2013 7:56:31 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: JoeProBono

These health and Safety Codes prohibiting burials other than a cemetary are nothing more than payoff laws made for the Funeral lobby.


15 posted on 06/21/2013 7:56:32 AM PDT by Old Retired Army Guy
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To: JoeProBono

When my first wife died I was amazed at how difficult it is to check out. I needed countless official death certificates for probate, life insurance, pension, auto titles even my kids college. Without an official finding this woman won’t have death certificates. I’m very sorry for her anguished decision.


16 posted on 06/21/2013 7:56:43 AM PDT by muir_redwoods (Don't fire until you see the blue of their helmets)
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To: twister881
That brings back some childhood memories of the parents taking us chirren to Roy's place...


17 posted on 06/21/2013 7:58:51 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (Piffle....)
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To: Vigilanteman

“wife, mother and many other Americans have a cultural taboo”

It’s contrary to Christian teachings. I would sooner violate the law of the state regarding cemetary burial than violate the law of God against cremation.


18 posted on 06/21/2013 7:59:05 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Un Pere, Une Mere, C'est elementaire)
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Sorry. Correction:

But the resultslaws in place for minimum gave sites sizes, vaults, etc. go way beyond the pale.

19 posted on 06/21/2013 7:59:44 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: AlmaKing


20 posted on 06/21/2013 8:00:02 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: Salgak

The government is just upset because it couldn’t reach into the dead man’s pants and steal his wallet.


21 posted on 06/21/2013 8:00:08 AM PDT by corlorde (forWARD of the state)
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To: JCBreckenridge

“It’s contrary to Christian teachings.”

How?


22 posted on 06/21/2013 8:01:10 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Just wanted to say I hope you great NSA folks are enjoying my posts here.)
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To: JCBreckenridge

“It’s contrary to Christian teachings. I would sooner violate the law of the state regarding cemetery burial than violate the law of God against cremation.”

Can you please tell me which scripture prohibits cremation?


23 posted on 06/21/2013 8:02:58 AM PDT by treetopsandroofs (Had FDR been GOP, there would have been no World Wars, just "The Great War" and "Roosevelt's Wars".)
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To: JCBreckenridge
It’s contrary to Christian teachings.

How so?

I know a lot of people feel that way and I respect those feelings. The big government-funeral industry alliance have, unfortunately, exploited those feelings as a way to line their pockets.

Japan, Korea, Taiwan and many other Asian country have millions of Christians where cremation is the only option. I don't think Jesus Christ considers them any less Christian by the way they lived their lives just because their burial options were limited.

24 posted on 06/21/2013 8:05:26 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: muir_redwoods
Speaking of death certificates, I was livid with Forest Lawn (they'd taken over another mortuary that went bankrupt, so we were 'pre-paid stuck') after my Mom died.....they held one back - that I'd paid for - so they could send it to the insurer so THEY'd get paid.

When I got my seven copies, I got on the horn to the regional manager, tore her a new a-hole, and had the additional copy hand delivered the next day.

I can't say enough bad about Forest Lawn.

25 posted on 06/21/2013 8:06:30 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (Piffle....)
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To: Vigilanteman
The big deal is that the funeral industry has made burial prohibitively expensive for people of limited means.

Bump that!
26 posted on 06/21/2013 8:06:58 AM PDT by AD from SpringBay (We deserve the government we allow.)
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To: JoeProBono
is the wife one of these ladies?
27 posted on 06/21/2013 8:07:38 AM PDT by ZinGirl (kids in college....can't afford a tagline right now)
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To: Vigilanteman

a little cheaper...but cremation usually still requires you buy a coffin. go figure.


28 posted on 06/21/2013 8:08:34 AM PDT by ZinGirl (kids in college....can't afford a tagline right now)
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To: cuban leaf

cremation isn’t just throwing a body in a shalow hole. she would have had wildlife digging that body up and leaving parts all over.


