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Duchess of Cambridge in Labor, Admitted to Hospital
Sky News ^ | 7/22/13 | Sky News

Posted on 07/21/2013 11:53:50 PM PDT by hoagy62

Headline only

(Excerpt) Read more at news.sky.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: baby; duchessofcambridge; englandgoesberserk; katemiddleton; royal; royalbaby; uk
I was going through Twitter, just playing around and bored, when Twitter just seemed to explode. Hundreds of tweets pouring in about "Royal baby on the way!" Kate's in labor!" "AHHH! So excited!"

C'mon...it's a baby. Yes, it's third in line to the throne of England, but still.

I am fairly sure there is massive disinterest out there in FReeperland, but I thought you might want to know.

1 posted on 07/21/2013 11:53:50 PM PDT by hoagy62
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To: hoagy62

Admin Moderator- This is dupe thread. Please Kill it? Thank you.


2 posted on 07/21/2013 11:58:37 PM PDT by hoagy62 ("Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered..."-Thomas Paine. 1776)
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To: hoagy62

In Britain, do they spell it labour?


3 posted on 07/22/2013 12:03:03 AM PDT by iowamark
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To: iowamark

Yes we do.


4 posted on 07/22/2013 12:03:59 AM PDT by Vanders9
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To: hoagy62

A most happy and blessed event.

If I owned pigeons I think I should let them loose.
Instead, I’ll let myself loose!


5 posted on 07/22/2013 12:08:57 AM PDT by Berlin_Freeper (Obama: I seriously hate white people.)
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To: hoagy62
Sky News HQ
6 posted on 07/22/2013 12:17:35 AM PDT by Berlin_Freeper (Obama: I seriously seriously hate white people.)
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To: Berlin_Freeper

Thanks...I am watching. However, I need to go to bed.

I’m gonna guess labor will last 9 hours. We’ll see.


7 posted on 07/22/2013 1:09:04 AM PDT by hoagy62 ("Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered..."-Thomas Paine. 1776)
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To: hoagy62

I’m shocked! I was certain the good Duchess was a Tory!!!


8 posted on 07/22/2013 1:48:47 AM PDT by Ronin (Dumb, dependent and Democrat is no way to go through life - Rep. L. Gohmert, Tex)
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To: Vanders9

Godspeed Luv! All the Best Kate!


9 posted on 07/22/2013 2:47:42 AM PDT by poobear (Socialism in the minds of the elites, is a con-game for the serfs, nothing more.)
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To: hoagy62

This is a BANNER headline on the NY Post’s website today. Now, I like this gal a lot and I’m thinking of her and saying a prayer and hoping all goes well, but I had to ask, is this appropriate for a NYC paper.

I can’t remember them ever having a banner like that before,it’s a little over the top.


10 posted on 07/22/2013 2:53:10 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: jocon307

Yeah, well, we like the Brits and it’s great to have a chance to share good news with them for a change.


11 posted on 07/22/2013 3:24:29 AM PDT by McGavin999
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To: hoagy62

Ugh, this annoys me so much.

It’s THE hospital, okay? THE hospital!

Leaving off the article is even more annoying than the propensity to stick extraneous “U”s into words where there is no phonetic reason to do so.

/end rant

I could not care less about the baby. Any news about the royals is wasted airspace, IMO...


12 posted on 07/22/2013 4:02:54 AM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: hoagy62

In America, only dogs are call Duke or Duchess.


13 posted on 07/22/2013 4:44:11 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: exDemMom

In England - which you might recall, is where the English language is from - they say “in hospital” and many words that we spell with “or” they spell with “our”. This is the country and culture that gave us Shakespeare and the King James translation of the bible - and even our Declaration of Independence and our constitution comes from English writing and philosophy.


14 posted on 07/22/2013 4:44:17 AM PDT by kabumpo (Kabumpo)
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To: Daveinyork

Or jazz musicians.