29 posted on 06/21/2013 8:09:25 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
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To: Jonty30

i didn’t get the impression anyone was going to go after her for this from what was posted.


30 posted on 06/21/2013 8:10:43 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
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ph


31 posted on 06/21/2013 8:10:59 AM PDT by xone
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To: Vigilanteman

I can see common sense regulations such as prohibiting burials on a hillside subject to erosion and landslides or places likely to pollute the water supply.


Thing is, around here if a cow dies you can just bury it. And it’s a lot bigger than a human, and all that that implies related to the quoted comment above. ;-)


32 posted on 06/21/2013 8:12:16 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Secret Agent Man

she would have had wildlife digging that body up and leaving parts all over.


I’m with you. There is a reason we bury people so deep.


33 posted on 06/21/2013 8:12:52 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Vigilanteman


34 posted on 06/21/2013 8:13:41 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: ZinGirl
Yep. The industry-big government alliance still needs to get their cut. Still the average cremation is $1500 to $2000, still WAY less than the average funeral cost, especially when you add the costs of vaults, plots, etc.

I'm seriously considering opening up a Japanese style cemetery as I see the cremation trend definitely as a growth industry, but I'll bet there would be a maze of regulations to make ensure the industry-big government alliance still gets their cut.

35 posted on 06/21/2013 8:14:30 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: ZinGirl


36 posted on 06/21/2013 8:14:44 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: twister881
I hope Sunset Hills Memorial Park and Mortuary in Apple Valley will step in and help if there has been no foul play.

I would think Chet Hitt (owner & former family member)would help if he knew of the story. He's rarely in AV these days, however.

37 posted on 06/21/2013 8:18:10 AM PDT by zlala (Thank you for the ultimate sacrifice Capt. Aaron R. Blanchard, KIA 4-23-13, Pul-E-Alam, Afghanistan.)
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To: cuban leaf
Thing is, around here if a cow dies you can just bury it. And it’s a lot bigger than a human, and all that that implies related to the quoted comment above. ;-)

Your logic is correct, but again it is a cultural thing. People would be far less grossed out by cow remains washing down a hillside than by human remains.

So, yes, I am willing to cut the big government-funeral industry alliance a little slack for common sense regulations and the fact that our culture still respects humans more than cows. But no more.

38 posted on 06/21/2013 8:18:26 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

“Japan, Korea, Taiwan and many other Asian country have millions of Christians where cremation is the only option. I don’t think Jesus Christ considers them any less Christian by the way they lived their lives just because their burial options were limited.”

The idea higher up in the thread is that ‘the body is nothing and the soul is everything’. Christians believe that the body is an essential part, and we believe in bodily resurrection. So - whenever possible a Christian should preserve the body in it’s final state.

Law prohibiting Christian burial are unjust laws and should be disregarded.


39 posted on 06/21/2013 8:18:33 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Un Pere, Une Mere, C'est elementaire)
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To: Salgak

How sad. Please say a prayer for her.

Government....in the days of the old west the dearly departed were lucky to be laid to rest with a tombstone. These days, TPTB would rather use them as Soylent Green The NSA bldg in SA is perhaps the ‘Carousel” (A la Logans Run) A round in a square so to speak


40 posted on 06/21/2013 8:19:52 AM PDT by V K Lee
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To: ZinGirl
"a little cheaper...but cremation usually still requires you buy a coffin. go figure."

Perhaps a card board one if you want to show the body.

41 posted on 06/21/2013 8:20:25 AM PDT by Average Al
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To: treetopsandroofs

Christians believe in the resurrection of the body, thus defilement of graves and bodies in graves is wrong.


42 posted on 06/21/2013 8:21:25 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Un Pere, Une Mere, C'est elementaire)
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To: JCBreckenridge
Christians believe that the body is an essential part, and we believe in bodily resurrection.

Do you seriously think our God, who can resurrect a body which has decayed into dust and bone fragments, could not do the same thing with one converted to ashes and bone fragments?