15 posted on 07/22/2013 4:53:53 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
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To: exDemMom

Hon, get a coffee before you offend out Brit cousins any more egregiously.

I am excited having seen the births of two other future Kings.

And I love the Queen!


16 posted on 07/22/2013 4:55:30 AM PDT by cajungirl
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To: AnAmericanMother

“Or jazz musicians.” I’ll grant you that, but I must quote Robert Heinlein: “The United States has become a place in which professional athletes and entertainers are mistaken for people of significance.”

You’ve just proved the point.


17 posted on 07/22/2013 5:00:11 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: hoagy62
[A] traditional method is used to announce the birth. A messenger carries a piece of paper from the hospital to Buckingham Palace containing details of the gender, weight and time of birth. [T]he Lindo Wing - where rooms cost about 5,000 pounds (5,800 euros; $7,800) - is where Princess Diana gave birth to William and his younger brother, Harry.

18 posted on 07/22/2013 5:16:17 AM PDT by kitkat (STORM THE HEAVENS WITH PRAYERS FOR OUR COUNTRY)
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To: hoagy62

Victoria Elizabeth Diana Ann

Charles William Phillip George


19 posted on 07/22/2013 5:26:34 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: exDemMom

How about “ in school”? The ‘in hospital’ thing bothered me till I realized we use that wording for “in school”. We don’t say “our kids are ‘ in the school today’. Tis a puzzlement.


20 posted on 07/22/2013 5:53:40 AM PDT by Exit148
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To: kabumpo

They also say “...at table...” and use their fork with their left hand, upside down...just a few social differences we might acknowledge.


21 posted on 07/22/2013 5:55:50 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: matginzac
... and use their fork with their left hand, upside down...just a few social differences we might acknowledge.

I actually think this an efficient way to eat.

22 posted on 07/22/2013 6:03:42 AM PDT by stayathomemom (Beware of kittens modifying your posts.)
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To: stayathomemom

I do it all the time as my mother was from Europe but can do it both ways...
(Somehow, that didn’t come out right!)


23 posted on 07/22/2013 6:15:27 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: Daveinyork

Well, they are presumably higher in the hierarchy than dogs, yes? (depending I guess on whether you like jazz)


24 posted on 07/22/2013 8:47:49 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
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To: exDemMom

I’ve often wondered why Brits say “to hospital.” But we say, “She went to school,” not “she went to THE school.”


25 posted on 07/22/2013 1:53:08 PM PDT by Nea Wood (When life gets too hard to stand, kneel.)
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To: Nea Wood
I’ve often wondered why Brits say “to hospital.” But we say, “She went to school,” not “she went to THE school.”

It reflects a difference in the way we think about these things. Going to school implies that a certain process is happening; it is more than a place, it is an institution. The same goes for "going to jail." If you want to specify that you are going for a purpose other than learning or incarceration, you would specify that you are going to the school, or the jail. The hospital, however, does not have a specific process associated with it. You could be going for any number of reasons: for treatment, for observation, for testing, etc. Since there is no specific process associated with the hospital, we go to *the* hospital. Brits, apparently, consider that the hospital denotes a process.

26 posted on 07/22/2013 6:10:17 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: kabumpo
In England - which you might recall, is where the English language is from - they say “in hospital” and many words that we spell with “or” they spell with “our”. This is the country and culture that gave us Shakespeare and the King James translation of the bible - and even our Declaration of Independence and our constitution comes from English writing and philosophy.

I've been to England. The people there were almost incomprehensible.

We may have started out with the same language, but it has evolved considerably since we parted ways. As a result, most dialects of American are comprehensible, while most dialects of British are not. Our pronunciation, spelling, grammar, and word usage are all quite different.

27 posted on 07/22/2013 6:14:15 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom
As George Bernard Shaw stated: "The US and Britain are two peoples separated by a common language."

Pardon me if the quote is not exact.

28 posted on 07/23/2013 4:03:34 AM PDT by theDentist (FUBO; qwerty ergo typo : i type, therefore i misspelll)
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To: exDemMom; theDentist
I've been to England. The people there were almost incomprehensible.

We may have started out with the same language, but it has evolved considerably since we parted ways. As a result, most dialects of American are comprehensible, while most dialects of British are not. Our pronunciation, spelling, grammar, and word usage are all quite different.

I work for a company that is a fully owned subsidiary of a large UK company. It’s a very good company to work for BTW, one of the best in my career. The division I work for is based in the US but we have a sales and shipping office in the UK as well so in addition to my US payroll, I have a small UK payroll to process and manage.

I don’t have too much trouble understanding the folks across the pond in most cases but yes, depending on the regional dialect along with differences in word usage and colloquialisms, it can be very difficult or just plain funny.

I’ve been on several phone calls, conference calls and a few video conferences with our parent group, other UK payroll sites and the pension administrators as we were launching a new pension “scheme”¸ a “scheme” being what we here call a plan or a benefit; the holiday scheme, the bonus scheme, the sick pay scheme….a "scheme" having a bit of a different connotation and often negative here in every day usage.

The new pension administrators are based out of Edinburgh and at times I could barely understand what they were saying at all - a thick Scottish brogue being very difficult for us Yanks to understand. But they were very nice and understanding about it, my constant “can you repeat that please?” I was talking to two of the pension administrators one day and the gal even made a joke at the beginning of one of our phone calls about her co-worker being difficult to understand with his "accent" since he was from Glasgow and not from Edinburgh like her. I told her that being from Maryland (Baltimore), that some of my co-workers here in Pennsylvania have trouble understand me sometimes (they don't really but even with only a 50 some mile difference there is a very big difference in dialect and colloquialisms, the central PA accent and phrases being heavily influenced by the PA Dutch and the Maryland accent especially the southern or eastern shore accent being more “tidewater” and of course the classic Baltimore dialect being something of its own).

I remember shortly after I started working for this company, I received a request from the business manager of our UK location to payout out some holiday (vacation) pay in advance for two of our employees who were also a married couple. “Tom and Jane are taking holiday in two weeks so is it possible to pay their holiday this pay before they “break up" for the Christmas holiday?” I was saddened to hear that Tom and Jane were breaking up especially during the holidays - they’d been married a long time, until my boss explained that in the UK, they use the term “break up” as we would “leaving” as in “can you pay out their vacation pay in advance before they “leave” work for vacation?”

I also have heard the word “brilliant” used quite a lot. Not long ago our internal auditors came over for our annual audit. The young man conducting our audit (who BTW was spectacularly handsome :), ) was reviewing our payroll internal controls, looking a randomly selected new hire, termination, pay increase paperwork for two levels of management signatures, and every time I explained our processes or showed him examples, he’d say “Oh that’s brilliant or "just brilliant”. I thought to myself, “Wow, he’s really impressed and I must be doing a really great job” until one of the other auditors came in and told the younger auditor, “we are breaking up for lunch now, they’ve ordered in pizza” and the young man said, “Brilliant”. It seems to me that the Brits use the word “brilliant” to mean; “good”, “great”, “nice”, “acceptable” or just plain “OK”.

And I’ve had many phone calls and emails from across the pond that end in “Cheers” and "cheerio" which is to me a much nicer way to end a communication than “good bye”.

I’ve also had occasion to call the HMR&C (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs), the equivalent to our IRS and after I start talking, I’ve on a few occasions heard a bit of a snicker on the other end of the phone line, I’m guessing because to them, I have a funny accent. To be fair though, they’ve all been extremely polite and quite helpful and the HMR&C website and tax forms and instructions are much more comprehensible (in plain English) than those of the IRS.

29 posted on 07/23/2013 5:47:07 AM PDT by MD Expat in PA
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To: exDemMom

Perhaps incomprehensible to you. I have never found them so. The point was not that differences have evolved. I was responding to your xenephobic rage at the very slight, surely comprehensible differences of our versus or spellings and the use of “ in hospital” as opposed to “in the hospital.”