43 posted on 06/21/2013 8:23:14 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: AlmaKing
I really don’t have a problem with this, as long as a person is buried in a coffin I think. I wouldn’t have a problem buying a house with the old folks buried in the yard, as long as they’re not next to the house and as long as they died of natural causes. ;)

Remains are usually required also to be in a cement liner far from a residential zone -- as a cemetery is the modern equivalent of a "south 40". Human decomposition can enter the water table. Animals will dig up a shallow grave; Scottish people, also American indians and frontier folks often covered graves with cairns (pyramids of stones) to prevent that. And if the next owners want to dig a garden, discovery of bones in a shallow grave would put them on the hook for identifying the corpse and all the costs involved with moving the remains to a more suitable location.

We may hate some of the effects of living close to one another in civilization, but there are often practical reasons.

44 posted on 06/21/2013 8:24:16 AM PDT by Albion Wilde ("Remember... the first revolutionary was Satan."--Russian Orthodox Archpriest Dmitry Smirnov)
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To: Vigilanteman

So why not dig up graves and ‘convert’ the remains into ashes and fragments? That’s the same thing, right?

Why do you think Christians in the Roman Empire resisted cremation and put their dead in the catacombs?


45 posted on 06/21/2013 8:24:29 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Un Pere, Une Mere, C'est elementaire)
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To: cuban leaf

and i am not bagging on her to be clear, i am just saying sometimes there ae real reasons why certain things are done to certain specs and rules. a second big issue with shallow graves and decaying bodies is the ground is going to give and you’re gongto have an indent and if it’s just sand and dirt and it’s muddy either the body or parts could make it back to the surface or you’re gonna step there and possibly sink in....

there are sometimes good reasons on how to buy someone properly.


46 posted on 06/21/2013 8:24:39 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
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To: Vigilanteman
Cultural taboos about burial go back a long ways, to pre-historic times and in the ancient Middle East (e.g. Iran) for examples.

Jews have associated the burning of bodies with the holocaust of idol worship of ancient Carthage, and more recently that of the Nazis.

Traditional burial can't last, our species is filling up the earth, and more and more we plant infrastructure underground.

But unless as the Japanese have done we associate a sense of reverence with cremation or common graves, then we will eventually have to make changes through government fiat.
47 posted on 06/21/2013 8:25:53 AM PDT by kenavi ("Beware of rulers, for they befriend only for their own benefit." Gamliel)
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To: JoeProBono

I plan to donate my body to a medical school to train doctors in anatomy. My brother-in-law did this and when he died the university medical school arranged to have his body picked up by a local funeral home and about a year and a half later his cremated remains were returned to the family for burial...all without cost.


48 posted on 06/21/2013 8:26:35 AM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: Vigilanteman

I agree first when my mother passed away the funeral wanted $5.000.00 up front then they try to sell us more stuff which we said no. Her total cost was like $10,000.00. Then when my father died they wanted again $5,000.00 up front then another $5,000.00. Thank God he had a life insurance policy he got from his work because we used it all for his burial.
This is insane that these funeral places are jacking up prices on all of us making it difficult to bury our love ones. I don’t see the Democrap shouting out that poor people are being enfranchised.

Bill Cosby had his son buried on his estate and Andy Griffith is buried on his estate. I thought it was against the law to bury on a private property.


49 posted on 06/21/2013 8:26:47 AM PDT by Patriot Babe
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To: Average Al

if only. when my mother-in-law passed away, my stepfather-in-law was flabbergasted at cremation prices. geez. still needed to buy a coffin. dems da rules. fine...he goes flipping to the back of the book for the cheapest one. we loved her dearly (and miss the heck out of her still), but a bargain-shopper she was for her whole life. crikey....she would have come back from the dead and walloped us if we paid for a fancy coffin which was just going to burn. it’s a crock, anyway.


50 posted on 06/21/2013 8:27:40 AM PDT by ZinGirl (kids in college....can't afford a tagline right now)
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