30 posted on 07/23/2013 2:43:26 PM PDT by kabumpo (Kabumpo)
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To: MD Expat in PA
I told her that being from Maryland (Baltimore), that some of my co-workers here in Pennsylvania have trouble understand me sometimes (they don't really but even with only a 50 some mile difference there is a very big difference in dialect and colloquialisms, the central PA accent and phrases being heavily influenced by the PA Dutch and the Maryland accent especially the southern or eastern shore accent being more “tidewater” and of course the classic Baltimore dialect being something of its own).

I'm a CA native. Even though I have lived most of my adult life in MD, I still cannot stand listening to the Baltimore accent. There is a radio show that comes on after Rush, co-hosted by a man and a woman--his accent is bad, but hers is so ugly that I can't change the station fast enough. I probably speak some composite of CA and MD accent; people *always* ask where I'm from.

I went to a class with a British ex-pat a few years ago. She told of her first night in the US, where she was staying at a house with several college students. When she went to bed, she asked if someone would knock her up in the morning. Needless to say, she received a few shocked looks. They were nice--they did explain what she had just said.

31 posted on 07/24/2013 3:32:17 AM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: kabumpo
Perhaps incomprehensible to you. I have never found them so. The point was not that differences have evolved. I was responding to your xenephobic rage at the very slight, surely comprehensible differences of our versus or spellings and the use of “ in hospital” as opposed to “in the hospital.”

It is not "xenephobic rage" (the word is xenophobic, BTW). I genuinely cannot read non-standard English without making mental corrections of the spelling and grammar. Doing this is tiring. This means that I very quickly get tired when I try to read British.

It is simply an observation that most British dialects are utterly incomprehensible. While I do not find "The Queen's English" very difficult, some of the other dialects--like Scottish, Irish, and Cockney--are not even recognizable as English. I think that most Americans--Canadians, too--would agree with me on this. Do not mistake my bluntness in stating my thoughts on the matter for rage--it isn't.

The people you see on TV shows or in movies are selected because their accents are mostly comprehensible, but try watching some of the reality shows, which are filmed in towns and feature people who are not actors. Those shows are subtitled because no one would understand them otherwise.

32 posted on 07/24/2013 3:50:37 AM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom

So I guess you get too tired to read Dickens, Galsworthy, Milton, Pope, C.S. Lewis, Barbara Pym, Robert Graves, A.A.Milne, Orwell, Wilde, Shaw, Herrick, Huxley, Mansfield, Woolfe, Austen, Bronte.....


33 posted on 07/25/2013 4:49:18 PM PDT by kabumpo (Kabumpo)
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To: kabumpo
So I guess you get too tired to read Dickens, Galsworthy, Milton, Pope, C.S. Lewis, Barbara Pym, Robert Graves, A.A.Milne, Orwell, Wilde, Shaw, Herrick, Huxley, Mansfield, Woolfe, Austen, Bronte.....

Dickens, A Christmas Carol. C.S. Lewis, The Chronicles of Narnia and the Space Trilogy. A.A. Milne, all of the Pooh books. Orwell, 1984 and Animal Farm. Huxley, Brave New World. You didn't mention Tolkein, but you can add him to the list; he's only the greatest author who ever lived with his Lord of the Rings trilogy. Those other authors on your list do not write the kind of literature I read.

And yes, I did mentally correct every oddly spelled word and strange grammatical construct when I read those books.

34 posted on 07/25/2013 6:45:53 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom

Sorry for you that you have that tic, and sorry that you have chosen to ignore the major works of English literature. But, as my father used to say, water seeks its own level.


35 posted on 07/27/2013 1:23:51 PM PDT by kabumpo (Kabumpo)
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To: hoagy62

What? Again?


36 posted on 07/27/2013 1:24:55 PM PDT by x
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